18 April 1996



<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 April 1996: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 25 March


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions
of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the
following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 25
March.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

JOHN RODNEY CLEMENTS, MA status, Merton College

SERGEI LVOVICH DUDAREV, Linacre College

PATRICK SPENCER GRANT, MA status, D.PHIL., Linacre College

HELENA FRANCIS HAMEROW, D.PHIL., St Cross College

PHILIPP PODSIADLOWSKI, St Edmund Hall

JACK CHARLES TURNER, M.PHIL., Exeter College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. VI, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are
qualified for membership of Congregation:

ELAINE CHASTON, University Offices

CHARLES VOLLGRAFF CROWTHER, Faculty of Literae Humaniores

BRIAN FREDERICK GASSER, D.PHIL., St Edmund Hall

VERONICA JOANNA LAWRENCE, Pitt Rivers Museum

HEIDI MARRIOTT, Institute of Biological Anthropology

BERNARD MOMMER, St Antony's College

MICHAEL ASHLEY MORRIS, Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology

ABIGAIL CHARLOT REBECCA MUNSON, School of Geography

YANG SONG, Institute for Chinese Studies

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2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Chaston, E., MA status, University Offices

Croghan, M.F.J., MA, St Hilda's

Crowther, C.V., MA status, Faculty of Literae Humaniores

Dudarev, S.L., MA, Linacre

Efstathiou, H.J., MA, St Hugh's

Gasser, B.F., MA status, D.Phil., St Edmund Hall

Hamerow, H.F., MA, D.Phil., St Cross

Hope, R.A., BM, MA, New College

Jeffreys, E.M., B.Litt., MA, Exeter

Kauffmann, M.R., MA, Merton

Lawrence, V.J., MA status, Pitt Rivers Museum

Marriott, H., MA status, Institute of Biological Anthropology

Mommer, B., MA status, St Antony's

Morris, M.A., MA status, Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology

Munson, A.C.R., MA status, School of Geography

Mynors-Wallis, L.M., MA, DM, Balliol

Newbury, G.T., MA, Pembroke

Pike, M.G., MA, St Edmund Hall

Podsiadlowski, P., MA, St Edmund Hall

Song, Y., MA status, Institute for Chinese Studies

Turner, J.C., MA, M.Phil., Exeter

Whalley, S.R., MA, Keble

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GENERAL BOARD AND BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations concerning the Joint Committee about
Undergraduate Affairs, and for examinations, see "exam.htm">`Examinations and
Boards' below.




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 April 1996: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 22 April


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
noon on 22 April, unless by that time the Registrar has received
notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. VI, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995,
p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

MARGARET ROSALIND LINTERN-BALL, St Hilda's College

HELEN JAYNE MARDON, D.PHIL., St Catherine's College

PADDY ANDREW PHILLIPS, D.PHIL., New College





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 April 1996: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    UNIVERSITY PREACHERS


    Trinity Term 1996

    Thursday, 18 April, at 8 a.m. THE REVD DR ALISTER E.
    MCGRATH, Principal of Wycliffe Hall. Holy Communion (Latin). At St
    Mary's.

    Sunday, 21 April, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR URSULA KING, Head of
    the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of
    Bristol. (Sixth Bampton Lecture: `Christian spirituality and inter-
    faith dialogue: the spiritual contribution of world faiths'.) At St
    Mary's.

    Sunday, 28 April, at 10 a.m. THE LORD BLAKE, Honorary
    Student of Christ Church, Honorary Fellow of Queen's College. (St
    Mark's Day Sermon
    .) At Magdalen College.

    Sunday, 5 May, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR URSULA KING. (Seventh
    Bampton Lecture: `Christian spirituality, Third World theology, and
    the voices of women: the spiritual significance of otherness'.) At St
    Mary's.

    Sunday, 12 May, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR URSULA KING. (Eighth
    Bampton Lecture: `Seeing Christ in all things: the spirit of Christ
    as a spirit of renewal and transformation for our planet'.) At St
    Mary's.

    Sunday, 19 May, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD DAVID CONNER,
    Suffragan Bishop of Lynn. At St Mary's.

    *Whit Sunday, 26 May, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR HUGH WILLIAMSON,
    Regius Professor of Hebrew, Student of Christ Church. At the
    Cathedral.

    *Trinity Sunday, 2 June, at 10 a.m. THE REVD CANON IAIN
    MACKENZIE, Canon Residentiary, Worcester Cathedral. At
    Queen's College.

    Sunday, 9 June, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PHILLIP URSELL,
    Principal of Pusey House, Fellow of St Cross College.
    At St Mary's.

    *Commemoration Sunday, 16 June, at 10 a.m.THE RT REVD
    MICHAEL TURNBULL, Bishop of Durham. At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 23 June, at 10 a.m. THE REVD DR JOHN FARRELL, Prior
    of Blackfriars. (St John Baptist's Day Sermon.) At
    Magdalen College
    .

    *On these days, Doctors will wear their robes.

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    KOLKHORST EXHIBITION

    The Curators of the Taylor Institution have elected TANIA LYNETTE
    HUMPHREYS, New College, to a Kolkhorst Exhibition from Trinity Term
    1996.

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    HONOUR MODERATIONS IN GREEK AND LATIN
    LITERATURE, AND HONOUR MODERATIONS IN LATIN LITERATURE WITH GREEK

    Hertford Prize: P.H. MASTER, Queen's College

    de Paravicini Prizes: R.D.A. PEPPER, St Anne's
    College, and N.J. SEWELL-RUTTER, University College

    Sunderland Prize for Greek in Honour Moderations in Greek
    and
    Latin Literature
    : L.V. PITCHER, Exeter College

    Sunderland Prize for Greek in Honour Moderations in Latin
    Literature with Greek
    : L.N. CHADWICK, Somerville College

    Proxime accesserunt: K.L. HEFFERNAN, Merton College,
    and O.R.C. MCMONIGALL, Lady Margaret Hall

    Comparative Philology Prize (joint award): C.L.
    POULTER, Jesus College, and A.D. ROUTLEDGE, St John's College

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    SHELLEY-MILLS PRIZE 1996

    The prize has not been awarded.

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    THE REINTRODUCTION OF THE OXFORD MOBILITY
    INCENTIVE SCHEME (OMIS) WITH EFFECT FROM 2 APRIL 1996

    The University's funding from HEFCE has been reduced by 7.6 per cent
    in real terms for 1996–7 and reductions are expected of at least
    a further 3 per cent in 1997–8 and a further 2 per cent in
    1998–9 (not including likely further reductions in the capital
    element of the grant). The University will join in the efforts being
    made by the CVCP to bring to the attention of the government the
    damaging long-term effects for the country of these reductions. None
    the less, there seems little doubt that resources available from
    public funds will be squeezed in the next few years. Although the
    Development Programme is continuing, it will not be able to make up
    for this squeeze. The University is also continuing to lose money
    (perhaps as much as £3m per annum) because of the effects of the
    dual support transfer (the transfer of funds from HEFCE to the
    research councils) and although a review of the effects of this
    transfer on behalf of the OST by Coopers and Lybrand has shown that
    the transfer has probably led to the funding of an increased volume
    of research rather than of the same amount of research but better
    supported, there can be no confidence at present that any steps will
    be taken which will improve the position from Oxford's point of
    view.

    All these factors, which affect all universities (although Oxford
    and the major research universities are more seriously affected than
    others by the dual support transfer), point to the need for the
    University to try to create as much flexibility as possible in the
    use of its resources. One important means of achieving this, as in
    1987, will be the reintroduction for a limited period from 2 April
    1996 to 31 March 1997 of a consensual `Oxford Mobility Incentive
    Scheme' (OMIS).

    Such a scheme will also be helpful in addressing an internal
    financial issue, namely the decision by the General Board to redeploy
    departmental resources over a period of time through a system of
    formula funding better to reflect the present pattern of activity in
    the major departments.

    Details of the scheme are set out below.

    Details of the 1996 Oxford Mobility Incentive Scheme

    1 The features of the Oxford Mobility Incentive
    Scheme are:

    (a) That the scheme will be entirely voluntary and will
    feature a consensual termination of employment in each individual
    case.

    (b) That there will be no obligation upon particular
    individual members of staff to avail themselves of the scheme, and
    each eligible member of staff shall be free to choose to consider, or
    to ignore, the scheme offered.

    (c) That the scheme should offer an incentive to
    established staff, aged 63 and under, to consider obtaining and
    moving to other employment or paid activity not with the Chancellor,
    Masters, and Scholars of the University of Oxford, and/or retiring
    early.

    (d) That the invitation to apply for the mobility
    incentive scheme benefits will be open to all established staff in
    the employment of the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the
    University of Oxford and aged 63 or under on the effective date of
    termination of employment. (Established staff for this purpose are
    defined as those members of staff who, according to central records,
    are appointed to (or held against) university posts in which the
    first letter of the post number prefix is A–E inclusive and
    whose appointment is not for a fixed term of seven years or less.)

    (e) That, within OMIS, the financial benefits to each
    qualifying member of staff may, according to individual
    circumstances, be used by the University to purchase enhanced pension
    provision and/or be taken as a lump-sum payment. (See also para. 5.)

    (f) That OMIS benefits will be paid, however, only on an
    ex gratia basis and in cases where, inter alia, the
    voluntary resignation of the individual member of staff concerned is
    in the management interests of the University—resulting in the
    abolition of an established post (directly or via appropriate
    internal reorganisation), or resulting in the planned suspension of
    that post with no prospect of it being refilled for some years; and,
    in both cases, the voluntary resignation being consistent with
    operational needs and future plans as well as being a resignation
    which would not have occurred but for the availability of OMIS.

    (g) That the Oxford Mobility Incentive Scheme will be
    offered for a specific limited period of up to 31 March 1997 at the
    latest, for all members of established staff who resign with effect
    from a date within the period of availability of the scheme* and
    satisfy the necessary criteria; and that the scheme may be withdrawn
    by Council at any earlier point if financial limits are reached, or
    if the required levels of staff reductions are achieved, or if other
    more appropriate national schemes or guidelines become available, or
    for any other appropriate reason. (* In exceptional circumstances,
    such as the need to meet an essential teaching or research
    commitment, staff whose resignation is tendered and accepted within
    the period of availability of the scheme and is to be effective on a
    date no later than 1 July 1997, may be granted OMIS benefits.)

    2 The level of financial benefit within OMIS is
    to be based upon basic monthly university pay at the date of
    termination of employment and, for staff aged 60 or under, will
    broadly reflect: (i) years of continuous employment beyond two with
    the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Oxford, up
    to a set maximum; and (ii) in the case of `tenured' "#note">[1] established
    staff, years of service remaining to age 65, up to a separate
    maximum. In the case of non-`tenured' staff, there will be a fixed
    sum to replace the additional second element described above. In
    certain circumstances, OMIS benefit from element (i) above may exceed
    one year's university salary, but in no case, even with the full
    component related to `tenured' service to age 65, will the combined
    level of benefits exceed two years' university salary. For staff aged
    61–3 inclusive, lower maximum limits on OMIS benefit will apply.
    Special limits on OMIS benefit may also apply (1) where a member of
    academic staff moves to take up a senior academic or related position
    not with the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of
    Oxford; and/or (2) where arrangements to leave were at an advanced
    stage before 31 January 1996. OMIS payments in excess of £30,000
    will be taxable.

    3 If the salary point on which OMIS benefits
    have been calculated and paid to an individual is subsequently
    increased and that increase is to be effective on or before the date
    of termination of employment, OMIS benefits will be recalculated on
    the basis of the increased salary point, and the balance will be paid
    to the individual concerned.

    4 Members of staff holding joint
    university/college appointments should note that the Oxford Mobility
    Incentive Scheme concerns only employment with the Chancellor,
    Masters, and Scholars of the University of Oxford, and the associated
    university salary. It does not apply to employment with a college.
    However, Council and the General Board have agreed that termination
    of employment with the University under OMIS will not be agreed in
    the case of a holder of a joint appointment without full consultation
    with the relevant college. To this end, it has been agreed that where
    an application for OMIS benefits is received from the holder of a
    joint appointment, the Chairman of the General Board will consult a
    nominated representative from the college concerned in order to seek
    to avoid any clash of managerial interest between the college and the
    University. Moreover, the Chairman of the Senior Tutors' Committee
    will attend meetings of the Planning and Development Committee of the
    General Board, where applications for OMIS benefits from members of
    the academic staff will be finally discussed (after appropriate
    discussion at faculty board level), in order to ensure that college
    interests are properly taken into account.

    5 In certain circumstances, staff who qualify
    for OMIS benefits and who will be aged 50 or over at the date of
    termination of employment may, in addition, be eligible for their
    accrued university pension benefits to be brought into payment upon
    the termination of their employment with the University and in some
    cases payment of accrued University pension benefits may be made
    without actuarial reduction. Confidential advice on this matter will
    be available to individual members of staff from the University
    Superannuation Officer, and individuals may make an inquiry without
    any commitment on their part.

    6 In exceptional circumstances (such as the
    temporary need to meet declining teaching commitments in consequence
    of rationalisation and change) the strictly limited part-time
    re-engagement of staff in receipt of OMIS benefits may be sanctioned
    for a fixed non-renewable term, but in all cases individuals who
    resign from employment with the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of
    the University of Oxford and receive OMIS benefits may not normally
    be re-employed by the University, even in an unestablished post,
    without the prior approval of the OMIS Steering Committee.

    7 Members of established university staff
    wishing to inquire further, without commitment, or wishing to take
    advantage of the Oxford Mobility Incentive Scheme, are invited to
    discuss the matter with the relevant appointing authority for their
    post. In the case of academic-related and non-academic related staff
    this authority is usually the head of department concerned; members
    of academic staff are invited to consult the Secretary of
    Faculties.

    [1] `Tenure' may apply only to certain members
    of academic and
    academic-related staff. Members of staff wishing to inquire whether
    for the purposes of OMIS they are `tenured' may ask, in the first
    instance, the appointing authority for their post, but the ruling of
    the OMIS Steering Committee on whether a member of staff is `tenured'
    for these purposes shall prevail and be final.

    Return to text

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    FACULTY OF LITERAE HUMANIORES


    Declamation Prizes 1996

    Undergraduates are invited to enter for a competition in the
    reading and recitation of Greek and Latin prose and verse
    . It
    is hoped that this will be of particular interest to those who have
    taken part in similar events arranged by the Classical Association.
    The competition will be held at Balliol College on Friday, 31 May, at
    5 p.m.

    Individual competitions will be held as under:

    1. Greek Reading: candidates to read prescribed passages (of
    approximately twenty-five lines) in both prose and verse. First
    prize: £50. Second prize: £25.

    2. Latin Reading: as for Greek Reading.

    3. Greek Recitation: candidates to recite a passage of verse
    (of sixteen to twenty-four lines) of their own choice from memory.
    One prize of £25.

    4. Latin Recitation: as for Greek Recitation.

    Candidates may enter for any one competition or two
    which should be either 1 or 2 together with 3 or 4. No one is
    eligible to enter for a competition in which (s)he has won a prize in
    an earlier year.

    Undergraduates interested in taking part should apply as soon as
    possible to the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square, for an
    application form. Details will then be sent of the prescribed
    passages for reading together with any other necessary information.
    Forms and details may also be obtained through college tutors.
    Completed application forms should be returned to the Classics Office
    by 4 p.m. on the closing date for entries, which is Friday, 24 May
    (fifth week).

    The attention of interested undergraduates is drawn to the classes on
    the Sound and Delivery of Greek being given by Mr D.A. Raeburn in the
    Schools during weeks one to four of Trinity Term.

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    CIRCULATION OF THE GAZETTE TO
    RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    The University Gazette is circulated on request to
    retired resident members of Congregation until they reach the age of
    seventy-five. However, it has been decided that any former member of
    Congregation over the age of seventy-five may continue to receive the
    Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on application in
    writing to the Information Office, University Offices, Wellington
    Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. Such applications must be renewed at the
    beginning of each academic year.

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    WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE

    The next meeting of the Women's Studies Committee will be at 1 p.m.
    on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Old Bar, Mansfield College.

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    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

    Arabic Classes for the Study of the Qur'an

    Classes are continuing to be held for those wishing to improve their
    Arabic for the Study of the Qur'an, starting on Friday, 26 April, at
    5 p.m.

    For further details and to register, contact Dr Basil Mustafa, Oxford
    Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street, Oxford OX1 2AR (telephone:
    (2)78730).

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    Arabic Classes

    Classes in Modern Standard Arabic at beginner and
    intermediate/advanced levels are continuing to be held at the centre
    this term, starting on Monday, 22 April.

    For further details and to register, contact the Oxford Centre for
    Islamic Studies, George Street (first floor), Oxford OX1 2AR
    (telephone: (2)78730).

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    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM


    Vivien Leigh Prize

    A prize of £275 is offered by the Ashmolean Museum from the
    Vivien Leigh Fund for a two-dimensional work of art on paper, not
    exceeding 55 by 40 centimetres, by an undergraduate member of the
    University. The work will be chosen, if a work of sufficient merit is
    submitted, by the Keeper of Western Art in the Ashmolean Museum, from
    work submitted to the Print Room by Wednesday, 12 June, or work
    exhibited at the annual degree show at the Ruskin School of Drawing
    and Fine Art. It is a condition of the award that the winning work be
    given to the Ashmolean.

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    CONCERTS


    St John's College and Colin Carr

    THE BORROMEO STRING QUARTET and COLIN CARR will give a concert of
    works by Beethoven and Schubert at 8.30 p.m. on Friday, 17 May, in
    the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College. The programme
    will include the Schubert Quintet. Admission is free, by ticket,
    which will be available from the Porters' Lodge after 6 May.

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    Wolfson College

    ALBERT JULIÀ will give a recital of piano works by Mozart and
    Liszt, at 5 p.m. on Sunday, 28 April, in Wolfson College (tickets
    £4 and £2 (concessions), at the door).

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    BODLEIAN LIBRARY


    Closure of Duke Humfrey's Library
    1997–8

    Duke Humfrey's Library will be closed for major repairs from 1
    September 1997. It is anticipated that this work could take nine
    months to complete.

    Alternative arrangements for readers who would normally use Duke
    Humfrey's Library are under discussion, and will be announced as soon
    as possible.

    The Library regrets the inconvenience this closure will cause, but
    undertakes to publicise details of dates and alternative arrangements
    as soon as they become available.

    More information can be obtained from the Superintendent of Duke
    Humfrey, William Hodges, by telephone (Oxford (2)77150), by fax
    (Oxford (2)77182), or by e-mail (william.hodges@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

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    Exhibition now open

    Women and natural history: artists, collectors, patrons,
    scientists—in association with the Society for the History of
    Natural History (until 11 May)

    In the Exhibition Room: open Monday–Friday, 9.30 a.m.–4.45
    p.m., Saturday 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.

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    MAISON FRANÇAISE

    Concerts

    The following concerts will be given at 8.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Maison Francaise.

    Admission to the events is free (limit of two places per person), but
    reservations must be made one week in advance. (Telephone: Oxford
    (2)74220).

    For details of this term's lectures and other meetings at the Maison,
    see the Special Lecture List.

    DELPHINE LEBAUD, cello, and PASCAL JOURDAN, piano

    26 Apr.: pieces by Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt, and Brahms.

    URSULA VON LERBER, piano

    10 May: pieces by Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, and Rachmaninov.

    SANDRA ZELTZER, soprano, and FELIX HOLLER, piano

    17 May: pieces by Schumann, Chopin, Brahms, Duparc, Dubugnon,
    and Satie.

    GEOFFREY BAKER, recorder, and CHRISTOPHER MORRONGIELLO, lute, with
    NICOLE GORE, reader

    24 May: Music and poetry from the court of François
    I—music by Josquin, Janequin, Sermisy, Arcadelt, and
    Sandrin, with readings of texts by Louse Labé, Pierre de
    Ronsard, Marguerite de Navarre, and Clément Marot


    Film-showings

    Alfred Hitchcock and French cinema

    The following films will be shown at 8.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Maison Française.

    Admission to the events is free (limit of two places per person), but
    reservations must be made one week in advance. (Telephone: Oxford
    (2)74220).

    30 Apr.: Les Diaboliques (Henri-Georges Clouzot,
    1954; 110 minutes; subtitled)

    7 May: A Double Tour (Claude Chabrol, 1959; 100
    minutes; subtitled)

    14 May: La Sirène du Mississippi
    (François Truffaut, 1969; 109 minutes; subtitled)

    21 May: Vertigo/Sueurs froides (Alfred Hitchcock,
    1958; 128 minutes; in English)

    28 May: Série Noire (Alain Corneau, 1979;
    110 minutes; subtitled)

    4 June: Poulet au vinaigre (Claude Chabrol, 1985;
    110 minutes; subtitled)

    11 June: Topaz/L'Etau (Alfred Hitchcock, 1969; 125
    minutes; in English)





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 April 1996: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

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    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Professor of European
    Thought

    PROFESSOR J. BURROW will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `A common culture? Nationalist ideas in
    nineteenth-century European thought.'

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    Harmsworth Professor of American History

    PROFESSOR D.M. KENNEDY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Can the United States still afford to be a
    nation of immigrants?'

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    WINCHESTER LECTURE IN INTERNATIONAL
    RELATIONS

    PROFESSOR PETER J. KATZENSTEIN, Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of
    International Relations, Cornell University, will deliver a
    Winchester Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 April, in the Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `Identity and norms in world politics.'

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    GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE SEPTUAGINT

    The Septuagint as a cultural document (second series)

    DR TESSA RAJAK, Head of the Department of Classics, University of
    Reading, will deliver the second series of her Grinfield Lectures at
    5 p.m. on Mondays in the Collier Room, Regent's Park College.

    13 May: `Greek as a Jewish language: translation and
    literature.'

    20 May: `The Greek Bible and the language of
    power.'

    27 May: `In and out of the Bible: Greek additions to
    the biblical text.'

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    JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN BRITISH
    HISTORY

    DR M. ASTON, FBA, FSA, F.R.HIST.S., will deliver a James Ford Special
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Obliteration and memory in the English
    Reformation.'

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    CHERWELL-SIMON MEMORIAL LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR U. AMALDI, University of Milan and European Laboratory for
    Particle Physics, CERN, will deliver the Cherwell-Simon Memorial
    Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 24 May, in Lecture Theatre A, the
    Zoology/Psychology Building.

    Subject: `When nothing is something: a history of the
    vacuum.'

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    HALLEY LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR D. GOUGH, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge,
    will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the
    Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

    Subject: `The seismic structure of the sun.'

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    WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN
    COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 1995–6

    Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western
    philosophical/literary tradition

    Amended notice

    PROFESSOR MARTHA C. NUSSBAUM, Chicago, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the
    following days, as follows: the lectures on 22 April to 13 May
    inclusive will be given in the Examination Schools; the lectures on
    20 and 27 May will be given in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St
    Anne's College.

    This notice replaces that published in the Gazettes of 7
    March (p. 842), and 21 March (p. 903), from which it differs as
    follows: the lectures which were to have been given on Thursday, 25
    April, and Thursday, 2 May, will now be given on Wednesday, 24 April,
    and Wednesday, 1 May, respectively.

    Professor Nussbaum will also give seminars at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7
    May, and Thursday, 23 May, in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College.

    Mon. 22 Apr.: `Contemplative creativity I:
    Plato.'

    Wed. 24 Apr.: `Contemplative creativity II: Spinoza,
    Proust.'

    Mon. 29 Apr.: `The Christian ascent I: Augustine.'

    Wed. 1 May: `The Christian ascent II: Dante.'


    Mon. 6 May: `The Romantic Ascent I: Emily
    Brontë.'

    Mon. 13 May: `The Romantic Ascent II: Mahler.'

    Mon. 20 May: `Democratic desire: Walt Whitman.'

    Mon. 27 May: `The descent of love: Joyce's
    Ulysses.'

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    THE TIMES LECTURE 1996

    MS D. CAMERON, Strathclyde, will deliver the Times
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 25 April, in the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `Language and gender: feminist language reform
    and the history of English.'

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    RATANBAI KATRAK LECTURES 1996

    PROFESSOR PHILIPPE GIGNOUX, Ratanbai Katrak Lecturer 1996, will
    lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination
    Schools.

    Mon. 29 Apr.: `The three immortal souls and other human
    faculties.'

    Wed. 1 May: `Body: anatomy, physiology, and
    medicine.'

    Fri. 3 May: `Cosmic elements and theory of
    microcosm.'

    Mon. 6 May: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (1).'

    Wed. 8 May: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (2).'

    Fri. 10 May: `Problems of identity and conversion in
    Zoroastrianism.'

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    SIR JOHN HICKS LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR JOEL MOKYR, Northwestern University, will deliver the Sir
    John Hicks Lecture on Economic History at 5 p.m. on Friday, 3 May, in
    the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Famine and mortality: an historical re-
    examination.'

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    O'DONNELL LECTURE IN CELTIC STUDIES
    1995–6

    PROFESSOR DONATIEN LAURENT, Directeur de recherche, CNRS, and
    Directeur du Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique,
    Université de Bretagne occidentale, will deliver the O'Donnell
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 30 May, in Room 2, the Taylor
    Institution.

    Subject: `Ronan's eyes: duality tamed in Breton folk
    culture.'

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    HUSSEY LECTURE ON THE CHURCH AND THE ARTS

    PROFESSOR PETER S. HAWKINS, Professor of Religion and Literature,
    Yale University, will deliver the eighth annual Hussey Lecture at 5
    p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: ` "Take it and read": an invitation to
    the Divine Comedy.'

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    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Biochemistry Department: departmental colloquia and OUBS talks

    The following research colloquia will be given at 4 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

    Conveners: G.K. Radda, MA, D.Phil., BHF Professor of
    Molecular Cardiology, and A.J. Kingsman, MA, University Lecturer in
    Biochemistry.

    DR D. ST JOHNSTON, Wellcome/CRC Institute

    22 Apr.: `The origin of polarity in
    Drosophila.'

    DR L.S. COX

    29 Apr.: `Co-regulation of DNA replication and DNA
    repair by the tumour suppressor p53.'

    DR C. TICKLE, University College, London

    13 May: `Molecular basis of vertebrate limb
    development.'

    DR M. MARSH, University College, London

    20 May: `Endocytosis and viral pathogenesis.'

    DR C. TYLER-SMITH

    3 June: `The Y chromosome in human evolution.'

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    Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

    With the exception of the final meeting, the following seminars will
    be given at 1 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Theatre 1, the Department of
    Biochemistry.

    The final seminar will be held at 2 p.m. on Monday, 17 June, in the
    Seminar Room, OCMS, the New Chemistry Building.

    Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor of
    Molecular Biophysics.

    PROFESSOR R.C. LIDDINGTON, Leicester

    26 Apr.: `Structural determinants of integrin
    adhesiveness.'

    PROFESSOR D.I. STUART

    10 May: `The co-evolution of structural virology
    and synchrotrons: where physics is leading Orbivirus
    biology.'

    DR R. GRISSHAMER, Cambridge

    24 May: `Membrane receptors: strategies for
    expression, purification, and structure determination.'

    DR T.J. GREENHOUGH, Keele

    31 May: `Structure of human C-reactive protein:
    resolution of an acute phase problem.'

    DR W.I. WEIS, Stanford University School of Medicine

    7 June: `Cell-surface carbohydrate recognition by
    calcium-dependent animal lectins.'

    DR M.S.P. SANSOM

    14 June: `Not quite liquid, not quite solid:
    simulation studies of water within ion channels.'

    PROFESSOR E. EGELMAN, University of Minnesota Medical School

    17 June: `Conserved structures in DNA replication
    and recombination.'

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    Department of Plant Sciences: research talks

    The following lectures will be given at 4 p.m. on the days shown in
    the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences. They
    will be held on Thursdays, with the exception of the first meeting,
    which will take place on Tuesday, 23 April.

    Convener: J.A.C. Smith, MA, University Lecturer in Plant
    Science.

    PROFESSOR R.H.W. BRADSHAW, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre,
    Alnarp, Sweden

    23 Apr.: `How stable are north European forest
    ecosystems?'

    DR N.J. TALBOT, University of Exeter

    2 May: `Welcome to the pressure dome: appressorium
    development in the rice blast fungus.'

    DR N. SMITH, Sussex

    9 May: `Sex and bacteria: do they have it, and if
    so how much?'

    PROFESSOR J.A. RAVEN, Dundee

    16 May: `The early evolution of land plants:
    aquatic ancestors and atmospheric interactions.'

    DR K. PALLET, Rhône-Poulenc Agriculture Ltd., Ongar, Essex

    23 May: `The role of biochemistry and molecular
    biology in new herbicide discovery.'

    DR L. BEEVERS, Oklahoma

    30 May: `Clathrin-coated vesicles from plants:
    their role in vacuolar targeting.'

    DR M. CHEEK, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

    6 June: `Rain forests of Mt. Cameroon.'

    DR M. BEVAN, John Innes Centre, Norwich

    13 June: `Progress in the Arabidopsis
    genome project.'

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    PROFESSOR P. REVELL, Royal Free Hospital Medical School, will hold a
    seminar at 4 p.m. on Monday, 22 April, in the Lecture Theatre, the
    Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre.

    Conveners: J. Kenwright, BM, MA, Nuffield Professor of
    Orthopaedic Surgery, and M.J.O. Francis, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Subject: `Wear debris and bone loss around orthopaedic
    implants.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    University Department of Cellular Science: haematology seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Tuesdays in the
    Haematology Seminar Room, Level 4, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    DR S. WATSON

    23 Apr.: `Collagen receptor signalling in
    platelets—similarities with signalling by immune
    receptors.'

    C. FIDLER

    30 Apr.: `Amplification of mtDNA in leukaemia.'

    DR A. CHILD, Leeds General Infirmary

    7 May: `Developing new strategies for the treatment
    of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.'

    DR D. REES

    14 May: `The Haemoglobin E Syndromes.'

    A member of the Department of Haematology, the John Radcliffe
    Hospital

    21 May: case presentation.

    DR R. PHILLIPS

    28 May: `How does the human immunodeficiency virus
    escape T cell-mediated immunity?'

    DR D. LO

    4 June: `Cell traffic between mother and foetus:
    clinical and biological implications.'

    DR L. FORONI, Royal Free Hospital, London

    11 June: `Molecular investigation of minimal
    residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.'

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    Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

    The following postgraduate lectures will be given at the times shown.
    They will take place in the Lecture Theatre, the Oxford Eye Hospital,
    the Radcliffe Infirmary, except where indicated otherwise.

    Case presentations will be given at 2.30 p.m. on 29 April, 20 May, 10
    June, and 17 June. A consultation clinic will be held at 2 p.m. on 3
    June.

    Convener: A.J. Bron, MA, Clinical Professor and Margaret
    Ogilvie's Reader in Ophthalmology.

    Monday, 22 April

    M. HARRIS and C. DODRIDGE

    2.30 p.m.: Orthoptics lecture.

    MR. J. ELSTON

    3.15 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

    DR P. FRITH

    4.15 p.m.: `Medical ophthalmology.'

    MISS I. RUSSELL-EGGITT, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick
    Children, London

    5.30 p.m.: `A review of Albanism.'

    Monday, 29 April

    DR P. ANSLOW

    3.15 p.m.: `Neuro-radiology.'

    MR J. SALMON

    5.30 p.m.: `Post-traumatic angle-recession
    glaucoma.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Monday, 13 May

    DR B. MACDONALD

    2.30 p.m.: `Ocular pathology.'

    MR. J. ELSTON

    4.15 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

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    Monday, 20 May

    DR P. FRITH

    3.15 p.m.: `Medical ophthalmology.'

    MS S. STUART BROWN and DR D. SACKETT

    4.15 p.m., Witts Lecture Theatre: `Evidence-based
    medicine: why and how?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Monday, 3 June

    MR J.R.O. COLLIN, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London

    5.30 p.m.: `Ocular plastic surgery.'

    Monday, 10 June

    MR J. ELSTON

    3.15 p.m.: `Assessing a child with low vision'
    (master-class).

    DR R. ZEIMER, Wilmer Institute, USA

    5.30 p.m.: `Laser targeted drug delivery: a
    promising method for the diagnosis and treatment of age-related
    macular degeneration.' (Litchfield Lecture)

    Monday, 17 June

    MR P. ROSEN

    3.15 p.m.: `Refractive surgery' (master-class).

    PROFESSOR G. RUSKELL, City University, London

    5.30 p.m.: `Structure and formation of extraocular
    muscles.'

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    Nuffield Department of Surgery

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Seminar Room, Nuffield Department of Surgery, Level 6, the John
    Radcliffe Hospital. Seminars will not be held on 21 May, 28 May, 4
    June, and 11 June, as the Oxford `Evidence-based' Surgical Debates
    take place on those days (see below).

    Convener: P.J. Morris, MA, Nuffield Professor of
    Surgery.

    M. RITTER, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital

    30 Apr.: `Functional and developmental studies of
    the thymic microenvironment.'

    A. PORTER, Gene Tarteting Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre,
    Hammersmith Hospital

    7 May: `Conditional activation of an essential
    human cell cycle gene.'

    F. RAMIREZ

    14 May: `Glucocorticoid regulation of cytokine
    production by CD4-positive T lymphocytes.'

    V. CERUNDOLO

    18 June
    : `Presentation of intracellular proteins by MHC
    class 1 molecules.'

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    The Oxford `Evidence-based' Surgical Debates

    These debates will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the John
    Radcliffe Hospital, as follows: the debates on 21 and 28 May in
    Lecture Theatre I, the Academic Corridor; the debates on 4 and 11
    June in Lecture Theatre II, the Academic Corridor.

    Proposed by: MR M. SHARP, JRH, and MR J. COLLIN, JRH; opposed by: MR
    B. GEORGE, JRH, and DR R. COLLINS, Radcliffe Infirmary

    21 May: `Heparin is contraindicated as DVT
    prophylaxis in surgical patients.'

    Proposed by: MR T. COOKE, JRH, and MR B.J. BRITTON, JRH; opposed by:
    MR J. PERKINS, JRH, and MR M. PARKER, Joyce Green Hospital, Dartford

    28 May: `All inguinal hernias should be repaired by
    mesh.'

    Proposed by: MR R. BAIGRIE, JRH, and MR T. DEHN, Battle Hospital,
    Reading; opposed by: MR J. FAWCETT, JRH, and PROFESSOR D. JOHNSON,
    Leeds Royal Infirmary

    4 June: `Patients with gastric cancer should not be
    treated by radical gastrectomy.'

    Proposed by: DR S. COOMBES, JRH, and MR A. FOX, JRH; opposed by: MR
    M. WHITELY, JRH, and DR J. PHILLIPS-HUGHES, JRH

    11 June: `Diagnostic angiograms are no longer
    required in vascular patients.'


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    LAW, SOCIAL STUDIES

    The function of law in the international community

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Old Library, All Souls College.

    Details of the 29 May seminar will be announced later.

    Conveners: I. Brownlie, D.Phil., DCL, Chichele
    Professor of Public International Law, and E.A. Roberts, MA, Montague
    Burton Professor of International Relations.

    PROFESSOR J. DUGARD, Cambridge

    24 Apr.: `The criminal responsibility of the
    state.'

    PROFESSOR T. FARER, American University, Washington, DC

    1 May: `Defence of the "right" to
    democracy: Haiti and other cases.'

    H. FOX, British Institute of International and Comparative Law,
    London

    8 May: `Enforcing international law in national
    courts.'

    PROFESSOR J. JACKSON, Michigan

    15 May: `Dispute settlement in GATT and WTO.'

    PROFESSOR C. GREENWOOD, LSE

    22 May: `Criminal prosecution for breaches of
    international law: the Yugoslav and Rwanda trials.'

    SIR R.Y. JENNINGS, Cambridge

    5 June: `The contribution of the International
    Court of Justice.'

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    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    The following lectures will be given at the times shown on Wednesdays
    in the Institute of Archaeology.

    Convener: J.J. Coulton, MA, Reader in Classical
    Archaeology.

    PROFESSOR E. ÖZGEN, Director General of Monuments and Museums,
    Republic of Turkey

    5 p.m., 24 Apr.: `War on the illicit antiquities
    trade: the Turkish contribution.'

    PROFESSOR C. LE ROY, University of Paris I (Sorbonne)

    4.30 p.m., 15 May: `Tlos and Oinoanda: a tale of
    two cities in Northern Lycia.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    David Lewis Lecture

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL JAMESON, Crossett Professor of Humanities Emeritus,
    Stanford University, will deliver the David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Wednesday, 29 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's
    College.

    Subject: `The rituals of Athena Polias in Athens.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Nellie Wallace Lectures 1996

    Two dialogues of Plato's maturity: the Euthydemus and
    Hippias Major

    PROFESSOR M. BURNYEAT, Cambridge, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the
    following Thursdays in the Sub-faculty of Philosophy.


    25 Apr.: `The Euthydemus and
    Republic VII' (text: E.290c–291b).

    2 May: `Frames, dates, perspectives' (texts:
    E.271a–275c, 293b–296d, 304b–307c).

    9 May: `Ambiguities' (text: E.275d–283b).

    16 May: `Love and logic' (text: E.283b–288d).

    23 May: `Socratic v. Platonic ethics' (text:
    E.288b–293a).

    6 June: `The Hippias Major and
    Republic V' (text: HM281a–295b).

    A seminar on `Chronology and cross-reference in the Dialogues of
    Plato' will be given at 2 p.m. on Fridays 26 April, 17 May, and 7
    June, in the Ryle Room, 10 Merton Street.

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    Graduate seminar

    PROFESSOR R.M. SAINSBURY, Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry Visiting Lecturer,
    will give a graduate seminar (open to undergraduates) at 5 p.m. on
    Thursdays of weeks 2–7 in the Goodhart Room, University College.

    Subject: `Meaning and truth.'

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    LITERAE HUMANIORES, THEOLOGY

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Examination Schools.

    There will be discussion of each lecture in the Small Senior Common
    Room, Oriel College, at 8.30 p.m. on the day of the lecture.

    Convener: R.G. Swinburne, B.Phil., MA, Nolloth Professor
    of the Philosophy of the Christian Religion.

    PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN, Notre Dame

    29 Apr.: `Why is there anything at all?'

    PROFESSOR E. STUMP, St Louis

    13 May: `Libertarian free will and the principle of
    alternate possibility.'

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    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

    Probability, Operational Research, and Statistics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Department of Statistics.

    Convener: J.E. Kennedy (Ph.D. Cambridge), Junior Lecturer
    (Temporary) in Statistics.

    PROFESSOR B. SILVERMAN, Bath

    25 Apr.: `Monotone discriminant functions and some
    applications in rheumatology.'

    DR D. DE ANGELIS and DR W. GILKS, Cambridge

    2 May: `A Bayesian approach to AIDS back-
    calculation.'

    PROFESSOR S. SENN, UCL

    9 May: `Cross-over trials: how to adjust for carry-
    over and why you shouldn't.'

    DR J. KUHA

    16 May: `Adjusting for covariate measurement error
    in regression models.'

    PROFESSOR M.A.H. DEMPSTER, Cambridge

    23 May: `Fast valuation of American options by
    linear programming.' (Southern Operationsl Research Group
    Seminar
    )

    DR G. ROBERTS, Cambridge

    30 May: `Some recent developments in the theory of
    MCMC.'

    PROFESSOR T.J. SWEETING, Surrey

    6 June: `Directed likelihood Bayesian inference and
    conditional inference.'

    DR P. SASIENI, London

    13 June: `Testing hypotheses in Aalen's additive
    risk model.'

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    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    Graduate seminar in Spanish studies

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Taylor Institution.

    Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII
    Professor of Spanish Studies, and C.P. Thompson, MA, D.Phil., Faculty
    Lecturer in Spanish.

    DR ADELINA SARRIÓN, Cuenca

    23 Apr.: `Clérigos torpes y mujeres
    solicitadas en los procesos de la Inquisicíon
    española.' (Public lecture)

    MS A. SAXENA

    30 Apr.: `Towards a definition of pre-Expulsion
    Judeo-Spanish.'

    DR R.W. FIDDIAN

    14 May: `Carmen from
    Mérimée to Saura.'

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    Seminars and lecture

    The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in 47
    Wellington Square. The 9 May meeting will take place in the ground-
    floor lecture room; the other meetings will be held in Room T7.

    Convener: P.A. Mackridge, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer in Modern Greek.

    DR S. EKDAWI, Belfast

    Wed. 1 May: `The Passions File: Cavafy's private
    collection.'

    DR R. PADEL

    Thur. 9 May: `Isolation and community in some Greek
    and Irish poets.'

    MR C. ROBINSON

    Thur. 16 May: `Gender, sexuality, and narration in
    the work of Kostas Tachtsis.'

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    MODERN HISTORY

    Creole histories and societies

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown in
    the Modern History Faculty. With the exception of the final meeting,
    to be held on Friday, 14 June, they will take place on Mondays.

    Conveners: M.A. Vaughan, MA (Ph.D. London), Rhodes
    Lecturer in Commonwealth Studies, and S. Trapido, MA (Ph.D. London),
    University Lecturer in the Government of New States.

    DR TRAPIDO

    22 Apr.: `The Dutch and the Cape Dutch: the making
    of a colonial identity.'

    R. DRAYTON

    29 Apr.: `Calypso and the Creole memory: the
    conscious unconscious in the Caribbean.'

    T. ROOPNARAINE, Cambridge

    6 May: `Diamonds and dislocation: Creole identity
    in the Guyanese hinterland.'

    R. BLACKBURN, New Left Review

    13 May: `The making of Creole societies in the
    Americas.'

    G. FREDRICKSON, Stanford

    20 May: `Reform and revolution in the American and
    South African freedom struggles.'

    J. PARKER, Keele

    27 May: `Mankraloi, merchants, and mulattoes: Carl
    Reindorf and the politics of race in early colonial Accra.'

    DR VAUGHAN

    3 June: `We are all Creoles now: cultural theory
    and Indian Ocean history.'

    PROFESSOR R.R. POSNER

    10 June: `Creoles and Creolisation from a
    linguist's point of view.'

    J. COMAROFF, Chicago

    14 June: `New persons, old subjects: of rights,
    righteousness, and the double self.' (Joint meeting with
    the World History Seminar
    )

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    MODERN HISTORY, LITERAE HUMANIORES,
    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Oxford History and Philosophy of Biology Programme

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Sherrington Room, the Department of Physiology.

    Conveners: R. Fox, MA, D.Phil., Professor of the History
    of Science, H.R. Harré, B.Phil., MA, Emeritus Fellow, Linacre
    College, and T.J. Horder, BM, MA, University Lecturer in Human
    Anatomy, from whom further details may be obtained (telephone: Oxford
    (2)72189).

    DR R. DAWKINS

    7 May: `In praise of reductionist, adaptationist,
    progressivist, gradualist, neo-Darwinism.'

    PROFESSOR J. MAYNARD SMITH, Sussex

    14 May: `Information theory and the history of
    genetics.'

    PROFESSOR A. ROSENBERG, Georgia

    21 May: `Reductionism redux; computing the
    embryo?'

    PROFESSOR D. HULL, Northwestern University

    11 June: `The role of biology in the philosophy of
    biology.'

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    MODERN HISTORY, ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Seminar in medieval Jewish history and literature

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Pembroke
    College. All are welcome.

    Conveners: D. Frank (Ph.D. Harvard), Research Fellow,
    Wolfson College, M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Jewish Studies,
    M.E. Rubin, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, and A.
    Tanenbaum.

    DR J. EDWARDS, Birmingham

    29 Apr.: `Spanish Inquisitorial evidence: truth or
    fiction?'

    DR I. ZWIEP, Warburg Institute

    3 June: `Medieval Jewish scholars on the origin and
    multiplicity of languages.'

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    MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

    Economic History Seminar

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Chester Room (Staircase C), Nuffield College.

    Conveners: J.S. Foreman-Peck, MA, University Lecturer in
    Economic History, and T.C. Leunig, BA, M.Phil., Research Fellow,
    Nuffield College.

    N. DIMSDALE

    24 Apr.: `A primary producing economy in the Great
    Depression: the case of inter-war Australia.'

    J. MOKYR, Northwestern University

    1 May: `Technological selection, information, and
    changing household behaviour, 1850–1914.'

    B. EICHENGREEN, Berkeley

    8 May: `Institutions and economic growth: Western
    European experience after 1945.'

    G. FEDERICO, Pisa

    15 May: `Was Italy a protectionist economy before
    1914?'

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    MODERN HISTORY, INSTITUTE OF CHINESE
    STUDIES, ASIAN STUDIES CENTRE (ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE)

    Hong Kong in transition

    This one-day conference will be held on Friday, 10 May, in the Modern
    History Faculty.

    Session I (chaired by Professor J. Brown)

    DR J. DARWIN

    10 a.m.: `Hong Kong in British decolonisation.'

    DR S. TSANG

    11.10 a.m.: `Government and politics in Hong Kong:
    a colonial paradox.'

    Discussion (led by Dr R. Bickers), 12 noon.

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    Session II (chaired by Professor Glen Dudbridge)

    DR B. HOOK, Leeds

    2 p.m.: `National and international interests in
    the decolonisation of Hong Kong.'

    M. SHENFIELD, Ki Pacific Asset Management, Honk Kong

    2.45 p.m.: `Hong Kong and its wider global economic
    links.'

    Discussion (led by Dr R. Ash, SOAS), 3.30 p.m.

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    Session III (chaired by Dr Rosemary Foot)

    DR J. TANG, Hong Kong

    4.35 p.m.: `Hong Kong's transition from British to
    Chinese rule: back to the future?'

    Discussion (led by Sir Percy Cradock), 5.20 p.m.

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    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Jewish history and literature in the Graeco-Roman period

    The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    Wolfson College.

    Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Jewish
    Studies.

    C. SCHAMA

    23 Apr.: `Scribes in the first century CE: the
    evidence of Josephus.'

    M. MACINA, Louvain and Lille

    30 Apr.: `The covenant which is not abolished and
    the Epistle to the Hebrews.' (In French)

    DR S. STERN, Jews' College, London

    7 May: `Calendar reckoning in the Jewish
    Diaspora.'

    DR C. HEMPEL, Birmingham

    14 May: `Communal legislation in the Laws of the
    Damascus Document.'

    DR G. BROOKE, University of Manchester

    21 May: `The Allegro Quman photograph collection
    previewed.'

    DR T. LIM, Edinburgh

    28 May: `4Q306: the men of the people who err.'

    DR GOODMAN

    4 June: `The pilgrimage economy of Jerusalem in the
    Second Temple period.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ORIENTAL STUDIES, THEOLOGY

    Old Testament Studies

    The following lectures will be given at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays, as
    follows: on 22 April, in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute; on
    13 May, in the Large Seminar Room, the Theology Faculty Centre.

    Conveners: H.G.M. Williamson, DD, Regius Professor of
    Hebrew, and J. Barton, MA, D.Phil., Oriel and Laing Professor of the
    Interpretation of Holy Scripture.

    DR A. BIRAN, Director of Biblical Archaeology, Hebrew Union College,
    Jerusalem

    22 Apr.: `Biblical Dan and the "House of
    David" inscription.'

    PROFESSOR J. MILGROM, Hebrew University, Jerusalem

    13 May: `The Jubilee (Leviticus 25): problems and
    solutions.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Oxford Physics Colloquia

    The following lectures will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    For details of the Cherwell-Simon Memorial Lecture, to be given by
    Professor U. Amaldi on 24 May, see above.

    Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Physics,
    and C.E. Webb, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Laser Physics.

    DR A.M. FOX

    3 May: `Squeezed light.'

    PROFESSOR G.O. JONES, formerly Professor of Physics, Queen Mary
    College, London

    10 May: `The physics of playing the violin.'

    DR A. HOFZUMAHAUS, Institut für Atmosphärische Chemie,
    Forschungszentrum KFA Jülich

    31 May: `The hydroxyl radical OH: inner cleanliness
    for the atmosphere.'

    PROFESSOR T. YAMAZAKI, University of Tokyo and CERN, Geneva

    7 June: `Laser spectroscopy of metastable
    antiprotonic helium atomcules.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Hinshelwood Lectures

    Molecules and molecular dynamics at liquid interfaces

    PROFESSOR KENNETH B. EISENTHAL, Professor of Chemistry, Columbia
    University, will deliver the Hinshelwood Lectures at 11.15 a.m. on
    the following Tuesdays and Thursdays in the Physical and Theoretical
    Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: J.P. Simons, MA, Dr Lee's Professor of
    Chemistry.

    2 May: `Molecules at liquid interfaces.'

    7 May: `Orientation of molecules at liquid
    interfaces.'

    9 May: `Chemical equlibria at liquid interfaces.'

    14 May: `Vibrational spectroscopy at liquid
    interfaces—sum frequency spectroscopy.'

    16 May: `Ultrafast dynamics at liquid interfaces.'

    21 May: `Ultrafast dynamics of electrons in bulk
    liquids.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theoretical Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

    Convener: Sir Roger Elliott, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Theoretical Physics.

    PROFESSOR M. NAUENBERG, Santa Cruz and Leiden

    26 Apr.: `Newton, Hooke, and the birth of celestial
    mechanics: solution to a 300-year-old puzzle.'

    PROFESSOR N. TUROK, Cambridge

    10 May: `Looking for cosmic defects.'

    DR J.J. BINNEY

    24 May: to be announced.

    DR B. SIMONS, Cambridge

    7 June: From Anderson localisation to quantum
    chaos.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theoretical Chemistry Group

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Seminar Room, the New Chemistry Building.

    Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of
    Theoretical Chemistry.

    PROFESSOR D.C. CLARY, University College, London

    22 Apr.: `Quantum simulation of clusters.'

    DR R. SCHACK, Royal Holloway College, London

    29 Apr.: `Applications of quantum state
    diffusion.'

    DR P.M. RODGER, Reading

    6 May: `Local symmetry and local structure in
    solutions.'

    PROFESSOR E.A. CARTER, UCLA

    13 May: `Achieving scaling advantages in electronic
    structure theory.'

    A. SZARECKA

    20 May: `Theoretical conformational analysis of
    selected (R,R)-tartaric acid derivatives.'

    J. OSBORNE

    27 May: `Magnetic impurities in disordered
    systems.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics

    The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on the days shown in
    the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. They
    will be given on Thursdays, except for the seminars to be given on
    Monday, 13 May, and Tuesday, 9 July.

    Because on rare occasions the arrangements need to be changed, anyone
    intending to come to Oxford specially to attend is advised to check
    first by telephoning Oxford (2)72933.

    Convener: F.W. Taylor, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Atmospheric Physics.

    DR W. FRÜH

    25 Apr.: `Low-frequency behaviour of baroclinic
    waves.'

    DR P. LYSTER, Maryland, and Goddard Space Flight Center

    2 May: `Assimilation of atmospheric constituent
    gases using the Kalman filter approach.'

    PROFESSOR J.R. DRUMMOND, Toronto

    9 May: `Measurements of tropospheric composition
    from space.'

    DR S.F. SINGER, Science and Environmental Policy Project, Fairfax,
    Virginia

    13 May: `CFC production ban: barking up the wrong
    tree?'

    DR J. DERBER, European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting,
    Reading

    16 May: `Recent progress in atmospheric data
    assimilation and the implications for using observations.'

    PROFESSOR J.M. MCGLADE, Warwick

    23 May: `Estimation of net photosynthetically
    available radiation using satellite and atmospheric data for use
    in spatially extended dynamical models of ocean
    productivity.'

    DR T.W.N. HAINE

    30 May: `Baroclinic instability of the oceanic
    mixed layer.'

    MR B. GARDINER, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge

    6 June: `Antarctic ozone and effects on ultra-
    violet radiation.'

    DR N. MCINTYRE, Earth Observation Sciences Ltd.

    13 June: `Towards the commercial application of
    satellite remote sensing: ship routing in sea ice.'

    DR C. JACOBI, Leipzig

    9 July: `The quasi two-day wave over central Europe
    as seen from D1 LF mesopause wind measurements at Collm,
    Germany.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Nonlinear dynamics seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. Further
    details may be obtained from Anne Juel (telephone: Oxford (2)72342).

    Convener: T. Mullin, MA, University Lecturer in
    Physics.

    PROFESSOR J.C.W. ROGERS, Polytechnic University of New York

    22 Apr.: `The response of a damped pendulum to a
    large driving force.'

    DR S. DALZIEL, Cambridge

    29 Apr.: `Rayleigh-Taylor instability: resolving
    the differences between experiments and simulations.'

    T. PEACOCK

    13 May: `Bifurcations and noise in liquid crystal
    hydrodynamics.'

    DR C. EGBERS, Bremen

    20 May: `Instabilities in rotating fluids.'

    DR G. HUGHES, Surrey

    3 June: `Internal wave field produced by a
    turbulent patch in a stratified fluid.'

    PROFESSOR P. DRAZIN, Bristol

    10 June: `Pade approximation for the nonlinear
    scientist.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Department of Human Anatomy: research seminars

    The following seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy.

    Convener: R.W. Guillery, MA, Dr Lee's Professor of
    Anatomy.

    DR G. JEFFREY, Institute of Ophthalmology, London

    26 Apr.: `Retinal cell birth and death are
    regulated by the tyrosinase gene: an explanation of the problems
    associated with albinism?' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    DR C.P. SMITH, University of Manchester

    3 May: `Molecular physiology of urea
    transporters.'

    PROFESSOR D.C. WATHES, Royal Veterinary College, London

    10 May: `Steroidal regulation of the uterine
    oxytocin receptor.'

    DR J. ROGERS, Cambridge

    17 May: `Eph-like receptor tyrosine kinases in the
    developing nervous system.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    DR J. TODD, Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics

    24 May: `A genetic basis for the clustering of
    insulin-dependent diabetes in families.'

    DR C. NOBES, University College, London

    31 May: `Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and
    cell motility by the rho family GTPases.' (Jenkinson
    Seminar
    )

    DR D. CLARKE

    7 June: `Survival of the fittest? Promoting
    dopamine neuron survival in vitro.'

    DR S.J. KENWRICK, Cambridge

    14 June: `Mutations in L1 cause abnormalities of
    human brain development.' (Jenkinson Seminar)


    Return to List of Contents of this section


    University Laboratory of Physiology

    The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the
    Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology.

    Convener: J.E. Ellory, MA, Reader in Human
    Physiology.

    DR K. KIRK

    24 Apr.: `Promiscuous pathways, catholic channels:
    chloride channels are not just for chloride.' (Seminar
    sponsored by the Physiological Society
    )

    PROFESSOR T. LAMB, Cambridge

    1 May: `Phototransduction: the rod as a model G-
    protein cascade.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological
    Society
    )

    DR M. HALLET, Cardiff

    8 May: `Confocal imaging of calcium in
    neutrophils.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological
    Society
    )

    PROFESSOR M. BOYETT, Leeds

    15 May: `Regulation and function of the muscarinic
    potassium channel in the heart.' (Seminar sponsored by
    the Physiological Society
    )

    DR R. WONG, Washington University, St Louis, USA

    22 May: To be announced. (McDonnell–Pew
    Seminar in Cognitive Neuroscience
    )

    PROFESSOR M. HANSON, University College, London

    29 May: `The development of control of the foetal
    circulation.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    DR L. MAFFEI, Neurophysiology Institute, Pisa, Italy

    5 June: `Role of neurotrophins in the plasticity of
    the visual system of mammals.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar
    in Cognitive Neuroscience
    )

    DR C. DALY, Glasgow

    12 June: `Blood vessel structure and receptor
    studies using confocal microscopy.' (Seminar sponsored by
    the Physiological Society
    )

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Weiskrantz Room (C113), the Department of Experimental Psychology.

    Conveners: S.D. Iversen, Ma, Professor of Psychology, and
    P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

    DR J. BRADSHAW, Monash

    23 Apr.: `The three Moirai: Parkinson's,
    Huntingdon's, and Tourette's.'

    PROFESSOR M. BUTTERWORTH, University College, London

    30 Apr.: `The psychology and the neuropsychology of
    numbers.'

    PROFESSOR M. MORGAN, London

    7 May: `What does the primary visual cortex (V1)
    contribute to conscious awareness?'

    DR R. WISE, National Hospital, London

    14 May: To be announced.

    PROFESSOR B. HOPKINS, Lancaster

    21 May: `On the developmental origins of
    handedness.'

    PROFESSOR R. PLOMIN, London

    28 May: `Genetics and experience: the interface
    between nature and nurture in psychology.'

    PROFESSOR R. HINDE, lately Royal Society Research Professor,
    Cambridge

    4 June: `Integrating the behavioural sciences.'
    (McDonnell–Pew Seminar in Cognitive
    Neuroscience
    )

    PROFESSOR G. GOODWIN, Edinburgh

    11 June: `What has the brain got to do with
    depression?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SOCIAL STUDIES

    Presidential politics in 1996: interpretations by participants

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American
    Government.

    C. HENICK, political consultant, Republican National Committee

    25 Apr.: `The 1996 Republican nomination: a bookend
    to the 1994 revolution?'

    DR W.J. MITOFSKY, polling consultant, CBS News and The New York
    Times


    2 May: `Public polls/pseudo-polls and the 1996
    elections.'

    J.A. BARNES, reporter and analyst, National Journal

    9 May: `Picking presidents in 1996: from the
    invisible primary to the conservative crusades.'

    DR E.C. KAMARCK, Director of Policy Analysis, Office of the Vice-
    President

    16 May: `Running for President from the White
    House.'

    D.S. BRODER, reporter and analyst, The Washington Post

    23 May: `American politics: 1996 and beyond.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    THEOLOGY

    Seminars in Patristics and Byzantine Studies

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    House of St Gregory and St Macrina, 1 Canterbury Road.

    Convener: K.T. Ware, MA, D.Phil., Spalding Lecturer in
    Eastern Orthodox Studies.

    DR L. BRUBAKER, Birmingham

    8 May: `Art and theology in the ninth century.'

    PROFESSOR J. HERRIN, King's College, London

    15 May: `How did women acquire an education in late
    antiquity?'

    DR J. MCGUCKIN, Leeds

    5 June: `Gregory Nazianzen: the Christianisation of
    Hellenism.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BYZANTINE STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College.

    Details of the 3 June seminar will be announced later.

    Conveners: E.M. Jeffreys, B.Litt., MA, Bywater and
    Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and
    Literature, Dr M. Mango, and J.D. Howard-Johnston, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer in Byzantine Studies.

    DR J. HAYES

    22 Apr.: `Some thoughts on trading patterns in the
    Mediterranean and beyond, fifth to eighth centuries.'

    P. STEPHENSON, Cambridge

    29 Apr.: `Trade and frontier diplomacy in the
    Balkans in the middle Byzantine period.'

    DR O. NICHOLSON, Minnesota

    6 May: `What the emperor saw: the vision of
    Constantine reconsidered.'

    A. MCCABE

    13 May: `Horses, medicine, and magic.'

    PROFESSOR JEFFREYS

    20 May: `The letters and homilies of James of
    Kokkinobaphos: a stylistic oddity?'

    DR T. ANTONOPOULOU, Harvard

    27 May: `The homilies of Leo VI and the search for
    the middle Byzantine sermon.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    UNIVERSITY CATHOLIC CHAPLAINCY


    Thomas More Lecture 1996

    HIS GRACE JOHN R. QUINN, Archbishop Emeritus of San Francisco, will
    deliver the annual Thomas More Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 8 May,
    in the University Catholic Chaplaincy, Rose Place, St Aldate's.

    Subject: `Moral life or moral law.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Strachey Lecture

    GORDON PLOTKIN will deliver the Strachey Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 30 April, in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

    Subject: `Denotational semantics: an unbalanced
    perspective?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

    Oxford Architectural History Seminar

    DR M. HENIG will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Monday, 29 April, in the
    Institute of Archaeology.

    Conveners: M.R. Airs, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in
    Conservation and the Historic Environment, and G. Tyack, MA, M.Litt.,
    Fellow of Kellogg College and Director, Stanford University Centre in
    Oxford.

    Subject: `Religious buildings in late Roman Britain.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Convener: R. Hood, MA, Reader in Criminology and Director
    of the Centre.

    DR S. SINGER, State University of New York and Cambridge

    24 Apr.: `Recriminalising delinquency: some
    American and English examples of getting "tough" on
    juvenile crime.'

    D. FAULKNER

    1 May: `Justice, crime, and management in modern
    Britain.'

    DR P. RAYNOR, Swansea

    8 May: `Evaluating probation: a moving target.'

    PROFESSOR A. ASHWORTH, King's College, London

    15 May: `Reflections on the Government's criminal
    justice proposals.'

    C. HOYLE

    22 May: `Policing domestic violence: the victim's
    role.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

    Affirming the comprehensive ideal

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Department of Educational Studies. The meetings will be followed by a
    reception.

    1 May: Effective schools and effective teachers

    MS C. BENN, Kensington and Chelsea College of
    Further Education: `What is an effective comprehensive
    school?'

    PROFESSOR TED WRAGG, Exeter: `Teachers for the
    comprehensive ideal.'

    15 May: Effective learning

    B. CLARKE, head teacher, Peers School, Oxford:
    `What comprehensive schools do better.'

    J. ABBOTT, Director, Education 2000: `Information
    technology and the comprehensive ideal.'

    29 May: The organisation of comprehensive education in the future

    TIM BRIGHOUSE, Chief Education Officer,
    Birmingham: `A local democratic framework.'

    PROFESSOR S. RANSON, Birmingham: `The comprehensive
    school within the learning society.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EUROPEAN STUDIES INSTITUTE

    PROFESSOR G. LOCK and PROFESSOR J.W. BURROW will hold seminars on the
    following subject at 10 a.m. on Fridays in Lecture Room 23, Balliol
    College.

    Subject: `The idea of Europe.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

    Collection and comparison in the sciences

    The following seminars will be given on Wednesdays in the Museum of
    the History of Science. With the exception of the 8 May meeting,
    which commences at 6 p.m., they will commence at 5 p.m.

    P. KELL

    24 Apr.: ` "Distributing happiness"?
    Acquisitions policy in eighteenth-century British museums.'

    PROFESSOR H. RIVTO, MIT and Cambridge

    1 May: `Some meanings of monsters.'

    A. TURNER, Paris

    8 May: `Collecting history and natural history:
    Robert Plot, the Ashmolean Musaeum, and the Survey of
    Britain.'

    E. JORINK, Groningen

    15 May: `Reading the book of nature: changing ideas
    of the marvels of nature in the seventeenth-century Dutch
    Republic.'

    M. WINTROUB, Cambridge

    22 May: `Taking stock at the end of the world:
    millenarian eschatology, civic ritual and collecting in the
    Royal Entry Festival of Henri II.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

    R.MITTER, Cambridge

    26 Apr.: `Sweet talk, subterfuge, and subsidies:
    the co-optation of Chinese élites during the Japanese
    occupation of Manchuria, 1931–3.'

    YUJI GENDA, Gakushuin University

    3 May: `The over-skilled Japanese: changes in
    earnings inequality in Japan.'

    MS C. POLLARD

    10 May: `Miyagawa Kôzan and the evolution of
    Makuzu ware: a Japanese potter adapting to western tastes in the
    Meiji period.'

    PROFESSOR W. CORNELIUS, University of California, San Diego

    17 May: `Japan's growing foreign worker population:
    why the influx is unstoppable.'

    PROFESSOR IPPEI YAMAZAWA, Hitotsubashi and Birmingham

    24 May: `Asia Pacific co-operation: tasks ahead and
    links with Europe.'

    PROFESSOR J. MORAN, Stirling

    31 May: `Explaining Japan to sixteenth-century
    Europe—the writings of Alessandro Valignano.'

    PROFESSOR CHU, YUN HAN, National Taiwan University and Institute for
    National Policy Research

    7 June: `The international dimension of
    democratisation in Taiwan with a focus on Japan and the US.'

    DR R.D. SCHLUNZE, Free University, Berlin

    14 June: `The locational balance of Japanese firms
    in Germany.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Seminar in Contemporary South Asia

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays. With the
    exception of the 2 May meeting, which will be held in the Library
    Wing Seminar Room, they will take place in the Blackhall Seminar
    Room.

    G. CHAPMAN, Lancaster

    25 Apr.: `Mass media, environment, and development
    in India.'

    C. GUPTA, Delhi

    2 May: `Print media and communalism in India in the
    1990s.' (Joint seminar with the Centre for Cross-Cultural
    Research on Women
    )

    S. PAL, Aberystwyth

    9 May: `Casual and regular contracts: worker's
    self-selection in rural labour markets in India.'

    G. ETIENNE, Geneva

    16 May: `Agricultural policies and economic reforms
    in India and Pakistan: the new look of the urban bias.'

    S. SRIVASTAVA, Allahabad

    23 May: `Politics, culture, and history:
    reinventing Rama in modern India.'

    M. MOORE, Sussex

    30 May: `Conflict and devolution in Sri Lanka.'

    C. MARKOVITS, Centre d'Etudes de l'Inde et de l'Asie du Sud, Paris

    6 June: `The history of a world-wide trading
    network from south Asia: the Sindworkies, from Hyderabad (Sind),
    c.1860–1996.'

    Z. ZAMAN, Dhaka

    13 June: `The theme of partition in the writings of
    Bapsi Sidhwa.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

    Gender and development—protest and politics

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Conveners: Cecillie Swaisland and Dr Helen Callaway
    (telephone: Oxford (2)73644).

    DR A. BASU

    25 Apr.: `Wagri women of a Delhi slum—the
    problem of psycho-social development.'

    DR C. GUPTA

    2 May: `Fundamentalism and the print media in
    contemporary India.' (Joint seminar with the South Asian
    Programme
    )

    H. SUMMERFIELD

    9 May: `Gender and identity in Cambodia.'

    DR D. SUTTON

    16 May: `Myths of matriarchy, memories cast in
    stone: tales of power on a Greek island.'

    F. MACAULEY

    23 May: `Gender relations and local politics in the
    transition to democracy in Brazil.'

    L. HOECKLIN

    30 May: `Social welfare, the family, and gender
    ideology in southern Germany.'

    H. CRAWLEY

    6 June: `Seeking sanctuary—women and asylum in
    Britain.'

    H. TEREFE

    13 June: `The impact of gender and culture on
    achievement of women and girls in Ethiopia.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

    The significance of judges and juries to democracy in America and
    Great Britain

    The following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on Mondays and
    Wednesdays in the Law Board Room, the Law Faculty. They will be
    presented by Mr D. Howarth, Ms S.M. Smith, and The Hon. S.
    Hufstedler.

    Conveners: D.J. Galligan, BCL, MA, Professor of Socio-
    Legal Studies and Director of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, and
    Lord Plant of Highfield, MA, Master, St Catherine's College.

    6 May: `Development of an "independent"
    judiciary.'

    8 May: `The role of the judiciary in a democratic
    political system.'

    13 May: `We the jury.'

    15 May: `Modern juries, the media, and the future of
    the judicial system.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXETER COLLEGE


    Marett Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR S. HOWELL, Oslo, will deliver the Marett Memorial Lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Friday, 26 April, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room,
    Exeter College.

    Subject: ` "May blessings come, may mischiefs
    go!": living kinds as agents of transition and transformation
    among the Lio.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MANSFIELD COLLEGE


    Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics,
    and Society

    PROFESSOR HOLMES ROLSTON III, Professor of Philosopy, Colorado State
    University, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 April, in
    the Council Room, Mansfield College.

    Enquiries should be directed to Nina Booth-Clibborn, OCEES, Mansfield
    College (telephone: Oxford (2)70886, e-mail:
    ocees@mansfield.ox.ac.uk).

    Subject: `Nature for real: is nature a social construct?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PEMBROKE COLLEGE


    Blackstone Lecture

    THE RT. HON. SIR RICHARD SCOTT, V.-C., will deliver the twentieth
    Blackstone Lecture at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 11 May, in the
    Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `Ministerial accountability.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


    Asian Studies Centre

    Democratisation in Taiwan: implications for China

    This workshop will be held on Friday, 7 June, and Saturday, 8 June,
    in the venues given below. Registration takes place at 9.30 a.m. on 7
    June.

    Friday, 7 June
    In the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College

    HUNG-MAO TIEN, INPR, and CHYUAN-JENG SHIAU, INPR and National Taiwan

    10 a.m.: `Crafting democratic institutions.'

    S. TSANG

    11.30 a.m.: `From Leninist-style party-state to
    democracy: the relevance of the Taiwan experience for political
    reforms in the PRC.'

    In the New Lecture Theatre (Nissan Institute), St Antony's
    College

    TEH-FU HUANG, INPR/National Cheng-chi

    2.15 p.m.: `Evolving electoral and party
    politics.'

    J. DOMES, Saarlandes

    3.30 p.m.: `From authoritarian to democratic
    politics: lessons of electoral and party reforms in Taiwan for
    the PRC.'

    YUN-HAN CHU, INPR/National Taiwan

    5 p.m.: `International dimension of democratisation
    in Taiwan with a focus on Japan and the US' (combined with
    Nissan Institute seminar
    ).

    Saturday, 8 June, in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's
    College

    TUN-JEN CHANG, INPR/William and Mary College

    9.15 a.m.: `Development of the opposition: the DPP
    and New Party.'

    F. MENGIN, Paris

    10 a.m.: `Provincial sub-ethnic ties and national
    identity.'

    M. HSIAO, INPR/Academia Sinica

    11.45 a.m.: `Emergence of civil society.'

    C. HUGHES, Durham

    2 p.m.: `Democratisation and cross-Straits
    relations.'

    L. WHITEHEAD

    3.15 p.m.: `Sum up: putting matters in a
    comparative framework.'

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    Korea Forum: economic and political reform in Korea

    The following meeting will be held on Wednesday, 29 May, in the New
    Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

    CHAN-JONG PARK

    2 p.m.: `The progress of Korean democracy.'

    KEUN-TAE KIM

    3 p.m.
    : `Tackling the problems of Korean political
    reform.'

    JOONG-SIK PARK

    4 p.m.: `National competitiveness and
    employer–employee relations.'

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    Centre for Indian Studies

    State and civil society in Pakistan

    This one-day workshop will be held on Friday, 17 May, in the
    Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Convener: M. Waseem, Quaid-i-Azam Fellow, St Antony's
    College (telephone: Oxford 311524, fax: 54465).

    Session I: 9.45–11.15 a.m.

    DR I. TALBOT, Coventry: `Foundations of Pakistan's
    political culture.'

    DR J. MAJEED, SOAS: `Iqbal and Muslim identity
    formation in the twentieth century.'

    DR S. ANSARI, Royal Holloway College: `Refashioning
    definition of the political community in post-partition
    Pakistan.'

    Session II: 11.30 a.m.–1 p.m.

    DR D. TAYLOR, SOAS: `Authority, power, and
    legitimacy: dilemmas of political leadership in contemporary
    Pakistan.'

    DR O. NOMAN, QEH: `Pakistani bourgeoisie: the ethnic
    dimension.'

    DR M. LAU, SOAS: `Environment and failure of urban
    planning in Karachi.'

    Session III: 2–3.30 p.m.

    MS V. SCHOFIELD, freelance journalist: `Kashmir:
    the way forward.'

    DR I. MALIK, College of Higher Education, Bath:
    `Geopolitics of Pakistan in the central and south-west Asian
    context.'

    DR V. HEWITT, Bristol: `Parity with India?: Pakistan's
    relations with its eastern neighbour.'

    Session IV: 3.45–5.15 p.m.

    DR J. RICHARDS: `Ethniticy and nationalism in
    Pakistan.'

    DR P. WERBNER, Keele: To be announced.

    DR Y. SAMAD, Bedford: `Globalisation, fundamentalism,
    and British Muslims.'

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    South Asian History Seminar

    The following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

    Those wishing to attend are asked to note the changed venue and time
    of the seminars.

    Conveners: D.A. Washbrook, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Modern
    South Asian History.

    I. CHATTERJEE, SOAS

    23 Apr.: `The complicity of law, slavery, and the
    company.'

    PROFESSOR T. METCALF, California

    30 Apr.: `Decentering empire.'

    DR L. SUBRAMANIAN, Calcutta

    7 May: `Power and the weave: rulers and weavers in
    eighteenth-century Surat.'

    DR S. AIYA, Cambridge

    14 May: `August anarchy: the partitition massacres
    in Punjab.'

    PROFESSOR S. CHANDRA, Surat

    21 May: `Colonial law and conjugal relations.'

    DR N. PEABODY, Cambridge

    28 May: `Inchoate in Kota: contesting authority
    through a North Indian pageant play.'

    PROFESSOR T. RAYCHAUDHURI, Professor Emeritus

    4 June: `Transformation of religious sensibilities
    in colonial Bengal.'

    DR S. WALLIA, Panjab

    11 June: `Pluralism and cultural formation.'

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    Centre for Indian Studies and Queen
    Elizabeth House

    Informal evening seminar on South Asia

    The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Mondays in the New
    Room, the Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College.

    DR S. SRIVASTAVA, Allahabad

    29 Apr.: `Language, identity, empowerment:
    constructing a Hindu identity in India in the nineteenth
    century.'

    PROFESSOR V.K. NATRAJ, Mysore and Sussex

    13 May: `Demystifying decentralisation.'

    DR D.R. NAGARAJ, Delhi

    10 June: `The comic collapse of authority: a study
    of Indian films.'

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    Russian and East European Centre

    Inaugural Elliott Lecture

    DR ZBIGNIEW BRZEZINSKI will deliver the inaugural Elliott Lecture
    (sponsored by Geoffrey Elliott and Fay Elliott), at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 8 May, in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

    Subject: `Eurasia: post-imperial dilemmas.'

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    ST EDMUND HALL


    A.B. Emden Lecture 1996

    PROFESSOR Q. SKINNER, Cambridge, will deliver the A.B. Emden Lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Ancient laughter and modern philosophy.'

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    ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


    Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR LUCA CAVALLI-SFORZA, Member of the Royal Society, will
    deliver the fifteenth Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30
    p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, in the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College.

    Subject: `Genetic dissection of Europe and its use for
    historical reconstruction.'

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    WOLFSON COLLEGE

    Public Lecture

    DR B. SHEPSTONE, University Lecturer in Radiology, will lecture at
    5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 2 May, in the hall, Wolfson College.

    Subject: `The radiological dimension of early Alzheimer's
    dementia.'

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    CAMPION HALL


    Martin D'Arcy Lectures (Campion Hall
    Centenary) 1996

    PROFESSOR RAYMOND E. BROWN, Auburn Distinguished Professor Emeritus
    of Biblical Studies, Union Theological Seminary, New York, will
    deliver the Martin D'Arcy Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Fridays
    23, 26, 30 April, and 3, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
    today.'

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    NUFFIELD COLLEGE WOMEN'S GROUP

    Women, poverty, and social policy

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Seminar Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: H.E. Russell, M.Sc., Prize Research Fellow,
    Nuffield College.

    DR H. LAND, Royal Holloway College

    1 May: `Care and dependency—reformulating the
    equation?'

    PROFESSOR A. PHIZACKLEA, Leicester

    8 May: `Homeworking women: grateful slaves?'
    (To be confirmed)

    DR J. LEWIS

    15 May: `Women and welfare regimes.'

    PROFESSOR S. ARBER, Surrey

    22 May: `Women and income inequality in later
    life.'

    PROFESSOR S. JACKSON, Swansea

    29 May: `Educational outcomes for young women who
    have been in care.'

    DR C. VOGLER, City University

    5 June: `Money and the household.'

    PROFESSOR P. THANE, Sussex

    12 June: `Old women past and present.'

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    WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE

    Policy, practice, and power: issues in human female reproduction

    The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Wolfson Hall, Somerville College. Further details may be obtained
    from Lucia Nixon, Magdalen College, or Carrie LaSeur, University
    College.

    DR F. BLAKE, John Radcliffe Hospital

    23 Apr.: `Introduction: psychosocial background to
    women's reproductive lives.'

    DR E. GREENHALL, Family Planning Association

    30 Apr.: `Control of conception.'

    DR A. STEWART, Warneford Hospital

    7 May: `Menarche and other issues in
    adolescence.'

    PROFESSOR W. SAVAGE, London Hospital Medical College

    14 May: `Antenatal interventions.'

    DR J. LUMLEY, National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit

    21 May: `Labour and birth.'

    G. PALMER, London Centre for International Child Health

    28 May: `Lactation.'

    DR V. BERAL, ICRF

    4 June: `Reproductive cancers: the effects of
    contraception and child-bearing on cancer risk.'

    DR A. MCPHERSON, GP

    11 June: `Menopause.'

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    FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

    The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on the
    days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre. All are
    invited.

    Sandwiches and wine will be served after the lectures at a cost of
    £2.50 per person. Bookings should be made in advance with the
    Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library,
    Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234).

    DR J. BENSON

    Wed. 1 May: `Some illuminated Sanskirt manuscripts
    in the Bodleian Library.'

    P. ADAMS

    Tue. 21 May: ` "A voice and a physiognomy of
    their own": the libraries of the Oxford women's colleges.'

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    HAKLUYT SOCIETY

    Society and geography in imperial contexts

    A study afternoon to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the
    foundation of the Hakluyt Society will be held at 2 p.m. on Friday, 3
    May, in the Modern History Faculty.

    The programme of short papers (set out below) and discussion, chaired
    by Professor Judith Brown, will be followed by tea at 4.45 p.m. and a
    visit to the Museum of the History of Science, conducted by the
    Director, Dr J.A. Bennett, at 5.30 p.m.

    Those wishing to attend should send their names in advance to Dr F.
    Fernandez-Armesto, care of the Moder History Faculty.

    DR RICHARD DRAYTON: A paper on the origins of the
    Hakluyt Society (title to be confirmed).

    DR JUAN PIMENTEL IGEA: `Travellers and readers: the
    scientific expedition as a genre and its publics.'

    DR MANUEL LUCENA GIRALDO: `Imperial politics and the
    publication of geographical discoveries in enlightenment
    Spain.'

    DR RICHARD GROVE: `Empires of nature' (title to be
    confirmed).

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    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 April 1996: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    PAVRY AND WINCHESTER THESIS PRIZES 1996

    The Board of the Faculty of Social Studies proposes to award two
    prizes in Michaelmas Term 1996, provided that there are candidates of
    sufficient merit. Both of these prizes are awarded for succesful
    theses (M.Phil., M.Litt., or D.Phil.) in the faculties of Social
    Studies, Law, or Modern History.

    The Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry Memorial Prize
    (£500) is for a thesis on a subject in the area of international
    peace and understanding.

    The Bapsybanoo Marchioness of Winchester Prize
    (£500) is for a thesis on international relations, with
    particular reference to the area of human rights and fundamental
    freedoms.

    Candidates should apply in writing to Mrs Marga Lyall, Secretary to
    the Managers of the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, Centre for
    International Studies, Social Studies Faculty Centre, George Street,
    Oxford OX1 2RL, not later than 12 noon on Friday, 26
    July
    . Applications must include a copy of the thesis, together
    with a short abstract, and a letter supplying (a) the
    candidate's name, college, and degree; (b) the names of the
    candidate's examiners and supervisor(s) (not applicable to M.Phil.
    candidates); (c) a clear indication concerning for which of
    the two prizes the candidate is submitting the thesis; (d)
    an address for communication should the candidate not be returning to
    the University in Michaelmas Term.

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    SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

    The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications from
    members of the University for grants towards the costs of research in
    economic history. Applications will be considered from
    undergraduates, graduate students, and members of academic staff, and
    may related to research into the economic history of any period or
    country.

    Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information about
    the general nature of their research to establish that it falls
    within the field of economic history; and (b) specify the
    precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which a grant is
    requested. They should also give the name of one referee who might be
    consulted by the committee.

    It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be made
    for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded.
    Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional
    circumstances.

    The committee will consider applications twice in each year. The
    closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of
    Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week of
    Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A. Macallister,
    Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University
    Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

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    RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL BEQUEST

    The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at
    Oxford who are citizens of the Republic of India, and who, because of
    unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to complete the
    qualifications for which they are registered. Grants will not
    normally be awarded to those near to the beginning of their course of
    study. Application forms may be obtained from the Secretary of the
    Radhakrishnan Memorial Bequest, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane,
    Oxford OX1 2LE.

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    SASAKAWA FUND

    Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to be
    applied to `the advancement within the University of knowledge and
    understanding of Japan by way of academic contact and exchange
    between members of the University and citizens of Japan'. Further
    details may be obtained from the Secretary of the Board of Management
    of the Fund (Miss Suzanne Byrch), the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane,
    to whom applications should be returned by the end of the fourth week
    in each term.

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    HAYTER FUND

    Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established
    university posts for travel and research purposes connected with the
    languages and the economic, social, and political development of the
    following areas: the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, the
    Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east Asia, and Latin America.
    Application forms and further details may be obtained from the
    Secretary of the Hayter Committee, the Oriental Institute, Pusey
    Lane.

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    VARLEY-GRADWELL TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP IN
    INSECT ECOLOGY

    Applications are invited for the Varley-Gradwell Travelling
    Fellowship in Insect Ecology. A travelling fellowship, which may be
    of up to £1,900 in value, will be made for the support of field
    work, travel, and other activity of direct benefit to the field of
    insect ecology. The fellowship will be tenable for one year
    commencing on a date to be agreed. It will not be renewable.

    Applications, including a curriculum vitae and a
    research proposal, should be sent to the Secretary of the Board of
    Management for the Varley-Gradwell Travelling Fellowship in Insect
    Ecology (Dr E.A. Gemmill), University Offices, Wellington Square,
    Oxford OX1 2JD, by 31 May. The research proposal should include a
    budget and should not exceed two sides of A4 in length. Applicants
    should arrange for two referees to write in confidence to the
    secretary by the closing date. In the case of graduate students, one
    of the referees should be the supervisor.

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    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 18 April 1996: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

    With the approval of the General Board the following appointments
    and reappointments have been made and titles conferred for the
    periods stated.

    
    1 Appointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS
    
    Committee for the School of Management Studies
    
    stephen j. new (b.sc. Southampton, ph.d. Manchester), Fellow-
    elect of Hertford. In Management Studies (Operations Management).
    From 10 June 1996 until 9 June 2001.
    
    Medieval and Modern Languages
    
    catriona h.m. kelly, ma, d.phil., Fellow of New College. In
    Russian. From 18 March 1996 until 17 March 2001.
    
    Physical Sciences
    
    fion p.e. dunne (b.sc. Bristol, ph.d. Sheffield), Fellow-elect
    of Hertford. In Engineering Science. From 22 April 1996 until 21
    April 2001.
    
    patrick s. grant, ma, d.phil. (b.eng. Nottingham), Fellow-elect
    of Linacre. In Processing of Materials. From 1 October 1999 until
    30 September 2004.
    
    lance miller (b.sc. Leicester, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of
    St Catherine's. In Physics (Astrophysics). From 1 March 1996
    until 28 February 2001.
    
    amy b. zavatsky, ma status, d.phil. (b.sc. Philadelphia), Fellow-
    elect of St Edmund Hall. In Engineering Science. From 1 September
    1996 until 31 August 2001.
    
    Social Studies
    
    hyun song shin, ma, m.phil., d.phil., Fellow-elect of Nuffield.
    In Economics. From 1 October 1996 until 30 September 2001.
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)
    

    (From 1 October 1996 until 30 September 2001 unless otherwise stated) English peter d. mcdonald, ma status, d.phil. (ba, ma, Rhodes, SA), Fellow-elect of St Hugh's. In English. TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURERS Physical Sciences h. janet efstathiou, ma (ph.d. Durham), Fellow of St Hugh's. In Information Engineering. From 1 January 1996 until 31 December 1999. helen s. margolis, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Worcester. In Physics. From 1 January 1996 until 30 September 1998. GRAMMATIKOS Literae Humaniores andrew hobson, ma, Fellow-elect of Magdalen. From 1 October 1996 until 30 September 2001. JUNIOR LECTURERS (fixed-term) Mathematical Sciences richard a. earl, ba. In Pure Mathematics. From 1 January 1996 until 30 September 1998. Interfaculty Committee for Chinese Studies rana s.j. mitter (ba, m.phil. Cambridge). In the Modern Politics and Society of China. From 1 August 1996 until 31 July 1999. INSTRUCTOR IN GERMAN Medieval and Modern Languages gudrun r. loftus, ma status. From 1 February 1996 until 31 December 1998.

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    2 Reappointments UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

    (From 1 October 1996 until the retiring age unless otherwise stated) Biological Sciences mark s.p. sansom, ma, d.phil., Student of Christ Church. In Molecular Biophysics. Educational Studies christopher w.r. davies, ma, m.sc., d.phil., Fellow of Kellogg. In Educational Studies (English). From 1 September 1996. geoffrey f. hayward, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Kellogg. In Educational Studies (Biology). From 1 September 1996. Physical Sciences stephen p. hesselbo, ma (b.sc. Aberdeen, ph.d. Bristol), Fellow of St Peter's. In Stratigraphy. paul w. smith, ma (m.sc. Southampton, ph.d. London), Fellow of Pembroke. In Engineering Science. From 1 June 1996. Psychological Studies kim r. plunkett, ma (b.sc. London, m.sc., d.phil. Sussex), Fellow of St Hugh's. In Psychology. UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

    (From 1 October 1996 until the retiring age unless otherwise stated) Law stephen a. smith, ma, d.phil. (ba Queen's, Kingston, ll.b. Toronto). In Law. Social Studies desmond s. king, ma (ba Dublin, ma, ph.d. Northwestern), Fellow of St John's. In Politics. RESEARCH OFFICER Physical Sciences n. demaria (ph.d. Turin). In Particle and Nuclear Physics. From 1 January 1997 until 31 December 1998.

    3 Conferment of title UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

    (From 1 October 1996 until 30 September 2001 unless otherwise stated) English jonathan a. mee (ba Newcastle-upon-Tyne, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of University College. In English. Law patricia r. ferguson, ba, Fellow-elect of Hertford. In Law. lionel d. smith, (b.sc. Toronto, ll.b. W.Ontario, ll.m. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of St Hugh's. In Law. Literae Humaniores denis c. feeney, d.phil. (ba, ma Auckland), Fellow-elect of New College. In Classical Languages. Social Studies a. stanley hurn, m.phil., d.phil. (b.com. Natal), Fellow-elect of Brasenose.

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    4 Appointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine CLINICAL TUTOR derek e. roskell, ba, bm (ma Cambridge). In Pathology. From 1 January 1996 until 31 December 1998. CLINICAL LECTURERS mahomed a. dada (mb, ch.b., m.med. Natal, m.med. Stellenbosch). In Cellular Science. From 1 February 1996 until 31 January 1999. gabor g. libertiny (Dip.in Medicine, Budapest), frcs. In Surgery. From 18 March 1996 until 17 March 1999. PFIZER CLINICAL LECTURER anneke lucassen, d.phil. (b.med.sci., mb, bs Newcastle), mrcp. In Clinical Genetics. From 6 March 1996 until 5 March 1997.

    5 Reappointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine UNIVERSITY LECTURER (NON-MEDICAL) kathryn j. wood, ma status, d.phil., Fellow of University College. In Surgery (Immunology). From 1 October 1996 until the retiring age. CLINICAL LECTURERS h.-y. chan (mb, bs London), frcs. In Surgery. From 1 November 1996 until 31 October 1999. vinod nargund, ma status (mb, bs, ms Karnatak, Dharwad), frcs. In Surgery (Urology/Transplantation). From 1 August 1996 until 31 July 1997. clare e. smith, ba, bm (ma Cambridge). In Psychiatry. From 1 January 1997 until 31 December 1997. TUTOR IN GENERAL PRACTICE (part-time) rickman j.p. godlee, ma status (mb, bs London, ma Cambridge), mrcgp, drcog. From 1 March 1996 until 28 February 2001.

    6 Conferment of title by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS fergus v. gleeson (mb, bs London), mrcp, frcr. In Radiology. From 1 April 1996 until 31 March 1999. john r. lehane (mb, ch.b. Liverpool), mrcp, frca. In Anaesthetics. From 1 February 1996 until 31 January 1999.

    7 Reconferment of title by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURER ian d. buley, bm, ma. In Histopathology/Cytopathology. From 1 July 1996 until the retiring age or resignation from his substantive appointment.

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    section



    ANNUAL ELECTIONS OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS
    OF FACULTIES


    Board of the Faculty of Clinical
    Medicine (7 June): Vacancies

    Council has made the following decree for 1996: Notwithstanding
    the provisions of Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 5, cll. 2 and 5 (1)
    (Statutes, 1995, p. 235), the timetable for the
    elections to the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine in
    Trinity Term 1965 shall be varied so that nominations of
    candidates by six members of the faculty shall be made twelve
    clear days before the day fixed for the election and voting
    papers shall be sent out not later than the eighth day before the
    election day.

    Notice is hereby given of vacancies for official and ordinary
    members, as set out below. Qualification for official and
    ordinary membership is set out in Ch. II, Sect. VI, §§
    1 and 2 (Statutes, 1995, pp. 229–32). Those
    entitled to nominate and vote in these elections are:

    (a) For official members, all the members of the
    faculty, and

    (b) for ordinary members, the members of the faculty
    exclusive of those qualified to be official members of the
    faculty board.

    Nominations in writing by two electors will be
    received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices
    up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, and nominations in writing by
    six electors up to 4 p.m. on Friday, 24 May. There
    is no special form, but, in addition to the signatures of
    nominators, nominations must state, in block
    capitals
    , the name and initials, and colleges (or, if no
    college, the department) of (1) each person nominated, (2) each
    nominator.

    Vacancies Retiring Members Period from
    MT 1996
    (a) Official members Three Professor Barlow

    Professor Bell

    Professor
    Grahame-Smith
    2 years
    (b) Ordinary members Three Dr Donaghy

    Dr Hart
    Dr Thomson
    2 years

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    section



    APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINERS

    The following have been appointed:

        MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY
    
        European Literature
    
        a.m.v. suerbaum, ma, Somerville
        d.j. constantine, ma, d.phil., Queen's
        t.j. reed, ma, Queen's
        r.c. ockenden, ma, d.phil., Wadham
        h. watanabe-o'kelly, ma, Exeter
        c.j. davis, ma, d.phil., Lady Margaret Hall
        d.w. maskell, ma, d.phil. Oriel
        c.f. robinson, ma, Christ Church
        m.m. bowie, ma, All Souls
        n.e. cronk, ma, d.phil., St Edmund Hall
        j.h.m. taylor, ma, d.phil., St Hilda's
        c.h. griffin, ma, d.phil., Trinity
        j.d. rutherford, ma, d.phil., Queen's
        p.r.j. hainsworth, ma, Lady Margaret Hall
        r.f.s. hamer, ma, Christ Church
        e.h. cooper, ma, University
        d.g.e. norbrook, ma, d.phil., Magdalen
        j.l. johnson, ma, m.phil., Exeter
        c. scott, ma, m.phil., d.phil., St John's
    
            All for Trinity Term 1996    
    
    MASTER OF STUDIES
        European Literature
    
        r.n.n. robertson, ma, d.phil., St John's
        t.j. reed, ma, Queen's
        r.f. green, ma, d.phil., Keble
        m.m. bowie, ma, All Souls
        r.d.f. pring-mill, ma, d.litt., St Catherine's
        c. scott, ma, m.phil., d.phil., St John's
    
        Research Methods in Modern Languages
    
        t.j. reed, ma, Queen's
        m.m. bowie, ma, All Souls
        c. scott, ma, m.phil., d.phil., St John's
    
            All for Trinity Term 1996    
    
    BACHELOR OF MEDICINE
        Second Examination
        Year 3
        Additional Examiner
            Surgery
    
        a.n. kingsworth (b.sc., ms London) FRCS (vice
    Dunn, granted leave of absence)
    
            For Trinity Term 1996
    
    


    APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINER PRO HAC VICE

    The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have appointed c.j.f. spry, ma,
    d.phil., Merton College and Professor of Immunology at St
    George's Hospital Medical School as the external examiner in
    Anatomy for the First Examination for the degree of Bachelor of
    Medicine held in Hilary Term 1996 pro hac vice
    (vice Professor B.A. Wood, granted leave of
    absence).

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    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    The following changes in regulations made by the General Board of the
    Faculties, and, with the approval of the General Board, the following
    changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees
    will come into effect on 3 May.


    1 General Board of the Faculties

    Joint Committee about Undergraduate Affairs

    With immediate effect

    1 In Ch. II, Sect. v, § 3, cl. 1
    (Statutes, 1995, pp. 228–9) before the paragraph
    commencing `(9)–(16)' insert:

    `(9) the President of the Oxford University Student Union;

    (10) the Education Officer of the Oxford University Student Union;

    (11) the Chair of the Oxford University Student Union Education
    Committee;'.

    2 Ibid., delete `(9)–(16) eight Junior
    Members, of whom four shall be drawn from the art faculties and four
    from the science faculties' and substitute `(12)–(17) six Junior
    Members, of whom three shall be drawn from the arts faculties and
    three from the science faculties'.

    3 Ibid., delete `General Faculties Committee' in
    all four places in which these words occur and in each case
    substitute `Education Committee'.


    2 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology
    and Geography

    Master of Science in Environmental Change and Management

    With immediate effect (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 745,
    l. 14, after `Methods' insert `and
    techniques
    '.

    2 Ibid., l. 18, delete `Law, Policy, and
    Economics' and substitute `Managing the environment'.


    3 Board of the Faculty of Clinical
    Medicine

    Second Examination for the Degree of BM

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 873, ll. 11–15,
    delete `Each essay submitted must be accompanied by a certificate,
    signed by each candidate, indicating that it is the candidate's own
    work and that it has not been submitted for any degree, diploma, or
    prize, or for publication, prior to the commencement of the
    candidate's third year of clinical studies.' and substitute `A
    certificate, signed by the candidate in respect of each essay,
    indicating that it is the candidate's own work and that it has not
    been submitted for any degree, diploma, or prize, or for publication,
    prior to the commencement of the candidate's third year of clinical
    studies, must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed
    to the chairman of examiners.'


    4 Board of the Faculty of English
    Language and Literature

    (a) Honour School of English Language and Literature

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 216,
    ll. 5–7, delete `Save that tutors . . . candidate's own work.'
    and substitute `Every thesis must be the candidate's own work. Tutors
    may, however, advise on the choice and scope of the subject, provide
    a reading list, and read and comment on a first draft.'

    2 Ibid., l. 12, delete `give credit to' and
    substitute `consider'.

    3 Ibid., p. 217, delete ll. 21–3 and
    substitute:

    `(e) Every extended essay shall be the candidate's own
    work. Tutors may, however, advise on the scope of the subject and
    may provide a reading list.'

    (b) M.Phil. in English Studies

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first
    examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 594, ll. 11–13,
    remove asterisks.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
    1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 588,
    after l. 38 insert: `Teaching may not be available for every option
    in every year and candidates are advised to enquire when they submit
    their applications for admission.'

    2 Ibid., p. 589, ll. 5–6, delete from `of
    the first . . . Trinity' and substitute `of the eighth week of the
    Hilary'.


    5 Boards of the Faculty of English
    Language and Literature and Literae Humaniores

    Honour School of Classics and English

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first
    examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 150, l. 22, after `or
    the' insert `Deputy'.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
    1998)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 150, delete ll.
    34–6 and substitute:

    `2. Every thesis must be the candidate's own work. Tutors may,
    however, advise on the choice and scope of the subject, provide a
    reading list, and read and comment on a first draft.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    6 Boards of the Faculty of English
    Language and Literature and Modern History

    Honour School of Modern History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 401, l. 16, at the
    beginning of the line, insert `Deputy'.


    7 Boards of the Faculty of English
    Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

    Honour School of English and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    As for the Final Honour School of English Language and
    Literature

    (see 4 (a) above).


    8 Boards of the Faculty of Law, Literae
    Humaniores, Mathematical Sciences, Modern Languages, Physical
    Sciences, Psychological Studies, Social Studies, and Theology

    Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, delete from p. 484, l. 38
    to p. 485, l. 7 and insert:

    `119. Formal Logic

    The paper will consist of three sections:

    (i) Propositional and Predicate Logic.

    Formal languages of propositional logic, adequate sets of
    connectives, conjunctive and disjunctive normal form, tautologies,
    logical consequence; formal languages of predicate logic,
    satisfaction, truth, validity, logical consequence. Deductive systems
    of propositional and predicate calculus; proofs and theorems; prenex
    normal forms; the soundness and completeness theorem. Derivation of
    the compactness theorem; simple applications of the compactness
    theorem. Predicate calculus with identity, normal models.
    Elementariness. The LÜwenheim–Skolem theorems. First-order
    theories and their properties: completeness, categoricity.
    Differences between first-order and second-order logic.

    (ii) Set Theory.

    Basic axioms of set theory. Cartesian products, relations and
    functions. Axiom of infinity and the construction of the natural
    numbers; induction and the recursion theorem. Cardinality: finite,
    countable and uncountable sets; Cantor's theorem; the
    SchrÜder–Bernstein theorem. Linear orders and well-orders;
    order isomorphism, dense linear order. Transfinite induction and
    recursion. Comparability of well-orders. Ordinals, and their
    arithmetic. Equivalence of the axiom of choice, Zorn's lemma, the
    well-ordering principle, and cardinal comparability. Cardinals, and
    their arithmetic.

    (iii) Metamathematics.

    Primitive recursion and general recursion. Total and partial
    functions. Computability: Turing machines or register machines;
    existent of a universal machine; the s-m-n theorem. Decision
    problems; undecidability of the halting problem. Church's thesis.
    Formal systems of arithmetic: representability of sets and functions.
    Undefinability of truth. GÜdel's first incompleteness theorem;
    Rosser's theorem; Löb's theorem; the Hilbert–Bernays
    adequacy conditions on a provability predicate; Gödel's second
    incompleteness theorem. No decision procedure for first-order logical
    validity; no complete proof procedure for second-order logical
    validity.

    In addition to questions requiring precise knowledge of
    topics of the syllabus and some problem solving ability, there will
    also be questions which give candidates an opportunity to discuss
    philosophical implications of some of the topics.

    Candidates will
    be required to attempt at least one question from section
    (i) and at least one from section (ii) or section (iii).'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    9 Board of the Faculty of Literae
    Humaniores

    (a) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and
    Literature

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 608,
    l. 20, after `Written examination' insert `and presubmitted essays'.

    2 Ibid., ll. 23–6, delete `Each option in
    section A . . . will not be required.' and substitute `Each option in
    Section A will be examined in one paper (three hours) of passages for
    translation and comment (passages for comment will be set only from
    books prescribed for closer study; discussion of textual points and
    readings will not be required) and either one paper (three hours) of
    essays or three presubmitted essays, each of between 5,000 and 7,500
    words, which between them display knowledge of more than a narrow
    range of the topic. Supervisors or others are permitted to give
    bibliographical help with, and to discuss a first draft of,
    presubmitted essays. The essays (two typewritten or printed copies)
    must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Essays presubmitted
    for the M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Literature' to the Clerk of the
    Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, to reach
    him by noon on the Thursday of sixth week of the Trinity Full Term in
    which the examination is to be taken.'

    3 Ibid., ll. 41–3, delete `course, and any
    proposed . . . following; such' and substitute `course; any proposed
    thesis title not later than Tuesday of first week in the Trinity Full
    Term next following; and the proposed titles of any presubmitted
    essays (see (5)) as soon as practicable, but in any case no later
    than Tuesday of the first week of the Hilary Full Term of the second
    year of the course. Such'.

    (b) M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

    With effect from October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 680,
    l. 41, delete `and to discuss drafts of' and substitute `, and to
    discuss a first draft of'.

    2 Ibid., p. 682, after l. 5 insert:

    `(f)
    Computing and Classical Literary Studies. This option will be
    examined by means of a project.'

    3 Ibid., after l. 17 insert:

    `(viii) Literary Theory for Classical Studies'.

    4 Ibid., l. 18, delete `Option (vii)' and
    substitute `Options (vii) and (viii)'.

    5 Ibid., l. 19, renumber (viii) as (ix).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    10 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
    Humaniores and Physical Sciences

    Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 518,
    l. 30, delete `Trinity' and substitute `Michaelmas'.

    2 Ibid., l. 31, delete `six' and substitute
    `five'.


    11 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
    Humaniores and Theology

    Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1–16 As for the Honour School of Theology (see 22 (a)
    (ii) below).

    17 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 510, l. 12, delete
    `461' and substitute `451'.


    12 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical
    Sciences

    M.Sc. in Computation

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 723, delete ll.
    2–37 and substitute:

    `M.Sc. in Computation

    1. The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, in
    consultation with the Sub-faculty of Computation, shall elect for the
    supervision of the course an organising committee which shall have
    power to arrange lectures and other instruction.

    The committee
    shall elect a chairman from its own members; the chairman shall have
    power to approve applications on behalf of the committee. The
    committee shall be responsible for appointment of a supervisor for
    each student.

    2.Candidates must follow for at least three terms a course of
    instruction in Computation.

    3. The examination shall be in three parts, as follows:

    (i) Candidates shall complete a written assignment on
    each of seven topics from the syllabus described in Schedules A and
    B, with at least three selected from Schedule B;

    (ii) Candidates shall submit a dissertation of not more than
    30,000 words, plus not more than thirty pages of diagrams, tables,
    listing, etc., on a subject selected by the candidate in consultation
    with the supervisor and approved by the chairman of the organising
    committee.

    (iii) There shall be an examination viva voce, unless the
    candidate shall have been individually dispensed by the examiners, on
    the dissertation and on any of the topics listed in the schedules
    below, to take place in the first week of October.

    4. Every candidate must submit to the chairman of the organising
    committee by the end of Hilary Term in the year of the examination
    the title and a brief statement of the form and scope of his or her
    dissertation, together with an essay of not more than 3,000 words,
    describing the background of the project, its objectives and its plan
    of work. The submission must be approved by the person who has agreed
    to act as supervisor during the preparation of the dissertation.

    Candidates will be expected to demonstrate in their dissertation
    an appreciation of the role of methods studied in the course as
    contributing to the design and development of computing systems.

    5. Two typewritten or printed copies of the dissertation must be
    delivered not later than noon on the first Friday in September in
    the year of the examination to the M.Sc. Examiners (Computation), c/o
    the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford
    OX1 4BG.

    Candidates will, on submission of a dissertation, be
    required to produce a certificate from their supervisor that they
    have followed for three terms a course of instruction in Computation.
    One copy of the thesis of each successful candidate will normally be
    presented to the Computing Laboratory Library.

    6. Before the end of the third week of Michaelmas Term, each
    candidate in consultation with their supervisor must submit for
    approval by the chairman of the organising committee a list of topics
    under Schedule A which will be offered for examination and similarly
    for the topics of Schedule B before the end of the third week of
    Hilary Term. A total of seven topics must be selected with at least
    three from Schedule B. The choice must exclude any topics which
    substantially overlap the topics of the candidate's undergraduate
    degree or other recent academic study.

    7. For each topic, the lecturer on the course of instruction
    shall prescribe a schedule of practical work, tutorial exercises and
    a written assignment, and shall make available to the Chairman of
    Examiners evidence showing the extent to which each candidate has
    pursued an adequate course of practical and class work.

    8. With the permission of the organising committee, a candidate
    may offer up to two alternative topics to replace any of the topics
    listed in Schedule B. An application for such replacement must be
    made to the chairman of the organising committee by the end of the
    first week of the term in which the lecture course on the topic is
    given; it must be approved by the student's supervisor and by the
    lecturer on the course, who thereby undertakes to accept appointment
    as assessor for the topic.

    9. Not later than noon on the Monday of the third week following
    termination of the course of instruction on the topic, the completed
    assignment for that topic must be delivered to the M.Sc. Examiners
    (Computation), c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools,
    High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG.

    10. A list of those candidates who have satisfied the examiners in
    a particular topic shall be posted in the vestibule of the Computing
    Laboratory within three working weeks of the final date for
    submission of assignments.

    11 Any candidate who has not satisfied the
    examiners in four topics by the beginning of the Trinity Term shall
    be deemed to have failed the degree course.

    To satisfy the
    examiners a candidate must pass five of the assignments under clause
    3(i) (including at least two from Schedule B or assignments
    on alternative topics approved under clause 8) and attain an
    adequate level of achievement in all three parts of the examination.

    12. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the
    whole examination.

    13. A candidate who has failed to satisfy the examiners in the
    examination as a whole will be permitted to retake it on one further
    occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. A
    revised or new dissertation may be submitted before the designated
    date in that same year; otherwise, the same dissertation will be
    accepted.

    No written assignment shall be submitted to the
    examiners on more than one occasion.

    A candidate who has passed in
    four of the assignments under clause 3(i) will be required
    to re-attend the course and obtain a pass in one further topic,
    selected from Schedule B.

    Schedule A

    The topics of Schedule A will be chosen from a list approved by the
    Organising Committee and published in the University
    Gazette
    before the end of the Trinity Term in the academic
    year before the examination is taken. The published list will include
    topic (i) below and at least four of the topics (ii) to
    (vi).

    (i) Mathematics for Software Engineering

    (ii) Introduction to Imperative Programming

    (iii) Introduction to Concurrency

    (iv) Introduction to Functional Programming

    (v) Introduction to Numerical Computation

    (vi) Introduction to Architecture

    Schedule B

    The topics of Schedule B will be chosen from a list approved by the
    Organising Committee and published in the University
    Gazette
    before the end of the Trinity Term in the academic
    year before the examination is taken. The list will include topic
    (i) and at least four other of the topics described below.

    (i) Software Specificaton and Design

    (ii) Requirements Engineering

    (iii) Object-Oriented Programming

    (iv) Parallel Scientific Computation

    (v) Software Development Management

    (vi) Advanced Concurrency Tools

    (vii) Machine-Assisted Software Engineering

    (viii) Software Testing

    (ix) Logic Programming and Learning

    (x) Operating Systems

    (xi) Programming Language Implementation

    (xii) Theorem Proving

    (xiii) Application-oriented Program Semantics

    (xiv) Critical Systems Engineering

    (xv) Hardware/software Codesign

    (xvi) Performance Analysis

    (xvii) Scalable Parallel Programming'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    13 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and
    Modern Languages

    (a) Honour School of Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 421, delete ll.
    31–5 and substitute:

    `(2) Góngora, with a special study of Soledad
    primera
    (from Soledades, ed. R. Jammes,
    Castalia), Fábula de Polifemo y Galatea (ed. A.
    A. Parker, Cátedra), Sonnets (Poems of
    Góngora
    , ed. R.O. Jones, pp. 87–92). Candidates will
    be expected to have read Soledad segunda.

    (3) Quevedo, with a special study of `Infierno', `El mundo por de
    dentro'. `Sueno de la muerte', in Sue§os y
    discursos
    (ed. J.O. Crosby, Castalia);'.

    (b) Transfer to M.Litt. and D.Phil. status

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 824, l. 30, delete `.'
    and insert `though this is in itself not a sufficient condition for
    transfer.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    14 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

    (a) Honour Moderations in Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 58,
    after l. 28 insert:

    `4. The English and Celtic Peoples, 1154–1216.'

    2 Ibid., ll. 29–42, renumber existing cll.
    4–15 as 5–16.

    3 Ibid., p. 61, after l. 16 insert:

    `4. THE ENGLISH AND THE CELTIC PEOPLES, 1154–1216

    1. Gerald of Wales, Expugnatio Hibernica: The Conquest of
    Ireland
    , ed. and transl. A. B. Scott and F. X. Martin (Dublin,
    1978).

    ——The Journey through Wales and The Description
    of Wales
    , transl. L. Thorpe (Penguin Classics, 1978).

    2.The Song of Dermot and the Earl, ed. and transl.
    G.H. Orpen (Oxford, 1892; repr. Felinfach: Llanerch Press, 1994). 3.
    Brut Y Tywysogyon or The Chronicle of the Princes, Peniarth MS.
    20 Version
    , transl. T. Jones (Cardiff, 1952): the annals for
    1157, 1158, 1164–5, 1170–3, 1176, 1197–8,
    1215–16.

    4. The Annals of Tigernach, ed. and transl. W. Stokes
    (repr. Felinfach: Llanerch Press, 1993), ii. 394–449. [c.28 pp.]

    5. A.O. Anderson, Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers,
    ad 500–1286
    (London, 1908; reprinted Stamford, 1991), pp.
    239–40, 241–2, 247–8, 249–59, 268, 270, 278,
    286–90, 293–4, 299–300, 307, 311, 328–31.

    6. A.O. Anderson, Early Sources of Scottish History
    (Edinburgh, 1992; reprinted Stamford, 1990), pp. 240, 244– 5,
    254–5, 263–4, 292–5, 310–12, 322, 347–8,
    374–6.

    7. E. Curtis and R.B. McDowell, Irish Historical
    Documents
    , 1172–1922 (London, 1943), nos. 3 and 4
    (possibly also 5–7). No. 3 is also available in EHD ii.
    776–9.

    8. E.L.G. Stones (ed. and transl.), Anglo-Scottish
    Relations
    , 1174–1328: Some Selected Documents (Edinburgh,
    1965; repr. Oxford, 1970), nos. 1–3, 5.

    9. O. Bergin (ed. and transl.), Irish Bardic Poetry
    (Dublin, 1970), nos. 20–4.

    10. J.P. Clancy (transl.), The Earliest Welsh
    Poetry
    (London, 1970), pp. 129–35, 145–8,
    153–6.

    11 D. Jenkins (transl.), The Law of
    Hywel Dda: Law Texts from Medieval Wales
    (Llandysul, 1986),
    pp. 1, 5–7.'

    4 Ibid., pp. 61–7, renumber existing cll. 4–13 as
    5–14.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 361,
    delete ll. 25–9 and substitute:

    `SPECIAL SUBJECTS'.

    2 Ibid., p. 362, delete ll. 19–22 and
    substitute:

    `3. Gregory of Tours, Miracles of St Martin, Bk.
    I, translated by R. Van Dam, Saints and their Miracles in Late
    Antique Gaul
    (Princeton, NJ, 1993), pp. 199–228.

    4. The Suffering and Miracles of the Martyr St
    Julian
    , translated by R. Van Dam, Saints and their
    Miracles in Late Antique Gaul
    , pp. 162–95.'.

    3 Ibid., delete ll. 24–7 and substitute:

    `Paris, 1887) I. Preface, 20; II. 10; III. 7, 12, 18; IV.
    4–5; V. 3, 5; VI. 2, 5; VII. 1, 7, 16; VIII. 12; IX. 1; X. 12;
    Appendix, 1, 2 (xerox).'.

    4 Ibid., after l. 27 insert:

    `6. W.E. Klingshirn, Caesarius of Arles: Life, Testament,
    Letters
    (Liverpool, 1994).'

    5 Ibid., ll. 28–45, renumber existing cll.
    6–14 as 7–15.

    6 Ibid., delete ll. 31–2 and substitute:

    `9. Cassiodorus, Variae, II. 41; III. 1–4,
    17; IV. 1; translated by S.J.B. Barnish, The Variae of Magnus
    Aurelius Cassiodorus Senator
    (Liverpool, 1992), pp. 43–9,
    54, 74.'.

    7 Ibid., delete ll. 43–4 and substitute:

    `14. The Frankish princely tombs in Cologne Cathedral: J. Werner,
    `Frankish Royal Tombs in the Cathedrals of Cologne and Saint-Denis',
    Antiquity, 38 (1964), plates xxx–xxxiii (between
    pp. 204–5).'

    8 Ibid., p. 364, before l. 1 insert:

    `2. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of Willian of
    Jumiéges, Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Torigni
    , ed.
    E.M.C. van Houts (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1992–5), vol. ii, pp.
    105 (`At that time . . .)–109 (. . . almost twenty-three
    years.'), pp. 159 (`Edward, king of the English . . .)–173 (. .
    . descended from noble origins.'), 177 (`While the victorious king .
    . .)–191 (. . . To Virgin's bosom when he died')'.

    9 Ibid., delete ll. 16–17 and substitute:

    `9. The Chronicle of John of Worcester, ed. R. R.
    Darlington and P. McGurk (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1995), vol. ii, pp.
    599– 607 (annal for 1066); and The Chronicle of Florence
    of Worcester
    , trans. T. Forester (London, 1854), pp.
    171–185 (start of annal for 1067 to `. . . founded and endowed
    himself.')'

    10 Ibid., ll. 1–18, renumber existing cll.
    2–9 as 3–10.

    11 Ibid., delete l. 23.

    12 Ibid., ll. 24–6, renumber existing cll.
    3–4 as 2–3.

    13 Ibid., l. 37, delete `3,'.

    (c) M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 577,
    l. 43, delete `1800' and substitute `1860'.

    2 Ibid., after l. 43 insert:

    `1.3. Navies and economies: Britain and France, 1660– 1815.'

    3 Ibid., renumber existing cll. 1.3–1.7 as
    1.4–1.8.

    4 Ibid., after l. 48 insert:

    `2.1 The Economic organisation of Science and Technology in the
    West since 1600'.

    5 Ibid., renumber existing cll. 2.1–2.3 as
    2.2–2.4.

    6 Ibid., p. 578, delete ll. 1–3 and
    substitute: `2.5 Science and Instrumentation in the Industrial Age'.

    7 Ibid., delete l. 11.

    8 Ibid., after l. 33 insert:

    `1.3. Navies and economies: Britain and France, 1660– 1815

    Over this period a great navy was the most expensive, elaborate and
    technically advanced expression of national power. Anglo-French naval
    rivalry helped to generate the largest industrial complexes in the
    Western world, and spurred major developments in ship design. These
    immensely costly activities had massive implications for public
    finance, colonial and trading policy, and administrative practices.
    This course will concentrate on the economic and technological
    aspects of the subject, at both theoretical and practical levels,
    including contemporary perceptions of maritime strategy. Attention
    will also be given to timber supply, gun-founding, problems of
    manpower and recruitment, promotion structures, food and health.
    While a comparative approach is a vital part of the course, a degree
    of concentration on one country will be allowed. A good knowledge of
    French, while desirable, is not essential.'

    9 Ibid., pp. 578–9, renumber existing cll.
    1.3–1.7 as 1.4– 1.8.

    10 Ibid., pp. 579–80, renumber existing cl.
    2.5 and cl. 2.1 and existing cll. 2.1–2.3 as 2.2–2.4.

    11 Ibid., p. 580, delete ll. 10–22 and substitute:

    `2.5 Science and Instrumentation in the Industrial Age

    The course
    examines the relations between science and instrument-making in the
    industrial age. It treats developments in the practices of instrument
    makers, both individuals and companies, in the context of the growing
    demand for precision in the laboratory science and industrial
    practice. The aim is to foster an approach that embraces not only the
    artefact-based analysis of instruments and their performance but also
    the wider scientific, economic, and social dimensions of their
    production and use, including their role in teaching and museums.'.

    12 Ibid., p. 584, delete l. 39 and substitute
    `The American Revolution and Constitution'.

    13 Ibid., after l. 42, insert `Nationalism,
    Politics and Culture in Ireland c.1870–1921'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    15 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and English Language and Literature

    (a) Honour Moderations in Modern History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 14 (a)
    above).

    (b) Honour School of Modern History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 14 (b)
    above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    16 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Literae Humaniores

    (a) Honour Moderations in Ancient and Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 14 (a)
    above).

    (b) Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 14 (b)
    above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    17 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Modern Languages

    (a) Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern
    Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 14 (a)
    above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 14 (b)
    above).


    18 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Social Studies

    (a) Honour Moderations in Modern History and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 14 (a)
    above).

    (b) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 14 (b)
    above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    19 Board of the Faculty of Oriental
    Studies

    Honour School of Oriental Studies

    (i) With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 463, ll. 13, 18 and
    29, delete `Oriental Institute' and substitute `Institute for Chinese
    Studies'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (ii) With immediate effect (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 471,
    after l. 4 insert new cl. (r):

    `(r) Modern Jewish Thought1'.

    2 Ibid., delete l. 8 and renumber existing cll.
    (r)–(t) as cll (s)–(u).

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (iii) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in
    1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 461, delete ll.
    23– and substitute:

    `Taha Husayn: al-Ayyam, vol. 1. Mahmud Tahir Lashin,
    Hadith al-qarya. Yusuf Idris, Arkhas layali, Bayt
    min lahm
    . Idwar al Kharrat: Turabuha za`faran
    (Dar al-Adab 1991, pp. 23–40). Emile Habibi: al-Kharaza
    al-zurqa' wa `awdat jubayna
    . al-Tayyib Salih: Dumat wad
    hamid
    . Tawfõq al-Hakim, Ughniyat al-mawt. Mahfuz,
    al-Liss wa'l-kilab. M.M. Badawi, An Anthology of
    Modern Arabic Verse
    , poems by al-Barudi, Shawqi, Hafiz
    Ibrahim, Zahawi, Rusafi, Mutran, Shukri, Naji, Taha, al-Shabbi,
    Nu`ayma, Abu Risha, Abu Shabaka, al-Bayyati, al-Sayyab, `Abd
    al-Sabur, Adunis.'

    2 Ibid., delete ll. 27–34 and substitute:

    `Tawfiq al-Hakim, Yawmiyyat na'ib fi'l-aryaf. Yahya
    Haqqi, Qindil Umm Hashim. Ghassan Kanafani, Rijal
    fi'l-shams
    . Salwa Bakr, Maqam `Atiyya.'

    3 Ibid., p. 49, l. 3, after `or Turkish]' insert:

    `[From 1 October 1997: or Persian]'.

    4 Ibid., l. 11, after `or Turkish]' insert:

    `[From 1 October 1997: or Persian]'.

    5 Ibid., p. 471, l 22, after `course' insert
    `abroad'.

    6 Ibid., ll. 28–9, delete `to participate in
    one or more approved projects of fieldwork or museum-based study,
    normally in a country within the historic Dar al-Islam, and'.

    7 Ibid., p. 474, l. 24, delete `A candidate' and
    substitute `Candidates'.

    8 Ibid., delete `his or her' and substitute
    `their'.

    9 Ibid., l. 26, after `passed' delete `an' and
    substitute `their'.

    10 Ibid., l. 29, delete `his or her' and
    substitute `their'.

    11 Ibid., after l. 3 insert:

    `Either, for Turkish with a subsidiary language,'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    20 Board of the Faculty of Physiological
    Sciences

    Honour School of Natural Science (Physiological Sciences)

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 449, l. 26, delete
    `Biochemistry' and substitute `Biochemistry: Molecular Mechanisms of
    Disease'.


    21 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

    (a) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 08, ll. 19–20,
    delete `Monday of the first week of' and substitute `Friday of the
    week before'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) M.Phil. in International Relations

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 614,
    delete l. 38 and substitute:

    `(a) Nationalism and Integration in Europe.
    The development of nationalisms and integration processes in Europe.
    Part I introduces the main concepts and theories used to analyse
    European nationalisms, and takes a close look at nation-building and
    national conflict in different regions, concentrating on the period
    since the French Revolution. The principal theories of nationality;
    uses of the doctrine of national self-determination in Europe; the
    formation of early nation-states; unification nationalisms in Germany
    and Italy, and the rise of separatist and anti-imperial nationalism.
    Part II looks at the twin processes of European integration and
    disintegration since 194. Classical and contemporary theories of
    integration; non-material conditions and consequences of political
    integration processes, especially those relating to
    identity-formation, communication, citizenship, and democracy; the
    idea and boundaries of Europe'.

    2 Ibid., p. 61, delete l. 6 and substitute:

    `(g) International Political Economy. The
    interrelationship between the world economy and the international
    political system, including the principal theories regarding
    international political economy. Topics will include: the
    reconstruction of the international economy after 194; the role of
    the US and theories of hegemonic stability; the politics of
    international trade and the evolution of the GATT/ WTO system; the
    development of regional economic arrangements and the relationship
    between regionalism and multilaterialism in the world economy; the
    politics of international finance, including the rise and decline of
    the Bretton Woods monetary system; the changing character of
    financial markets, and debt crises; the role of Japan and the
    emergence of the newly industrialising countries; the position of
    developing countries in the world economy; the politics of
    international investment'.

    3 Ibid., delete l. 18 and substitute: `(l) The
    International Relations of the Developing World
    . The
    international relations of developing countries from 1945 to the
    present day, focusing on the characteristics of developing states
    and their interaction with the international system at the political,
    economic, and military levels. Topics include: decolonisation and the
    emergence of the Third World; the nature of the state,
    self-determination and the problems of state building; the political
    and economic forces shaping international arrangements for trade,
    investment, and finance; the political and economic constraints on
    growth in the world economy; international financial institutions and
    their political impact; the politics of global investment; security,
    conflict, and intervention; the politics of alliance formation
    including Third World coalitions and their impact on international
    order; regionalism and `regimes''.

    4 Ibid., delete ll. 20–36 and substitute:

    `(n) The 1919 Paris Peace Conference. (Available in
    1996–7 only, for second-year M.Phil. students.)'

    (c) M.Sc. in Applied Social Studies

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 718, ll. 31–2,
    delete `(first placement) and not more than ,000 words (second
    placement)'.

    (d) M.Sc. in Economics for Development

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1995 (for first
    examination in 1996)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 731,
    delete ll. 41–2 and substitute `Demand theory; choice under
    uncertainty; economics of information; market structures; theories of
    the firm; public goods and externalities; distribution/ social
    welfare.'

    2 Ibid., delete ll. 44–6 and substitute
    `Macroeconomic aggregates: behaviour and measurement; macroeconomic
    models; money and interest rate; employment and unemployment;
    inflation, rational expectations; monetary and fiscal policy (closed
    economy).'

    3 Ibid., delete ll. 48–9 and substitute
    `Exchange rates, balance-of-payments adjustment; monetary and fiscal
    policy (open economy); comparative advantage/trade theory; models of
    economics growth.'

    4 Ibid., p. 732, l. 1, after
    `statistics' insert `and
    mathematics
    '.

    5 Ibid., delete ll. 2–7 and substitute:

    `(i) Mathematics


    Multivariate calculus (total differentiation, partial
    differentiation, integration); constrained and unconstrained
    optimisation; differential and difference equations; linear algebra.

    (ii) Statistics


    Descriptive statistics; measures of inequality, index numbers;
    probability theory and the principal probability distributions;
    estimation (properties of estimators and OLS estimation); statistical
    inference (sampling theory, hypothesis testing); analysis of
    variance.'

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1995 (for first examination in
    1996)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 731, l. 37, after `the
    M.Sc. course.' insert `A student who fails the examination in July
    may be allowed by the committee to re-sit it in September.'

    (d) Confimation of D.Phil. status

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1996)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 838, l. 9, delete `at
    least'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    22 Board of the Faculty of Theology

    (a) Honour School of Theology

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first
    examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 40,
    ll. 41–2, delete `This certificate shall be presented together
    with the essay.'

    2 Ibid., l. 48, after `for examination.' insert
    `The certificate signed by the candidate in accordance with cl. above
    must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the
    Chairman of the Examiners at the above address at the same time as
    the essay is submitted.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
    1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 30,
    l. 47, delete `461' and substitute `41'.

    2 Ibid., p. 32, ll. 4–6, delete `will be
    required . . . (34)' and substitute `must offer two papers (but may
    offer three) selected from among papers (13)–(31)'.

    3 Ibid., after l. 47, insert `Candidates not
    offering paper (1), The Hebrew of the Old Testament, or (18), The New
    Testament in Greek, as Special Subjects may, in addition to their two
    or three Special Subjects, also offer the Optional translation papers
    in Old Testament Hebrew and/or New Testament Greek.'

    4 Ibid., p. 33, delete ll. 33–40.

    5 Ibid., l. 41, delete `(iii)' and substitute
    `(ii)'.

    6 Ibid., p. 34, delete ll. 22–41.

    7 Ibid., after l. 7 insert:

    `(i) Wisdom

    Proverbs 1–9, 22: 17–31: 31.

    Job 1–19, 38–42.

    Ecclesiastes.

    Wisdom of Solomon 1–9.

    Ecclesisasticus Prologue, 1: 1–2: 12, 36: 18–43: 33,
    1.

    Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

    Proverbs 1–9.'

    8 Ibid., l. 8, delete `(i)' and insert
    `(ii)'.

    9 Ibid., p. 36, delete ll. 20–4.

    10 Ibid., p. 36, ll. 2 and 40, and p. 37, l. 11,
    renumber papers (23)–(2) as (21)–(23) respectively.

    11 Ibid., p. 37, delete ll. 16–37.

    12 Ibid., p. 37, l. 38, p. 38, ll. 2, 27, and 33;
    p. 39, ll. 1, 16, and 34; and p. 40, l. 1: renumber papers
    (27)–(34) as (24)–(31) respectively.

    13 Ibid., p. 39, l. 47, delete `(32) and (33)'
    and substitute `(29) and (30)'.

    14 Ibid., p. 33, ll. 46–7, delete `(ed. R.H.
    Charles . . . (1913))' and substitute `(ed. H. F. D. Sparks, The
    Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984))'.

    15 Ibid., ll. 48 and 49, delete `Charles' and
    substitute `Sparks'.

    16 Ibid., p. 36, ll. 44–, delete `tr. J.H. Bernard . . . 1912)'
    and substitute `tr. J. Emerton in H.F.D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old
    Testament (OUP, 1984)'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Pass School of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Theology (see (a) (i)
    above).

    (c) B.Th. in Applied Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 937,
    l. 40, delete `<alpha> '.

    2 Ibid., p. 938, after l. 16 insert:

    `5. An Essay in Church History.

    As an alternative to III.1 and III.2, candidates may write on any
    of the periods described in III.1. (a)–(d) and
    III.2. above, or offer a thematic treatment of more than one period.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (d) M.St. in Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 704,
    l. 2, after `the regulations for the M.Phil.' insert `(unless
    otherwise stated in the regulations for a particular subject).'

    2 Ibid., p. 70, l. 6, delete `(excluding
    Ecclesiastes)'.

    3 Ibid., after l. 19 insert: `Texts to be
    studied may differ from those for the M.Phil. The texts will be
    published by the board in the Theology Centre by the end of the third
    week of Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination
    .'

    4 Ibid., p. 706, delete ll. 3–14 and
    substitute:

    `(i) Candidates shall offer three of the following
    papers, subject to (ii)–(iv) below.

    (ii) All candidates must offer paper 1 unless exempted by the
    Theology Board. Applications for exemption must be submitted on the
    entry form for the examination, and will be considered by the
    Theology Board at its first meeting in Hilary Term.

    (iii) All candidates must offer paper 4.

    (iv) An essay of 10,000–1,000 words may be offered in place
    of one of papers 1, 2, 3, or , or in addition to the candidate's
    three written papers.

    1. Paper 1 The Development of Christian Doctrine to ad 41.

    2.Paper 2 (a) Hellenistic Philosophy and Christian
    Theology: General Paper.

    3. Paper 3 (a) Christology in the Patristic Period:
    General Paper.

    4. Translation, commentary, and essays on either [Basil of
    Caesarea], Epistle 38 (in St Basil: the Letters, Loeb edition vol. 1,
    tr. R.J . Deferrari, London 1926) or Boethius, De Trinitate (in
    Boethius: Tracts etc., Loeb edition, tr. J.F. Stewart and E.K. Rand,
    London).

    5. Byzantine Theology.

    Candidates may offer one of the following:

    EITHER

    Paper

    (a) 41–682

    Candidates will be
    expected to show familiarity with the history of the Byzantine Church
    in this era, the doctrines of its principal theologians and the
    following texts:

    Ps.-Dionysius the Areopagite, The Divine Names (tr.
    C. Luibheid, in Ps.Dionysius The Complete Works, Paulist
    Press: Classics of Western Spirituality, New York, 1987).

    John Climacus: The Ladder of Divine Ascent (tr. C.
    Luibheid and N. Russell, Paulist Press: Classics of Western
    Spirituality
    , New York, 1982).

    St Icaac of Nineveh, The Ascetical Life (tr. M.
    Hansbury, St Valdimir's Seminary Press, New York, 1989).

    Maximus the Confessor: Four Centuries on Love (tr. G.
    Berthold, Paulist Press: Classics of Western
    Spirituality
    , New York, 198).

    The Trial of Maximus the Confessor (tr. Berthold,
    op.cit.)

    Acts of the Fifth Ecumenical Council (Constantinople
    II) in the Seven Ecumenical Councils, T. & T. Clark: Library of
    the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, XIV.

    Acts of the Sixth Ecumenical Council (Constantinople
    III), in ibid.

    OR

    Paper(b) 726–143

    Candidates will be expected
    to show knowledge of the history of the Byzantine Church in this era,
    the doctrines of the principal theologians, and the following texts:

    St Germanus of Constantinople: On the Divine Liturgy
    (tr. P. Meyendorff, St Vladimir's Seminary Press, New York, 1984).

    St John Damascene, On the Orthodox Faith, Books I and
    III (tr. J. Salmon, T. & T. Clark: Library of the Nicene and
    Post-Nicene Fathers, IX).

    St Theodore the Studite: On the Holy Icons (tr. C.P.
    Roth, St Vladimir's Seminary Press, New York, 1981).

    St Symeon the New Theologian: Discourses I,
    VII–IX, XI–XV (tr. C.J. deCatanzaro, Paulist Press:
    Classics of Western Spirituality, New York, 1980).

    St Gregory Palamas: The Triads (tr. N. Grendle,
    Paulist Press: Classics of Western Spirituality, New York, 1983).

    N. Cabasilas, The Life in Christ (tr. C.J.
    deCatanzaro, St Vladimir's Seminary Press, New York, 1974).

    Acts of the Seventh Ecumenical Council (Nicea II),
    in The Seven Ecumenical Councils, T. & T. Clark,
    Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, XIV.

    5 Ibid., ll. 40–2, delete `Candidates who
    wish . . . in place of paper 4 or 6.'

    6 Ibid., ll. 49–1, delete `Candidates who
    wish . . . in place of paper 4.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (e) M.Th. in Applied Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 9,
    delete ll. 13–16 and substitute:

    `2. A candidate may complete Part I of the course either in ONE
    year full-time (residential), with a maximum two additional years for
    Part II (dissertation); or TWO years part-time (non-residential),
    with a maximum two additional years for Part II (dissertation);'

    2 Ibid., after l. 2 insert:

    `Extended essays must be the candidates' own work, and must be
    typed or printed on one side of the paper. Essays must include a
    bibliography and footnotes (only the latter being included in the
    word count). Candidates may receive tutorial guidance in the
    preliminary states of composition; tutors may also read or comment on
    a first draft, giving the candidate not more than one tutorial
    session at this further stage. Normal graduate supervision shall be
    provided for the preparation of the dissertation in Part II. When
    submitted, the extended essays must be accompanied by a certificate
    signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own
    work. This certificate must be submitted separately in a sealed
    envelope addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners for the M.Th. in
    Applied Theology at the address below.'

    3 Ibid., after l. 38 insert:

    `5. In Part I, a candidate whose extended essay fails to reach the
    level which the examiners have determined to be the pass mark (or the
    required average for passing Part I) may be allowed to resubmit that
    work once only, within the next two examination periods, provided
    that no extended essay is submitted later than the submission of the
    dissertation.

    In Part II, if the examiners are satisfied that the
    dissertation has reached the required level for the M.Th., but minor
    corrections are needed, they shall require the candidate to make
    these corrections before they submit their report. If the
    dissertation fails to reach the required level, the examiners may,
    but are not obliged to, give a candidate permission to revise and
    resubmit a dissertation at one further examination period, not later
    than three terms after the first submission.'

    4 Ibid., p. 97, l. 13, after `if part-time.'
    insert:

    `The completed dissertation must be accompanied by a signed
    statement by the candidate that it is his or her own work except
    where otherwise indicated. This statement must be submitted
    separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of the
    Examiners for the M.Th. in Applied Theology at the above address.
    All candidates are required to present themselves for a viva voce
    examination unless individually dispensed by the examiners.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    23 Committee for Archaeology

    Confirmation of D.Phil. status

    With effect from 1 October 1996

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 806, ll. 14–18
    delete `The . . . research.' and substitute:

    `The status of student for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy shall
    be confirmed by the committee under the provisions of Sect. viii,
    § 4, cl. 1. Candidates are required to provide a research
    outline, of approximately 1,000 words, consisting of a table of
    contents and a summary of how much work has been done on each section
    of the thesis to date. The committee will appoint two assessors to
    consider the submitted outlines and reserves the right for the
    assessors to interview candidates.'


    24 Standing Committee for Economics and
    Management

    Honour School of Economics and Management

    (i) With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 17,
    l. 31, delete `10' and substitute `9'.

    2 Ibid., l. 40, delete `(8) Statistical Methods
    in Social Science OR Econometrics*' and the footnote.

    3 Ibid., pp. 17–6, renumber items
    (9)–(13) as (8)–(12).

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in
    1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 176, l. 39, delete
    `presented together with the thesis', and substitute `submitted
    separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of
    examiners'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    25 Committee for Educational Studies

    Bachelor of Education at Westminster College

    With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 943,
    ll. 40–1 delete `or in the final Block School Experience'.

    2 Ibid., l. 42, after `failure.' insert
    `Candidates who fail in the final Block School Experience may be
    permitted to apply for re-examination only at the discretion of the
    Examination Board'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    26 Joint Committee for Human Sciences

    Honour School of Human Sciences

    (i) With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 26, l. 43, delete
    `presented together with the long essay' and substitute `submitted
    separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of
    examiners'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    27 Committee for the Ruskin School of
    Drawing and Fine Art

    (a) Preliminary Examination in Fine Art

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 46, l. 39, prior to
    `The chairman' insert `This certificate must be submitted separately
    in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of examiners.'

    (b) Final Examination in Fine Art

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 47, l. 36, after
    `presentation.' insert `This certificate must be submitted separately
    in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of examiners.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    28 Inter-faculty Committee for Slavonic
    and East European Studies

    M.Phil. in Russian and East European Studies

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 640,
    delete ll. 11–1 and substitute:

    `(i) Transformations in Russian and Soviet History,
    190–91.

    (ii) Political and Economic Transitions in the Former Soviet
    Union and Eastern Europe.

    (iii) Two papers chosen from the list of special subjects below.'

    2 Ibid., after l. 31 insert:

    `Candidates will also be required to demonstrate competence in
    Russian or, in the case of candidates who select at least one special
    subject and a thesis topic concerned with Eastern Europe, in a
    relevant East European language (see below).'

    3 Ibid., p. 640, delete l. 36 and substitute:

    `LIST OF SPECIAL SUBJECTS'. 4 Ibid., p. 640, delete ll. 40–4
    and substitute:

    `Group A: Economics

    1. The Economic History of Russian and the Soviet Union,
    1900–91.

    2.The Economic History of Eastern Europe, 194–89.

    3. Transitions from Command to Market Economies in the Former
    Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.

    Group B: History

    1. Russian Social and Political Thought 182–1917.

    2.The History of Russia, 1861–1917.

    3. The Russian Revolution and Civil War.

    4. The History of Eastern Europe, 1918–4.

    5. The History since 1918 of Individual East European Countries:
    either Bulgaria or Hungary or Poland or Romania or Yugoslavia and
    its successor states or Czechoslovakia and its successor states.

    Group C: Politics and Law

    1. Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Politics.

    2.Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Foreign Policy.

    3. Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Defence Policy.

    4. Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Law.

    5. The History and Politics of Central and Eastern Europe since
    1945.

    Group D: Literature

    1. Russian Literature, 1840–1917.

    2.Russian Literature, 1917–6.

    3. Russian Literature since 1965.

    4. Czech and Slovak Literature since 1945.

    5. Twentieth Century Polish Literature.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Group E: Society, Culture, and Social Policy

    1. The History of Russian Women's Writing from Enlightenment to
    Modernism.

    2.Soviet and Post-Soviet Urban and Regional Development.

    3. Health and Welfare in the Soviet Union and Russia.

    4. Soviet Literature and Society 1917–91.'

    5 Ibid., p. 641, delete ll. 1–25.

    6 Ibid., p. 641, after l. 2 insert:

    `LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT'.

    7 Ibid., p. 641, delete ll. 26–44 and
    substitute:

    `Before admission to the examination all candidates will be
    required to produce evidence of a satisfactory knowledge of Russian
    or, in the case of candidates who select at least one special subject
    and a thesis topic concerned with Eastern Europe, of a relevant East
    European language.

    All candidates with a previous knowledge of
    Russian or an East European language will be required to pass, on the
    Monday of Seventh Week in the Michaelmas Term in which they begin the
    course, a qualifying test in Russian or, a relevant East European
    language. The two-hour test will be administered by an examiner
    appointed by the committee, and will consist of one unseen written
    paper.

    Candidates who fail the qualifying test in the Michaelmas
    Term in which they begin the course, will be recommended to attend
    lanaguage classes approved by the committee until they resubmit
    themselves for the test at the beginning at the Trinity Term of their
    initial year. The committee will remove from the Register of Bachelor
    and Master of Philosophy Students the name of any candidate who fails
    the test a second time.

    Those candidates with no previous
    knowledge of Russian will be required to pass the written qualifying
    test in Russian in the First Week of Trinity Term in the year which
    they begin the course. Such candidates will be required to attend a
    special language course in the September preceding their
    matriculation and to attend language classes approved by the
    committee. Candidates who fail the qualifying test in the First Week
    in the Trinity Term in the year which they begin the course will be
    required to resubmit themselves for the test in the Ninth Week of
    that Trinity Term. The committee will remove from the Register of
    Bachelor and Master of Philosophy Students the name of any candidate
    who fails the test a second time.

    All candidates with a previous
    knowledge of Russian or an East European language will be required to
    demonstrate a satisfactory knowledge of Russian, or a relevant East
    European language in an oral and written language test on Monday of
    Seventh Week in the Trinity Term in the year which they begin the
    course. The language test may, at the discretion of the examiners, be
    related to the subject or subjects of the candidates' optional papers
    and to ghe general field of their thesis.

    Those candidates with no
    previous knowledge of Russian will be required to demonstrate a
    satisfactory knowledge of Russian in an oral and written language
    test in the First Week in the Michaelmas Term of their second year.
    The language test may, at the discretion of the examiners, be related
    to the subject or subjects of the candidates' optional papers and to
    the general field of their thesis.'

    8 Ibid., p. 642, delete ll. 1–1.

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    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

    The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to
    B.G. EVANS, Jesus, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of
    Medicine.

    The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `The extent of
    under-reporting of AIDS cases for England, Wales, and Northern
    Ireland'.

    The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to
    J.T. O'BRIEN, Green College, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor
    of Medicine.

    The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Magnetic
    resonance imaging and hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal axis function
    in depression and Alzheimer's disease.'

    The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to
    w.s. smellie, Merton, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of
    Medicine.

    The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Clinical
    applications of an assay for intact proinsulin'.

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    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
    of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Anthropology and Geography

    S. BEKHRADNIA, St Antony's: `Changing identity among Iranian
    Zoroastrians in the twentieth century'.

    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Thursday, 2 April, 2
    p.m.

    Examiners: M.J. Banks, N. Lindisfarne.

    Biological Sciences

    J. BREED, St John's: `Molecular modelling of ION channels'.

    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Monday, 13 May, 2.1
    p.m.

    Examiners: J. Findlay, W.G. Richards.

    P.J. MCHUGH, Trinity: `Sunlight induced DNA damage in relation to
    sunscreening chemicals'.

    Department of Biochemistry, Wednesday, 8 May, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: D.J. Sherratt, M.H.L. Green.

    K.E. WILLETTS, St Hugh's: `PDGF and PDGFRa in mammalian
    development'.

    Department of Human Anatomy, Thursday, 2 April, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: G.M. Morriss-Kay, W. Richardson.

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    English Language and Literature

    D. NABERS, Magdalen: `Race's half-life: British fiction and the
    sciences of race, 180–1930'.

    Worcester, Friday, 24 May, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: J.D. Bradshaw, E. Boehmer.

    S. NIXON, St John's: `A Reading of Thomas Carew in manuscript'.

    Examination Schools, Thursday, 2 May, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: H. Woudhuysen, D.F. McKenzie.

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    Literae Humaniores

    N.C. POLETTI, Wadham: `Wittgenstein on ethics'.

    Trinity, Monday, 22 April, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: B.B. Rundle, C. Radford.

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    Medieval and Modern Languages

    D. BARNETT, St Anne's: `"Literatur ist dazu da, dem Theater
    Widerstand zu leisten": textual problems and theatrical
    realisations in the later plays of Heiner MŸller'.

    Examination Schools, Thursday, 2 April, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: J.H. Reid, K.J. Leeder.

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    Modern History

    TAKEHIKO HONDA, Wadham: `Indian civil servants, 1892– 1937: an
    age of transition'.

    Examination Schools, Wednesday, 24 April, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: D.C. Potter, A.H.M. Kirk-Greene.

    M. MCLEISH, Magdalen: `Trade disputes, trade unions, and the law: the
    legal politics of industrial relations in Britain, 1906–27'.

    Merton, Friday, 10 May, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: G.R. Rubin, P.J. Waller.

    W.G. MERKEL, Lady Margaret Hall: `Liberty, racism, and anti-slavery:
    a re-evaluation of Thomas Jefferson, his critics, and his
    legacy'.

    St Cross, Thursday, 16 May, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: C. Brookes, P.J. Thompson.

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    Oriental Studies

    J.W. CHILDERS, Merton: `Studies in the Syriac versions of St John
    Chrysostom's homilies on the New Testament, with special reference to
    homilies 6, 20, 22, 23, 37, 62, 83, and 84 on John'.

    Oriental Institute, Thursday, 2 April, 2.15 p.m.

    Examiners: R.W. Thomson, D.G.K. Taylor.

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    Physical Sciences

    P.M. FRAHER, Christ Church: `Environmental sensor validation'.

    Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 2 May, 9.30 a.m.

    Examiners: A.J. Morris, A.L. Dexter.

    M.T. HARRISON, University: `Laser spectroscopy of rare-earth doped
    inorganic glasses'.

    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 23 April, 10.30 a.m.

    Examiners: W.S. Brocklesby, M.J. Rosseinsky.

    S.A. WELLINGS, Linacre: `Structural, metamorphic, and thermal studies
    of the Dawros-Currywongaun-Doughruagh complex, W. Ireland'.

    Department of Earth Sciences, Friday, 19 April, 10 a.m.

    Examiners: P.D. Ryan, J.D. Bell.

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    Physiological Sciences

    T. HUGHES, Brasenose: `Studies into DNA metabolism using
    permeabilised cells'.

    Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Thursday, 2 May, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: R.T. Johnson, D.J.T. Vaux.

    Social Studies

    A.H. AL-YOUSUF, St Edmund Hall: `The Dutch disease in Kuwait:
    1973–88'.

    St Antony's, Tuesday, 23 April, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: R.E. Mabro, C.R. Milner.

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    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
    LETTERS

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
    of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Medieval and Modern Languages

    M. DI PALMA, Magdalen: `"La morale sensitive, ou le
    materialisme du sage": a critical study of Rousseau's abandoned
    work'.

    Jesus, Wednesday, 8 May, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: R. Wokler, A.E. Pilkington.

    Theology

    C.J. POWELL, Harris Manchester: `Pugin's theories'.

    Lady Margaret Hall, Tuesday, 23 April, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: A.G. Doig, J. Champ.

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    Committee for Management Studies

    J. EVANS, Magdalen: `Sustainable development in British Columbia's
    forest industry'.

    Templeton, Wednesday, 24 April, 3 p.m.

    Examiners: K. Grint, M. Williams.





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 April 1996: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    • OBITUARIES


    • MEMORIAL SERVICES

    • ELECTIONS

    • NOTICES:

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      OBITUARIES


      Corpus Christi College

      ROBERT WILLIAM INGRAM BAND, MA, 14 February 1996; commoner
      1929–31. Aged 88.

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      Magdalen College

      ALAN MACLEOD CARSON, 23 November 1994; demy 1936. Aged 78.

      HUGH ARMSTRONG CLEGG, 9 December 1995; demy 1939. Aged 75.

      PETER GRAHAM MARTIN DAWE, 17 January 1996; commoner 1948. Aged
      72.

      LARS THOMAS DAY, 16 January 1996; commoner 1994. Aged 20.

      RICHARD HENRI MARTIN, 8 July 1995; commoner 1941. Aged 82.

      CHIT MAUNG, 25 May 1995; commoner 1951. Aged 66.

      PETER TREVOR HOPKIN MORGAN, 30 December 1995; commoner 1932. Aged
      76.

      THORNTON LEIGH PAGE, January 1996. Rhodes Scholar 1934. Aged 82.

      HENRY SERRANO VILLARD, 21 January 1996. Commoner 1922. Aged 95.

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      Merton College

      ARTHUR WILLIAM HOPE ADKINS, 13 February 1996; Postmaster
      1948–54. Aged 66.

      SIR JAMES SUTHERLAND, 24 February 1996; commoner 1923–5.
      Aged 95.

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      Oriel College

      MICHAEL JOSEPH BLAISE NAUGHTON, 27 April 1994; commoner 1959–62.
      Aged 54.

      THE RT REVD STANLEY BOOTH-CLIBBORN, 6 March 1996; commoner
      1948–50. Aged 71.

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      St Anne's College

      MRS GLORIA BENNETT (née Wilden-Hart); member, St
      Anne's Society, 1946–9. Aged 68.

      MISS DOROTHEA FENNING; member, Society of Oxford Home-Students,
      1927–31. Aged 88.

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      St Catherine's College

      HAROLD W. DEANE, 9 March 1996; Professorial Fellow 1971–9;
      Secretary of Faculties 1971–9. Aged 79.

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      St Hilda's College

      BARONESS FAITHFULL OF WOLVERCOTE (LUCY FAITHFULL), OBE, MA, 13 March
      1996; Honorary Fellow 1992–6.

      ELIZABETH MERYL JANCEY, MA, DIP.ED., 23 March 1996; commoner
      1943–7. Aged 71.

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      St Hugh's College

      ESTHER CHAWNER, 4 August 1995; commoner 1922–5. Aged 91.

      AGNES BRENDA YULE FAITHWEATHER (née Mitchell), 17
      January 1996; commoner 1937–40. Aged 75.

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      Somerville College

      ELIZABETH BRYER (née Lipscomb), 16 December 1995;
      commoner 1958–61. Aged 56.

      BARBARA MONA EUSTACE (née Belloc), 11 December
      1995; commoner 1948–9. Aged 65.

      ELIZABETH ALISON GRAYSON (née Aste), October
      1995; commoner 1934–8. Aged 79.

      GERTRUDE MARY INSLEY, 29 February 1996; exhibitioner 1933–6.
      Aged 82.

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      MEMORIAL SERVICES


      Merton College

      A Memorial Service for SIR JOHN BADENOCH, Fellow 1965–87,
      Emeritus Fellow 1987–96, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday,
      27 April, in the chapel, Merton College.

      Tea will be served in hall after the service.

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      Oriel College

      A Memorial Service for JEREMY J. BEADLE, MA, D.PHIL., Orielensis
      1975–81, will be held in the chapel, Oriel College, at 2 p.m. on
      Sunday, 28 April.

      A reception will be held at the Oxford Union immediately following
      the service.

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      ELECTIONS


      All Souls College

      The following will be in residence for Trinity Term 1996 as Visiting
      Fellows at All Souls College:

      PROFESSOR KENNETH ARROW, Stanford University

      PROFESSOR ANDREI LEBEDEV, Moscow State University

      PROFESSOR JOSEPH MACGILLIVRAY, Columbia University

      PROFESSOR DENISE MEYERSON, University of Cape Town

      PROFESSOR ROBERT SCHNEIDER, Catholic University of America

      DR ANER SHALEV, Hebrew University

      PROFESSOR SUSAN TREGGIARI, Stanford University

      PROFESSOR FRANCIS WILSON, University of Cape Town

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      Corpus Christi College

      To a Benefactor Fellowship:

      JOHN BASIL ZOCHONIS

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      Lady Margaret Hall

      To an Exhibition:

      ANNA J. MAYBANKS, formerly of Bishop Luffa
      School, Chichester

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      Magdalen College

      To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Politics (for five
      years from 1 October 1996):

      STEWARD WOOD, BA (AM Harvard)

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      Oriel College

      To a fixed-term Lecturership and Tutorial Fellowship in Applied
      Mathematics (for five years from 1 October 1996):

      ELIZABETH
      WINSTANLEY, BA, St Hugh's

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      Queen's College

      Corrigenda

      To an Honorary Fellowship:

      SIR COLIN MCCOLL, KCMG, BA

      To a Laming Junior Fellowship (with effect from 1 October
      1996):

      ROSALIND H. GRAY, BA, Christ Church

      Note: these notices replace the corresponding notices
      published in the Gazette of 21 March (No. 4396), p. 909.

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      St Antony's College

      To Honorary Fellowships:

      MRS MONNA BESSE

      THE RT. HON. LORD BULLOCK, MA, D.LITT., FBA

      PROFESSOR W. ROGER LOUIS, D.PHIL., D.LITT., FBA

      PROFESSOR SARVEPALLI GOPAL, MA, D.PHIL., D.LITT.

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      St Hilda's College

      To a Schoolmistress Fellowship (TT 1996):

      MRS MARGARET
      MCAULEY (BA Queen's, Belfast), English teacher, St Louis Grammar
      School, Ballymena, Northern Ireland

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      University College

      To the Margaret Candfield Fellowship and Praelectorship in
      English (from 1 October 1996):

      JONATHAN ANSON MEE (BA Newcastle
      upon Tyne, PH.D. Cambridge)

      To a Weir Junior Research Fellowship in Biochemistry (from 1
      October 1996):

      STUART ANDREW WILSON (B.SC., PH.D. London)

      To a Radcliffe Travelling Fellowship (from 14 March 1996):

      GARETH TURNER, BM, B.CH. (BA Cambridge)

      To Research Scholarships (from 1 October 1995):

      FRIEDHELM VON BLANCKENBURG (Diploma, West Berlin, PH.D. ETH-Zurich)

      DAVID GRIBBLE, MA, D.PHIL.

      IAN LANE (B.SC., PH.D. Nottingham)

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      NOTICES


      All Souls College


      Visiting Fellowships 1997–8

      The college proposes to elect a number of Visiting Fellows, for
      periods up to one year, for the academic year October 1997 to June
      1998. These fellowships are intended to enable their holders to carry
      out study and research in Oxford, and to participate in the academic
      life of the University. Visiting Fellowships are open in all
      subjects, and to both men and women. Preference will be given to
      candidates who will not be over the age of sixty-five during the
      relevant academic year. Applications will be considered from staff of
      any university or other institution of higher learning, and from
      other persons who wish to work on problems that can be studied with
      the help of the facilities offered by the college and University. In
      making its final choice, the college will give weight to academic
      quality, the interest and feasibility of the research project, and to
      the advantages candidates might derive from being in Oxford.

      Visiting Fellows will be entitled to accommodation, a study in
      college, and lunches and dinners without charge. Limited financial
      subvention may also be offered in exceptional circumstances. In
      certain cases (not at present expected to exceed one in each year)
      such assistance may be extended to include the cost of replacement
      teaching at the Visiting Fellow's own institution. Any candidate
      desiring to take advantage of this provision should make specific
      application to the Dean of Visiting Fellows preferably some time
      before the general closing date given below. Application forms and
      further particulars may be obtained from the Secretary (Visiting
      Fellows), All Souls College, Oxford OX1 4AL. Applications must be
      received by 13 September.

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      Balliol College


      Junior Research Fellowship

      Balliol College proposes to elect a non-stipendiary Junior Research
      Fellow from among those successful in obtaining a British Academy
      Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in any subject other than
      Archaeology, English, or History. Candidates interested in being
      considered for this post are invited to apply to the college as well
      as to the British Academy. The closing date for college applications
      is 3 May. Further particulars can be obtained from the College
      Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ.


      Six-hour Lecturership in Physics

      The college proposes, if a suitable candidate applies, to appoint a
      six-hour Lecturer in Physics from Michaelmas Term 1996 for one year,
      renewable for a further two years. The lecturer should be prepared to
      teach a wide range of subjects within the physics undergraduate
      courses.

      The lecturer will also be expected to assist with the
      administration of the subject, with pastoral care of students and
      with entrance.

      The lecturer will be expected to teach up to six
      hours a week and will receive, in addition to the normal rates for
      tuition, a retainer of £3,105 per annum, an entertainment
      allowance, and certain common room rights.

      Applicants should
      indicate their teaching experience, and state which options they
      would be willing to teach. They should give the names of two referees
      whom they should ask to write directly to the Senior Tutor.
      Applications and references must reach the Senior Tutor, Balliol
      College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by 26 April at the latest. It is expected
      to interview short-listed candidates during the week beginning 6 May.

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      Brasenose College and Worcester College


      Official Fellowship and Lecturership in
      Law

      The college proposes to elect a Tutor in Law, with effect from 1
      October 1996, or as soon as possible thereafter. The person appointed
      will be an Official Fellow of Brasenose College and a Lecturer of
      Worcester College. The fellowship is associated with a titular
      university lecturership (CUF) which the University may at a later
      stage convert into a stipendiary post; meanwhile the colleges will
      pay the full stipend. The salary scale is age-related, reaching a
      maximum of £33,773 at age forty-five, plus additional benefits
      and allowances.

      Applications should be sent to the Senior Tutor,
      Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ, with details of career and
      publications and the names and addresses of three referees, not later
      than Friday, 3 May. Applicants should ask their referees to write
      direct to the Senior Tutor by the closing date. Further particulars
      may be obtained from the College Secretary (telephone: Oxford
      (2)77823).

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      Christ Church


      College Lecturership in Ancient History

      The college proposes to appoint a stipendiary Lecturer in Ancient
      History to provide nine hours of tutorial teaching per week, for one
      year from 1 October 1996. The successful candidate will be required
      to teach papers for the Final Honour Schools of Literae Humaniores
      (Classics), and of Ancient and Modern History, and for Classical
      Honour Moderations. Teaching for Literae Humaniores will be
      concentrated in the second (146 bc to ad 54) and third (43 bc to ad
      117) periods in Roman History, with some additional work for the
      Ancient History and Historiography paper. The relevant historical
      Special Subjects in Classical Honour Moderations are: Cicero and
      Catiline and Tacitus and Tiberius. Teaching for Ancient and Modern
      History will be in the general periods of Roman History from 200 bc
      to ad 284, and in some of the Special and Further Subjects.

      Further particulars may be obtained by writing to the Dean's
      Secretary, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP. Applications should be made
      to The Very Reverend the Dean of Christ Church by Friday, 3 May.

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      Christ Church and Oriel College


      College Lecturership(s) in Politics

      The colleges propose to appoint either one twelve-hour or two
      six-hour stipendiary Lecturers in Politics, for one year from 1
      October 1996, with the possibility of renewal for up to one further
      year. The successful candidate will be required to teach papers for
      the Preliminary Examination, and for the Final Honour School of PPE,
      including Comparative Government, and at least one other core paper
      (British Government and Politics since 1885, International Politics
      since 1945, Theory of Politics, or Political Sociology).

      Further
      particulars may be obtained by writing to the Dean's Secretary,
      Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP. Applications should be made to The
      Very Reverend the Dean of Christ Church by Friday, 3 May.

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      Corpus Christi College


      Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship(s)
      1997–8

      The college proposes, if suitable candidates offer themselves, to
      elect to a Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship for each term in the
      academic year 1997–8. The fellowship is intended for persons of
      high academic distinction, either from abroad or from the UK, who
      wish to pursue academic study and research as a member of the
      college. It is tenable for one, two, or three terms during the year.
      Preference will be given to candidates whose work is close to the
      academic interests of one or more fellows of the college.

      A
      Visiting Fellow is entitled to free luncheon and dinner during all
      periods when the kitchen is open and to full membership of the senior
      common room. The college hopes to be able to provide the fellow with
      shared study accommodation.

      Applicants should write to the
      President's Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, before
      1 November, enclosing a curriculum vitae, a list of
      publications, a programme of work, and the names of three referees.
      It is their responsibility to ask their referees to send their
      references direct by the same date.

      The college exists to promote
      excellence in education and research and is actively committed to the
      principle of equality of opportunity for all suitably qualified
      candidates.

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      Exeter College


      Visiting Fellowship 1996–7

      The college proposes to elect a distinguished visitor to Oxford to a
      Visiting Fellowship during the academic year 1996–7. The
      fellowship is intended for a scholar who is already provided with
      financial support and who plans to spend at least one term of next
      academic year in Oxford. The fellowship is non-stipendiary but
      entitles the holder to daily free lunch and dinner and membership of
      the senior common room. Further particulars may be obtained from the
      Rector, Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP.

      Members of Congregation
      are invited to nominate visitors to the University for election to
      the fellowship and to invite their nominee(s) to apply direct to the
      college. Applications and nominations should reach the Rector by 6
      May.

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      Jesus College


      Appointment of Home Bursar

      Jesus College wishes to appoint a Home Bursar, to take up the post
      early in 1997. The Home Bursarship, open to men and women, involves
      general responsibility for the domestic administration of the college
      and carries with it eligibility for election to an Official
      Fellowship.

      Further particulars may be obtained from the Acting
      Principal, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford
      (2)79718), to whom applications should be addressed before 30 April.

      The college exists to promote excellence in education and
      research, and is an equal opportunities employer.

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      Mansfield College


      Appointment of Principal's Personal
      Assistant/Secretary

      A highly-qualified and experienced secretary is required to undertake
      this new position within the college. The post has hitherto been
      undertaken by the College Secretary, but due to a general
      reorganisation of the administration of the college it has been
      decided to appoint a separate personal assistant/secretary to the
      Principal. This is a responsible and varied post, with salary on the
      clerical and library grade 4 scale. Further details may be obtained
      from Mrs Jill Phillips, Personnel Administrator for Non-Academic
      Staff, Mansfield College, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone:
      Oxford (2)82888), to whom applicants should send four copies of their
      curriculum vitae by Friday, 10 May.

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      St Antony's College


      The Wardenship

      The college invites applications for the post of Warden in succession
      to Lord Dahrendorf, KBE, FBA, who is retiring on 30 September 1997.
      St Antony's is a postgraduate college within the University of
      Oxford. It has devoted its energies to the study of international
      topics broadly defined. Interdisciplinary study is also fostered
      through the college's long-standing Area Centres. It has an
      international student body numbering, on average, 250 students from
      over forty countries. The college also attracts some eighty visiting
      senior members, from many different countries, each year. The post of
      Warden is full-time. It carries a salary within the professional
      range, and other allowances. Suitably qualified individuals who wish
      to be considered, or any person who would like to suggest the names
      of others the college might consider, are invited to write in
      confidence to Dr Rosemary Foot, Chair of the Search Committee, St
      Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF, from whom further particulars are
      available. The college's choice will not necessarily be limited to
      those whose names come forward in this way. The closing date for
      applications is 8 May.


      Kirk-Greene Junior Research Fellowship in
      Tropical African Studies

      Applications are invited for a Junior Research Fellowship to be
      tenable for the academic year 1996–7. The fellowship is intended
      to allow the successful candidate to write up a thesis for
      publication. Applicants should have successfully completed a
      doctorate or should have done so before taking up the appointment.
      The basic stipend of the fellowship will be £10,000 in addition
      to other benefits. Further particulars may be obtained from the
      Bursar, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF, to whom applications
      should be sent not later than 10 May.

      The college exists to
      promote excellence in education and research, and is an equal
      opportunities employer.

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      St Catherine's College


      One-year Stipendiary Lecturership in
      Economics

      The college proposes to appoint a six-hour Stipendiary Lecturer in
      Economics for the academic year 1996–7. The lecturer will be
      required to teach (in tutorials and classes) six hours per week on
      average in the eight weeks of each full term. In addition, he or she
      will be expected to play a full role in the running of Honour Schools
      involving Economics, including participating in the admissions
      process, setting and marking college examinations, and the pastoral
      care of undergraduates.

      The lecturer will be expected to teach (in
      tutorials and classes) macro- and micro-economics for the Second
      Public Examination in the Honour Schools involving Economics, to run
      revision classes in these subjects, and to do such special paper
      teaching as falls within his or her research area.

      A teaching room
      will be provided. The lecturer will be a member of the senior common
      room and receive five meals per week, free of charge, during full
      term. The stipend for 1996–7 will be £7,170 (under review),
      and will be pensionable. Applications should be addressed to the
      Senior Tutor, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ, and should
      include a curriculum vitae, an indication of areas of
      teaching expertise, and the names of two referees. Applicants should
      ask their referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor.
      Applications and references must arrive by Friday, 26 April.
      Short-listed candidates will be interviewed during the week beginning
      6 May.

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      St Edmund Hall


      Appointment of Junior Dean

      The college invites applications from men or women for the post of
      Junior Dean, for the academic year 1996–9 (with the possibility
      of renewal for a further year). The Junior Dean is responsible
      (under the Dean) for the discipline and welfare of junior members in
      college. The post carries an honorarium and entertainment allowance,
      a free room in college, and free meals and membership of the senior
      common room. It is particularly suitable for postgraduate or
      postdoctoral students. Further particulars and application forms are
      obtainable from the Principal's Secretary, St Edmund Hall, Oxford OX1
      4AR. Closing date for applications: 19 May.

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      St Hugh's College


      Fixed-term Tutorial Fellowship and
      University Lecturership (CUF) in Modern History

      St Hugh's College proposes to elect an Official Fellow and Tutor in
      Modern History with effect from 1 October 1996. The fellowship is
      tenable with an Oxford University Lecturership (CUF). Both
      appointments will be for three years, and will not be renewed. The
      person appointed will replace Professor H.C.G. Matthew during the
      remainder of his period of special leave, granted to him to edit the
      New Dictionary of National Bibliography. Applications are invited
      from those with interests in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

      Further particulars and application forms may be obtained from
      the Senior Tutor, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE (fax: Oxford
      (2)74912), to whom applications, including a full curriculum
      vitae
      , a list of publications, and the names of three
      referees, should be sent to arrive by 10 May. Candidates should ask
      referees to write direct to the Senior Tutor by the same date.


      Fixed-term Stipendiary Lecturership in
      Early Modern History

      The college proposes to elect a Stipendiary Lecturer in Early Modern
      History for one year with effect from 1 October 1996. The holder of
      the post will replace Dr John Robertson during his tenure of a
      British Academy/Leverhulme Research Fellowship and will be expected
      to teach British and European History in the ealry modern period. The
      person appointed will be required to teach not less than ten hours
      per week (see further particulars) and share responsibility for the
      teaching of Modern History in the college. The lecturer will be paid
      on the stipendiary lecturers' scale (at present
      £11,111–£15,317 per annum).

      Further particulars may
      be obtained from the Senior Tutor, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE,
      to whom applications should be sent to arrive by 3 May. Candidates
      should ask two referees to write direct to the Senior Tutor by the
      same date.

      The college and the University are equal opportunities
      employers.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      St John's College


      Appointment of Research Assistants

      Two research assistants are sought to work with Dr John Pitcher on
      his Oxford English Text edition of Samuel Daniel from 1 October 1996.
      One appointment is for twelve months, and candidates must be able to
      read French and Latin and be familiar with early modern
      historiography and printed sources, and Elizabethan poetry. The
      second appointment is for six months, and candidates must be able to
      read Italian and be familiar with Italian Renaissance poetry and
      drama. Candidates for both posts must have a higher degree, or be
      studying for one in a relevant field. Salaries will be funded by an
      award from the British Academy and the University of Oxford, and will
      be on the minimum point of the research staff 1A scale (£14,317
      for twelve months). Further details may be obtained from the College
      Secretary, St John's College, Oxford OX1 3JP. The closing date for
      applications is 3 May.

      St John's College operates an equal
      opportunities policy. The college exists to support excellence in
      education and research.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      St Peter's College


      Stipendiary Lecturership in Economics

      The college invites applications for an eight-hour Stipendiary
      Lecturership in Economics (or two four-hour lecturerships) for two
      years in the first instance from 1 October 1996. Applicants should be
      advanced doctoral students or have completed a doctorate and should
      preferably have some teaching experience. They should be able to
      teach at least one of the core Economics papers in PPE. Candidates
      for an eight-hour lecturership should also be able to teach for one
      or more PPE optional papers in economics. Candidates should specify
      whether they wish to be considered for one or both types of
      appointment. The stipend for an eight-hour lecturership will be
      £8,800 per annum (or £4,400 per annum for a four-hour
      lecturership) and the lecturer will be entitled to common table
      rights.

      Applicants should provide a curriculum vitae
      and the names and addresses of two referees, and applications (six
      copies) should reach the College Secretary, St Peter's College,
      Oxford OX1 2DL, by 2 May.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Stipendiary Lecturership in Politics

      The college invites applications for an eight-hour Stipendiary
      Lecturership in Politics (or two four-hour lecturerships) for one
      year in the first instance from 1 October 1996. Applicants should be
      advanced doctoral students or have completed a doctorate, preferably
      with some teaching experience. Candidates should be able to teach at
      least one of the following papers: International Politics since 1945,
      British Government and Politics since 1880, and should specify
      whether they wish to be considered for one or both types of
      appointment. The stipend for an eight-hour lecturership will be
      £8,800 per annum (or £4,400 per annum for a four-hour
      lecturership) and the lecturer will be entitled to common table
      rights. Applicants should provide a curriculum vitae and
      the names and addresses of two referees, and applications (six
      copies) should reach the College Secretary, St Peter's College,
      Oxford OX1 2DL, by 2 May.





      <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 18 April 1996: Advertisements<br />

      Advertisements


      Contents of this section:



      How to advertise in the
      Gazette


      Terms and
      conditions of acceptance of advertisements

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      Exhibition

      Jane Furness Drawings 1950–96, at the Mary
      Ogilvie Foyer Gallery, St Anne's College, until 4 May. For opening
      times tel.: Oxford (2)74800.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Tuition Offered

      Piano lessons: children and adults. All grades.
      Beginners welcome. Experienced teacher. Miss P. Read, BA (Hons.),
      LRAM. (Jericho.) Tel.: Oxford 510904.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Services Offered

      Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture
      designed and made by Piers Roberts from workshops in Thame. From
      tables, chairs, cabinets, desks to fitted bedrooms, kitchens,
      studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 218929 or
      201325.

      Finders Keepers à La Carte—a new
      concept: a selection of services available to tenants of Finders
      Keepers rental properties, designed to enhance comfort, convenience,
      and enjoyment whilst renting Finders Keepers' properties. Call us for
      your menu. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE
      (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also
      27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e-
      mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).

      Jeanne Bliss, landscape designer; roof gardens and
      colourful courtyards, Oxford, London, and California; Rewley House
      gardener 1985–90. A two-hour initial visit: £30, followed
      by garden plans for a two-year programme. Tel. for leaflet: Oxford
      515379.

      Stella Campion, gold and silversmith; Goldsmiths'
      Crafts Council first prize winner 1994. I can design a unique hand-
      made piece for your anniversary, gifts, or awards. A friendly and
      efficient service. Gold work and repousséea
      speciality. Tel.: Oxford 790867.

      Frederick and Sudabeh Hine. Persian carpet dealers.
      We specialise in large and extra-large hand-knotted oriental carpets
      and runners and our list includes over 100 such pieces from Iran,
      Turkey, Afghanistan, and China; we can search other importers' stocks
      for hard-to-find items if necessary. We also keep quantities of
      traditional hand-made nomadic and village rugs and kelims at
      warehouse prices. Business hours: 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Sat.
      Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 59396.

      Gardens creatively designed, planted, and
      maintained. Portfolio available on request. Colin Broad. Tel.: Oxford
      882711.

      Micro Instruments Ltd. are an Oxford-based company
      whose prime business is in the sales and servicing of optical
      microscopes and micromanipulation equipment. Holding agencies for
      Carl Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, Narashige, De Fonbrune, and other leading
      manufacturers, we have for the past 35 years been able to assist in
      the selection and supply of equipment for microscopy all over the UK
      and overseas. For further information and assistance please contact
      us. Tel.: 01993 883595, fax: 01993 883616.

      Speech preparation and presentation support: big
      speech? We'll help you structure and prepare your speech to suit
      spoken word. Service includes: audience analysis, keyline extraction,
      graphics (OHP/slides), and coaching. Also professional preparation of
      manuscripts and theses, including illustrating (line art or
      photographic). Contact Harry. Tel.: Oxford 514220, e-mail:
      harrylts@globalnet.co.uk.

      Garden design. Spring is coming: let me help you put
      your ideas for your garden into action. Short consultation or full-
      scale design. Judith Walton. Tel.: Oxford 735179.

      Professional IT solutions: KGH Computing Solutions
      offers expert advice on all PC requirements. Particular expertise in
      database design and implementation (Access, dBase, FoxPro); Local
      Area Networks (Novell, WFWG, Windows 95) and connection to TCP/IP
      (University Network); consultancy and specification for new PCs and
      upgrades. Contact Keith Hatton. Tel.: 01734 625707 (answerphone), or
      0850 064387 (mobile); fax: 01734 625708; e-mail:
      100415.314@compuserve.com.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Domestic Services

      Children's day nursery—St Paul's Nursery
      (Somerville College), 119A Walton Street, Oxford, offers full- and
      part-time places for children aged from 3 months to 5 years within a
      12-place nursery, set in a homely environment. For further
      information, contact Suzanne Hodgson. Tel.: 01543 416616.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Houses to Let

      Berkeley, California, USA, Sept. 1996–May 1997:
      house with garage and small yard, 10 minutes' drive from the
      University of California; 1½ blocks from bus line; 2 bedrooms,
      living-room, dining-room, 1 bath, washer-drier, porch; fully
      furnished in quiet, tree-lined neighourhood in walking distance of
      shops, stores, bookstores, restaurants. Weather moderate all year
      round. No pets or smokers. Rent $1,300 p.m. Lynn Rhodes, 726 Neilson
      Street, Berkeley, CA 94707. Tel.: 510 525 2643.

      Furnished central North Oxford house to let from 1
      Oct.; walk to colleges, train station and bus station; near Port
      Meadow; c.h., recently redecorated, 3 desks, filing cabinets, several
      large closets, secluded garden, garden furniture, terrace, 3
      bedrooms, 1½ bathrooms, washing-machine, drier, telephone,
      linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. £870
      p.m. Tel. (J. Mackrell): Oxford 775567 (evenings), or (A. Gaston,
      Canada): 613 7451368, fax: 613 7450299, e-mail:
      gastont@nwrc.cws.doe.ca.

      Only the best is good enough for Finders Keepers'
      clients and tenants. We aim for 100 per cent in everything we do; on
      call 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year to offer a caring,
      comprehensive service. We are an `Investor in People' and National
      Winners of the Best Letting and Management Company Award for the
      second consecutive year—call us to find out why the best is not
      the most expensive. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2
      6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk);
      also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax:
      204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).

      Four-bedroom semi-detached house available for 1
      year's rental from late May/June; in friendly neighbourhood in east
      Oxford, c.1 mile University and hospitals; ideal for a family; in
      excellent condition throughout with all mod. cons. £900 p.c.m.
      Tel.: Oxford 240017 (evenings).

      Witney, 12 miles west of Oxford, modern 4-bedroom
      unfurnished detached house in quiet road, walking distance of town
      centre; cooker, fridge, full c.h., garage, small garden. £700
      p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 300362 (evenings).

      Brand-new 2-bedroom bungalow in quiet position in
      Cowley; fully furnished to a high specification; gas c.h.; parking;
      small walled garden; close to local shops, bus-routes, library,
      swimming-pool, etc. Long let preferred. Available Apr./May. £650
      p.c.m. Tel./fax: Oxford 361772.

      Modern 3-bedroom detached house, 2 miles city
      centre; kitchen/family room, dining-room, lounge; fully furnished;
      cat in residence; secluded garden, off-road parking. Available 22
      July–4 Sept. Non-smokers. £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 744232.

      Pleasant furnished house in Risinghurst; 1 single
      and 2 double bedrooms, lounge-cum-diner, study, gas c.h., appliances;
      good decorative order; small secluded garden; off-street parking.
      £595 p.c.m. Dr Basu. Tel.: 01734 860630 or 01734 875123, ext.
      4344.

      Osney: 3-bedroom terrace house in excellent
      condition 10 minutes' walk from central Oxford in secluded district
      by the river. Fully furnished and equipped, gas c.h., fitted kitchen,
      washing-machine, freezer, fridge, phone, TV, garden with patio and
      seats. Available July for 1 year. Only visiting academics considered.
      £700 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 862347.

      Headington, close to hospitals, shops, schools, and
      buses: 3-bedroom bungalow; 1 master bedroom with en-suite shower and
      w.c., 1 single bedroom, other bedroom/study, family bathroom, gas
      c.h., attached garage, telephone, security system, sun-lounge, modern
      fitted kitchen with automatic washing-machine and drier, waste
      disposal unit. From 1 Aug., £625 p.c.m. Fully furnished.
      Unsuitable for sharers. Tel.: O1993 881667 or 01993 704858.

      Premier offer a fine selection of property for long
      or short let. Similar properties always required. Competitive fees
      and the friendliest service in the city. Call Jan Bartlett at
      Premier, 207 Cowley Road. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: Oxford 798087.

      Aug.–Dec.: terrace house, east Oxford, c.1 mile
      from city centre; 3 bedrooms, 2 reception, large kitchen/diner,
      garden; friendly neighbourhood; all mod cons. £600 p.c.m. plus
      utilities. Tel.: Oxford 793378 (evenings) or (2)76595 (day).

      Two-bedroom house in central North Oxford, very
      close to Green College; beautifully furnished and superbly equipped,
      with landscaped garden and off-street parking. This is a real jewel
      of a house. Non-smokers only, please. Available from 1 Oct. for 1
      year. Rent £800 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 511382.

      An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
      saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer
      but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the
      surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of
      Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to
      academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
      offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please
      telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do
      whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Flats to Let

      Central North Oxford, 10 minutes from city centre:
      two delightful and very comfortable flats available now in quiet,
      civilised family house: (1) large double bedroom, single bedroom,
      drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom; (2) large double bedroom, drawing-
      room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, garden. Regret no
      children or pets. Tel.: Oxford 52400.

      Headington, available May: newly-converted flat;
      large double bed, en-suite shower, living-room and kitchen, c.h.,
      parking. Professionals and academics only. £495 p.c.m. inc.
      water rates. Tel.: Oxford 68504.

      North Oxford : 1 Sept. 1996–30 June 1997,
      £520 p.m., fully-furnished ground-floor flat; dining-room/study,
      hall, living-room/study, bedroom, shower-room, kitchen; dish-washer,
      washing-drying machine, electric stove, etc.; c.h.; car-port; garden.
      Stone, 266 Moore Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

      Two-bedroom flat in North Oxford within easy reach
      of the colleges and university departments available from end of Aug.
      £600 p.m. Tel./fax: Oxford 59408.

      Central Paris: small artists' flat in Le Marais
      quarter; 2 rooms separated by arch, kitchen and bathroom; 2 months,
      July/Aug., and/or for the academic year, Oct.–June. FF 3,700
      p.m. plus deposit. Sutton, 20 Rue de la Cerisaie, 75004 Paris. Tel.:
      40 27 93 09.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Offered

      Central North Oxford: Victorian house available July
      for 6 months plus; comfortable family accommodation; sleeps 6;
      £200 p.w. Also central North Oxford, studio flat; suit couple or
      single person; available shortly, for 6 months plus. £100 p.w.
      Apply: 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon.

      Bed-and-breakfast available in warm, comfortable
      house in exclusive central North Oxford, within easy walking distance
      of city centre, all main university buildings, parks, river, shops,
      pubs, and restaurants. Every room has tea- and coffee-making
      facilities, microwave, and colour television. Very moderate terms.
      Tel.: Oxford 57879.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Sought

      Swiss family (2 adults, 3 children) seeks to rent 2-
      or 3-bedroom house in Cumnor or Botley from 1 Sept. (or earlier) for
      12 months. Rent max. £850 p.m. Dr Martin Tramer, Pain Relief
      Unit, Churchill Hospital. Tel.: Oxford 226161, fax: 226160.

      Assistant professor from the English Department,
      University of Colorado, Boulder, seeks accommodation in Oxford,
      June–July, to finish book project. Timothy Morton. Tel.: 303 492
      1614, fax: 303 492 8904, e-mail: mortont@stripe.colorado.edu.

      One/two room(s) required now for professional(s) in
      shared house or flat within 3 miles of the centre of Oxford; both
      persons reliable, friendly, and non-smokers. Rent in the region of
      £200 p.c.m. Emily. Tel.: Oxford 784010 (day).

      Visiting American professor with family (wife, 1
      well-behaved child) seeks furnished 2–3-bedroom house to rent
      for 6–12 months from 1 July; washer/drier, fridge, c.h., off-
      street parking and location near John Radcliffe preferred. Non-
      smokers who will tend your house and garden lovingly. Tel. (US): 716
      338 4368, fax: 716 338 2347, e-mail: srichardson@rghnet.edu.

      Bosnian girl aged 15½, daughter of professional
      parents, now living in Vienna, would like to spend July and Aug. with
      an Oxford family. Accustomed to looking after children and helping
      with housework. Contact Marianne Fillenz. Tel.: Oxford (2)75908
      (day), or 58055 (evening).

      Academic couple (medical doctors), on short visit to
      Oxford University, require accommodation during May and June. One
      child. Happy to look after pets, garden, house, etc. Tel.: Oxford
      (2)71898.

      Visiting fellow with wife and two children seeks a
      flat in Oxford for 6–8 weeks in July–Aug. Contact Dr Avi
      Shlaim. Tel.: Oxford 56244.

      Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
      property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents
      and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and
      professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
      of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford
      area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply
      need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us.
      Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Exchange

      Law student seeks Oxford accommodation, 23
      June–4 Aug. Will trade house: 3 bedrooms, 3 bath, office, 2
      living areas, sunroom, lovely yards; amenities. Inc. pool, tennis,
      and golf membership. 4315 Woodcrest Lane, Dallas, TX 75206. Tel.: 214
      823 3098, e-mail: ldedman@post.cis.smu.edu.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

      Sydney: family on UK sabbatical Jan.–June 1997
      seeks house-swap or rent. We offer lovely detached house on quiet
      street; 2 large beds, 2 small beds/study, kitchen/family/dining area,
      double living-room, 2 baths; best appliances f & f; large garden;
      pool. Lovely inner harbourside suburb, close shops, schools, bus,
      ferry, 10 minutes drive/bus downtown. We require well-equipped
      2–3-bed/study house in Oxford/area, close to shops, primary
      school, rail station. Douglas Tomkin. Fax: 00 612 330 8877, e-mail:
      douglas.tomkins@uts.edu.au.

      Visiting professor, wife and son seek quiet,
      three-bedroom house in North Oxford or surrounding area,
      Aug.–Jan. Off-street parking and washer-dryer preferred.
      Non-smokers. No pets. British, now based in US. Looking to rent or
      exchange our well-appointed house in quiet neighbourhood 30 minutes
      north of New York City. Will take good care of your home. Tel:
      1-(914) 365-6631, fax (until 26 April): 1-(914) 365-8150, e-mail:
      ncb@lamont.ldeo.columbia.edu or (after 26 April)
      kottie_christieblick@socsd.lhric.org.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Holiday Lets

      Languedoc: village mansion, 11 bedrooms, huge garden
      and courtyard, swimming-pool; Mediterranean 25 minutes, lake 7
      minutes, canoeing rivers 20 minutes; still available 3–20 June,
      21–7 July, all Sept. From £350 p.w. Tel.: Oxford
      511065/512470.

      Welsh Borders: in small town (Ludlow 12 miles),
      grade II listed house, sleeps 4–5; c.h.; walled garden;
      excellent walking country. Offa's Dyke Path 6 miles. Tel.: 01993
      811013 (p.m.).

      Provence: La Garde Freinet, 30 minutes St Tropez
      beaches; spacious edge-of-village house; garden, roof-terrace;
      excellent furniture and equipment; c.h., log fire; popular mountain
      village; twice-weekly market, restaurants, pool;
      £150–£350 p.w. Mrs Dare. Tel.: 0171-352 6975, or 00 33
      94 43 17 21.

      Les Eyzies (the cradle of prehistory), Dordogne,
      France: 2 tastefully restored period farmhouses on small private
      estate; one sleeps 8 adults and 4 children; other sleeps 6 adults;
      both have honey-coloured stonework and spectacular oak-beamed
      ceilings, TV, fully-equipped modern bathrooms and kitchens,
      comfortable sitting-rooms, access to fax/phone; in 3 acres of grassed
      and wooded grounds; British owners nearby; to let for 2-week periods
      (or longer) during summer and available at reduced rates for
      academic/sabbatical projects (1–6 months) in autumn, winter, and
      spring. Tel.: 0161-439 7398; Internet:
      http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dawber_uk.

      Simple farmhouse accommodation in beautiful Dordogne
      countryside; sleeps 6; available to rent May–Sept, £130
      p.w. Tel.: 01295 780641.

      Coastguard cottage: comfortable, quiet, and fairly
      isolated cottage on edge of coastal path overlooking Chesil Beach
      and Lyme Bay at Langton Herring; sleeps 4 + cot; colour TV, record-
      player, radio. £150–£250 p.w. inc. of electricity for
      heating, cooking, lighting. Tel: 01608 810563, or write: D. Simon,
      Little Orchard, Charlbury, Oxon. OX7 3RL.

      Italy, outskirts Verona, charming ground-floor flat
      in fine 15th-c. villa: own entrance, large bed-sitting room, ditto
      kitchen dining room, secure parking, use of garden area. £250
      p.w. inc. all services and weekly cleaning. Vacancies June, July,
      Aug. Tel. (Moore): 01844 238247, or, in Verona, Contessa Da Sacco: 00
      45 526 499.

      Peleponnese: unique, recently reconstructed house in
      the Byzantine Castro of Monemvasia; sleeps 4 (1 double, 2 singles),
      fully equipped kitchen and bathroom, verandah with views of Cape
      Malea; under-floor c.h.; open fire. £400 p.w.. Adjacent
      apartment sleeps 4 also available, £300 p.w. For brochure, tel.:
      0181-977 3490 (evenings), or send postcard to: Kate Rendall,
      Monemvasia 23070, Lakonia, Greece.

      Czech Republic, for a holiday full of pleasant
      surprises; fairy-tale woodland cottage available May–Oct.; 30
      minutes Prague; sleeps 4+; wood fires, lake, views, walks, mushrooms,
      castles, sunshine; abundant food and wine; low prices; English-
      speaking owner. From £225 p.w. Tel.: 0171-373 0667.

      Villa with garden and wonderful views, 40 minutes
      from Florence; all mod. cons.; swimming and sports facilities
      nearby; sleeps 8; available late July–mid-Sept. £325 p.w.
      Lukes. Tel. (Italy): 00 39 55 8428317.

      South-west France: tranquil roof-terraced luxury
      apartment within tiny walled hill-top medieval village; 2 double
      bedrooms, excellent bathroom and kitchen; 30-ft south-facing roof
      terrace, half shaded, high above rural valley and completely private.
      Mrs C. Laird. Tel./fax: 00 33 53.70.46.80.

      Lake Garda---Dolomites, near Riva-del-Garda in
      peaceful hillside villa with spectacular mountain panorama,
      self-contained accommodation for two, May--Oct. Separate garden
      entrance with patio; private facilities. £45--£50 per
      night. Excursions to the Dolomites, Verona operas, Trento.
      Wine-tastings. English spoken. Tel./fax: 0039 464 518559, or 0171-359
      1629.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Houses for Sale

      Portland Road, Summertown: attractive 1930s family
      house with south-facing garden, in very popular area close to
      excellent schools, bus route to town, and local shops; large sitting-
      room, dining-room, big kitchen, 4 bedrooms with built-in wardrobes,
      bathroom, study in large insulated wooden cabin in garden with own
      radiator, phone, etc.; period features; gas c.h.; also workshop in
      garden which is well planted, with a mature walnut tree, pond,
      flower-beds, lawn, terrace. Possibility of extension. £220,000.
      Tel.: Oxford 54058, or 226490 (day).

      Islip: stone-built cottage of exceptional charm;
      large living-room with exposed stone walls; ceiling beams and
      inglenook fireplace; good-size kitchen; 2 bedrooms, upstairs
      bathroom; 50-ft south-facing garden with patio. Oxford 4 miles, M40 2
      miles. £91,950. Tel.: Oxford 376684.

      Cumnor Hill, Oxford: 4 bedrooms (1 en-suite), 2
      bathrooms, 3 reception rooms, single garage; set in large garden.
      Convenient for Oxford and public transport. £199,000. Tel.:
      Oxford 862835.

      Holiday family accommodation, central North Oxford:
      charming Victorian house, sleeps 6, £280 p.w. Also studio flat
      for couple, £170 p.w. Both residences centrally heated,
      washer/driers, microwaves plus conventional cookers, fridge/freezers,
      colour TVs, linen; telephones optional. Tel.: Oxford 59911.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Retirement flats for sale

      Finding cooking and housekeeping tiresome? For a
      person over retirement age £30,000 will purchase a single-
      bedroom service flat in a purpose-built block with 24-hour warden
      cover in Summertown area of Oxford. Contact R.A. Birchall, 20
      Plantation Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 310091.

      Return to List of Contents of this section






      <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 19 April<br /> - 8 May

      Diary


      Contents of this section:

      Academic Staff Seminars: places
      should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office,
      University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

      For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/3_4373.htm">Staff Development Programme
      supplement.

      Return to Contents Page of this
      issue



      Friday 19 April

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Chinese paintings' (special
      exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
      (2)78015.)

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      Saturday 20 April

      TRINITY TERM begins.

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      Sunday 21 April

      TRINITY FULL TERM begins.

      PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Christian spirituality and inter-faith
      dialogue: the spiritual contribution of world faiths' (sixth Bampton
      Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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      Monday 22 April

      PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor):
      `Contemplative creativity I: Plato' (lecture series: `Ascents of
      love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary
      tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR J. CHEVALLIER: `L'État de droit', Maison Française,
      5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in
      advance).

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      Tuesday 23 April

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Children in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
      £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

      PROFESSOR P.J. KATZENSTEIN: `Identity and norms in world politics'
      (Winchester Lecture in International Relations), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
      today' (first of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR HOLMES ROLSTON: `Nature for real: is nature a social
      construct?' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society
      seminar), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

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      Wednesday 24 April

      PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor):
      `Contemplative creativity II: Spinoza, Proust' (lecture series:
      `Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western
      philosophical/literary tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Thursday 25 April

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Tutorial teaching', 9.30 a.m. (see
      information above).

      DR A. BASU: `Wagri women of a Delhi slum—the problem of
      psycho-social development' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on
      Women seminars: `Gender and development—protest and politics'),
      Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

      DR D. CAMERON: `Language and gender: feminist language reform and
      the history of English' (Times Lecture), St Cross
      Building, 5 p.m.

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      Friday 26 April

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Monarchs in the Museum', 1.15 p.m.
      (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

      FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and
      France—the 1992 General Election in Britain and the 1995
      Presidential Election in France', Maison Française, 2 p.m.
      (places to be booked one week in advance).

      PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
      today' (second of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR S. HOWELL: ` "May blessings come, may mischiefs go!":
      living kinds as agents of transition and transformation among the
      Lio' (Marett Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter
      College, 5 p.m.

      MAISON FRANÇAISE debate: `Le journalisme politique en
      France, aujourd'hui' (various speakers), 5 p.m. (admission free, but
      places to be booked one week in advance).

      D. LEBAUD and P. JOURDAN play cello and piano works by Beethoven, Schumann,
      Liszt, and Brahms, Maison Française, 8.15 p.m. (tel. for
      reservations one week in advance: (2)74220).

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      Saturday 27 April

      DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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      Sunday 28 April

      LORD BLAKE preaches the St Mark's Day Sermon, Magdalen, 10 a.m.

      ALBERT JULIÀ plays piano works by Mozart and Liszt,
      Wolfson, 5 p.m. (tickets £4, concessions £2, at the door).

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      Monday 29 April

      PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The
      Christian ascent I: Augustine' (lecture series: `Ascents of love:
      desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary
      tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `The three immortal souls and other human
      faculties' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      J. BLOT: `The French perception of Bloomsbury', Maison
      Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked
      one week in advance).

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      Tuesday 30 April

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Drinking in the past!', 1.15 p.m.
      (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

      PROFESSOR Q. SKINNER: `Ancient laughter and modern philosophy'
      (A.B. Emden Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
      today' (third of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      G. PLOTKIN: `Denotational semantics: an unbalanced perspective'
      (Strachey Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Computing Laboratory, 5 p.m.

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      Wednesday 1 May

      DR J. BENSON: `Some illuminated Sanskirt manuscripts in the Bodleian
      Library' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil
      Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

      PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The
      Christian ascent II: Dante' (lecture series: `Ascents of love: desire
      and the good in the Western philosophical/literary tradition'),
      Schools, 5 p.m.

      MS CAROLINE BENN and PROFESSOR TED WRAGG: `Affirming the
      comprehensive ideal: effective schools and effective teachers',
      Department of Educational Studies, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Body: anatomy, physiology, and medicine'
      (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Thursday 2 May

      DR C. GUPTA: `Fundamentalism and the print media in contemporary
      India' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender
      and development—protest and politics'), Library Wing Seminar
      Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

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      Friday 3 May

      HAKLUYT SOCIETY: `Science and geography in imperial contexts',
      Modern History Faculty, 2 p.m. (names in advance to Dr F. Fernandez-
      Armesto, care of Modern History Faculty).

      FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and
      France—protest and tactical voting, party identification and
      volatility', Maison Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one
      week in advance).

      PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
      today' (fourth of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Cosmic elements and theory of microcosm'
      (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR J. MOKYR: `Famine and mortality: an historical re-
      examination' (Sir John Hicks Lecture on Economic History), Schools, 5
      p.m.

      M. RIOT-SARCEY: `Femmes et démocraties', Maison
      Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked
      one week in advance).

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      Sunday 5 May

      PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Christian spirituality, Third World theology,
      and the voices of women: the spiritual significance of otherness'
      (seventh Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

      CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY exhibition opens: `Jeff Clarke---new
      work' (until 5 June).

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      Monday 6 May

      UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (today only).

      ANNUAL ELECTIONS of members of faculty boards (except Clinical
      Medicine), 30 May: nominations by two electors to be received at the
      University Offices by 4 p.m.

      PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The
      Romantic ascent I: Emily Brontë' (lecture series: `Ascents of
      love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary
      tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (1)'
      (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Tuesday 7 May

      PROFESSOR J. BURROW (Professor of European
      Thought): `A
      common culture? Nationalist ideas in nineteenth-century European
      thought' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR D.M. KENNEDY (Harmsworth Professor of American History):
      `Can the United States still afford to be a nation of immigrants?'
      (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR D. GOUGH: `The seismic structure of the sun' (Halley
      Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University Museum, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
      today' (last of series of Martin D'Arcy Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Wednesday 8 May

      FRANCO-BRITISH workshop: `Le transfert de concepts et de pratiques
      dans les sciences des XXIXe et XXe siècles—sciences
      biologiques et humaines', Maison Française, all day (tel.:
      (2)77277 or (2)74220).

      DR Z. BRZEZINSKI: `Eurasia: post-imperial dilemmas' (Elliott
      Lecture), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (2)'
      (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      ARCHBISHOP EMERITUS J.R. QUINN: `Moral life or moral law' (Thomas
      More Lecture), Catholic Chaplaincy, 5 p.m.

      H. MORPHY: `Hunting art' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum:
      Beatrice Blackwood Lecture), Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, 7
      p.m.

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