18 January 1996



<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 15 January


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions
of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the
following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 15
January.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

CHRISTOPHER ROSS LAKE, Magdalen College

KARL JAMES MOORE, Templeton College

ROBERT WINNING SCOTLAND, MA status, Linacre College

MARSHALL DAVID YOUNG, D.PHIL., Templeton College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 15 January


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on
2 February.

List of the decrees:

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Explanatory note to Decree (1)

The following decree removes anomalies and makes consequential
amendments to existing decrees which have been overlooked in recent
legislation.

Decree (1)

1 In Ch. II, Sect. I, § 1, cl. 1 (9),
concerning the Accommodation Committee (Statutes, 1995,
p. 203), § 7, cl. 1 (8), concerning the Childcare Committee (p.
208), and § 8, concerning the City Questions Committee (p. 209),
Sect. II, § 6, cl. 1 (9), concerning the International Committee
(p. 221), and Sect. III, cll. 2 (c), 3, and 5, concerning
junior member attendance at Council (p. 225), and in Ch. III, Sect.
XIV, § 17, cll. 2 (b), 3, and 5, concerning junior
member representation at meetings of the Bodleian Curators (p. 272),
Sect. XXI, cll. 1 (vii) and 2, concerning the Committee for the
Careers Service (p. 275), Sect. XXIV, § 1, cl. 1 (7) and §
2, cl. 1 (5), concerning the Clubs Committee (pp. 278, 279), Sect.
XXXI, cl. 1 (13)–(14), concerning the Committee for Disabled
People (p. 285), Sect. LI, cll. 1 (11) and 5, concerning the
Management Committee for the Language Centre (p. 300), and Sect.
LXXVII, cl. 1 (14), concerning the Committee on Student Health (p.
323), in each case delete `Oxford University Graduate Union' and
substitute `Graduate Committee of the Oxford University Student
Union'.

[The formerly separate OUGU has now become the Graduate Committee
of OUSU.
]

2 In Examination Decrees, 1995,
p. 544, ll. 2–4, delete `At the end ... Gazette.'

[The above clause rescinds the requirement that the
Vice-Chancellor and Proctors should publish each term in the
Gazette a list of persons dispensed by them from one
term of the statutable residence for the BFA. The corresponding
requirement in respect of the BA was rescinded in 1984–5.
]

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Explanatory note to Decree (2)

Council, at the request of the Childcare Committee, has agreed that
the number of persons whom that committee can co-opt might usefully
be increased from one to three so that representative parents of
children attending the two university nurseries might take part in
committee business. The following decree accordingly increases the
maximum number of co-opted members.

Decree (2)

In Ch. II, Sect. I, § 7, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p.
208), delete `one additional member' and substitute `three additional
members'.

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Explanatory note to Decree (3)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Committee for
Educational Studies and with the concurrence of the General Board,
enlarges the electoral board for the Readership in Educational
Studies by providing for college representation, increasing the total
number of members from seven to nine, and adjusting the composition
to bring it into line with the recommendations of the Working Party
on Statutory Posts.

Decree (3)

In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 64 (Statutes, 1995, p.
401), delete cl. 1 and substitute:

`1. There shall be a Reader in Educational Studies who shall be
elected by a board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor or, if the head of the college
specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-Chancellor, a person
appointed by Council;

(2) the head of the college to which the readership shall be
for the time being allocated by Council under any decree in that
behalf, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person
appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college
specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) a person appointed by Council;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7)–(9) three persons appointed by the Committee for
Educational Studies.'

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Explanatory note to Decree (4)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physical
Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, amends
the decree governing the Preliminary Examination in Physical Sciences
in order to allow candidates to offer different subjects when
resitting the examination. This is unintentionally excluded by the
present wording of the decree.

Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p.
108, delete ll. 20–5 and substitute:

`3. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they
have satisfied the Moderators in five different subjects either at a
single examination or at two examinations in accordance with the
proviso to clause 2, and provided further that the same number of
subjects as were failed at the first sitting has been passed at the
same attempt at a subsequent examination.'

2 Ibid., l. 29, delete `retake all five
subjects' and substitute `offer five subjects at a subsequent
examination'.

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Decree (5)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to L.M. Carpenter, MA
(BA Exeter; M.Sc., Ph.D. London), Fellow of Nuffield College and
University Lecturer in Statistical Epidemiology, for the period from
1 April 1996 to 31 March 1998, to enable her to accept appointment as
Senior Statistician within the MRC programme on AIDS in Uganda.


Decree (6)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to P. Podsiadlowski
(Prediploma München; Ph.D. MIT), Fellow of St Edmund Hall and
University Lecturer in Physics, for the period from 1 March 1996 to
28 February 2001, to enable him to hold a PPARC Advanced Fellowship.

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Decree (7)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 6, cl. 14
(ii) (b) (Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1054),
Mr S. Cassasus, St Cross College, shall pay fees at the `home' rate
while he holds a PPARC Gemini Studentship for research studies in the
Department of Physics.

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Decree (8)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 6, cl. 3
(a) (Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1049), Mr J.
Dykema, New College, shall not be required to pay composition fees in
respect of study for the M.Sc. in Physics during 1995–6.

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Decree (9)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 6, cl. 3
(b) (Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1050), Mrs
D. Shelper, St Cross College, shall not be required to pay
composition fees in respect of study for the M.Sc. in Computation
during 1995–6.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are
qualified for membership of Congregation:

LYNETTE GAIL MITCHELL, Oriel College

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Lake, C.R., MA, Magdalen

Margolis, H.S., MA, D.Phil., Worcester

Mitchell, L.G., MA status, Oriel

Moore, K.J., MA, Templeton

Noble, J.A., MA, D.Phil., Oriel

Ridley, M., MA, D.Phil., New College

Young, M.D., MA, D.Phil., Templeton

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CONGREGATION 16 January


Promulgation of Statute

A form of Statute was promulgated. No notice of opposition having
been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preamble carried of the
proposed Statute correcting a drafting error in Statute (1) approved
by Congregation on 28 November 1995.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 22 January


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
noon on 22 January, unless by that time the Registrar has received
notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995,
p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

ROWENA ELIZABETH ARCHER, D.PHIL., Manchester College

ROBERT ALEXANDER MCKEE, Manchester College

WILLIAM JAMES MANDER, MA status, Manchester College

ANN MCDERMID MANN, MA status, Manchester College

JUDITH JANE NISBET, Manchester College

MARGARET SAROSI, Manchester College

JACOB FRANK SCHULMAN, MA status, Manchester College

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CONGREGATION 6 February 2 p.m.


1 Voting on Statute
promulgated on 16 January



2 Promulgation of Statute

Explanatory note to Statute

The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the
statute is approved, which are promoted on the recommendation of the
Mathematical Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board, establish the Degree of Master of Mathematics as the degree
awarded to candidates successfully completing the new four-year
course in Mathematics. The adoption of a Master's title for a
four-year first degree is in line with recent approvals given for the
titles of M.Biochem., M.Chem., M.Eng., and M.Phys. As with those
degrees, holders of the M.Math. would not be eligible for separate
award of the MA but, after the requisite period of time, they would
be eligible to apply for membership of Convocation as holders of the
degree of M.Math.

WHEREAS it is expedient to establish the Degree of Master of
Mathematics, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in exercise of the powers
in that behalf conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and
Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it, ENACTS,
clauses 1 and 2 being subject to the approval of Her Majesty in
Council, AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. II, Sect. II, cl. 1, concerning the
composition of Congregation (Statutes, 1995, p. 5),
after `Master of Engineering,' in each of the two places in which
these words occur insert `Master of Mathematics,'.

2 In Tit. III, cl. 3, concerning Convocation
(p. 29), after `Master of Engineering' insert:

`Master of Mathematics'.

3 In Tit. XI, cl. 4, concerning degrees of the
University (p. 77), after `Master of Engineering' insert:

`Master of Mathematics'.

4 Clauses 1 and 2 of this statute shall be
effective from the date on which they are approved by Her Majesty in
Council; clause 3 shall have immediate effect.

Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

1 In Ch. I, Sect. I, FIRST SCHEDULE
(Statutes, 1995, p. 183), insert new item 27 as follows
and renumber existing item 27 as item 28:

`27. Master of Mathematics

Ego A. B. etc. testor E. F. (or, if more than one, X,
Y, etc.), e collegio (or aula or societate) C. D.,
quem (or quos) per integrum tempus ad gradum Magistri in
Mathematicis per statuta requisitum intra academiam, prout statuta
requirunt, cubile et victum continue sumpsisse scio, quatenus examen
publicum subierit (or subierint) et reliqua compleverit
(or compleverint) omnia quae per statuta Universitatis
requiruntur (nisi quatenus cum eo dispensatum fuerit), gratiam
(or gratias) a collegio suo (or aula sua
or societate sua) pro gradu Magistri in Mathematicis
concessam (or concessas) fuisse; fide mea data huic
Universitati. A. B. dec. Coll. C.'

2 Ibid., SECOND SCHEDULE, item 23 (p. 186),
after `Engineering,' insert `Mathematics,'.

3 Ibid., after `Ingeniaria' insert
`or Mathematicis'.

4 Ibid., THIRD SCHEDULE, item 21 (p. 188),
after `Engineering,' insert `Mathematics,'.

5 Ibid., after `Ingeniaria' insert
`or Mathematicis'.

6 Ibid., FOURTH SCHEDULE, item 16 (p. 190),
after `Engineering,' insert `Mathematics,'.

7 Ibid., after `Ingeniaria' insert
`or Mathematicis'.

8 Ibid., Sect. IV, cl. 1 (p. 194), after
`Master of Engineering' insert:

`Master of Mathematics'.

9 Ibid., Sect. VIII, cl. 1 (p. 197), after
`Master of Arts or Master of Biochemistry or Chemistry or
Engineering' insert `or Mathematics'.

10 Ibid., footnote 1, after `Engineering'
insert `or Mathematics'.

11 Ibid., (p. 198), after `Bachelor of Arts or
Master of Biochemistry or Chemistry or Engineering' insert `or
Mathematics'.

12 In Examination Decrees, 1994,
p. 18, ll. 12 and 16, in each case after `Engineering' insert `or
Mathematics'.

13 Ibid., p. 21, l. 8, after `ENGINEERING'
insert `OR MATHEMATICS'.

14 Ibid., ll. 12, 17, and 26, in each case
after `Engineering' insert `or Mathematics'.

15 Ibid., p. 319, after l. 17 insert new cl. 4
as follows and renumber existing cll. 4-5 (ll. 18-20) as cll. 5-6:

`4. A candidate adjudged worthy of Honours in Part I and Part II may
supplicate for the Degree of Master of Mathematics provided that he
or she has fulfilled all the conditions for admission to a degree of
the University as specified in Ch. I, Sect. I, § 1, cl. 1.'

16 Ibid., p. 841, l. 10, after `Engineering'
insert `or Mathematics'.

17 Ibid., p. 1016, l. 27, after
`Engineering,' insert `Master of
Mathematics
,'.

18 Ibid., p. 1048, l. 23, after `M.Eng.' insert
`or the M.Math.' 19 Ibid., l. 37, after `M.Eng.' insert `or the
Degree of M.Math.'

20 Clause 8 of this decree shall be effective
from the date on which clause 2 of the Statute approved by
Congregation on ... is approved by Her Majesty in Council; the
remaining clauses shall have immediate effect.

Key to decree

Cll. 1–7 provide for admission to the degree of M.Math.

Cl. 8 provides for holders of the new degree to be admitted to
membership of Convocation.

Cll. 9–11 determine the academic precedence of holders of the
new degree.

Cl. 12 dispenses candidates with Senior Status from the requirement
to have passed the First Public Examination as a condition of
supplication for the new degree.

Cll. 13 and 14 extend the present provisions governing the time and
exercises required for the degree of BA so as to cover the new
degree.

Cl. 15 provides for candidates attaining honours in the relevant
honour school to be eligible to supplicate for the new degree.

Cl. 16 inserts a reference to the new degree into the provisions
governing the award of the relevant higher doctorate.

Cl. 17 provides for the form of class and pass lists for the new
degree.

Cl. 18 provides for the issue of certificates to holders of the new
degree.

Cl. 19 provides that students for the new degree shall pay university
composition fees at the same rate as those working for the degree of
BA.

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3 Voting on General Resolution

Explanatory note to General Resolution

Council has considered the recommendations of its working party on
senior library posts under the chairmanship of the President of
Corpus Christi (published as Supplement (1) to Gazette
No. 4373, 21 September 1995, p. 37) and of the subsequent report of
the advisory group on the management structure for an integrated
library system, under the chairmanship of the Warden of Rhodes House
(published as Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4380, 13
November 1995, p. 339), together with the comments on both these
documents received from the General Board of the Faculties, from the
Libraries Board, the Bodleian Curators, and other bodies concerned
with the management of the University's libraries, from faculty
boards and inter-faculty committees, and from individuals.

On the basis of this evidence, Council has reached the following
conclusions.

(1) There is widespread support for the establishment of a new
and very senior library post, the holder of which would be in a
position to take a strategic overview of the library sector in the
University as a whole and to represent it at the highest professional
levels nationally and internationally, and would have sufficient
authority to address those features of the present arrangements for
library provision which the Thomas Report identified as being
generally acknowledged to be unsatisfactory. There is a large body of
opinion in the University to the effect that it would be regrettable
to lose the present opportunity to establish such a post and to
address the needs and concerns of all users.

(2) The ideal of having the University's many libraries
functioning as an integrated—or, at the very least, as a highly
co-ordinated—whole commands extensive support There are,
however,
different views on the extent to which, and on the means by which,
the University can approach that ideal; and there are concerns that
structural integration, without careful consideration, may adversely
affect those parts of the existing provision which are functioning
effectively and to the satisfaction of users. In particular, the
concerns of a number of faculty boards about a potential loss of
responsiveness and flexibility, and an increase in bureaucracy,
remain to be allayed.

(3) Features of the structural model sketched in the appendix to
the Thomas Report and amended and amplified by the advisory group
have been queried, particularly as regards cost and operational
feasibility. It is also widely thought that more time should be
allowed for the development of proposals and for the exploration of
financial and other implications. It has also been argued that it is
premature to develop a scheme before the new senior library post has
been filled and the holder able to be involved in the development of
plans.

(4) Weighing, on the one hand, support for the creation of a new
post and, on the other, the various concerns and reservations which
have been expressed, Council considers that the way forward is to
seek a decision from Congregation in favour of the establishment of a
new post with the remit, amongst other things, of bringing forward
within three years proposals, which will be subject to approval by
Congregation, for the creation of an integrated library service that
will facilitate the achievement of the following major objectives
identified in the Thomas Report:

(a) the distribution of resources within the service to
meet users' needs most effectively;

(b) the improvement of the Bodleian's capacity to
respond
to the needs of users in the University;

(c) maintenance and development of, and provision of
access to, Oxford's historic collections as an international
research resource;

(d) the provision of university-wide services such as
library automation and electronic media, preservation, and staff
development

(e) The fostering of the qualities of responsiveness, and
of flexibility in provision.

(5) The development of proposals for integration will, therefore,
be a process initiated and carried forward by the holder of the new
senior post. A decision to establish the post requires interim
decisions at this stage on:

(a) other powers and responsibilities of the post
(including its position vis-à-vis the Bodleian);
(b) the reporting structure for the new post.

(6) With regard to (a), the evidence in both reports
suggests that the holder of the new post could not be expected to
have responsibility both for developing proposals for integration
(and carrying integration forward in areas where consensus already
existed) and for the day-to-day running of the Bodleian. Council's
view is that the title of Bodley's Librarian should continue to be
attached to the most senior library appointment in the University and
that the new post should therefore be called `Director of University
Library Services and Bodley's Librarian', but that responsibility for
the day-to-day running of the Bodleian ad interim should
be assumed by the holder of one of the keeperships. There would be a
consequential case for additional resources to cover the discharge of
responsibilities for the Bodleian currently exercised by Bodley's
Librarian, such resources being provided in the first instance on a
temporary basis in order not to remove flexibility when the time
comes to determine the future long-term organisational structure.
Arrangements for making an appointment to the new senior post would
be as recommended in the Thomas Report, namely, by a specially
appointed committee, headed by Mr Vice- Chancellor, and including
members external to the University.

(7) In addition to developing proposals for integration of the
library system, responsibility for the following areas should be
assigned to the new post from the outset: (a) preparation of
the draft budget for the funds currently distributed through the
Libraries Board; (b) overall executive responsibility for
automated library services in the University; (c)
preservation; (d) library staff training and professional
development.

(8) With regard to (5) (b)—the reporting structure
for the new post—Council thinks that, if the new senior library
post is to be established, it would not be satisfactory (or, indeed,
workable), even as an interim measure, to retain the existing
reporting structure unchanged. Under the proposals which Council is
now submitting to Congregation it is not—with one
exception—proposed to disturb the existing relationships between
libraries and their respective faculty or departmental managing
authorities until such time as Congregation chooses to approve
proposals for alternative arrangements. The exception is the
Bodleian, since the new senior post-holder, while inheriting the
title of Bodley's Librarian, will, as set out above in paragraphs (6)
and (7), have responsibilities in the context of which the Bodleian
would be an important, but not the only, element. This consideration,
together with the desirability of providing the post-holder with a
single, clear source of support and guidance during the period when
proposals for integration are being developed, has led Council to the
conclusion that the statutes and decrees governing the functions of
the Libraries Board and the Bodleian Curators should be suspended to
allow the creation of a new, single body replacing them as an interim
measure pending eventual decisions by Congregation on proposals for
the longer term.

(9) Council proposes that this interim body should be called the
Libraries Committee and should report jointly to Council and the
General Board and have direct access to the Resources Committee for
the purpose of stating the financial requirements of the library
sector. The composition of this Libraries Committee should be as
suggested in recommendation (vii) of the Thomas Report, with the
modifications proposed in the Kenny Report (summary recommendations
(10) and (11)) regarding external members and representative
appointment by the Conference of Colleges, namely:

(1) a chairman, appointed by the Vice-Chancellor;

(2) a Proctor or the Assessor;

(3)–(5) three persons appointed by Council, of whom at
least
one should be a member of Council and at least one a member of the
Resources Committee;

(6)–(8) three persons appointed by the General Board, of
whom
at least one should be a member of that Board;

[(3)–(8) should include at least two external members, of
whom at least
one should have experience of running a major research library; the
legislation would require the General Board to seek to ensure an
appropriate balance of subject interests on the committee as a whole
in making its appointments]

(9)–(12) four persons elected by Congregation from amongst
those qualifying for faculty membership under Tit. VI, Sect. I, cl.
21 (a) and (b);

(13) the Chairman of the IT Committee or his or her nominee;

(14) a person with experience of managing a college library,
elected by the Conference of Colleges;

(15) a junior member appointed by OUSU;

(16) a junior member appointed by the Graduate Committee of OUSU.

The new senior library post-holder would be secretary to the
committee.

(10) Suspension of the statutes and decrees governing the
functions of the Bodleian Curators would necessitate the creation of
a `users' committee' for the Bodleian to discharge some of the
current functions of the curators. Council and the General Board have
therefore agreed to ask the Libraries Board and the Bodleian Curators
to prepare proposals for such a committee, particular attention being
paid to subject balance. In addition, they have agreed that there
would need to be an advisory committee of professional librarians,
which the new Libraries Committee should be required to consult. This
advisory committee should be representative of departmental and other
university libraries, and of college libraries, as well of Libraries
Board libraries.

Text of General Resolution

That this House endorse the establishment by Council of a new post of
Director of University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian with
effect from 1 January 1997, the holder of which shall be charged
with:

(1) bringing forward within three years for consideration by
Congregation proposals
for the creation of an integrated library service that will
facilitate the following major objectives:

(a) the distribution of resources within the service to
meet users' needs most effectively;

(b) the improvement of the Bodleian's capacity to respond
to the needs of users in the University;

(c) the maintenance and development of, and provision of
access to, Oxford's historic collections as an international
research resource;

(d) the provision of university-wide services such as
library automation and electronic media, preservation, and staff
development;

(e) the fostering of the qualities of responsiveness, and
of flexibility in provision;

(2) responsibility for preparation of the draft budget for the
allocation to individual libraries and services of funds currently
distributed through the Libraries Board;

(3) overall executive responsibility for automated library
services in the University;

(4) responsibility for carrying forward programmes for the
preservation of collections in the University's libraries and for
the provision of training and professional development for library
staff;

and instruct Council to bring forward legislation suspending the
present functions of the Libraries Board and the Curators of the
Bodleian Library from 1 January 1997 and establishing in their place
a Libraries Committee, a Bodleian users' committee, and an advisory
committee of professional librarians as described in the explanatory
note to this
general resolution until such time as alternative arrangements are
approved by Congregation.

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CONGREGATION 15 February


Election

Buildings Committee


Vacancy

: one


Retiring member

: Ms E.A. Chapman


Period from TT 1996

: four years

Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation will be
received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington
Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 29 January, and similar nominations
by six members of Congregation up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 5 February.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each
signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any
names which are not so shown may not be published.

The following nominations have been duly received (5 February):

E.A. CHAPMAN, MA status, Institute of Economics and Statistics

D. PALFREYMAN, MA, Fellow of New College

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    DRUE HEINZ PROFESSORSHIP OF AMERICAN
    LITERATURE

    RONALD BUSH (BA Pennsylvania, BA Cambridge, PH.D. Princeton),
    Professor of Literature, California Institute of Technology, has been
    appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 January 1997.

    Professor Bush will be a fellow of St John's College.

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    FIELD MARSHAL ALEXANDER PROFESSORSHIP OF
    CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE

    HUGH C. WATKINS (B.SC., MB, BS, PH.D. London), Assistant Professor of
    Medicine, Harvard Medical School, has been appointed to the
    professorship funded by the British Heart Foundation with effect from
    1 January 1996.

    Professor Watkins will be a fellow of Exeter College.

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    PROFESSORSHIP OF SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    DAVID JOHN PARKIN (BA, PH.D. London), Professor of African
    Anthropology, University of London, has been appointed to the
    professorship with effect from 1 October 1996.

    Professor Parkin will be a fellow of All Souls College.

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    BRIAN JOHNSON PRIZE IN PATHOLOGY 1995

    The Prize has been awarded to GÖRAN DARIUS HILDEBRAND, Magdalen
    College.

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    CURATORS OF THE BODLEIAN LIBRARY


    Annual Report 1993–4

    The Annual Report for 1993–4 of the Curators of the Bodleian
    Library has recently been published, and a copy may be obtained by
    any member of Congregation on request to the Secretary's Office,
    Bodleian Library, Oxford (telephone: (2)77170).

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    WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE

    The next meeting of the Oxford University Women's Studies Committee
    will be at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 January, in the Old Bar, Mansfield
    College.

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    CIRCULATION OF THE GAZETTE TO
    RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    The University Gazette is circulated on request to
    retired resident members of Congregation until they reach the age of
    seventy-five. However, it has been decided that any former member of
    Congregation over the age of seventy-five may continue to receive the
    Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on application in
    writing to the Information Office, University Offices, Wellington
    Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. Such applications must be renewed at the
    beginning of each academic year.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

    2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

    Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the University, was
    established in 1988. The company has been formed to exploit know-how
    arising out of research funded by the UK Government through the
    Research Councils and funded by other bodies where the rights are not
    tied. The function of the company is to ensure that the results of
    research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors, who are given
    a financial incentive for exploitation.

    Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or royalties
    for the use of know-how arising out of research. Isis also exploits
    the intellectual property of the University by setting up individual
    companies using venture capital or development capital funds.

    Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish to exploit
    the results of research supported by non-Research Council sources,
    when there are no prior conditions on the handling of the
    intellectual property rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a
    small pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting
    intellectual property rights and for taking work to a stage where its
    potential can be assessed.

    Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new ideas can be
    developed for market requirements. The company has established the
    Oxford Innovation Society for major industrial companies, so that
    they can have a window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to
    license and invest where appropriate.

    A brochure explaining Isis' activities is available. Please
    contact the above address, or the telephone and fax numbers given
    below.

    Members of the University should contact Dr James Hiddleston if
    they wish to take advantage of the services that Isis provides.
    (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    UNIVERSITY CLUB


    Wine-tastings

    The following wine-tastings will be held at 5.45 p.m. on Wednesdays
    in the University Club, 6 South Parks Road. All members and their
    guests are welcome, the fee being £2 per person.

    24 Jan.: Wines to brighten January.

    6 Mar.: Wines from southern France.

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR R.W. GUILLERY, FRS, Dr Lee's Professor of Anatomy, will
    deliver the Jenkinson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 19
    February, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building.

    Subject: `Mirrored maps in the forebrain: reflections on
    thalamocortical development.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WINCHESTER LECTURE IN INTERNATIONAL
    RELATIONS

    DR ROBERT HUNTER, United States Ambassador to NATO, Brussels, will
    deliver the Winchester Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 29 January, in
    the Examination Schools.

    This is the first of a series of annual visiting lecturerships
    held on the basis of a generous endowment by Bapsybanoo, Marchioness
    of Winchester (b. 1902, d. 1995), and will be in the field of
    International Relations.

    Subject: `NATO and the former Yugoslavia.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH HISTORY
    1995–6

    Origins of the English State

    JAMES CAMPBELL, FBA, FSA, Reader in Medieval History and Fellow of
    Worcester College, will deliver the Ford's Lectures for 1995–6
    at 5
    p.m. on the following Fridays in the Examination Schools.

    19 Jan.: `The first nation state?'

    26 Jan.: `Politics and participation.'

    2 Feb.: `Shires, hundreds, and leets.'

    9 Feb.: `Towns.'

    16 Feb.: `The state and the economy.'

    23 Feb.: `Conclusion.'

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    ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

    School of Geography: research seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 4.45 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

    Conveners: G.C.K. Peach, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Social
    Geography, G.L. Clark, MA, Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography,
    and A.S. Goudie, MA, Professor of Geography.

    R. MAYHEW

    23 Jan.: `Was William Shakespeare an
    eighteenth-century geographer? Reflections on the historiography
    of geography.'

    W. MATTHEI

    30 Jan.: `South Africa versus India at the
    UN in 1948: a clash of political geographies.'

    DR J. REMEDIOS

    6 Feb.: `Ozone depletion: causes, solutions, and
    implications for environmental control.'

    G. ASSENZA and D. WEST

    13 Feb.: To be announced.

    R. FIELD

    20 Feb.: `Patterning in woody floral diversity in
    southern Africa.'

    H. CRAWLEY-LYONS

    27 Feb.: `Women and refugee status: beyond the
    public/private dichotomy in European asylum policy.'

    PROFESSOR S. SMITH

    5 Mar.: `Interpreting the soundscape.'

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    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture
    Theatre 1, the Department of Biochemistry.

    Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor
    of Molecular Biophysics.

    DR J. HAYLES, ICRF, London

    19 Jan.: `The role of p34cdc2 in maintaining the
    temporal order of S-phase and mitosis.'

    DR R. READ, Alberta

    26 Jan.: `Structural insights into pertussis toxin
    action, from cell surface through ER.'

    DR J. HAJDU

    9 Feb.: `Iron catalysis: time resolved diffraction
    studies.'

    PROFESSOR J. GOODFELLOW, Birkbeck College, London

    16 Feb.: `Protein hydration, stability and
    unfolding.'

    DR S. RADFORD

    23 Feb.: `New insights into protein folding
    mechanisms using biophysical methods.'

    DR M. MOORE, York

    1 Mar.: `Oligonucleotide crystallography.'

    DR S. SMERDON, Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London

    8 Mar.: `Structure of 14-3-3 protein: implications
    for signal transduction.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Department of Zoology: departmental research seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in
    Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology.

    For details of the Jenkinson Memorial Lecture, to be given on 19
    February, see above.

    Conveners: G. Barker (Ph.D. Livingstone), Research
    Worker, Department of Zoology, and G. Mason (Ph.D. Cambridge),
    Departmental Lecturer.

    PROFESSOR D. WARRELL

    22 Jan.: `Venomous animals and their venoms.'

    DR M. AXTON

    29 Jan.: `The gnu,
    plutonium, and p'an gu genes of
    Drosophila: the genetics of virgin birth.'

    PROFESSOR N. BARTON, Edinburgh

    5 Feb.: `The evolution of recombination.'

    DR J. PEMBERTON, Edinburgh

    12 Feb.: To be announced.

    DR P. AHLBEG, Natural History Museum

    26 Feb.: `Lungfishes and tetrapods: parallel
    histories, parallel mysteries.'

    DR M. BAILEY

    4 Mar.: `Gene flux and bacterial community
    succesion in the sugar beet phytosphere.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Department of Psychiatry

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Seminar Room, the Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford Hospital.

    Convener: M.G. Gelder, DM, Handley Professor of
    Psychiatry.

    DR R. PLOMIN, Institute of Psychiatry, London

    23 Jan.: `The genetic basis of complex human
    behaviour.'

    PROFESSOR J.F.W. DEAKIN, University of Manchester

    6 Feb.: `Modifying genetic brain dysfunction in
    schizophrenia.'

    DR M. KING, Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine

    20 Feb.: `How can we evaluate the cost
    effectiveness of brief psychotherapy in general practice?'

    PROFESSOR N. SARTORIUS, President-elect, World Psychiatric
    Association, Geneva

    27 Feb.: `The future of psychiatry.' (Upjohn
    Memorial Lecture
    )

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Nuffield Department of Surgery: seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, Level 6, the John
    Radcliffe Hospital.

    Convener: P.J. Morris, MA, Nuffield Professor of
    Surgery.

    M. THOMPSON-FAWCETT

    23 Jan.: `A new look at the anal transition zone in
    restorative protocolectomy.'

    C. WATSON

    30 Jan.: `Perception of distance in peripheral
    vascular disease.'

    P. DEMPSEY, Cambridge

    6 Feb.: `C3d of complement as a molecular adjuvant
    of innate immunity.'

    G. WILLIAMS, Keele

    13 Feb.: `Apoptosis and the immune system.'

    I. HUTCHINSON, University of Manchester

    27 Feb.: `Genetic and pharmacological regulation of
    cytokine gene expression.'

    D. SAITOVITCH

    5 Mar.: `CD4 modulation for induction of
    transplantation tolerance.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Oxford Immunology Group

    PROFESSOR F. MELCHERS, Basel Institute for Immunology, Basel, will
    lecture at 6 p.m. on Monday, 22 January, in Lecture Theatre 2, the
    Academic Block, the John Radcliffe Hospital. The meeting will be
    chaired by Professor Andrew McMichael.

    Subject: `Selection of the B cell repertoire.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES, MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

    Mathematical Logic Seminars

    The following seminars will take place at 4.30 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Mathematical Institute.

    Details of the 2 February seminar will be announced later.

    Convener: A.J. Wilkie, MA, Reader in Mathematical
    Logic.

    K. KUDAIBERGENOV, Almaty, Kazakhstan

    19 Jan.: `Homogeneous models of first order
    theories.'

    J. HENLE, Smith College, Massachusetts

    26 Jan.: `Conducting a civilised war on regular
    cardinals.'

    R. JOZSA, Plymouth

    9 Feb.: `Quantum computation: principles and
    achievements.'

    J. PARIS, University of Manchester

    16 Feb.: `An explanation of fuzzy logic?'

    D. HASKELL, Paris

    23 Feb.: `Dependence on parameters in variants of
    Hilbert's seventeenth problem.'

    M. ADDIS, Leeds

    1 Mar.: `Finite models and strict finitism.'

    M. OTERO, Madrid

    8 Mar.: `Models of normal open induction.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

    Department of Statistics: Probability and statistics seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Department of Statistics.

    Details of the 29 February seminar will be announced later.

    Convener: J.E. Kennedy (Ph.D. Cambridge), Junior Lecturer
    (Temporary) in Statistics.

    DR A. DAVISON

    18 Jan.: `Bootstrap diagnostics.'

    DR J. KOVAL, Western Ontario

    25 Jan.: `Selection of variables in stepwise
    logistic regression.'

    DR C. DONNELLY

    1 Feb.: `The analysis of a survey of sexual
    behaviour: a question of non- ignorable non-response.'

    DR S. COAD, Sussex

    8 Feb.: `Corrected confidence sets for sequentially
    designed experiments.'

    PROFESSOR V. ISHAM, UCL

    15 Feb.: `Stochastic models for macroparasitic
    infections.'

    DR M. KENWARD, Kent

    22 Feb.: To be announced.

    PROFESSOR P. DIGGLE, Lancaster

    7 Mar.: `Spectral analysis of replicated biomedial
    time series.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

    Differential equations and applications seminars

    The following seminars will be held in the common room, Dartington
    House, as follows: the seminar on Monday, 5 February, will take place
    at 4 p.m.; all other seminars take place at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays.

    For details of this term's Numerical Analysis Group seminars, see
    under `Computing Laboratory' below.

    Convener: S.D. Howison, MA, M.Sc., D.Phil., University
    Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics.

    DR P. CLIFFORD and MR M. MEIRION

    25 Jan.: `Reaction problems for spherical
    molecules.'

    PROFESSOR V.A. GALAKTINIOV, Bath

    5 Feb.: To be announced.

    PROFESSOR V. SMYSHLYAEV, Bath

    22 Feb.: `Scale effects in plasticity,
    geometrically necessary dislocations, strain gradient theories,
    and homogenisation.'

    PROFESSOR S.J. HOGAN, Bristol

    7 Mar.: `Perfection and imperfections in liquid
    crystals.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    The following seminars and poetry readings will take place
    as indicated at 5 p.m. on Thursdays.

    Convener: P.A. Mackridge, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer in Modern Greek.

    DR D. RICKS, King's College, London

    1 Feb., Room T7, 47 Wellington Square: `The poet as
    witness: Titos Patrikios and the "Cold Civil War".'

    DR S. PECKHAM, Cambridge

    15 Feb., ground-floor lecture room, 47 Wellington
    Square
    : `Ion Dragoumis and the politics of place.'

    TITOS PATRIKIOS

    22 Feb., basement lecture-room, 47 Wellington
    Square
    : Mr Patrikios will introduce his poetry in English
    and read a selection of it in Greek (English translations will
    be provided where possible).

    PROFESSOR E. KEELEY, Princeton

    29 Feb., Room 2, Taylor Institution: `Modern Greek
    poetry in translation: a reading.'

    E. KOUTRIANOU

    7 Mar., Room T7, 47 Wellington Square: `Wandering
    and illusion; strollers, runaways, exiles, and dreamers: the
    early Elytis and Karyotakis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Seminar: French Literature from the Renaissance to the
    Enlightenment

    These seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays, as follows: the
    seminar on 1 February will take place in Room 2, the Taylor
    Institution; all other seminars will take place in the Danson Room,
    Trinity College.

    Convener: G.J. Mallinson, MA, University Lecturer (CUF)
    in French.

    A.-M. THORNTON, Voltaire Foundation

    18 Jan.: `A neglected portfolio: a selection of
    eaux-fortes and engravings for the works of
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau in Oxfordshire.' (With slides)

    PROFESSOR G. DEFAUX, Johns Hopkins

    1 Feb.: `Rabelais au large de Ganobin: de la
    "fiction en archipel" au "symbolisme
    polémique".'

    G. JONDORF, Cambridge

    29 Feb.: ` "One language, and one
    speech"? La Fontaine's talking animals.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MODERN HISTORY

    Seminar in medieval history

    The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Mondays, as
    follows: the seminars on 29 January and 4 March will take place in
    the Wharton Room, All Souls College; other seminars will take place
    in the Memorial Room, Queen's College.

    Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor
    of Medieval History, and W.J. Blair, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in
    Modern History.

    S. SAYGIN

    22 Jan.: `Ambition: Piero del Monte, papal
    collector and nuntio in England 1435–40, and the background
    of
    his activity as a mediator of Italian humanism in England.'

    M. RYAN

    29 Jan.: `The oath of fealty and the lawyers.'

    S. ASHLEY

    5 Feb.: `The power of symbols: interpreting
    portents in the Carolingian empire.'

    K. MACDONALD

    12 Feb.: `The cloister and the world: some
    testamentary evidence for the connections between nunneries and
    lay society, c.1350–1540.'

    S. HICKSON

    26 Feb.: To be announced.

    S. WALKER, Sheffield

    4 Mar.: `Rumour and sedition in the reign of Henry
    IV.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Commonwealth History Graduate Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Modern History Faculty Building.

    In the final two meetings postgraduate research students will give
    presentations, as follows: Ms J. Duffy and Mr A. Fairweather-Tall in
    week seven; Mr J. Osborne and Ms M. Kuo in week eight.

    DR R. GROVE, Cambridge

    19 Jan.: To be announced.

    MISS H. BELL

    26 Jan.: `Midwifery training and the containment of
    female circumcision in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan.'

    DR H. DEACON

    2 Feb.: `The beginnings of a medical profession in
    the Cape Colony, 1800–50: the usefulness of biographical
    material.'

    DR M. LYONS, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London

    9 Feb.: `Foreign bodies: the history of labour
    migration as a threat to public health in Uganda.'

    MR THANT MYINT-U, Cambridge

    16 Feb.: `Why Burma has no king: the crisis of the
    Burmese state and the foundations of British colonial rule in
    upper Burma (1853–1900).'

    DR J. LEWIS, Cambridge

    23 Feb.: `Tropical East Ends: women, welfare, and
    development in wartime colonial policy.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Lectures in Korean Studies 1996

    PROFESSOR K. O'ROURKE, Kyunghee University, Seoul, Korea, will give a
    special lecture discussing his thirty years as a translator of Korean
    poetry and his most recent project on the Nobel nominee, Sô
    Chông-ju, at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 February, in the Lecture
    Theatre, the Nissan Institute, St Antony's College.

    Convener: J.B. Lewis, MA, Korea Foundation University
    Lecturer in Korean Studies.

    Subject: `Moments of vision in the poems of Midang
    Sô Chông-ju.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Oxford Physics Colloquia

    The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Physics,
    and C.E. Webb, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Laser Physics.

    DR W. VAN AMERSFOORT, FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Netherlands

    26 Jan.: `The infra-red free electron laser user
    facility FELIX.'

    DR G. REID, Office of Science and Technology, London

    2 Feb.: `Technology foresight: threat or
    opportunity?'

    PROFESSOR S. COOPER

    16 Feb.: `Cryogenic calorimeters and a search for
    dark matter.'

    PROFESSOR R.S. ELLIS, Cambridge

    23 Feb.: `Gravitational lenses: nature's giant
    telescopes.'

    PROFESSOR S. HAROCHE, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris

    1 Mar.: `Atoms in cavities: exploring the boundary
    between the quantum and classical worlds.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theoretical Chemistry Group

    Theoretical Chemistry Group seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
    Mondays, as follows: the seminars on 12 February and 4 March will
    take place in the Main Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical
    Chemistry Laboratory; all other seminars will take place in the
    Seminar Room, the New Chemistry Building.

    Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of
    Theoretical Chemistry.

    M. STUMPF

    22 Jan.: `Photodissociation of HO2: test of
    statistical theories.'

    PROFESSOR CHILD

    29 Jan.: `Ab initio input for Rydberg
    spectroscopy.'

    G. GARCIA DE POLAVIEJA, Spain

    5 Feb.: `Quantum localisation and stability.'

    S.C. WATSON

    12 Feb.: `Benefits of an Order-N ab initio
    method.'

    DR R.K. THOMAS

    19 Feb.: `Structure of wet surfaces.'

    PROFESSOR A.S. DICKINSON, Newcastle

    26 Feb.: `Transport properties of ions and
    molecules.'

    DR M.E. NEWTON

    4 Mar.: `Nearly perfect diamond.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theoretical Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

    Convener: Sir Roger Elliott, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Theoretical Physics.

    PROFESSOR G. ROSS

    19 Jan.: `Extending the symmetries of the standard
    model.'

    DR J. HALLIWELL, Imperial College

    2 Feb.: `The decoherent histories approach to
    quantum theory.'

    PROFESSOR G.S. PAWLEY, Edinburgh

    16 Feb.: `Crystallisation questions still
    unanswered by computer simulation.'

    DR R. KERNER, CNRS, Paris

    1 Mar.: `Self-similarity and growth of amorphous
    and quasi-crystalline structures.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Main
    Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic
    Chemistry.

    DR R.G. COMPTON

    22 Jan.: `Voltammetry in flowing systems: chemistry
    with electrons, photons, and ultra-sound.'

    DR P. PRINGLE, Bristol

    29 Jan.: `Self-replication of phosphines on
    platinum (O).'

    DR J. HUTCHISON

    5 Feb.: `Chemistry in an electron microscope.'

    DR M.J. ROSSEINSKY

    12 Feb.: `Fullerene solid state chemistry.'

    PROFESSOR K. WEIGARDT, Mülheim

    19 Feb.: `Phenoxyl radicals and transition metal
    ions: important intermediates in biology and chemistry.'

    PROFESSOR B.F.G. JOHNSON, Cambridge

    26 Feb.: `Cluster sandwich compounds.'

    DR A.P. DA SILVA, Belfast

    4 Mar.: `Luminescent spies and switches.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Department of Materials: materials modelling laboratory seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 1.15 p.m. on Fridays in
    Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building.

    Conveners: D.G. Pettifor, MA, Isaac Wolfson Professor of
    Metallurgy, and A.P. Sutton, MA, M.Sc., University Lecturer in
    Materials Science.

    DR SUTTON

    19 Jan.: `Computational materials synthesis.'

    PROFESSOR M. CROSS, Greenwich

    26 Jan.: `Computational modelling of materials
    processing.'

    DR S.G. ROBERTS

    2 Feb.: `Modelling the brittle–ductile
    transition.'

    PROFESSOR M.W. FINNIS, Belfast

    9 Feb.: `The interrelation of free energies of
    point, line, and planar defects in ordered alloys.'

    PROFESSOR J.M. BALL, Heriot-Watt

    16 Feb.: `Mathematical models of martensitic
    transformations.'

    DR A.J. FISHER, UCL

    23 Feb.: `Modelling of STM images.'

    DR J.D HUNT

    1 Mar.: `Modelling high-velocity array dendritic
    growth.'

    Discussion meeting

    8 Mar.: Discussion of modelling of plasticity via
    dislocations, led by Dr J.R. Ockenden.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Lecture Theatre of the laboratory.

    Convener: J.P. Simons, MA, Dr Lee's Professor of
    Chemistry.

    PROFESSOR D.W. PRATT, Pittsburgh

    22 Jan.: `High resolution spectroscopy in the
    ultra-violet.'

    PROFESSOR B. KOEL, Southern California

    29 Jan.: `Understanding chemical reactions at alloy
    surfaces.' PROFESSOR E.A. CARTER, Los Angeles


    5 Feb.: `Ab-initio molecular dynamics studies of
    cluster and surface chemistry.'

    DR P.J. HORE

    12 Feb.: `Radical pairs and molecular triplets:
    spin polarisation and magnetic field effects in chemistry.'

    PROFESSOR P.W. FOWLER, University of Exeter

    19 Feb.: `Isomers, isomers, and more isomers:
    theory of fullerenes and their derivatives.'

    DR G. HANCOCK

    26 Feb.: `Tropospheric ozone.'

    PROFESSOR D.A. KING, Cambridge

    4 Mar.: `From adsorbate-induced surface
    restructuring to sustained chemical oscillations.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Astrophysics Colloquia

    The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

    Conveners: Dr M.D. Lacy and Dr A.E. Lynas-Gray,
    Department of Physics.

    DR P. THOMAS, Sussex

    23 Jan.: `Simulating the universe.'

    DR A. BEASLEY, National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    30 Jan.: `The Very Long Baseline Array: status and
    recent results.'

    DR N. ACHILLEOS, University College, London

    6 Feb.: `Magnetism in white dwarfs.'

    DR L.J. KING

    13 Feb.: `Gravitational lensing statistics.'

    DR R. OUDMAIJER, Imperial College, London

    20 Feb.: `Properties and evolution of post-AGB
    stars.'

    DR S.F. GREEN, Kent

    27 Feb.: `In-situ detection of
    interplanetary and interstellar dust.'

    DR N. GREVESSE, Liège

    5 Mar.: `The solar chemical composition.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: solid state seminars

    The following talks on the chemistry, structure, and properties of
    solids will be given at 11.45 a.m. on Tuesdays in the Abbot's
    Kitchen, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: A.M. Chippindale, MA, D.Phil., Supernumerary
    Junior Research Fellow, New College.

    DR S.J. BLUNDELL

    30 Jan.: `Magnetic materials studied by muon-spin
    rotation.'

    DR S.J. HIBBLE, Reading

    6 Feb.: `Structural studies of disordered
    molybdates containing molybdenum clusters.'

    DR D.J. WATKIN

    13 Feb.: `Seeing is believing: do-it-yourself
    crystallography.'

    DR M.J. GORINGE

    20 Feb.: `Environmental cell TEM studies of
    oxides.'

    A. BERRY

    27 Feb.: `Optical spectroscopy of terbium
    elpasolites.'

    DR J. SLOAN

    5 Mar.: `Structural study of Nd2Ti2O7–SrTiO3
    and Nd2Ti2O7–NdTiO3 systems by TEM and associated
    techniques: an update.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    University Laboratory of Physiology

    The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the
    Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology.

    Convener: J.C. Ellory, MA, Reader in Human Physiology.

    DR A. SHAH, Cardiff

    24 Jan.: `Endothelial regulation of myofilament
    response to CA2+.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological
    Society
    )

    PROFESSOR J. ASHMORE, Bristol

    31 Jan.: `Sound amplification in the inner ear and
    the intrinsic limits to hearing.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar
    in
    Cognitive Neuroscience
    )

    PROFESSOR T. JACOB, Cardiff

    7 Feb.: `The lens, volume regulation, ion channels,
    and cataract.'(Seminar sponsored by the Physiological
    Society
    )

    DR J. SCHOLES, University College, London

    14 Feb.: `Niches and forays of microglia in fish.'
    (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    DR T. ARNETT, University College, London

    21 Feb.: `Osteoclasts and the acid turn-on.'
    (Jenkinson Seminar)

    DR M. EDWARDSON, Cambridge

    28 Feb.: `Mechanisms of exocytosis in the exocrine
    pancreas.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological
    Society
    )

    DR S. MCMAHON, UMDS, London

    6 Mar.: `Role of NGF on sensory systems.'
    (\McDonnell–Pew Seminar in Cognitive Neuroscience\)

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Department of Human Anatomy

    DR E.N. GUILLERY, Wisconsin, will lecture at 12 noon on Thursday, 18
    January, in the Small Lecture Theatre, the Department of
    Physiology.

    Subject: `Development of NaCl absorption from proximal
    tubule.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SOCIAL STUDIES

    Lecture

    CAROLINE KING, Georgetown University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Thursday, 25 January, in the Old Library, All Souls College.

    Convener: P.G.J. Pulzer, MA, Gladstone Professor of
    Government and Public Administration.

    Subject: `Losers of reunification? Gains and losses for
    women in transforming societies: the case of eastern Germany.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Lecture

    DR D.S. KING will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 January, in the
    Chester Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American
    Government.

    Subject: `Institutionalising positivism: the Federal
    Government and social science funding.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Sociology seminar: Employment, unemployment, and social
    inequality

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Clay Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: D.I.D. Gallie, MA, D.Phil., Fellow, Nuffield
    College.

    A. HEATH

    24 Jan.: `Class inequalities in education.'

    P. MOYLE

    31 Jan.: `Inequalities in mental health: an
    evaluation of Karasek's demand– control model of work
    stress.'

    DR GALLIE

    7 Feb.: `The flexible workforce: myth or
    reality?'

    H. RUSSELL

    14 Feb.: `Women's experience of unemployment.'

    M. BARTLEY

    21 Feb.: `Unemployment and health: an accumulation
    of disadvantage.'

    M. TOMLINSON

    28 Feb.: `Who lost out? The transition and labour
    market experiences in central and eastern Europe.'

    G. EVANS

    6 Mar.: `Socially structured inequality and
    interest formation in post- Communist societies.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    THEOLOGY, ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Eastern Christian Studies Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    House of St Gregory and St Macrina, 1 Canterbury Road.

    Conveners: K.T. Ware, MA, D.Phil., Spalding Lecturer in
    Eastern Orthodox Studies, and S.P. Brock, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
    Syriac Studies.

    R.A. KITCHEN

    31 Jan.: `Stairway to heaven: the anonymity of
    perfection in the Liber Graduum.'

    DR WARE

    14 Feb.: `Imagining the unimaginable: the Holy
    Trinity in Christian art.' (With slides)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BODLEIAN LIBRARY

    Oxford Seminars in Cartography

    D. GATFIELD, Senior Project Engineer, and M. CHESTERMAN, Project
    Engineer, both of Thames Water Utilities Ltd., will give a seminar at
    5 p.m. on Thursday, 1 February, in the Schola Astronomiae et
    Rhetoricae, Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian Library.

    Subject: `GIS in Thames Water Utilities Ltd.: a pipe
    dream?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BYZANTINE STUDIES

    The following lectures will take place at 5 p.m. on Mondays, as
    follows: the lecture on 29 January will be given in the Lecture Room,
    the Institute of Archaeology; all other lectures will be given in the
    Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College.

    Conveners: Dr A.M. Cameron, Warden, Keble College, and Dr
    M. Mango, University Lecturer in Byzantine Archaeology and Art.

    P. ARMSTRONG, Belfast

    22 Jan.: `The Oxford Byzantine ceramics project.'
    (Illustrated)

    DR C. LIGHTFOOT

    29 Jan.: `Excavations at Amorium, summer 1995.'
    (Illustrated)

    DR R. WEBB, London

    5 Feb.: `Byzantine dancing girls.'

    DR A. EASTMOND, Warwick

    12 Feb.: `Aliens in Byzantium? Islamic sculpture in
    thirteenth-century Trebizond.' (Illustrated)

    C. ROUECHÉ, London

    19 Feb.: `Acclamations in their physical
    setting.'

    T. PAPACOSTAS

    26 Feb.: `The urban churches of Byzantine Cyprus.'
    (Illustrated)

    DR I. ARZHENTSEVA, Moscow

    4 Mar.: `Byzantine monuments in the north-west
    Caucasus.' (Illustrated)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Numerical Analysis Group

    Differential Equations, Computational Mathematics, and
    Applications seminars

    The following seminars will be held on Thursdays. With the exception
    of the first meeting on 1 February, they will be held at 4 p.m. in
    the
    Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

    The 2 p.m. meeting on 1 February will be held in the Atlas Centre,
    the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

    The co-ordinators are S.D. Howison (telephone: Oxford (2)70500), E.
    Süli (Oxford (2)73880), and J. Scott, RAL (01235 445131).

    PROFESSOR D.W. MOORE, Imperial College

    18 Jan.: `Flow over a non-slender delta wing.'

    DR A.R. HUMPHRIES, Sussex

    25 Jan.: `Upper semi-continuity of attractors under
    approximation by variable time-stepping numerical methods.'

    DR K. MEERBERGEN, Leuven

    1 Feb., 2 p.m., RAL: `The calculation of Eigen
    values of Navier-Stokes problems.'

    PROFESSOR T.J. PEDLEY, Leeds

    1 Feb.: `Models of flow and self-excited
    oscillations in collapsible tubes.'

    DR S. GOMES

    8 Feb.: `Some remarks about spline biorthogonal
    wavelets.'

    PROFESSOR M.J. BAINES, Reading

    15 Feb.: `Analysis of an algorithm for generating
    locally optimal meshes for L2 approximation by discontinuous
    piecewise polynomials.'

    DR T. MULLIN

    22 Feb.: `The not-so-simple pendulum.'

    PROFESSOR R. RANNACHER, Heidelberg

    29 Feb.: `Approximate inertial manifolds and their
    potential in flow computations.'

    DR D. SILVESTER, UMIST

    7 Mar.: `Stabilises mixed finite element methods
    for incompressible flow.'

    PROFESSOR L.N. TREFETHEN, Cornell

    14 Mar.: `Non-normality, nonlinearity, and
    transition to turbulence.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Centre for Criminological Research.

    DR C. NORRIS, Hull

    24 Jan.: `A risky business: issues in the police running
    of informers.'

    DR S. WALKLATE, Keele

    7 Feb.: `Community, crime, and the underclass.'

    PROFESSOR D. GARLAND, Edinburgh

    21 Feb.: `A sociological analysis of contemporary
    crime control.'

    PROFESSOR S. COHEN, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, and LSE

    6 Mar.: `The futures of social control.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

    Affirming the comprehensive ideal

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Department of Educational Studies. The meetings will be followed by a
    reception.

    Admission will be by ticket only, obtainable from Ms Vicki Lloyd,
    Department of Educational Studies.

    24 Jan.: Ideals and history of comprehensive schooling

    EMERITUS PROFESSOR B. SIMON, Leicester, and P.
    CORNALL, Cornwall LEA
    : `A seismic change: process and
    interpretation.'

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    7 Feb.: Context

    PROFESSOR D. HALPIN, Goldsmith's College,
    London
    : `Fragmentation.'

    DR G. WALFORD: `Privatisation and selection.'

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    21 Feb.: Social and political philosophy

    PROFESSOR S.J. BALL, King's College, London:
    `Markets, equity, and values.'

    PROFESSOR R. PRING: `Personal worth/community.'

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    6 Mar.: The curriculum

    PROFESSOR D. LAWTON, Institute of Education,
    London
    : `What is worth learning?'

    MS S. TOMLINSON, Goldsmith's College, London: `A
    comprehensive curriculum 14–19.'

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    1 May: Effective schools and effective teachers

    MS C. BENN, Kensington and Chelsea College of
    Further Education
    : `What is an effective comprehensive
    school?'

    PROFESSOR TED WRAGG, Exeter: `Teachers for the
    comprehensive ideal.'

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    15 May: Effective learning

    B. CLARKE, head teacher, Peers School, Oxford:
    `What comprehensive schools do better.'

    J. ABBOTT, Director, Education 2000: `Information
    technology and the comprehensive ideal.'

    * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    29 May: The organisation of comprehensive education in the future

    TIM BRIGHOUSE, Chief Education Officer,
    Birmingham
    : `A local democratic framework.'

    PROFESSOR S. RANSON, Birmingham: `The comprehensive
    school within the learning society.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT

    The following seminars will be given at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Main Lecture Theatre, the School of Geography.

    Further information may be obtained from Martin Price at the ECU, 1a
    Mansfield Road, Oxford (telephone: Oxford (2)81182).

    DR S. TRUDGILL, Sheffield:

    22 Jan.: `Clean decisions for a dirty world?'

    DR D. POSEY, Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society

    29 Jan.: `Are indigenous and traditional peoples
    significant partners in biodiversity conservation?'

    DR J. PALEOCRASSAS, former European Commissioner for the Environment

    5 Feb.: `Environment 2000: the ostrich
    syndrome.'

    MS O. BENNETT, Panos Institute

    12 Feb.: `Oral testimony and the environment.'

    SIR CRISPIN TICKELL

    19 Feb.: `Climate and catastrophe.'

    PROFESSOR S. JASANOFF, Cornell

    26 Feb.: `Worldly politics, earthly knowledge.'

    DR R. GARDNER, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London

    4 Mar.: `Erosion crisis or environmental
    self-defence in Nepal?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

    Seminar in modern Jewish history

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in
    the Seminar Room, the Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 45 St
    Giles'. The first seminar takes place on Wednesday, 24 January;
    thereafter the meetings will be held on Tuesdays.

    Convener: D. Rechter (Ph.D. Jerusalem), Fellow of the
    centre.

    DR J. KLIER, University College, London

    24 Jan.: `Hasidism in Russia: what the archives
    tell.'

    DR A. KUSHNER, Southampton

    6 Feb.: `The memory of Belsen.'

    PROFESSOR S. BOWMAN, Cincinnati

    20 Feb.: `War needs and ideological considerations:
    the case of Greek Jewry during the Holocaust.'

    PROFESSOR R. RÜRUP, Technical University, Berlin

    5 Mar.: `German Jewish emancipation in comparative
    perspective.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

    Research seminar

    PROFESSOR G. EASTON, Lancaster, will give a seminar at 2.30 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 20 February, in the Seminar Room, the School of Management
    Studies, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Subject: `The unfeasibility of managerial prescriptions:
    the case of industrial networks.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Seminar in contemporary South Asia

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    W. OLSEN, Lancaster

    18 Jan.: `Gender and structural adjustment in rural
    India.'

    J. HUMPHREY, Sussex

    25 Jan.: `Japanese production methods in India.'

    M. WASEEM, Islamabad

    1 Feb.: `Electoral politics in Pakistan.'

    D. JAYARAJ, Madras Institute of Development Studies

    8 Feb.: `Non-agricultural employment in rural
    Tamilnadu.'

    S. ERB

    15 Feb.: `Disability in rural India.'

    R. KAUR, Jawaharlal Nehru University

    22 Feb.: `Agricultural development and intensity of
    female work participation: a case of Indian rural Punjab.'

    T.V. SATHYAMURTHY, York

    29 Feb.: `Centralised state power and decentralised
    politics in India.'

    J. BEALL, LSE

    7 Mar.: `Urban poverty in Pakistan.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Refugee Studies Programme

    Seminars on forced migration

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    L. WEE, Southampton

    24 Jan.: `International responsibilities for
    causing forced migration.'

    D. MALONE, formerly Canadian Ambassador to the UN

    31 Jan.: `The future of UN peace-keeping.'

    DR M. HERMAN

    7 Feb.: `Ethiopian Jews.'

    H. CRAWLEY

    14 Feb.: `Women and refugee status: beyond the
    public/private dichotomy in European asylum policy.'

    R. HINTON, Cambridge

    21 Feb.: `The problematics and potentials of
    participatory health research amongst refugee women and
    children.'

    L. GRAFOVA, Co-ordinating Council for Refugees and Forced Migrants,
    Moscow

    28 Feb.: `The resettlement of refugees and the
    forcibly-displaced in Russia.'


    Elizabeth Colson Lecture

    DR C. BEYANI, LSE, will deliver the Elizabeth Colson Lecture at 5
    p.m. on Wednesday, 6 March, in Rhodes House.

    Subject: `Legal dimensions of forced displacement of
    population groups.'


    Foundation courses

    Identity: nationalism, regionalism, and ethnicity in the
    explanation of human displacement (Eastern Europe)

    DR EFTIHIA VOUTIRA will teach this course on Mondays, 10 a.m.–12
    noon, in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Field methods

    DR CHRIS MCDOWELL will teach this course on Tuesdays, 10 a.m–12
    noon, in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Nutrition

    DR JAYA HENRY will teach this course on Wednesdays, 2–4 p.m., in
    the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE AND THE INDIAN
    STUDIES CENTRE, ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    Informal evening seminar on South Asia

    The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Mondays in the New
    Room, the Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College.

    C. GUPTA, Visiting Fellow, Queen Elizabeth House

    22 Jan.: `Communal constructions: media reality and
    real reality.'

    A. KHAN

    12 Feb.: `The rediscovery of India: a new
    subcontinent.'

    Reading seminar

    4 Mar.: Discussion of Peter van der Veer's book
    Religious Nationalism: Hindus and Muslims in India
    (University of California Press, 1994). The book is available at
    the Indian Institute Library and the Library of the Institute of
    Social and Cultural Anthropology.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    INSTITUTE OF VIROLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL
    MICROBIOLOGY

    The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on the days shown in
    the
    Seminar Room of the institute. They will take place on Fridays,
    except for the meeting on Thursday, 8 February.

    Details of the seminar to be given on 8 March will be announced
    later.

    PROFESSOR D.A. RITCHIE, Liverpool

    19 Jan.: `Probing the structure and function of
    natural bacterial populations.'

    DR M. THOMAS, Imperial College at Silwood Park

    26 Jan.: `Biological control of locusts and
    grasshoppers using pathogens.'

    DR D.W.H. WALTON, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge

    2 Feb.: `Antarctic microbiology—present and
    future challenges.'

    DR D.J. TYRRELL, CAMR, Porton Down

    8 Feb.: `Spongiform encephalopathies—including
    BSE.'

    DR R.G. VILE, ICRF, St Thomas's Hospital

    16 Feb.: `Gene therapy.'

    DR K. THOMPSON, Sheffield

    23 Feb.: `Expansion and decline in the British
    flora—the paradox of dispersal.'

    DR P. MILLS, Horticultural Research International

    1 Mar.: `Microbial technology at HRI.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BRASENOSE COLLEGE


    Tanner Lectures on Human Values

    PROFESSOR SIMON SCHAMA, Columbia University, will deliver the Tanner
    Lectures on Human Values at 5 p.m. on Monday, 29 January, Tuesday, 30
    January, and Thursday, 1 February, in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor
    Institution.

    Subject: `Humanism and history in the work of Rubens and
    Rembrandt.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE


    F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR HERMIONE LEE, Professor of English, University of York,
    will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 14 February, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Biomythographers: rewriting the lives of
    Virginia Woolf.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    GREEN COLLEGE


    Green College Lectures

    Death

    The Green College Lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on the following
    Mondays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    PROFESSOR M. RAFF, University College, London

    22 Jan.: `Death of the cell: apoptosis.'

    PROFESSOR TONY WRIGLEY, Cambridge

    29 Jan.: `Death, Malthus, and human society.'

    MR J. GLOVER

    5 Feb.: `Death, euthanasia, and eugenics.'

    PROFESSOR W. HAMILTON

    12 Feb.: `Death, sex, and evolution.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    KEBLE COLLEGE

    PROFESSOR M. WHEELER, Director, Ruskin Programme, Lancaster
    University, will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Sunday, 28 January, in the
    chapel, Keble College.

    Subject: `Keble, Ruskin, and The Light of the
    World
    .'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


    Latin American Centre

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in 1 Church
    Walk. Details of the seminars to be held in March will be announced
    later.

    W. MARSDEN, Assistant Under-Secretary, Americas Department, Foreign
    Office

    23 Jan.: `The making of British policy towards
    Latin America.'

    A. ANGELL

    30 Jan.: `Successful state reform: educational
    policy in Chile.'

    J.C. TORRE, Instituto Di Tella, Argentina

    6 Feb.: `El 17 de Octubre de 1945: el dia en que
    hace cincuenta años nacio el Peronismo.' (In
    Spanish
    )

    R. THORP

    13 Feb.: `A case study of successful reform: the
    Peruvian tax administration.'

    M. SERRANO, ILAS-London

    20 Feb.: `Contemporary Mexican politics'
    (provisional title).

    L. BETHELL

    27 Feb.: `The Paraguayan War (1864–70): a
    reassessment.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

    DR R.C. REPP and DR C.J. TYERMAN will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on
    Thursday, 25 January, in Bostar Hall, University College. Wine will
    be served from 8.15 p.m. New members are welcome.

    Subject: `The sixth century of Nicopolis: Islam and the
    West.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: Grants and Research<br /> Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    • *RESEARCH AND EQUIPMENT
      COMMITTEE
    • RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE


    • OTHER GRANTS

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

      The Oxford University Research Services Office is based in the
      University Offices, Wellington Square, and is part of the central
      university administration.

      The office processes and approves all applications to outside
      bodies for research grants and contracts. It also acts in an advisory
      capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring information
      about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, Teaching Company, EC research
      programmes, etc.).

      Contracts with industry are negotiated through the Research
      Services Office which also deals, inter alia,
      with various intellectual property matters, research-related work
      covered by purchase orders, consultancy agreements, agreements
      covering clinical trials and services, and liaison with funding
      bodies over discretionary pay awards.

      The Director of the Research Services Office is Ms June Clark
      (telephone: (2)70142, e-mail: june.clark@admin.ox.ac.uk).

      Other members of the Research Services Office from whom advice may
      be sought are as follows:

      • Ms Catherine Quinn (telephone: (2)70158, Assistant Registrar (on
        such matters as research-related and consultancy contracts,
        industrial liaison, and publications);
      • Dr Richard Liwicki (telephone: (2)80499), Assistant Registrar;
      • Mr Pierre Espinasse (telephone: (2)70043, Administrative Officer
        (on questions relating to externally funded research grants, European
        liaison, and EC contracts);
      • Dr Chris Norris (telephone: (2)70011), Administrative Officer
        and Assistant to the Director;
      • Mr Gavin Plumpton (telephone: (2)80319), Administrative Officer.

      Enquiries concerning day-to-day processing of research
      applications should be addressed to Room 330 (the Research Grants
      Office), Research Services Office (telephone: (2)70146).

      General enquiries may be addressed in the first instance to the
      Director's Personal Assistant, Ms J. Vicary (telephone: (2)70143),
      who will be pleased to direct calls to the appropriate member of
      staff.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Administrative procedures in respect of
      externally sponsored research

      Members of the University are reminded that it is a requirement of
      the General Board that all applications for externally funded support
      must be endorsed on behalf of the University through the Research
      Services Office before they are dispatched to the sponsor, whether or
      not this is required by the funding body. (This includes, for
      example, bodies such as the Leverhulme Trust, and other charities and
      EC programmes which do not specifically ask for administrative
      authorisation.)

      The reason for the requirement is twofold: namely (i) to ensure
      that the funds being requested are adequate for the purpose and the
      costing rules of the funding body have been applied correctly, and
      (ii) to ensure that the University would be in a position to
      undertake the obligations arising from an award and that these do not
      contravene University policy.

      The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for
      research grants should submit their applications, together with a
      completed copy of the University's outside grant form (OG12), to Room
      330, Research Services Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
      telephone (2)70146—leaving three clear working days for them to
      be processed.

      In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature of
      contracts it should be noted that Statutes, Tit. X, cl. 2, provides
      that `no official of the University or any other person employed by
      the University or working in or in connection with any department of
      or under the control of the University shall in connection with any
      invention, discovery, or patent, or ... process, or manufacture have
      authority to make any representations on behalf of the University or
      to enter into any contract on behalf of the University or to be
      concerned in any transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on
      behalf of the University except with the express consent of Council'.

      The relevant officials in the Research Services Office have
      been given authority to approve applications for external funds in
      support of research and the terms of contracts in straightforward
      cases under this provision: in more complicated cases, specific
      authority is necessary.

      Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored
      research should be directed to the Research Services Office, whose
      staff would be pleased to help.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Leverhulme Trust

      1996 Leverhulme Special Research Fellowships

      The Leverhulme Trustees launched a new category of Special
      Fellowships in 1993 to be offered in each of three successive years
      starting in 1994. Approximately ten appointments are available
      tenable from the beginning of the 1996–7 academic year. The
      awards are intended to provide opportunities for researchers with a
      proven record of research who do not hold and have not held a
      full-time established academic post in a UK university or comparable
      institution. The fellowships are tenable for twenty-four months and
      must be taken up between the beginning of the 1996–7 academic
      year and 1 May 1997.

      Applicants must normally be under thirty-five years of age at the
      time of taking up the award and must hold a doctorate or have
      equivalent research experience. However, exceptionally applications
      from those over thirty-five years of age will be considered, if a
      strong case can be made. The awards are not available to those who at
      the time of starting the appointment are registered or intending to
      register for, reading or waiting to have work examined for degrees or
      equivalent awards, including higher degrees and doctorates,
      professional or vocational qualifications. The fellowships are open
      only to residents of the United Kingdom who have been educated in the
      United Kingdom or some other part of the Common-wealth for at least
      two years at secondary school and first degree level.

      Applications will be considered in all subject areas. The
      fellowships are tenable in any UK university or other institution of
      higher education. Special Research Fellows will be expected to
      undertake a significant piece of publishable research during the
      tenure of the award. A limited amount of teaching will be permitted
      (normally about three hours per week in term time).

      At the time of the application it is not necessary for the applicant
      to know where he or she wishes to hold the award. However, if this is
      known the institution is not required to provide confirmation of its
      willingness to receive the applicant at this stage. This, together
      with details of the facilities to be provided, will be requested when
      the Special Research Fellows are selected and they have indicated
      where they would like to hold their awards.

      Special Research Fellows will be paid at a point on the national
      salary scale for academic staff based on age and experience and each
      case will be judged according to its merits. The scheme is based on a
      `pound for pound' system whereby the Leverhulme Trust will contribute
      up to 50 per cent of the total salary costs (including National
      Insurance, superannuation, and London allowance, where appropriate)
      up to an annual maximum of £13,500, and the institution where
      the award is held will contribute the balance. For this reason,
      departments or faculty boards are required to confirm the
      availability of matching funds before proposals are passed for
      approval on behalf of the University. The Leverhulme Trust cannot
      contribute to institutional overheads or incidental research expenses
      for the award holder.

      Application details are available from the address below upon written
      request only. All requests for application details must be
      accompanied by an A4 size addressed envelope, appropriately stamped
      for 100 grams for each set of details and no request for application
      details will be handled after Friday, 8 March. Completed application
      forms plus one photocopy must be in the hands of the Secretary by
      Friday, 15 March and will not be considered if arriving after this
      date. Applications made by fax cannot be accepted.

      Application details are available from the Secretary, Research Awards
      Advisory Committee, the Leverhulme Trust, 15–19 New Fetter lane,
      London EC4A 1NR.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      OTHER GRANTS


      Board of Management of the Pirie-Reid Fund

      Pirie-Reid Scholarship

      Applications are invited for a Pirie-Reid Scholarship tenable at the
      University of Oxford by graduates (including persons expecting to
      graduate in 1996) who intend in October 1996 to commence working for
      a degree or diploma.

      Preference will be given to candidates applying from other
      universities, i.e. not already matriculated at Oxford, and to those
      domiciled or educated in Scotland. Candidates not fulfilling these
      criteria are unlikely to be successful.

      The scholarship, which is to to be awarded to a person wishing to
      begin a course of study at Oxford who would otherwise be prevented by
      lack of funds will cover university and college fees and provide a
      grant for maintenance, subject to assessment of other sources of
      income (maintenance grants for 1995–6 are £1,885 for
      undergraduates and £5,260 for postgraduates). It will be
      renewable from year to year, subject to satisfactory progress and
      continuance of approved full-time study.

      Candidates for the Pirie-Reid Scholarship are expected to have
      applied for admission to the University in the usual way.

      Application forms may be obtained from Mrs J. Brown, University
      Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

      The closing date for applications is 1 May.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Segal Fund

      An award will be made annually to a graduate student preparing for
      submission to the University of a doctoral thesis in Hebrew or Jewish
      Studies. The award is likely to be in the region of
      £200–£400. Applications, which should include a
      statement of the project for which the grant is requested and the
      name of the applicant's supervisor, should be sent to the Secretary,
      the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, Oriental Institute,
      Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, no later than Monday, 18 March.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Association of Rhodes Scholars in Australia
      Scholarship

      Applications are invited from students enrolled in a higher research
      degree programme at an overseas Commonwealth university for the
      Association of Rhodes Scholars in Australia Scholarship. The
      scholarship will enable the successful applicant to spend a period of
      at least six months during the 1996–7 academic year at an
      Australian university to undertake research towards his/her higher
      degree. Applicants must be Commonwealth citizens and may not be
      graduates of an Australian or New Zealand university. The value of
      the award is A$9,000. Application forms may be obtained from the
      International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford
      OX1 2JD, or direct from the Secretary, Association of Rhodes Scholars
      in Australia Scholarship Committee, Office of the Deputy Vice-
      Chancellor, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052,
      Australia. The closing date for applications is 1 May.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Royal Thai Government Scholarships

      The Royal Thai Government is offering a number of scholarships to
      Thai students who are studying or have been accepted to study at a UK
      university in 1996–7. Two scholarships are available for
      students of computer science, one for a student of law, one for a
      student of economics, and one for a student of business
      administration. Applicants must be citizens of Thailand, under thirty
      years of age on 29 February 1996, and have no commitment to any
      scholarship donor. Upon completion of the studies the scholarship
      recipients are required to work for the Revenue Department of the
      Royal Thai Government for a minimum service of twice the length of
      the study undertaken under the scholarship programme. Further details
      and application material are available from the International Office,
      University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. The deadline
      for applications is 29 February.

      Return to List of Contents of this section






      <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: Examinations and<br /> Boards<br />

      Examinations and Boards


      Contents of this section:

      [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
      published or recurrent entry.]

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

      With the approval of the General Board, the following
      appointments and reappointments have been made and titles
      conferred for the periods stated.

      1 Appointments

      CHARLES SIMONYI READER IN THE PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING OF

      SCIENCE

      Biological Sciences/Continuing Education

      C. RICHARD DAWKINS, ma, d.phil., d.sc., Fellow of New College.
      From
      1 October 1995 until the retiring age.

      READER IN MUSIC

      Music

      PETER R. FRANKLIN (ba, d.phil. York), Fellow-elect of St
      Catherine's.

      From 1 April 1996 until the retiring age.

      UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

      Biological Sciences

      LYNNE S. COX (ma, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of Oriel. In
      Biochemistry. From 14 January 1996 until 13 January 2001.

      SEAN NEE (ba Toronto, ma Western Ontario, d.phil. Sussex),
      Fellow
      of Lady Margaret Hall. In Zoology (Ecology). From 1 October 1995
      until 30 September 2000.

      Committee for the School of Management Studies

      RICHARD C. WHITTINGTON (mba Aston, ph.d. Manchester),
      Fellow-elect
      of New College. In Management Studies (Strategic Management).
      From 1 April 1996 until 31 March 2001.

      Music

      NICHOLAS J. MARSTON (ma, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of St
      Peter's. In
      Music. From 1 October 1995 until 30 September 2000.

      Physical Sciences

      JAN T. CZERNUSZKA (b.sc. London, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of
      Trinity. From 1 January 1996 until 31 December 2000.

      PATRICK G.J. IRWIN, ma, d.phil., Fellow of St Anne's. In
      Physics.
      From 1 January 1996 until 31 December 2000.

      SIMON H. LAMB (BA, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of St Anne's.
      In
      Structural Geology and Tectonics. From 1 March 1996 until 28
      February 2001.

      J. ALISON NOBLE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel. In Engineering
      Science. From1 January 1996 until 31 December 2000.

      DOMINIC C. O'BRIEN (BA, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of Balliol.
      In
      Engineering Science. From 7 November 1995 until 6 November 2000.

      PATRICK F. ROCHE, ma status (b.sc. London, ph.d. UCL), Fellow
      of
      Hertford. In Physics. From 1 March 1996 until 28 February 2001.

      UNIVERSITY LECTURER (fixed-term)

      Mathematical Sciences/Continuing Education

      JAMES W.M. DAVIES, ma, Fellow of Kellogg. In Computation and
      Continuing Education. From 1 September 1995 until 31 August
      1998.

      JUNIOR LECTURERS

      Anthropology and Geography

      ABIGAIL MUNSON (b.sc. LSE). In Human Geography. From 9 October
      1995 until 8 October 1996.

      Literae Humaniores

      MAURICIO SUÁREZ (B.SC. EDINBURGH, m.sc., ph.d. LSE). In
      the
      Philosophy of Physics. From 1 October 1995 until 30 September
      1996.

      HEBREW CENTRE LECTURER

      Theology

      NORMAN SOLOMON (b.mus. London, ma Cambridge, ph.d. Manchester),
      Hebrew Centre Fellow in Modern Jewish Thought. In Theology.
      From 2 November 1995 until 30 September 1998.

      The following holders of the title of University Lecturer (CUF)
      have been appointed to the substantive posts:

      Law

      WILLIAM E. PEEL, ma, Fellow of Keble. In Law. From 1 October
      1995
      until 30 September 1999.

      Literae Humaniores

      ALISON E. DENHAM, ma status, d.phil. (ba Berkeley), Fellow of
      St
      Anne's. In Philosophy. From 1 October 1996 until 30 September
      2000.

      Return to List of Contents of this
      section


      2 Reappointments

      UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

      (From 1 October 1996 until the retiring age unless otherwise
      stated)

      Anthropology and Geography

      PATRICIA O. DALEY, ma, d.phil. (ba CNAA, ma London), Fellow of
      Jesus College. In Human Geography. From 1 September 1996 until
      the retiring age.

      Oriental Studies

      JAMES W. ALLAN, ma, d.phil., Keeper of Eastern Art and Fellow
      of St
      Cross. In Islamic Art (part-time). From 1 October 1996 until 30
      September 2001.

      EUGENE L. ROGAN, ma (ba Columbia, ma, ph.d. Harvard), Fellow of
      St
      Antony's. In the Modern History of the Middle East. From 1
      August 1996 until the retiring age.

      Physical Sciences

      COLIN D. BAIN, ma (ma Cambridge, ph.d. Harvard), Fellow of
      Magdalen. In Physical Chemistry.

      ANDREW T. BOOTHROYD, ma (ba, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of Oriel.
      In
      Physics.

      JOHN T. CHALKER, ma, d.phil., Fellow of St Hugh's. In Physics.

      CHRISTOPHER J. FOOT, ma, d.phil., Fellow of St Peter's. In
      Physics.
      THOMAS MULLIN, ma (ph.d. Edinburgh), Fellow of Linacre. In
      Physics.

      PETER L. READ, ma (b.sc. Birmingham, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow
      of
      Trinity. In Physics.

      ADRIAN P. SUTTON, ma (ba, m.sc., ph.d. Pennsylvania), Fellow of
      Linacre. In Materials Science.

      Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

      BRIAN D. CATLING, ma (ma Royal College of Art), Fellow of
      Linacre.
      In Fine Art.

      Social Studies

      CHRISTOPHER M. DAVIS, ma, d.phil. (ba Harvard, msa George
      Washington, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of Wolfson. In Russian and
      East European Political Economy.

      MICHAEL W.J. NOBLE, ma, Fellow of Green College. In Applied
      Social
      Studies (Social Work). From 1 September 1996 until the retiring
      age.

      UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

      (From 1 October 1996 until the retiring age unless otherwise
      stated)

      English

      JERI L. JOHNSON, ma, m.phil. (ba Brigham Young), Fellow of
      Exeter.
      In English

      CRAIG A. RAINE, ma, Fellow of New College. In English.

      NIGEL S. SMITH, ma, d.phil. (ba Hull, ma McGill), Fellow of
      Keble. In
      English.

      Literae Humaniores

      ROGER S. CRISP, b.phil., ma, d.phil., Fellow of St Anne's. In
      Philosophy.

      INSTRUCTORS

      (From 1 October 1996 until 30 September 1999.)

      Modern Languages

      MARIA L. ITURRI, ma status. In Spanish.

      PHILLIPE LAPLACE. In French.

      HEBREW CENTRE LECTURER


      JONATHAN M. WEBBER, ma status, d.phil. (ba London). In Social
      Anthropology. From 1 April 1996 until 31 March 2001.

      3 Change of title of post

      Management Studies

      The title of the post of University Lecturer in Management
      Studies (Corporate Strategy) held by DAVID FAULKNER, ma, d.phil.

      (b.sc. London), Student of Christ Church, has been changed to
      that of University Lecturer in Management Studies

      (Strategic
      Management).

      4 Appointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical
      Medicine

      UNIVERSITY LECTURER (MEDICAL) (part-time)

      RONALD A. HOPE, bm, ma (ph.d. London), m.r.c.psych., Fellow of
      St
      Cross. In Practice Skills. From 1 October 1995 until 30 September
      2000.

      UNIVERSITY LECTURER (NON-MEDICAL)

      HELEN J. MARDON, d.phil. (b.sc. Sussex), Fellow of St
      Catherine's. In
      Obstetrics and Gynaecology. From 1 October 1995 until 30
      September 2000.

      CLINICAL LECTURERS

      CRISPIN H. DAVIES (b.sc., mb, bs London), mrcp. In
      Cardiovascular
      Medicine. From 1 September 1995 until 31 August 1998.

      TUTORS IN GENERAL PRACTICE (part-time)

      MARTIN FLEMINGER (mb, bs London), drcog, mrcgp. From 1 January
      1996 until 31 December 1998.

      ROBERT T. WALTON (b.sc., mb, bs London), mrcp, mrcgp. From 1
      December 1995 until 30 November 1998.

      5 Reappointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical
      Medicine

      CLINICAL LECTURERS

      E.C. CROWNE, ma status (b.sc., mb, ch.b. Manchester). In
      Paediatrics. From 17 January 1996 until 16 January 1997.
      J. FAWCETT, ma status (mb, bs, b.med.sci. Newcastle). In
      Surgery.
      From 1 January 1996 until 31 December 1998.

      S.J. HOWELL, ma status (mb, bs London, ma Cambridge). In
      Anaesthetics. From 1 April 1996 until 31 March 2000.

      JOHN J. O'LEARY (md University of Ireland). In Pathology and
      Bacteriology. From 1 April 1996 until 31 March 1997.

      C.M. TANG, ma status (mb, ch.b. Liverpool). In Clinical
      Medicine.
      From 1 March 1996 until 28 February 1997.

      R&D LECTURERS IN GENERAL PRACTICE (part-time)

      MARTIN G. DAWES, ma status (md London), drcog, mrcgp. From 1
      October 1995 until 30 September 1998.

      THEO P.C. SCHOFIELD, bm, ma, mrcp, frcgp. From 1 October 1995
      until 30 September 1997.

      TUTORS IN GENERAL PRACTICE (part-time)

      (From 1 December 1995 unitl 30 November 2000)

      R.A. BRIGGS, bm, ma, mrcgp, drcog.

      PETER D. BURKE, ma status (mb, b.ch., bao Dublin) mrcpi, mrcgp.

      GORDON GANCZ, bm, ma, mrcog.
      anthony r. harnden, ma status (mb, B.Ch. Birmingham) mrcgp,
      mrcp.

      RICHARD V.M. HARRINGTON, ma status (ba Exeter, mb bs London)
      mrcgp.

      KULWANT S. PANDHER, ma status (mb, ch.b. Liverpool) mrcog,
      mrcgp.

      6 Conferment of title by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical

      Medicine

      HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS

      (From 1 December 1995 until 30 November 1998 unless
      otherwise
      stated)

      E. CLAIRE BURNS (md Dublin), mrcp. In Paediatrics.

      CHRISTOPHER P. CONLON, ba (md London) mrcp. In Infectious and
      Tropical Diseases.

      OLIVER J. DYAR (mb, b.ch., bao National University of Ireland),
      mrcpi, frca. In Anaesthetics.

      RHYS D. EVANS, d.phil. (md London), ffarcs. In Anaesthetics.

      N. KEVIN IVES, ma status (ma, md Cambridge), mrcp. In
      Paediatrics.

      MICHAEL A. MCSHANE (mb, b.ch. Belfast), mrcp. In Paediatrics.

      DAVID G. MASON (mb, bs London), ffarcs. In Anaesthetics.

      LAWRENCE M. MYNORS-WALLIS, ma, dm, mrcp. In Psychiatry. From 1
      January 1996 until 31 December 1998.

      MICHAEL G. PIKE, ma (md London), mrcp. In Paediatrics.

      Return to List of Contents of this
      section



      BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
      SCIENCES

      HONOUR SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 1997

      The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved
      the following papers for examination in Section 0 of the Honour
      School of Mathematical Sciences 1997 (see Examination
      Decrees
      , 1995, p. 310, regulation 3(e)).

      [Note: Papers 01 to 08 were listed in the 12 October
      1995 issue of the University Gazette, pp.
      198–9.]

      Paper 09: Astronomy (as for subject 9 of the
      Preliminary Examination in Physical Sciences). Candidates will
      not be required to undertake any practical work associated with
      this subject.

      Paper 010: Mathematics and Finance

      I Mathematical Models in Finance

      Introduction to markets, assets, interest rates and present
      value; arbitrage and the law of one price; European call and
      options, payoff diagrams; other option strategies; Wiener
      processes as models for asset price movements; informal treatment
      of Ito's lemma; hedging and the Black-Scholes analysis, leading
      to the Black-Scholes partial differential equation for a
      derivative price—reduction to the heat equation; review of
      theory for the heat equation, explicit solution for call and put
      options; extensions to dividends paid on the asset, time-varying
      parameters; forward and future contacts, options on them;
      American options as free boundary problems and linear
      complementarity problems; weakly path-dependent options including
      lookbacks and asians.

      II Finance

      Investment appraisal under conditions of certainty/ uncertainty;
      portfolio theory and capital asset pricing model; sources of
      finance, debt capacity, dividends and cost of capital; financial
      market efficiency; emerging issues in finance; takeovers and
      mergers.

      Paper 011: Mathematical Modelling and Applications

      I Introduction to Mathematical Modelling

      The aim of the course is to develop and extend some of the
      theoretical ideas developed in the mainstream mathematics course
      and to show how they can be applied in simple modelling
      situation. The methods and models will be fully integrated so
      that each technique will be illustrated with at least one
      application. Methods to be covered: Modelling,
      nondimensionalisation, dimensional analysis, similarity
      solutions. Asymptotic methods of solution for ordinary
      differential equations, regular and singular expansions,
      bifurcations, stability. First order quasi-linear partial
      differential equations, travelling wave solutions, shocks.
      Classification of second-order quasi-linear partial differential
      equations, well-posedness, linear and nonlinear diffusion
      equations, travelling waves, solutions with compact support,
      moving boundary problems.

      II

      either Mathematics and the Environment

      Applications of mathematics to environment problems involving the
      use of models with ordinary differential equations, first order
      partial differential equations, and nonlinear diffusion
      equations. Examples to be considered will be taken from the
      following: (i) river flow; (ii) climate dynamics and ice ages;
      (iii) geomagnetic reversals of the earth's magnetic field; (iv)
      soil consolidation and groundwater flow; (v) snow melt run-off;
      (vi) surging ice sheets; (vii) glacier outburst flood
      (jökulhlaups).

      or Mathematics in Materials Science

      Mechanics Simple models for elastic and plastic
      materials, rods and plates, elastic waves, dislocations, yield
      criterion (linar and nonlinear p.d.e.'s, tensors, complex
      variables).

      Phase Changes Basic ideas about free energy and order
      parameters. Melting and solidification of pure materials and
      alloys, simple Stefan problems, solid/solid phase transformations
      (ordinary and partial d.e.'s, asymptotics, calculus of
      variations, stability).

      Electromagnetic Properties Simple models for
      semiconductivity and superconducting devices, p-n junctions, type
      I and type II superconductors, vortices, critical-state models.

      Return to List of Contents of this
      section



      DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LETTERS

      The Board of the Faculty of English has granted leave to E. SHANNON,
      Merton, to supplicate for the Degree of doctor of Letters.

      A list
      of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available at the
      University Offices.


      EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
      PHILOSOPHY

      The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
      or oral examination of their candidates as follows:

      Anthropology and Geography

      P. SLOANE, St Antony's: `Goodworks and networks. Islam, modernity,
      and entrepreneurship among the Malays'.

      London School of Economics, Thursday, 25 January, 3 p.m.

      Examiners: J. Davies, K. Hart.

      Biological Sciences

      P. IRVING, St Catherine's: `The functional and evolutionary
      significance of Schreckstoff in natural communities of fish'.

      Department of Zoology, Friday, 23 February, 10 a.m.

      Examiners: N. Metcalfe, M.E. Dawkins.

      A.L. SANDERSON, Queen's: `Regulation of skeletal muscle
      metabolism'.

      Green College, Friday, 26 January, 10 a.m.

      Examiners: M.C. Sugden, G.F. Gibbons.

      Medieval and Modern Languages

      E.E. GREENWOOD, New College: `J.-K. Huysmans and the will to
      failure'.

      Taylor Institution, Friday, 9 February, 2.15 p.m.

      Examiners: R. Griffiths, C.F. Robinson.

      Modern History

      J.P. LAITY, Balliol: `The British peace movement 1896–1916:
      ideas and dilemmas'.

      Examination Schools, Friday, 26 January, 9.30 a.m.

      Examiners: J.H. Davis, K.G. Robbins.

      Physical Sciences

      S.R. LANGFORD, Jesus: `State to state photodissociation
      dynamics'.

      Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 23 January,
      2.15 p.m.

      Examiners: G. Hancock, R.N. Dixon.

      M.J. PORTER, Merton: `Mechanistic investigations into penicillin
      biosynthesis'.

      Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Tuesday, 23 January, 2 p.m.

      Examiners: S.M. Roberts, G.H. Whitham.

      N. REA, Green College: `Interference and laser feedback optical
      microscopy'.

      Department of Engineering Science, Tuesday, 23 January, 2.30 p.m.


      Examiners: G. Parry, M.C. Hutley.

      Physiological Sciences

      R.E. MACLAREN, Merton: `Optic nerve regeneration'.

      Department of Physiology, Monday, 29 January, 2.30 p.m.

      Examiners: R.D. Lund, M.C. Brown.

      N.A. REID, Wolfson: `Molecular and cellular studies on placental
      glucose transport'.

      University Laboratory of Physiology, Monday, 22 January, 2 p.m.

      Examiners: A.C. Hall, G.D. Holman.

      Social Studies

      D.F. KOOHI-KAMALI, St Antony's: `Economic and social bases of Kurdish
      nationalism in Iran'.

      St Antony's (68 Woodstock Road), Monday, 22 January, 11 a.m.

      Examiners: D. Hopwood, E. Abrahamian.

      Theology

      A.J. GODDARD, St John's: `The life and thought of Jacuqes Ellul with
      special reference to his writings on law, violence, the State, and
      politics'.

      Examination Schools, Friday, 8 March, 2 p.m.

      Examiners: G. Vahanian, T. Gorringe.

      Return to List of Contents of this
      section



      EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
      LETTERS

      The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
      of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

      English Language and Literature

      C. THORNTON, Somerville: `D.H. Lawrence's Italian travel books'.

      Worcester, Thursday, 15 February, 2 p.m.

      Examiners: J.D. Bradshaw, S. Matterson.

      Literae Humaniores

      S. BARBER, Balliol: `Persons: the Strawsonian tradition'.

      Balliol, Wednesday, 7 February, 2.30 p.m.

      Examiners: H.C. Steward, C. Janaway.

      Return to List of Contents of this
      section






      <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: Colleges, Halls, and<br /> Societies<br />

      Colleges, Halls, and Societies


      Contents of this section:

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      OBITUARIES


      Brasenose College

      REGINALD JOSEPH MITCHELL, MA, 21 November 1995; scholar 1929–33.
      Aged 85.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Corpus Christi College

      PETER MAURICE COOKE, 14 July 1995; commoner 1949–51. Aged 68.

      DAVID ERIC HOLT, MA, D.PHIL., 1 July 1995; exhibitioner 1970–6.
      Aged 44.

      JOHN MONTGOMERIE, 21 July 1995; Haigh Scholar 1930–4. Aged 83.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Hertford College

      ARTHUR COLLIS-JONES, 5 November 1995; exhibitioner 1926.

      PROFESSOR GROVER JEREMIAH CRONIN, 11 October 1995; commoner 1935.

      FRANCIS DUDLEY DOWSETT, 5 November 1995; commoner 1927.

      JAMES EDWARD HOLT, 22 September 1995; commone 1947.

      DENIS GORDON JOHNSON, CBE, 24 October 1995; commoner 1930.

      PROFESSOR JAMES EDWARD MEADE, CB, HON. D.LITT., FBA, 22 December
      1995; Fellow 1930–7, Honorary Fellow; a Vice-President of the
      Hertford Society. Aged 88.

      KENNETH STRAHAN WATT, MBE, 14 November 1995; commoner 1928.

      LESLEY PERCIVAL WHATLEY, 8 November 1995; commoner 1928.

      ALFRED ARDEN WOOD, CBE, TD, 8 December 1995; commoner 1944. Aged
      69.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Pembroke College

      ROBERT FRANCIS VERE HEUSTON, MA, DCL (MA, LL.B. Dublin), FBA, QC
      (NI), 21 December 1995; Fellow and Tutor in Law 1947–65, Dean
      1951–7, Supernumerary Fellow 1965–82, Honorary Fellow
      1982–95; Regius Professor of Laws, Trinity College, Dublin,
      1970–83. Aged 72.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      St Hilda's College

      CECILIA LUCY WALHOUSE TOMPSON, BA, October 1995; commoner
      1919–22.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Somerville College

      CATHERINE BEESTON, 26 November 1995; commoner 1992–5, St Cross
      College 1994–5. Aged 40.

      ANNA KELHAM (née Crichton), MA, 21 October 1995;
      commoner 1925–8. Aged 89.

      SUSAN DAVIDSON KELLY (née Willsher), MA, 23 November
      1995; commoner. Aged 54.

      MARY LASCELLES, MA, 10 December 1995; Fellow in English 1932, Vice-
      Principal 1947. Aged 95.

      MARGARET LEAN (née Appleyard), MA, June 1995;
      commoner 1930–3. Aged 85.

      MARY WALDEGRAVE (née Grenfell), 13 November 1995;
      scholar 1928–30. Aged 87.

      Return to List of Contents of this section


      MEMORIAL MEETING


      New College

      A Memorial Meeting for PROFESSOR SIR RUDOLF PEIERLS will be held at
      2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 20 January, in the Sheldonian Theatre.



      ELECTIONS


      Christ Church

      To Lecturerships in French (from 1 January 1996):

      ANTONELLA LIPSCOMB, M.STUD.

      W.S. MCMORRAN, M.PHIL.

      To a Lecturership in Mathematics (from 1 January 1996):

      I.S.
      STARES, D.PHIL.

      To a Lecturership in Spanish (from 1 January 1996):

      P.J.R.
      WHICKER, M.PHIL.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Nuffield College

      To Visiting Fellowships (from 1 October 1995):

      TIM HOLT (B.SC., PH.D. Exeter), Director, the Central Statistical
      Office

      WILL HUTTON (B.SOC.SCI. Bristol, MBA Fontainebleau), Economics
      Editor, The Guardian

      TESSA JOWELL (MA Aberdeen, DSA Edinburgh), Labour Member of
      Parliament for Dulwich

      To a Visiting Fellowship (from 1 October 1996):

      SHEILA
      MCKECHNIE (MA Edinburgh, MA Warwick), Director, the Consumers'
      Association

      To Associate Membership:

      HANS-MARTIN KROLZIG (BA Bochum, MA Bielefeld), Institute of Economics
      and Statistics

      MAIRE NI BHROLCHAIN (BA, M.SC. Dublin, PH.D. Southampton)

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Worcester College

      To a Supernumerary Fellowship in Physics (with effect from 1
      January 1996):

      HELEN S. MARGOLIS, MA, D.PHIL.

      Return to List of Contents of this section






      <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 January 1996: Advertisements<br />

      Advertisements


      Contents of this section:



      How to advertise in the
      Gazette


      Terms and
      conditions of acceptance of advertisements

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      Book Fair

      Oxford Book Fair: Randolph Hotel, 2 Feb., 2–7
      p.m. (note: new opening time), and 3 Feb., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
      Thousands of fine antiquarian, second-hand, and out-of-print books
      for sale by PBFA booksellers from all over Britain.
      Catalogue/admission £1.


      Royal Shakespeare Company

      The RSC's Oxford office is organising a return coach
      trip on Monday, 12 Feb., to the Barbican Theatre to Les Enfants
      du Paradis
      , directed by Simon Callow and starring Rupert
      Graves. Each £15.50 ticket includes a free upgrade to a best
      stalls seat—a £14 saving on normal RSC ticket prices.
      Coaches depart for London from St Giles' at 4.45 p.m. Tel. RSC Oxford
      for bookings: Oxford 511434.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Tuition Sought

      Tuition required for GCSE student in German,
      mathematics, and science. Contact Dr W.D. Macmillan. Tel.: Oxford
      (2)70097.

      Maths and physics tutor required for A-level student
      at an Oxford comprehensive school. Prefer female graduate mathematics
      student with an interest in computer art or graphics. One or two
      hours per week. £10 per hour. Tel./fax: Oxford 725770 or 310714;
      e-mail: owerd@werd.demon.co.uk.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Services Offered

      Tax advice and accountancy. We specialise in
      assisting academics and other professionals with all tax and
      accounting matters. Fast, personal service at competitive rates.
      Contact Dr Charles McCreery. Tassano & Co., 118 Banbury Road, Oxford.
      Tel.: Oxford 513381.

      Jeanne Bliss, garden designer for special events.
      Doorways. Colourful courtyards. Roof gardens and space between
      buildings. A 2-hour initial visit: £30. Rewley House gardener
      1985–90. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

      Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press---the University
      Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material,
      typesetting, printing, and finishing; Output Bureau provides
      high-quality output from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper,
      bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film; high-quality
      specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and
      competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press,
      Walton Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

      Book-search service: any author, title, on any
      subject—searched for all over the UK—no fee, no obligation
      to buy when book found. Send details, basic or precise, of wanted
      books with s.a.e.—wait 2–6 weeks to be contacted with
      offers or report. Fast and easy way to find books you have wanted for
      years. S.E. Owen Booksearch, 4 Cotswold Crescent, Old Marston, Oxford
      OX3 0SG.

      Display cabinets made to any design—for objects
      from half an inch to half a ton. Some cabinets also available to hire
      for exhibitions and open days. In addition we sell a wide range of
      individual display stands and can custom-make any item to your
      requirements. Please phone for our brochure. Dauphin Display
      (Oxford) Ltd. Tel.: Oxford 343542.

      Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery,
      orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at
      competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free
      quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Domestic Services

      Children's day nursery. St Paul's Nursery
      (Somerville College, 119a Walton Street, Oxford) offers two pre-
      school places for children aged 2–5 within a twelve-place
      nursery, set in a homely environment. For more information, contact
      Clare Phizacklea. Tel.: 01543 416616.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Situations Vacant

      Hadrian's Wall Walk—administrator. The
      University is organising a guided walk for its alumni, with
      accompanying archaeologist, from Carlisle to Newcastle, in the period
      15–20 Apr. The Walk Director requires an Administrator/Leader.
      The person selected will work in the University Alumni Office in
      Magdalen Street, Oxford, for two half-days per week from Jan. to
      mid-Apr. and, along with the Director and local helpers, will lead
      the Walk and co-ordinate day-to-day administration (must be available
      13–20 Apr. inclusive). A payment of around £300 will be
      made for the office work; free transport, board and lodging is
      offered for the Walk. Contact Mr Rodney Buckton, Alumni Officer.
      Tel.: Oxford (2)78105, fax: (2)78180.

      OUP is seeking freelances to undertake the clearing
      of permission fees for several edited volumes in the humanities:
      writing to publishers for permission to publish articles, chasing
      outstanding applications, and writing acknowledgements copy.
      Freelances needed for nine-month stints. For further information,
      contact Rebecca Hunt. Tel.: Oxford 56767, e-mail: huntr@oup.co.uk.

      Caretaker/chef: post available 1 April (no joke).
      Two-bed cottage. Previous services experience an advantage.
      Applications to the Administrative Officer, OUOTC, Manor Road, Oxford
      OX1 3UQ. Tel.: Oxford 242488.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Houses to Let

      Furnished centrally-heated 3-bedroom family house to
      let in Kidlington. Recently redecorated and in good condition.
      Conveniently situated and on direct bus route to Oxford. Includes
      garage, garden, and off-road parking. £625 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
      373596 (after 5 p.m.).

      Charming cottage on edge of village 15 miles north-
      west of Oxford. Double bedroom plus spare bedroom/study. Furnished
      and equipped to a very high standard. Beams, inglenook fire. South-
      facing. Very private walled patio garden. Suit caring non-smoking
      couple. Available from Apr. Tel.: 01608 684700.

      Attractive Victorian cottage to let for approx. 8
      weeks, mid-Feb.–Apr. (dates negotiable); 1 double, 1 single
      bedroom, large sitting/dining-room, c.h., parking space. Overlooking
      Wolvercote Green and Oxford Canal—country atmosphere but on city
      bus route. Tel.: Oxford 57791.

      Spacious Edwardian house, 4 bedrooms, fully
      furnished, at top of Divinity Road, one minute from South Park and
      good bus service, available for a.y. Aug. 1996– Aug. 1997; 2
      reception rooms with original fireplaces, dining-room, fitted kitchen
      with washing-machine, drier, dish-washer, fridge-freezer; garden;
      friendly neighbourhood. Suitable for academic family. £700 p.m.
      plus council tax. R.N. Gildea. Tel.: Oxford 240965, fax: 276361.

      Well-maintained 3-bedroom family house to let, with
      all modern facilities, garden, conservatory, and parking spaces, in
      quiet residential area of Kidlington, near bus-stop. Suitable for
      professional family. £450 p.c.m. Available from 1 Mar. Contact
      Dr Guo. Tel.: 0171-975 5569 (day), or Oxford 378245 (evenings).

      Detached house available appox. end Jan. for 2
      months, adjacent park in village 8 miles north of Oxford, on bus
      route; fully furnished and equipped to high standard, so regret no
      smokers/young children/pets. Ideal for overseas visitors. Tel./fax:
      01869 350109.

      At Finders Keepers each and every caller receive a
      personal service—fast, experienced, and efficient; for overseas
      applicants we offer a Priority Reservation System to ensure a
      suitable property is ready for arrival—meeting individual needs
      is our speciality. Try us first. Call, write, or e-mail for further
      information. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE
      (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; also
      27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 20844, e-mail:
      stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet site:
      http://www.oxlink.co.uk/business/finders.html.

      Detached large North Oxford house—central North
      Oxford, near University Parks. Available July, Aug., Sept. Seven
      bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and shower, 3 living-rooms, etc.; large garden;
      fully equipped for academic home. Suit sabbatical family; fax,
      bicycles, and all mod. cons. £1,000 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
      58743.

      Converted 16th-c. dairy in centre of pretty village
      (Church Hanborough), 7 miles from Oxford: 4 bedrooms, study, utility
      room with washer/drier, gas c.h. plus wood-burning stove; walled
      garden; parking; fully furnished; on bus service, near Cotswold rail
      line. Tel.: 01993 882065 or Oxford 310000 (Mrs Hurst).

      Desirable furnished mill house cottage to let, in
      pleasant village near Woodstock; bathroom, 2 bedrooms, large sitting-
      room, well-equipped kitchen, garden, garage. £500 p.m. Available
      end of Feb. Tel.: 01993 811351.

      Fully-furnished house, Margaret Road, Headington;
      easy reach of main hospitals, Brookes University, schools, and parks;
      3 bedrooms, 2 reception, well-equipped kitchen, bathroom, 2 w.c.s, 2
      telephones, c.h., off-street parking. Suit 3 singles or academic
      family. Long let available now. £760 p.c.m. (includes regular
      gardening). Tel.: Oxford 751237.

      An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
      saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer
      but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the
      surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of
      Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to
      academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
      offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please
      telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do
      whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Flats to Let

      Attractive 2-bedroom furnished stable flat (building
      listed grade 2) in beautiful rural setting 10 miles from central
      Oxford; parking for 2 cars and close to main bus route. Available
      Jan. £725 p.m. (6 months min.). Tel.; 01844 339650.

      North Oxford : fully-furnished, well-appointed,
      first-floor 1-bedroom flat, with gas c.h.; comfortable, well-equipped
      kitchen, living-room, small study, bathroom (bath, shower), utility
      space with washing and drying machine; ideally suitable for couple.
      Conveniently located in Linton Road just off the Banbury Road, with
      use of spacious garden plus ample parking. Available mid-Feb.
      £575 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 514340.

      Elegant, light, airy, don's 2-bedroom, fully-
      furnished flat in quiet leafy street in North Oxford (Summertown),
      5–10 minutes from the city centre; pleasant garden; garage, if
      required; near library, shops, buses. Would suit academic
      person/couple. Available mid-Feb. for min. of 6 months. £580
      o.n.o. Tel.: 0171-389 2403 (day), or 0171-235 8251 (evenings).

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Offered

      Spacious house to share with owner, west Oxford
      (Botley), 20 minutes' walk from city centre; fully furnished, inc.
      dish-washer; 100-ft garden (private). Would suit postgrads/postdoc or
      technician. References required. £300 p.c.m. exc. telephone.
      Tel.: Oxford (2)72519 (day), or 247774 (evenings).

      Large bed-sit, share kitchen, Cotswold village
      convenient for station. References essential. Tel.: 01608 658 175.

      Two rooms to let in Summertown (Lonsdale Road), at
      £240 and £230 p.c.m., bills included; rent reduced for
      person who speaks Japanese or (Brazilian) Portuguese, or both,
      prepared to give
      two hours' tuition p.w. in Japanese or Portuguese. Self-catering, no
      smoking. Peter. Tel.: Oxford 510010 or 0171-836 5454, ext. 3796.

      North Oxford : short let or long stay. Independent
      male graduate to share quiet house facing Port Meadow. Car space.
      £46 p.w. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

      Bed-and-breakfast available in a warm, comfortable
      house in exclusive central North Oxford, within easy walking distance
      of all main university buildings and town centre; a stone's throw
      from parks, river, and several excellent restaurants. Colour TV and
      tea- and coffee-making facilities in all rooms; microwaves available.
      Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 57879.

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      Accommodation Sought

      Yale professor on sabbatical seeks large, well-
      appointed furnished family house near Oxford centre for year-long
      rental or exchange starting July. Washer/drier/dish-washer preferred.
      Tel.: 203 432 4932; fax: 203 432 1040.

      Non-smoking American academic and wife seek 2- or 3-
      bedroom home, furnished, in Oxford for the approximate period 15
      Mar.–15 Aug. Can provide Oxford references. Robert E. Krainer,
      1125 Oak Way, Madison, WI. 53705. Tel.: 608 238 5310 (h), or 608 263
      1253 (w); fax: 608 265 4195.

      If you are thinking of letting your property Finders
      Keepers will be delighted to meet you to discuss your
      requirements—without obligation—and to offer expert advice
      based on over 25 years' experience of the Oxford rental market. Call,
      write, or e-mail for further information. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73
      Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-
      mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ
      (tel.: 200012, fax: 20844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk);
      Internet site: http://www.oxlink.co.uk/business/finders.html.

      Visiting professor and family desire to let a 4-
      bedroom furnished home for the period Apr.–July. Starting and
      end dates flexible. Contact David Magleby direct or local contact,
      Byron Shafer, Nuffield College. Fax (Prof. Magleby): 1 801 378 5730,
      e-mail: maglebyd@acd1.byu.edu; tel. (Prof. Shafer): Oxford
      (2)78509.

      Visiting research fellow (Australian Academy of
      Science/Royal Society Exchange Visitor) seeks furnished 2+-bedroom
      house/cottage for mid-Apr.–mid-June (TT). Female, non-smoker +/-
      visiting parents. Preferably on bus route to central Oxford. E-mail:
      judy.morris@flinders.edu.au.

      Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
      property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents
      and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and
      professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
      of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford
      area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply
      need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us.
      Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Exchange

      House exchange, Toronto, Canada, early July to mid-
      Aug. Responsible couple (teachers, non-smokers) wish to exchange
      house in central location (20 minutes' walk to University of Toronto,
      near public transport, museums, shops, and libraries) for similar
      accommodation in Oxford. Tel. (Canada): 416 921 7757, e-mail:
      fsik@cencol.on.ca.

      American family of four seeks house- and car-swap in
      Oxford or environs for six or seven weeks in June and July. Our 5-
      bedroom house in McLean, Virginia, is 8 miles from the centre of
      Washington, DC, and very close to all the attractions of mid-Atlantic
      USA: Blue Ridge Mountains, Atlantic beaches, Chesapeake Bay, New York
      City. Garage, Toyota in excellent condition, neighbourhood pool and
      tennis, safe family-friendly subdivision. Tel.: 00 1 703 356 9457.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation sought to rent or exchange

      Scottish visiting fellow with young family seeks
      furnished let of Oxford house/flat to sleep 5 from mid-Apr. to mid-
      July, or exchange for similar in central Edinburgh. Tel.: 0131-661
      5704.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Holiday Lets

      South-west France: comfortable village house in
      small ancient village, Herault, near Bezier; close to shopping and to
      lake, mountains, river, and sea; 3 bedrooms, small garden and large
      terrace, kitchen, bathroom, grenier, and cave. £200
      p.c.m. Not available during summer. Tel.: 0171-927 2079.

      Italy, Veneto: 1 hour north of Venice and Venice
      airport, modern house quietly situated in the beautiful foothills of
      the Alps; car essential; 4 bedrooms (sleeps 7/8), all mod. cons.,
      telephone, clothes- and dish-washers, cot, push-chair, paddling pool;
      children welcome. Lake nearby for swimming. Good wine-producing
      area—Prosecco, Merlot, etc. Excellent reasonably-priced meals
      out. £300 p.w. Arnold, 87 Bainton Road, Oxford OX2 7AG. Tel.:
      Oxford 515264.

      Oxford: modern 3-bedroom detached house, edge of
      Green Belt; fully equipped; 20 Apr.–28 June. Centre 6
      miles—regular buses. £175 p.w. inc. council tax. Dr
      Finnigan. Tel.: Oxford 377101 (evenings), or fax: 311237.

      Dorset coastguard cottage near Abbotsbury, sleeps 4
      plus child's cot; rent £150–£250 p.w. inc. all
      electricity (light, heat, cooking). Colour TV. D. Simon, Little
      Orchard, Charlbury, Oxon. OX7 3RL. Tel.: 01608 810563.

      Provence: holiday/sabbatical lets; luxury 3-bedroom
      apartment on two floors in 17th-c. château; spectacular views
      to the Gorge du Verdon; swimming-pool, tennis, boules; large lake for
      sailing, wind- surfing, etc., close by; wonderful walking country.
      Winter lets too; skiing an hour away; usually warm by day, c.h./log
      fires by night. Tranquil and idyllic for sabbatical. Priced for 2--6.
      Tel.: 01608 684700.

      Port Charlotte, Florida: luxury 3-bedroom dream home
      with heated swimming pool; fabulous beaches---a paradise mostly
      unknown to usual tourists. Rentals from £450 p.w. Contact soon
      to avoid disappointment. Tel.: Oxford 66344.

      Accommodation in Hungary: bed-and-breakfast or long-term
      in central Budapest in newly-refurbished spacious flat with all
      mod. cons. Resident Oxford host on the premises. Evans. Tel.: Oxford
      (2)77054 (w), or 863253 (h).

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Houses for Sale

      English Riviera: attractive house with 4 large
      bedrooms; interior/exterior well maintained; panoramic sea-views,
      south-facing, and large south-facing garden; garage. Quiet
      residential area. Beaches nearby. Large space under house for extra
      room/storage. Potential 2 flats. Many further changes could easily be
      made. £105,000 freehold. Write: Advertiser, 120 Arlington Drive,
      Old Marston Road, Oxford.

      Summertown, in sought-after side road, half-mile
      north of shops: detached house, built 1929; 4 bedrooms, 2/3
      reception, gas c.h., garage, west-facing garden. £230,000
      freehold. Chancellors. Tel.: Oxford 516161.


      Flat for Sale

      La Plagne Centre, Savoie: 3-room furnished flat,
      sleeps 6; large south-facing balcony, panoramic view; skiing starts
      at door; satellite dish. Offers in the region of £85,000. Tel.
      for details: 0171-221 3676.

      Return to List of Contents of this section






      <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette, 18 January 1996: Diary, 19 January - 16 February<br />

      Diary


      Contents of this section:

      Academic Staff Seminars: places
      should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office,
      University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

      For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/3_4373.htm">Staff Development Programme
      supplement.

      Return to Contents Page of this
      issue



      Friday 19 January

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Foundations of western drama', 1.15
      p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

      MR J. CAMPBELL: `The first nation state?' (Ford's Lectures in
      British History: `Origins of the English state'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      R. MATAITYTÉ and M.-J. ZIMMERMAN play works for violin and piano, including sonatas
      by Schnittke and Prokofiev (St John's College Musical Society
      concert), the auditorium, the Garden Quadrangle, St John's, 8.30 p.m.
      (admission free).

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Sunday 21 January

      PROFESSOR PHILIP S. ALEXANDER preaches the Macbride Sermon on the
      Application of Messianic Prophecy, Hertford, 10 a.m.


      Monday 22 January

      DR S. TRUDGILL: `Clean decisions for a dirty world?' (Environmental
      Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15
      p.m.

      PROFESSOR M. RAFF: `Death of the cell: apoptosis' (Green College
      Lectures: `Death'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6
      p.m.

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      Tuesday 23 January

      WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE meeting, Old Bar, Mansfield, 1 p.m.

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Oxfordshire in the Ashmolean',
      1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

      CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

      SIR ANTHONY KENNY: `Body, soul, and intellect in Aquinas' (Wolfson
      College Lectures: `From soul to self'), Wolfson, 5 p.m.

      B.K. JAYANTI: `The art of thinking', Pusey Room, Keble, 8 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Wednesday 24 January

      PROFESSOR A. GRAFTON: `The reading and teaching of the
      ancient historians' (Lowe Lectures in Palaeography: `Ancient history
      in early modern Europe'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR B. SIMON and P. CORNALL: `Affirming the comprehensive ideal: ideals and history
      of comprehensive schooling', Department of Educational Studies, 5
      p.m.

      L. WEE: `International responsibilities for causing forced
      migration' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration),
      Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

      UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: `Wines to brighten January', 5.45
      p.m. (admission £2).

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Thursday 25 January

      DR A. LAWSON: `After Beijing: the women's movement in the UK' (Centre
      for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Issues in gender and
      development'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2
      p.m.

      CAROLINE KING: `Losers of reunification? Gains and losses for
      women in transforming societies: the case of eastern Germany'
      (lecture), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR R. HINDE: `Humans and human habitats: reciprocal
      influences' (Linacre Lectures: `Mind, brain, and the environment'),
      Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Friday 26 January

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Still life painting', 1.15 p.m.
      (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

      MR J. CAMPBELL: `Politics and participation' (Ford's Lectures in
      British History: `Origins of the English state'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR A. GRAFTON: `The antiquarians and the reconstruction of
      ancient societies' (Lowe Lectures in Palaeography: `Ancient history
      in early modern Europe'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE international colloquium
      `Perspectives on philosophical dialogue' opens, Maison
      Française, 7.15 p.m. (Continues tomorrow. Enquiries to: Oxford
      (2)70497.)

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Sunday 28 January

      PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Christian spirituality today: old and new
      agendas in seeking wholeness and holiness' (first Bampton Lecture),
      St Mary's, 10 a.m.

      PROFESSOR M. WHEELER: `Keble, Ruskin, and The Light of the
      World
      ' (lecture), the chapel, Keble, 8.30 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Monday 29 January

      PROFESSOR SIMON SCHAMA: `Humanism and history in the work of Rubens
      and Rembrandt' (first of three Tanner Lectures on Human Values),
      Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

      DR D. POSEY: `Are indigenous and traditional peoples significant
      partners in biodiversity conservation?' (Environmental Change Unit
      seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

      DR R. HUNTER: `NATO and the former Yugoslavia' (Winchester
      Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR A. GRAFTON: `The rediscovery of barbarian texts and
      civilisations' (Lowe Lectures in Palaeography: `Ancient history in
      early modern Europe'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR TONY WRIGLEY: `Death, Malthus, and human society' (Green
      College Lectures: `Death'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe
      Infirmary, 6 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Tuesday 30 January

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Small treasures of the Ashmolean',
      1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

      PROFESSOR SIMON SCHAMA: `Humanism and history in the work of
      Rubens and Rembrandt' (second of three Tanner Lectures on Human
      Values), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

      THE RT REVD KALLISTOS WARE: `The soul in Greek Christianity'
      (Wolfson College Lectures: `From soul to self'), Wolfson, 5 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Wednesday 31 January

      PROFESSOR D. BROWN: `Tradition and revelation: Pentecost and Crib'
      (Hensley Henson Lectures: `Tradition and transformation—the
      virtue in tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      D. MALONE: `The future of UN peace-keeping' (Refugee Studies
      Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room,
      Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Thursday 1 February

      A. KOSHY: `Spring after a winter of discontent: women and the
      environment in India' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
      seminars: `Issues in gender and development'), Library Wing Seminar
      Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

      PROFESSOR SIMON SCHAMA: `Humanism and history in the work of
      Rubens and Rembrandt' (last in series of Tanner Lectures on Human
      Values), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

      M. CHESTERMAN: `GIS in Thames Water Utilities Ltd.: a pipe dream?'
      (Oxford Seminars in Cartography), Schola Astronomiae et Rhetoricae,
      Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian, 5 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Friday 2 February

      MR J. CAMPBELL: `Shires, hundreds, and leets' (Ford's Lectures in
      British History: `Origins of the English state'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      Sunday 4 February

      PROFESSOR URSULA KING: ` "Rediscovering Fire": the power of Teilhard
      de Chardin's spiritual vision' (second Bampton Lecture), St Mary's,
      10 a.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Monday 5 February

      DR J. PALEOCRASSAS: `Environment 2000: the ostrich syndrome'
      (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of
      Geography, 2.15 p.m.

      MR J. GLOVER: `Death, euthanasia, and eugenics' (Green College
      Lectures: `Death'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6
      p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Tuesday 6 February

      CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

      DR P. RIVIÈRE: `Shamanism and the unconfined soul' (Wolfson
      College Lectures: `From soul to self'), Wolfson, 5 p.m.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Wednesday 7 February

      PROFESSOR D. BROWN: `From victim to saint: Isaac and Joseph' (Hensley
      Henson Lectures: `Tradition and transformation—the virtue in
      tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR D. HALPIN and DR G. WALFORD: `Affirming the comprehensive ideal: context',
      Department of Educational Studies, 5 p.m.

      DR M. HERMAN: `Ethiopian Jews' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars
      on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
      House, 5 p.m.

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      Thursday 8 February

      P. READY: `British overseas domestic workers—a modern form of
      slavery?' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars:
      `Issues in gender and development'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
      Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

      PROFESSOR H. FREEMAN: `Mental health and the urban environment'
      (Linacre Lectures: `Mind, brain, and the environment'), Lecture
      Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

      ROY LANCASTER: `Plants from high places' (Botanic Garden 375th
      anniversary lectures: `A retrospective look at the future'), Garden
      Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8 p.m. (admission £6; tel. for
      tickets: (2)76920).

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      Friday 9 February

      MR J. CAMPBELL: `Towns' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Origins
      of the English state'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Sunday 11 February

      PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Spirituality and evolution: discovering our
      deepest energy resources' (third Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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      Monday 12 February

      MS O. BENNETT: `Oral testimony and the environment' (Environmental
      Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15
      p.m.

      PROFESSOR W. HAMILTON: `Death, sex, and evolution' (Green College
      Lectures: `Death'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6
      p.m.

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      Tuesday 13 February

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Etienne Delaune—designs for
      medals and jewels of the French Renaissance' (until 12 May).

      PROFESSOR R. GOMBRICH: `Selfless Buddhists: ethics without
      metaphysics?' (Wolfson College Lectures: `From soul to self'),
      Wolfson, 5 p.m.

      DR R. DAWKINS: `The gene's view of creation' (Friends of Rewley
      House Annual Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University Museum, 8 p.m.
      (tickets £2, available from the reception desk, Rewley House, 9
      a.m.–5 p.m., or at the door).

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      Wednesday 14 February

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Supervising D.Phil. students', 9.30 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

      PROFESSOR D. BROWN: `Apostle and penitent: Mary Magdalen' (Hensley
      Henson Lectures: `Tradition and transformation—the virtue in
      tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR HERMIONE LEE: `Biomythographers: rewriting the lives of
      Virginia Woolf' (F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

      H. CRAWLEY: `Women and refugee status: beyond the public/private
      dichotomy in European asylum policy' (Refugee Studies Programme
      Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
      Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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      Thursday 15 February

      PROFESSOR M. OHINATA: `The mystique of motherhood in Japan' (Centre
      for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Issues in gender and
      development'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2
      p.m.

      PROFESSOR N. SCHOR: `One hundred years of melancholy' (Zaharoff
      Lecture 1995--6), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.


      Friday 16 February

      MR J. CAMPBELL: `The state and the economy' (Ford's Lectures in
      British History: `Origins of the English state'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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