17 October 1996 - No 4413

Oxford University Gazette

17 October 1996


 


The following supplement was published with this Gazette:
Vice-Chancellor's Oration

 


University Health and Safety information

 


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University Acts

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 14 October

1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 1 November.

List of the decrees:


Decree (1)

The consent of the University is given to the amendment to Statute II of Hertford College approved by the Governing Body on 24 July 1996, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effect of the amendment is to reduce the retiring age of the Principal to 67.

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Decree (2)

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to Statutes IV and VIII of Magdalen College approved by the Governing Body on 12 June 1996, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are

(1) to remove the requirement as to length of appointment in relation to pension provision for persons other than fellows; and

(2) to increase the maximum number of Honorary Fellows to thirty.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

SANDIE BYRNE, D.PHIL., Balliol College

MARK DONALD LENEY, New College

GERALD LEE MACKIE, St John's College

AMIT SHARMA, St John's College

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Byrne, S., MA status, D.Phil., Balliol
Darbishire, O.R., MA, Pembroke
Josipovici, G.D., MA, St Anne's
Leney, M.D., MA status, New College
McCallien, D.W.J., MA, Pembroke
Mackie, G.L., MA status, St John's
Middlekauff, R.L., MA, Queen's
Sharma, A., MA status, St John's
Sorabji, R.R.K., B.Phil., MA, Wolfson

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CONGREGATION 15 October

1 Promulgation of Statutes

Forms of Statutes were promulgated. No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preamble carried of the proposed Statutes (1) concerning the Delegates of the University Press and their Finance Committee, (2) correcting an anomaly in the cycle for the election of the Proctors and the Assessor, and (3) establishing The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company Professorship of Management Studies.

 


2 Declaration of Approval of Special Resolution allocating a site

That an area of the site purchased from the Regional Office of the NHS Executive, comprising approximately 2.5 acres, be allocated to the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics.

 


3 Declaration of Approval of Special Resolution approving the conferment of a Degree by Diploma

That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law by Diploma upon his excellency professor roman herzog, President of the Federal Republic of Germany, be approved.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 1 November, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 21 October

Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at noon on 21 October, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

ANDREAS EDUARD BENDLIN, Brasenose College

MICHAEL JOHN BURDEN, MA status, New College

DENIS CECIL FEENEY, D.PHIL., New College

CECILIA MARIA GARCIA-PENALOSA, M.PHIL., Nuffield College

HANS ALFRED PETER KRAUS, Corpus Christi College

KATHRYN SUTHERLAND, D.PHIL., St Anne's College

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CONGREGATION 22 October

Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the preamble adopted and the special resolution carried without a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11 (Statutes, 1995, p. 8).

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CONGREGATION 14 November

Election

  Vacancy Retiring member Period from MT 1996
Buildings Committee One (not being also a member of Council or the General Board) Dr G.B. Robinson (resigned) Until TT 1997

¶ Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 28 October, and similar nominations by six members of Congregation up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 4 November.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published.

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Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    PASSMORE EDWARDS PRIZE FOR CLASSICS AND ENGLISH 1996

    Amended notice

    The Prize has been awarded to THOMAS J. VENNING, Corpus Christi College.

    Proxime accessit: NICHOLAS D. SMITH, Lady Margaret Hall.

    Note: this replaces the notice published in the Gazette of 3 October, p. 58.

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    MATERIALS PRIZES 1996

    Institute of Materials Prize (for best overall performance in the Final Honour Schools of Metallurgy and Science of Materials and of Materials, Economics, and Management): JAMES R. WILDE, St Catherine's College.

    Armourers' and Brasiers' Prize and Armourers' Medal (for the best Part II project and dissertation): EDWARD A.G. SHILLINGTON, St Catherine's College.

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    REVIEW OF THE CODE OF HARASSMENT

    In 1995--6, according to the arrangements agreed by Council at the time of adoption of the Code of Practice on Harassment, it was agreed that there should be a full review of the working of the code. A committee has been established under the chairmanship of Ms J. Innes, and its terms of reference are as follows:

    1 To review the University's code of practice and regulation on harassment in the light of experiences since its introduction in Michaelmas Term 1991 and in the light of the conclusions of the Zellick report.

    2 To include within the scope of the review such matters as:

    (a) The relation between the University's code of practice on harassment, and its regulation on harassment, and the possibility of adopting for both a common definition of the offence;

    (b) the relationship between college and university codes;

    (c) whether it would be possible to introduce new procedures, or amend existing procedures, so as to make the process of pursuing a formal complaint less arduous for the complainant;

    (d) the role played by the Advisory Panel on Harassment and by departmental and college advisers and the need or otherwise to increase the representation on the University's advisory panel;

    (e) the level of training required both by members of the advisory panel and by departmental and college advisers;

    (f) the relationship between the Advisory Panel on Harassment, Proctors, the Counselling Service, and OUSU;

    (g) whether or not the expansion of peer counselling by students should be encouraged or discouraged and the training implications involved;

    and such other aspects of the code on harassment as the committee may judge it appropriate to consider.

    The committee now invites views from members and staff of the University. Anyone wishing to comment is asked to write to the secretary of the committee, Mrs F.M. Barnwell, at the University Offices, Wellington Square, by Friday, 8 November.

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    UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY INSURANCE

    Personal Consultancies

    The University holds a Professional Indemnity Insurance policy which indemnifies the University, together with its employees and officers whilst acting on behalf of the University, against liability for damages (and claimants' costs and expenses) in respect of claims arising out of the University's activities as a university by reason of (amongst other things):

    (i) any act, neglect, error, or omission, occurring or committed in good faith by the University (together with its employees and officers whilst acting on behalf of the University);

    (ii) libel and slander committed in good faith by reason of words written or spoken by the University (together with its employees and officers whilst acting on behalf of the University).

    In the event of liability arising from any dishonest or fraudulent act or omission, no person committing or condoning the act or omission is entitled to indemnity.

    The policy does not cover the first £1,000 of any claim for damages.

    The policy also provides the same cover for individual members of the University's academic, academic-related, and technical staff who undertake private work, provided that

    (a) the permission of the University has been obtained, and

    (b) fees received for such work are declared to the insurer.

    It should be noted, however, that claims in US and Canadian courts are excluded.

    This insurance cover is subject to a number of conditions, of which the most important are:

    (a) that written notice is given to the insurance company as soon as possible after the University is aware of circumstances which might reasonably be expected to produce a claim against the University (including its employees and officers if within the cover)—irrespective of the validity of the claim—or as soon as it is informed of such a claim for which there may be liability under the insurance cover; and

    (b) that every letter, claim, writ, summons and process is forwarded to the insurance company immediately on receipt. No admission, offer, promise, payment, or indemnity is to be made or given by or on behalf of the University (including its employees and officers if within the cover) without the written consent of the company.

    Members of the academic staff undertaking consultancy work with the permission of the University (under the rules laid down by the General Board), and academic-related and technical staff (who must obtain the permission of the head of their department), are strongly urged to take advantage of this cover. They may do so by writing, on a strictly confidential basis, to Ms J. Clark, Director, Research Services Office, Wellington Square, Oxford, stating the name of the employer for each consultancy and the fee or the remuneration receivable.

    The insurance company will only be notified of the aggregate number of consultancies and the aggregate fees on an annual basis except in the event of a claim, when details of a particular consultancy will be required by the insurer.

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    DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE POLICIES AVAILABLE TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Sun Alliance Connections, the personal insurances division of the main insurer of the University, provides discounts for members, staff, their families, and pensioners of the University of Oxford. The following savings can be achieved:

    Household (buildings and/or contents: 20 per cent;
    Travel (including winter sports): 12.5 per cent;
    Private medical expenses: 10 per cent;
    Private car: 5 per cent.

    The University acts solely as an introducer of business to Sun Alliance Connections, receiving no commission or other remuneration, with all savings passed on to the subscribing member. For further information, a brochure may be obtained from Graham Waite (telephone: (2)80307), or Gill Tombs (telephone: (2)70110) at the University Offices. To obtain a quotation or receive specific information on the covers available, telephone the Sun Alliance Connections Oxford branch on Oxford 244501 and ask for either Louise Cox or Delia Cannon.

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    OCLC FIRSTSEARCH DATABASE

    A course has been arranged for new library staff and students who would like to know more about how to use the OCLC FirstSearch database. The course will include brief talks followed by an opportunity to do hands-on exercises. It will be presented by John Dowd from OCLC in the OUCS Lecture Theatre.

    The course will be held on 30 October and 6 November, 2–5 p.m. Documentation will be provided at the session.

    To book a place, e-mail: stephen.eyre@las.ox.ac.uk.

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    SPEAKING BY JUNIOR MEMBERS IN CONGREGATION

    Mr Vice-Chancellor has, with the agreement of Council, approved the following arrangements for junior members to speak in Congregation under the terms of Ch. I, Sect x (Statutes, 1995, p. 199), which reads as follows:

    `Any junior member as defined in Tit. XIV, Sect. iv, § 1, cl. 2, may speak at a meeting of Congregation, if called upon to do so by the Chairman at the Chairman's discretion, provided that the Chairman may at any time terminate a debate on the floor of the House and proceed to the final speeches and the taking of a vote.'

    The Chairman of Congregation will normally expect to call upon nominated representatives of the Oxford University Student Union if they wish to speak in debate, and will normally expect to call upon junior members to speak only from among those who have given advance notice of their wish to be called. Should the Chairman consider that the number of junior members who have given such notice is excessive, he or she will have to be selective in calling upon them. The Chairman will try to ensure a balanced debate in relation to the apparent spread and strength of views held by junior members. If informed selection is to be possible it is desirable that when giving notice of the wish to be called a junior member should indicate (a) whether he or she intends to support or oppose the motion before the House, (b) whether he or she would speak on behalf of any club, committee, group, or association, (c) whether he or she is supported by other junior members (up to twelve of whom might sign the notice).

    If the number giving notice is small they will all be admitted to the floor of the House although this does not ensure their being called. In other cases some selection may be necessary at the stages of both admission and calling of speakers. If there is to be time to tell applicants whether they will be admitted notice will have to be received in good time. Junior members should therefore send in such notice, in writing, to the Registrar to be received at the University Offices not later than 10 a.m. on the Monday preceding the debate in question. The name of any representative nominated by OUSU should also be communicated to the Registrar, in writing, through the President by that time. A notice will then be posted in the University Offices and on the gate of the Clarendon Building not later than 10 a.m. on the morning of the debate, indicating whether all applicants will be admitted to the floor of the House or, if selection has had to take place, the names of those selected for admission to the floor.

    Junior members not admitted to the floor of the House will normally be permitted to listen to the debate from the gallery. Junior members on the floor of the House will be asked to remain in their places while a vote is being taken.

    Under Tit. XIV, Sect. iv, § 1, cl. 2, junior members are defined as `those persons who, having been admitted to matriculation, are residing to fulfil the requirements of any statute, decree, or regulation of the University or reading for any degree, diploma, or certificate of the University and who have not proceeded to membership of Convocation'. (Membership of Convocation is normally obtained by taking the MA degree.)

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    CECIL ROTH MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR ITALIAN STUDIES 1997

    A Cecil Roth Memorial Prize for Italian Studies will be awarded, if there is a candidate of sufficient merit, in Trinity Term 1997 for an essay on an approved subject within the field of Italian art, history, or literature of the period from the end of the Roman Empire in the west until the end of the eighteenth century; it is recommended that the length of the essay should not exceed 10,000 words. The value of the prize is £400. Two book-prizes of £50 each may also be awarded. Applicants must be members of the University reading for a Final Honour School who, on 30 March 1997, will not have exceeded four years from the date of their matriculation. All candidates must apply, through the Secretary to the Curators of the Taylor Institution, 37 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF for approval of their intended essay subjects. (In addition to other subjects, the judges are also willing to consider proposals which involve the use of material intended for theses, extended essays, etc., in Final Honour School examinations.) Essays must be typed or word-processed in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper, and must be submitted to the Secretary to the Curators not later than 30 March 1997.

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    ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

    2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

    Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the University, was established in 1988. The company has been formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded by the UK Government through the Research Councils and funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The function of the company is to ensure that the results of research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors, who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

    Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or royalties for the use of know-how arising out of research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of the University by setting up individual companies using venture capital or development capital funds.

     

    Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish to exploit the results of research supported by non-Research Council sources, when there are no prior conditions on the handling of the intellectual property rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a small pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting intellectual property rights and for taking work to a stage where its potential can be assessed.

    Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new ideas can be developed for market requirements. The company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for major industrial companies, so that they can have a window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license and invest where appropriate.

    A brochure explaining Isis' activities is available. Please contact the above address, or the telephone and fax numbers given below.

    Members of the University should contact the Managing Director if they wish to take advantage of the services that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

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    CHINESE CLASSES FOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Non-intensive Chinese classes at the beginners' and intermediate levels, for members of the University, will be held as follows in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute: beginners' classes, 5–6 p.m. on Mondays; intermediate classes, 5–6 p.m. on Wednesdays.

    The tutor will be Song Yang, Instructor in Chinese, the Institute for Chinese Studies.

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    CONCERT

    St John's College Musical Society

    THE ADELPHI TRIO will give a concert, including works by Clementi, Beethoven, Stravinsky, and Pierne, at 8.30 p.m. on Saturday, 19 October, in the auditorium, the Garden Quadrangle, St John's College. Admission is free.

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    EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

    Visitors to the Examination Schools are asked to note that work is currently in progress on the installation of a lift in the Examination Schools which will improve accessibility for students with disabilities.

    Work will necessarily continue throughout Michaelmas Term but every attempt will be made to avoid disturbance to users of the Schools.

    Members of the University are asked to be as tolerant as possible of any difficulties which this work may cause.

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    MAISON FRANÇAISE

    Cinema and History

    The following films, with English sub-titles, will be shown at 8.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Maison Française. Reservation is necessary, and seats can be booked up to seven days before the screening.

    22 Oct.: Perceval le Gallois (Eric Rohmer, 1978; 138 minutes)

    29 Oct.: Farinelli (Gérard Corbiau, 1994; 110 minutes)

    5 Nov.: La Reine Margot (Patrice Chéreau, 1994; 162 minutes) 12 Nov.: Le hussard sur le toit (Jean- Paul Rappeneau, 1995; 135 minutes)

    19 Nov.: Le Colonel Chabert (Yves Angelo, 1993; 110 minutes)

    26 Nov.: La fille de d'Artagnan (Bertrand Tavernier, 1994; 132 minutes) 3 Dec.: Le grand chemin (Jean-Loup Hubert, 1987; 106 minutes)

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    Lectures

    Contents of this section:

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    ROMANES LECTURE 1996

    THE RT. HON. THE LORD JENKINS OF HILLHEAD, OM, PC, DCL, Chancellor of the University, will deliver the Romanes Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 14 November, in the Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets are not required for admission.

    Subject: `The Chancellorship: some present reflections with a little history.'

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    HUSSEY LECTURES ON THE CHURCH AND THE ARTS

    Discerning the body

    THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY, Dean of Christ Church, will deliver the Hussey Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Hilary Term in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    6 Feb.: `The incarnation of the Word and the Words.'

    13 Feb.: `The isolation of the sacrifical body.'

    20 Feb.: `The social body.'

    27 Feb.: `Two worlds/one world.'

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    CLARENDON LAW LECTURES

    Business Torts

    MR TONY WEIR, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, will deliver the second series of Clarendon Law Lectures in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building, as follows: Wednesday, 30 October, 5–7 p.m., and Thursday, 31 October, 5–5.50 p.m.

    The lectures take place under the auspices of the Oxford University Press and the Faculty of Law.

    The lectures are open to the public, and those wishing to attend are advised to arrive early.

     

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    ASTOR LECTURE

    PROFESSOR C.A. ANGELL, Arizona State University, will deliver an Astor Lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Monday, 21 October, in the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Lecture Theatre.

    Subject: `Polymorphism in glasses, liquids, and biopolymers: implications for protein folding and BSE.'

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    ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

    Southern Africa Seminars

    These seminars will take place at 4.45 p.m. on the days shown, as follows: the seminar on Thursday, 14 November, will be held in the Upper Lecture Room, the School of Geography; all other seminars will be held on Wednesdays, in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

    Convener: A. Lemon, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Geography.

    DR C. VOGEL, Witwatersrand
    23 Oct.: `Environmental policy in South Africa.'

    DR I. SMITH, Warwick
    30 Oct.: `The South African War (1899–1902) and the making of modern South Africa.'

    DR R. GIBB, Plymouth
    6 Nov.: `The Southern African Customs Union Agreement.'

    DR G. WILLIAMS
    14 Nov.: `Land reforms and agricultural policies in South Africa.'

    PROFESSOR C. DE WET, Rhodes
    20 Nov.: `Land reform and resettlement in South Africa.'

    DR D. SIMON, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College
    27 Nov.: `From desert enclave to regional gateway? The reintegration of Walvis Bay into Namibia.'

    DR S. PARNELL, Witwatersrand
    4 Dec.: `Post-apartheid housing policy: in search of an accompanying urbanisation policy.'

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    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

    The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Room, the Pauling Human Sciences Centre.

    Conveners: N.J. Allen, B.Sc., B.Litt., BM, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in the Social Anthropology of South Asia, and P.G. Rivière, B.Litt., MA, D.Phil., Professor of Social Anthropology.

    DR L. RIVAL, Kent
    18 Oct.: `Birthing fathers and the naturalness of parenting: an examination of the Huaorani couvade.'

    DR S. HEADLEY, Aix-en-Provence
    25 Oct.: `Purification through the telling of a Genesis: a Javanese cosmology in shadow puppet theatre.'

    DR S. HUGH-JONES, Cambridge
    1 Nov.: `Good reason or bad conscience? Why some Amazonians are ambivalent about eating meat.'

    DR M. BUTLER
    8 Nov.: `About the house: Jane Austen's anthropological eye.'

    DR R. ASTUTI, RSF
    15 Nov.: `It's a boy. It's a girl! Reflections on sex and gender in Madagascar and beyond.'

    DR D. JAMES, Witwatersrand
    22 Nov.: `Anthropology, history, and the making of past and place: a case study from South Africa.'

    PROFESSOR R. FARDON, SOAS
    29 Nov.: `Bovid imaginings: masks and the materiality of associations in West Africa.'

    DR C. KNIGHT, University of East London
    8 Mar.: `The origins of language: current theories.'

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    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology.

    Convener: R.M. Anderson, MA, Linacre Professor of Zoology.

    DR D.C. BARKER, Cambridge
    21 Oct.: `Can DNA diagnosis of human leishmaniasis be applied in the tropics?'

    PROFESSOR D. BUNDY
    28 Oct.: To be announced.

    PROFESSOR R. WARD
    4 Nov.: `Genetic evolution of bears: a phylogeographic approach.'

    DR L. ALPHEY, University of Manchester
    11 Nov.: `Protein phosphatase 1: one enzyme, several genes, many roles.'

    PROFESSOR R.E. PAGE, California, Davis
    18 Nov.: `Genomic mapping of behavioural quantitative trait loci in the honey-bee.'

    DR M. DAWKINS
    25 Nov.: `How hens see the world: visual images for the bird brain.'

    DR D.B. GOLDSTEIN
    2 Dec.: `The origin and spread of anatomically modern humans.'

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    Department of Biochemistry: departmental colloquia and OUBS talks

    The following colloquia will be held at 4 p.m. on Mondays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

    PROFESSOR N.A.R. GOW, Aberdeen
    21 Oct.: `Candida Albicans—fungal `Jekyll and Hyde'.'

    DR J. SMITH, Division of Developmental Biology, NIMR
    28 Oct.: `Upstream and downstream of brachyury: a gene required for vertebrate mesoderm formation.'

    DR K. DAY
    4 Nov.: `Sex and malaria: a population genetics view.'

    PROFESSOR J. WILLIAMS, University College, London
    11 Nov.: `Stop and go signalling pathways in Dictyostelium development.'

    DR A. MONACO, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics
    18 Nov.: `Isolation of genes for inherited disorders: from monogenic to polygenic diseases.'

    DR A.N. BARCLAY
    25 Nov.: `Biochemical analysis of lymphocyte surface proteins.'

    PROFESSOR D. LANE, Dundee
    2 Dec.: `Regulating and mimicking tumour suppression gene function.'

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    The following lectures will be given at 6.15 p.m. on the days shown in Lecture Theatre 1, the Academic Block, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    Convener: P. Foëx, MA, D.Phil., Nuffield Professor of Anaesthetics.

    DR J.D. YOUNG, DR K. DORRINGTON, and others
    Tues. 19 Nov.: `An evening of lungs—pulmonary circulation, nitric oxide, lung–liquid balance.'

    DR M. WARD
    Wed. 11 Dec.: `Acupuncture.'

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    Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

    These lectures will be held 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the New Lecture Theatre, ASC Building, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

     

    Note: the title of the 18 October lecture differs from that given in the notice in the Gazette of 3 October (p. 64), which is hereby replaced.

    Convener: J. Newsom-Davis, DM, Action Research Professor of Clinical Neurology.

    PROFESSOR S. SHORVON, Institute of Neurology, London
    18 Oct.: `Aspects of epilepsy and cortical dysplasia.'

    PROFESSOR M. HARRISON, Middlesex Hospital, London
    1 Nov.: `Neurological complications of HIV infection.'

    DR R. WILL, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
    20 Dec.: `Creutzfeld--Jakob disease: recent developments.'

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    Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery: David Fuller Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR CHARLES GALASKO, Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Manchester, will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 6 November, in the Lecture Theatre, the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre.

    Subject: `Neuromuscular scoliosis.'

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    Department of Paediatric Surgery

    PROFESSOR JOHN HUTSON, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, will lecture at 8.30 a.m. on Friday, 1 November, in the Main Lecture Theatre, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    Subject: `Descent of the testis and its abnormalities.'

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    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    PROFESSOR PATRICK RILEY, Professor of Philosophy and Politics, Wisconsin and Harvard, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 22 October, in the Lecture Room, the Philosophy Centre, 10 Merton Street.

    Convener: M.R. Ayers, MA, Professor of Philosophy.

     

    Subject: `Leibniz's theory of justice: universal jurisprudence and the charity of the wise.'

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    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown in 47 Wellington Square.

    Convener: P.A. Mackridge, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Modern Greek.

    PROFESSOR M. JEFFREYS, Sydney
    Thur. 31 Oct.: `The Australian dimension of the Macedonian controversy.'

    PROFESSOR W. PUCHNER, Athens
    Tue. 5 Nov.: `Shadow theatre in the Balkan Peninsula: from Ottoman Karagöz to modern Greek Karaghiozis.'

    PROFESSOR R. BEATON, King's College, London
    Thur. 14 Nov.: `Seferis and Byzantium.' (With slides)

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    Portuguese Graduate Seminar

    DR S.R. PARKINSON will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 24 October, in Room T11, 47 Wellington Square.

    Conveners: T.F. Earle, MA, D.Phil., King John II Professor of Portuguese Studies, and S.R. Parkinson, MA, University Lecturer in Portuguese Language and Linguistics.

     

    Subject: `Metrical virtuosity in the Cantigas de Santa Maria.'

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    MODERN HISTORY

    Special Faculty Lecture

    PROFESSOR N. DAVIES, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London, will deliver the annual Special Faculty Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 22 November, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Fair comparisons, false contrasts: East and West in modern European history.'

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    Seminar in Medieval History

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College. Those attending are asked to note the change of time.

    On 11 November a Group 1 Research Discussion will be held in place of the seminar.

    Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of Medieval History, and W.J. Blair, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History.

    P. GALLOWAY
    21 Oct.: `Discreet and devout maidens: Beguine communities in northern France, 1200–1500.'

    PROFESSOR E. JAMES, Reading
    28 Oct.: `Childhood in Merovingian Gaul.'

    S. KINGSTON
    4 Nov.: `Numerous Assemblies and Steadfast Common Men: the exercise of lordly power in Ulster and the Isles in the fifteenth century.'

    H. LORREY
    18 Nov.: `Conversion and the question of doubt in the High Middle Ages.'

    PROFESSOR T. REUTER, Southampton
    25 Nov.: To be announced.

    M. ELLIS
    2 Dec.: `Landscape and power: the Frangipani family and their clients in the Roman forum, 1100–1300.'

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    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Medieval Studies Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

    The seminars will take place in weeks 2–8 of term, and not in weeks 2–7, as stated in the Michaelmas Term Lecture List. No seminars will be held on 5 and 26 November.

    Conveners: J.S. Meisami, MA, University Lecturer in Persian, C.F. Robinson, MA, University Lecturer in Early Islamic History, and W.L. Treadwell, MA, Samir Shamma Lecturer in Islamic Numismatics.

    DR L.P. HARVEY, London and the OCIS
    22 Oct.: `The last books written in Arabic in Spain: the Sacromonte lead tablets.'

    DR S. GUTHRIE, London
    29 Oct.: `Masters of the Arabic bon mot: al-Wasiti's thirteenth-century illustrations of the Celebrated Maqamat (Assemblies) of al-Hariri.'

    DR M. MORONY, California, Los Angeles
    12 Nov.: `Issues in economic production from late antiquity to early Islam.'

    DR R. AMITAI-PREISS, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    19 Nov.: `The conversion of Tegudar Il- Khan to Islam: various perspectives in the Mamluk and Ilkhanid sources.'

    PROFESSOR J. LASSNER, Wayne State
    3 Dec.: `Reckoning time, recording history: the formation of historical consciousness in the Middle East.'

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    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Theoretical Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

    Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham Professor of Physics.

    PROFESSOR T. KIBBLE, Imperial College, London
    18 Oct.: `Formation of vortices/strings in the early universe and in liquid helium.'

    PROFESSOR J.M. BALL
    1 Nov.: `Some mathematical issues arising in the study of phase transformations in solids.'

    DR M. MEZARD, Ecole Normale Supérieure
    15 Nov.: `Statistical physics of Burger's turbulence.'

    PROFESSOR I.J.R. AITCHISON
    29 Nov.: `Time-dependent effective theories for BCS-type superconductors.'

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    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Main Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry.

    PROFESSOR V.C. GIBSON, Imperial College, London
    21 Oct.: `New directions in transition metal catalysis.'

    PROFESSOR A.G. ORPEN, Bristol
    28 Oct.: `Flexibility of metal complexes in crystals.'

    PROFESSOR E. CONSTABLE, Basle
    4 Nov.: To be announced.

    PROFESSOR M. SCHRÖDER, Nottingham
    11 Nov.: `Redox active macrocyclic complexes: rings, stacks, boxes, and liquid crystals.'

    PROFESSOR S. MANN, Bath
    18 Nov.: `Biomimetic inorganic materials.'

    DR J.D. SMITH, Sussex
    25 Nov.: `Novel organometallic compounds with very bulky ligands.'

    PROFESSOR A.J. DOWNS
    2 Dec.: `Reactive compounds of the group 12 and group 13 metals: chemistry in the cold or in low-pressure vapours.'

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    Materials Modelling Laboratory Seminars

    The following seminars will be given at 1.15 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building.

    Conveners: D.G. Pettifor, MA, Isaac Wolfson Professor of Metallurgy, and A.P. Sutton, MA, M.Sc., University Lecturer in Materials Science.

    PROFESSOR N. QUIRKE, Bangor
    18 Oct.: `Modelling of activated carbon.'

    PROFESSOR J.K. HARVEY, Imperial College, London
    25 Oct.: `Simulation of gas–surface reactions during silicon growth.'

    DR F. DUN
    1 Nov.: `Modelling of strain-induced porosity during high temperature forging.'

    DR CARTER WHITE
    8 Nov.: `Atomistic simulations of shock- induced chemistry and phase transitions.'

    PROFESSOR O. PENROSE, Heriot-Watt
    15 Nov.: `Modelling of diffusion-induced grain boundary motion.'

    PROFESSOR D. BIRD, Bath
    22 Nov.: `First principles simulations of molecular dissociation on metals.'

    DR H.E. ASSENDER
    29 Nov.: `Modelling random polymer crystal.' (Interdepartmental polymer seminar)

    PROFESSOR J.D. HUNT, G. ANTIPAS, and R.M. THOMAS
    6 Dec.: `Modelling microstructure.'

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    Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics

    The following seminars will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory.

    Because on rare occasions the arrangements may need to be changed, anyone intending to come to Oxford specially to attend should check first by telephoning Oxford (2)72933.

    PROFESSOR V. RAMASWAMY, Princeton
    24 Oct.: `Climate change in the global stratosphere?'

    PROFESSOR T.G. SHEPHERD, Toronto and Cambridge
    31 Oct.: `Issues in climate modelling of the middle atmosphere.'

    DR A. HARRIS, University College, London
    7 Nov. `Hurricanes—how many and how big?'

    F.M. REININGER
    14 Nov.: `The Spatially Modulated Infra-red Imaging Spectrometer (SMIIS): a compact Fourier transform remote sensing instrument for probing the Martian atmosphere and studying Martian geology.'

    DR S.J. ENGLISH, Meteorological Office, Bracknell
    21 Nov.: `Microwave remote sensing for weather forecasting.'

    DR G. HAYMAN, National Environmental Technology Centre, AEA Technology, Culham
    28 Nov.: `Air pollution modelling and mapping.'

    DR F. RABIER, European Centre for Medium Range Forecasting, Reading
    5 Dec.: `Four-dimensional variational assimilation in the ECMWF model.'

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    Astrophysics Colloquia

    The following colloquia will take place at 4.15 p.m. on the days shown in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre. They will be held on Tuesdays, with the exception of the meeting on Friday, 29 November.

    Conveners: M.D. Lacy and A.E. Lynas-Gray.

    DR M. JONES, Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory
    22 Oct.: `Assorted features in the microwave background.'

    DR C. HASWELL, Sussex
    29 Oct.: `Accretion adventures with HST.'

    DR B.J. RAUSCHER, Durham
    5 Nov.: `Evidence for a near infra-red halo in the rapidly rotating edge-on spiral galaxy ESO/Uppsala 240-G11.'

    DR T. SMALL, Cambridge
    12 Nov.: `Large-scale structure and galaxy evolution in the Norris survey of the Corona Borealis supercluster.'

    DR M. PERRYMAN, ESTEC
    19 Nov.: `Space astrometry and the impact of Hipparcos.'

    DR C.A. COLLINS, Liverpool John Moores University
    26 Nov.: `Evolution of high redshift X- ray clusters.'

    DR M. LIVIO, Space Telescope Science Institute
    29 Nov.: `The formation of astrophysical jets.'

    DR J. LASALA, Southern Maine
    3 Dec.: To be announced.

     

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    Solid State Seminars

    The following talks on the chemistry, structure, and properties of solids will be given at 11.45 a.m. on Tuesdays in the Abbot's Kitchen, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: A.M. Chippindale, MA, D.Phil.

     

    DR L. GLASSER, Witwatersrand
    22 Oct.: `Lattice energies and ionic strength: a generalised Kapustinskii equation.'

    DR T. MASSMEYER, Royal Institution
    29 Oct.: `Designing heterogeneous catalysts: organometallics and MCM-41.'

    DR J.O. EVANS
    5 Nov.: `Zirconium tungstate and negative thermal expansion—shrinking ceramics, phase transitions, oxygen mobility, and bullet-proof vests.'

    DR M. LAIDLAW
    12 Nov.: `NMR studies of paramagnetic cyanide bridge mixed-valence compounds.'

    DR L. SCHROEDER
    19 Nov.: `Determination of hydrogen atom positions in inorganic compounds by forcefield calculations and the Rietveld method.'

    P. HENRY
    26 Nov.: `Fullerene intercalation chemistry.'

    W.M. SIMPSON
    3 Dec.: `13C CPMAS and X-ray studies of deoxycholic acid inclusion compounds.'

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    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the University Department of Pharmacology.

    DR M. DARLISON, Hamburg
    22 Oct.: `Recent studies on GABA and glutamate-gated ion channels from complex and simple nervous systems.'

    DR S.C. O'NEILL, Liverpool
    29 Oct.: `Spontaneous release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and calcium homeostasis in cardiac muscle.'

    DR P. THORN, Cambridge
    5 Nov.: `Spatial domains of calcium signalling in secretory epithelial cells.'

    DR T. FREUND, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest
    12 Nov.: `Interneurones of the hippocampus, their local and subcortical control.'

    DR A. MORGAN, Liverpool
    19 Nov.: `Identification of proteins involved in regulated exocytosis.'

    DR C.J. GARLAND, Bristol
    26 Nov.: `Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarising factor. What is it and is it of any importance?'

    PROFESSOR A.D. SMITH
    3 Dec.: `A dietary risk factor for Alzheimer's disease?'

    DR E. BROWN, Marine Biological Laboratory, Plymouth
    10 Dec.: `L-type calcium channels in excitation–contraction coupling in twitch muscle of lower vertebrates and invertebrates.'

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    PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Weiskrantz Room (C.113), the Department of Experimental Psychology.

    Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of Psychology, and P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

    PROFESSOR J. GRAY, Institute of Psychiatry, London
    22 Oct.: `The use of neural transplants to restore cognitive function.'

    DR M. BROWN, Bristol
    5 Nov.: `Studies into the neural basis of recognition memory.'

    PROFESSOR T. SHALLICE, University College, London
    12 Nov.: `Right prefrontal involvement in the control of episodic memory retrieval.'

    PROFESSOR L. CIPOLATTI, National Hospital, London
    26 Nov.: `Refractory and storage impairments of semantic memory.'

    PROFESSOR M. CONWAY, Bristol
    3 Dec.: `False and recovered memories: some theory and some recent findings.'

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    SOCIAL STUDIES

    NEWTON MINNOW, current chairman, the Carnegie Corporation, and former chairman, US Federal Communications Commission, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 25 October, in All Souls College.

    Conveners: A.C. Stepan, MA, Gladstone Professor of Government, and B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American Government.

     

    Subject: `Television and modern American politics.'

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    RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

    The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Library, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art.

    Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Archaeological Science.

    M. RICHARDS
    17 Oct.: `Luminescence dating of the Dring Yuriakh site (Siberia).'

    S. BOURGET, East Anglia
    31 Oct.: `Sacrificial and funerary practices of the Moche, recent discoveries at Huaca de la Luna, Peru: the 1995 and 1996 field seasons.'

    P. DAY, Sheffield
    21 Nov.: `Tales of the unexpected: new light on ceramic production and consumption in pre- palatial Crete.'

    E.T. HALL
    28 Nov.: `The most precise pendulum clock—how to waste time after retirement.'

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    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Numerical Analysis Group

    Differential equations, computational mathematics, and applications seminars

    The following seminars will be held on Thursdays, as follows: at 2 p.m. on 31 October, in the Atlas Centre, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; at 2.15 and 3.45 p.m. on 14 November, in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory; all other seminars at 4 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

    Conveners: S.D. Howison (telephone: (2)70500) and E. Süli (telephone: (2)73880); J. Scott (telephone: 01235 445131) (RAL).

    PROFESSOR I. STAKGOLD, Delaware
    17 Oct.: `The porous medium equation with absorption.'

    DR S. LAZAAR, Marseille
    24 Oct.: `Preconditioning and numerical inversion of elliptic operators.'

    DR L. HEMMINGSSON
    31 Oct.: `Domain decomposition methods and fast solvers for first-order PDEs.'

    D. KAY, Leicester
    7 Nov.: `The p version of the FEM.'

    DR P. SWEETENHAM, AEA Technology
    14 Nov. (first seminar): `Convergence of additive correction algebraic multigrid.'

    DR A. ISERLES, Cambridge
    14 Nov. (second seminar): `Differential equations on manifolds.'

    DR I. GRAHAM, Bath
    21 Nov.: `Domain decomposition and preconditioned conjugate gradient methods for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients.'

    DR S. TAVERNER
    28 Nov.: `Convective effects on a propagating reaction front.'

    DR J. LEVESLEY, Leicester
    5 Dec.: `Radial basis function approximation on the sphere.'

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    DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

    Oxford Architectural History Seminar

    D. STURDY will give a seminar at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 4 November, in Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square.

    A further seminar in this series will be held on Monday, 2 December. Details will be announced later.

    Conveners: M.R. Airs, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Conservation and the Historic Environment, and G. Tyack, MA, M.Litt., Fellow of Kellogg College, and Director, Stanford University Centre in Oxford.

     

    Subject: `Thomas Knowle the Elder—an Oxford master builder.'

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    OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

    Qumran Forum

    The following seminars will take place at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Wolfson College. The seminars on 29 October and 19 November will be held in the Buttery; the seminar on 3 December will be held in the Committee Room.

    DR D. FALK, Kennicott Fellow in Hebrew
    29 Oct.: `Biblical adaptation in 4Q392 Mystery of Election and 4Q393 Communal Confession.'

    DR W. HORBURY, Cambridge
    19 Nov.: `Messianism at Qumran.'

    DR K. FLETCHER-LOUIS
    3 Dec.: `Humans, angels, and the songs of the sabbath sacrifice.'

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    MAISON FRANÇAISE

    Lectures

    The following lectures will be given at the times shown. They will take place in the Maison Française, unless specified otherwise.

    For details of this term's film-screenings at the Maison Française, see `Notices' above.

    M. FERRO, Directeur d'études à l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris
    Tue., 5 Nov., 5.15 p.m.: `Taboos in history.'

    Y. REY-HERME, former secretary of l'Amitié Charles Péguy
    Fri., 22 Nov., 5.15 p.m.: `Hommage à Péguy' (readings of texts in French and English).

    C. BLUM, State University of New York
    Mon., 2 Dec., 5 p.m.: `La polygamie "droit perdu de l'homme": une controverse nataliste au 18e siècle en France.'

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    Fiftieth Anniversary Lecture

    J. DERRIDA, Directeur d'études à l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris

    Thur. 28 Nov., 5 p.m., Examination Schools: `Short history of the lie (state of the lie, lie of state).'
    (In English. No reservation necessary.)

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    Conferences and other meetings

    The following meetings will be held on the dates shown. They will take place in the Maison Française unless otherwise specified. Further information may be obtained from the Maison (telephone: (2)74220).

    11–12 Nov., Franco-British Conferences (`Culture et sociétés: opinions, attitudes, comportements'): `La place des femmes dans les études de mobilité sociale et de stratification sociale.'

    15–16 Nov. (Maison Française and St Hugh's College), Translation Research in Oxford meeting: `Traduction, auto-traduction, bilinguisme, trilinguisme: Beckett, Nabokov.'
    (Registration: Edith McMorran, St Hugh's, (2)74996, or Katy Fletcher, Maison Française, (2)74222.)

    21–2 Nov., Franco-British Conferences (`Culture et sociétés: opinions, attitudes, comportements'): `Partis politiques et militants en France et en Grande-Bretagne.'

    23 Nov., Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France meeting: `La société française' (with Dominique Borne, inspecteur général de l'Education nationale).

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    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Economic Development Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    J. KNIGHT, Institute of Economics and Statistics
    17 Oct.: `Labour markets and policies and outcomes in Zimbabwe: lessons for South Africa.'

    G. KINGDON, Centre for Study of African Economies
    24 Oct.: `Does the labour market explain lower female schooling? The case of India.'

    B. DASGUPTA, Calcutta
    31 Oct.: `Environment and structural adjustment.'

    F. STEWART
    4 Nov.: `Human development and economic growth: chains and cycles.'

    P. BENNELL, Institute of Development Studies
    14 Nov.: `Rates of return on education in Africa.'

    R. ASH, SOAS
    21 Nov.: `Basic food self-sufficiency in China?'

    A. ADDISON, Warwick, and C. DE SOUZA, Warwick and Maputo
    28 Nov.: `Mozambique: poverty and economic reconstruction.'

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    Refugee Studies Programme

    Round Table

    A Round Table discussion will be held on Saturday, 19 October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., in the Church of St Philip and St James, Woodstock Road.

    Subject: `The challenge of the new asylum legislation for religious leaders.'

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    Annual Human Rights Lecture

    PROFESSOR ALBIE SACHS, Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa, will deliver the Annual Human Rights Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 28 October, in the Examination Schools (East School). The meeting will be chaired by Mr Joel Joffe, Chairman of Oxfam and defence lawyer for Nelson Mandela.

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    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

    ANNE DAVIES, Fellow of All Souls College and the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Monday, 21 October, in the centre.

    Subject: `National Health Service contracts—making trusts accountable?'

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    WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

    Culture and medicine in the early modern period

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road. Those attending are asked to note the new time.

    D. HARLEY
    17 Oct.: `Avoiding doctors and neglecting health: radical attitudes towards the body among the early Quakers.'

    L. KASSELL
    24 Oct.: `How to read Simon Forman's casebooks: astrology, medicine, and gender in Elizabethan London.'

    I. MACLEAN
    31 Oct.: `Medical mirabilia in the late Renaissance: the case of the golden tooth' (1593–99).'

    E. SMITH
    7 Nov.: `Blood whitened? Wet-nursing and national identity in early modern England.'

    C. SPENCE, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, London
    14 Nov.: `Death, hazard, and risk in the early modern workplace.'

    J. GEYER-KORDESCH, Glasgow
    21 Nov.: `Medical reform and curriculum standards: the education and licensing of medical practitioners in Scotland 1714–1858.'

    H. DINGWALL, Stirling
    28 Nov.: `Medical practice, surgical profession? Medicine in seventeenth-century Edinburgh.'

    M. KORNELL, Wellcome Institute, London
    5 Dec.: `Illustrating anatomy: the collaboration between art and science in early printed books.'

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    GREEN COLLEGE

    Brian Walker Lecture 1996

    SIR SHRIDATH RAMPHAL, Co-Chairman, Commission on Global Governance, will deliver the Brian Walker Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 November, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Subject: `Must the poor be always with us? Global politics for a sustainable future.'

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    HERTFORD COLLEGE

    Tyndale Lecture

    SIR ANTHONY KENNY will deliver the Tyndale Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 25 October, in the Examination Schools.

    After the lecture there will be a reception in the Old Hall, Hertford College.

    Subject: `William Tyndale and Thomas More.'

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    KELLOGG COLLEGE

    Research Seminars: current issues in professional education

    DR G. HAYWARD will give a seminar at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 21 November, in the Sadler Room, Kellogg College.

    Subject: `The socio-historical origins of competence-based education and training.'

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    MANSFIELD COLLEGE

    Yvonne Workman Fund Lecture

    THE RT. REVD RICHARD HARRIES, Bishop of Oxford, will deliver the fifth annual lecture of the Yvonne Workman Fund at 8.15 p.m. on Thursday, 31 October, in the chapel, Mansfield College.

    Subject: `The Church and homosexuality—recent writings.'

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    PEMBROKE COLLEGE

    R.B. McCallum Memorial Lecture

    THE RT. HON. GARY HART, formerly US Senator, Visiting Fellow of Pembroke College, will deliver the R.B. McCallum Memorial Lecture at 11 a.m. on Saturday, 2 November, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

    Further details may be obtained from the Pembroke College Development Office (telephone: Oxford (2)76417).

    Subject: `Reform or realignment: campaign 1996 (USA).'

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    ST ANNE'S COLLEGE

    Hoskins Lecture

    PROFESSOR P. GOODWIN, University College, London, will deliver the sixth Hoskins Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 12 November, in the Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College.

    The annual lecture, in honour of Professor William G. Hoskins, on some aspect of local history, has been generously endowed by Mrs Jean Duffield.

    Subject: `Transport—"A Tale of Two Cities".'

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    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    Special lecture

    MIKHAIL GORBACHEV will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 28 October, in the Sheldonian Theatre (the Chancellor presiding).

    Entry is free, but by ticket only, available from the Campaign Office, St Antony's College (telephone: (2)74496).

    Subject: `Russia between the past and the future: a difficult path from totalitarianism to democracy.'

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    WOLFSON COLLEGE

    Public Lecture

    PROFESSOR GEORGE H. PETERS, Research Professor in Agricultural Economics, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 24 October, in the Hall, Wolfson College.

    Subject: `Starvation or plenty in 2020?'

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    REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE

    Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture

    Lecture

    PROFESSOR N. GREINACHER, Tübingen, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 24 October, in Regent's Park College.

    Subject: `The role of religion and the institutional Church in a secularised society.'

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    Culture and the Nonconformist Tradition

    The following public lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in Regent's Park College.

    J. WALSH
    23 Oct.: `Methodism and the family.'

    M. REEVES
    30 Oct.: `Literary women in eighteenth- century Baptist circles.'

    J. BRIGGS
    6 Nov.: `Robert Hall and the "Signs of the Times".'

    D. BEBBINGTON
    13 Nov.: `Gospel and culture in Victorian Nonconformity.'

    J. GARNETT
    20 Nov.: `Nonconformists, economic ethics, and the consumer society.'

    C. BINFIELD
    27 Nov.: `Victims of success: twentieth- century Free Church architecture.'

    H. MCLEOD
    4 Dec.: `Dissent and the peculiarities of the British in the nineteenth century.'

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    WESTMINSTER COLLEGE

    Hans Urs von Balthasar Lecture

    JACQUES SERVAIS, SJ, Casa Balthasar, Rome, will deliver the second annual Hans Urs von Balthasar Lecture at 6 p.m. on Friday, 29 November, in the Theatre, Westminster College.

    The lecture will be preceded at 5 p.m. by the formal opening of the G.K. Chesterton Library. Further information may be obtained from Stratford Caldecott (telephone: Oxford 247644, ext. 3222).

    Subject: `The vocation of the Christian in the world.'

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    OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

    DR JOHN BLAIR will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 24 October, in the Lee Building, Christ Church. Wine will be served from 8.15 p.m. New members are welcome.

    Subject: `The origins of English towns: the case of Oxford.'

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    OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

    NICHOLAS BARKER will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 31 October, in the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: `The National Trust and its libraries.'

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    ROYAL COMMONWEALTH SOCIETY (OXFORD BRANCH)

    MS ALINA NZEKU, First Secretary, Lesotho High Commission, and P. WILLIAMS, Secretary, Wales–Lesotho Link, will give an illustrated talk at 7.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 23 October, in Rhodes House. The lecture is open to all members of the University.

    Subject: `Dolen Cymru—Wales–Lesotho Link: the history and aims of this unique twinning.'

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    Grants and Research Funding

    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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    RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

    The Oxford University Research Services Office is based in the University Offices, Wellington Square, and is part of the central university administration.

    The office processes and approves all applications to outside bodies for research grants and contracts. It also acts in an advisory capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, Teaching Company, EC research programmes, etc.).

    Contracts with industry are negotiated through the Research Services Office which also deals, inter alia, with various intellectual property matters, research-related work covered by purchase orders, consultancy agreements, agreements covering clinical trials and services, and liaison with funding bodies over discretionary pay awards.

    The Director of the Research Services Office is Ms June Clark (telephone: (2)70142, e-mail: june.clark@admin.ox.ac.uk).

    Other members of the Research Services Office from whom advice may be sought are as follows:

    • Ms Catherine Quinn (telephone: (2)70158, Assistant Registrar (on such matters as research-related and consultancy contracts, industrial liaison, and publications);
    • Dr Richard Liwicki (telephone: (2)80499), Assistant Registrar;
    • Mr Pierre Espinasse (telephone: (2)70043, Administrative Officer (on questions relating to externally funded research grants, European liaison, and EC contracts);
    • Dr Chris Norris (telephone: (2)70011), Administrative Officer and Assistant to the Director;
    • Ms Kathryn Dally (telephone: (2)80319), Adminstrative Officer.

    Enquiries concerning day-to-day processing of research applications should be addressed to Room 330 (the Research Grants Office), Research Services Office (telephone: (2)70146).

    General enquiries may be addressed in the first instance to the Director's Personal Assistant, Ms J. Vicary (telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to direct calls to the appropriate member of staff.

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    Administrative procedures in respect of externally sponsored research

    Members of the University are reminded that it is a requirement of the General Board that all applications for externally funded support must be endorsed on behalf of the University through the Research Services Office before they are dispatched to the sponsor, whether or not this is required by the funding body. (This includes, for example, bodies such as the Leverhulme Trust, and other charities and EC programmes which do not specifically ask for administrative authorisation.)

    The reason for the requirement is twofold: namely (i) to ensure that the funds being requested are adequate for the purpose and the costing rules of the funding body have been applied correctly, and (ii) to ensure that the University would be in a position to undertake the obligations arising from an award and that these do not contravene University policy.

    The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for research grants should submit their applications, together with a completed copy of the University's outside grant form (OG12), to Room 330, Research Services Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, telephone (2)70146—leaving three clear working days for them to be processed.

    In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature of contracts it should be noted that Statutes, Tit. X, cl. 2, provides that `no official of the University or any other person employed by the University or working in or in connection with any department of or under the control of the University shall in connection with any invention, discovery, or patent, or ... process, or manufacture have authority to make any representations on behalf of the University or to enter into any contract on behalf of the University or to be concerned in any transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on behalf of the University except with the express consent of Council'.

    The relevant officials in the Research Services Office have been given authority to approve applications for external funds in support of research and the terms of contracts in straightforward cases under this provision: in more complicated cases, specific authority is necessary.

    Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored research should be directed to the Research Services Office, whose staff would be pleased to help.

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    OTHER GRANTS

    Radhakrishnan Memorial Bequest

    The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at Oxford who are citizens of the Republic of India, and who, because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to complete the qualifications for which they are registered. Grants will not normally be awarded to those near to the beginning of their course of study. Application forms may be obtained from the Secretary of the Radhakrishnan Memorial Bequest, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. the closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 6 June 1997.

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    Sasakaw Fund

    Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to be applied to `the advancement within the University of knowledge and understanding of Japan by way of academic contact and exchange between members of the University and citizens of Japan'. Further details may be obtained from the Secretary of the Board of Management of the Fund (Miss Suzanne Byrch), the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, to whom applications should be returned by the end of the fourth week in each term.

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    Hayter Fund

    Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established university posts for travel and research purposes connected with the languages and the economic, social, and political development of the following areas: the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east Asia, and Latin America. Application forms and further details may be obtained from the Secretary of the Hayter Committee, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane. The closing date for applications is the end of the fifth week in each term.

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    Examinations and Boards

    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue


    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

    Honour School of Mathematics 1998 and Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1998

    The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved the following list of lecture courses for paper b (10) of the Honour School of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences to be examined in Trinity Term 1998 (see Examination Decrees, 1995, pp. 310 and 319, regulation 3 (c)).

    Elementary Number Theory
    Lattice Theory
    Mathematical Ecology and Biology
    Non-Linear Systems
    Communication Theory
    Applied Probability
    Combinatorial Optimisation

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    Honour School of Computation 1998

    Subjects approved for the Honour School of Computation, Trinity Term 1998:

    Section II

    1. Compilers and Operating Systems

    2. Computer Graphics, Splines, and Computational Geometry

    3. Parallel Scientific Computation and Parallel Algorithms

    4. Engineering and Computer Science (topics from Engineering and Computing Science paper IE2)

    5. Mathematical Foundations of Programming Languages (topics from a list including Lambda Calculus and Types, Domain Theory, Semantics of Programming Languages)

    6. Advanced Mathematical Logic: Model Theory and Proof Theory.

    Options 1, 2, and 3 will have 1/6 practical weight and a 2½- hour examination.

    Options, 4, 5, and 6 will have no practicals and a three-hour examination.

    Section E

    Paper a1, a2, a3, a4, a5, a6, b1, b8, b9, and b10 from the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences.

    There will be no practical element and each paper will be of three hours' duration.

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    Honour School of Mathematics and Computation 1998

    The subjects approved for Section II (MC) in the Honour School of Mathematics and Computation, Trinity Term 1998, will be the same as those for Section II of the Honour School of Computation, 1998.

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    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 1 November.

    1 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Theology

    Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    As for the Honour School of Theology (see 2, para. 1 below).

    2 Board of the Faculty of Theology

    Honour School of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 531, l. 22, delete `The History ... 1564' and substitute `History and Theology in Western Christianity, 1500–1619'.

    2 Ibid., p. 534, l. 14, delete `79' and substitute `89'.

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    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Biological Sciences

    D. HURD, Lady Margaret Hall: `The Ty1 protease'.
    Queen's, Monday, 28 October, 2 p.m.
    Examiners: M.F. Tuite, E.J.C. Mellor.

    J.M.S. MOSS, Green College: `The regeneration dynamics of arid Acacia tortilis woodland formations, northern Kenya'.
    Department of Plant Sciences, Tuesday, 22 October, 11.15 a.m.
    Examiners: P. Stott, J. Burley.

    Clinical Medicine

    K. BENDALL, Wolfson: `Inheritance of mitochondrial mutations'.
    Institute of Molecular Medicine, Monday, 21 October, 10 a.m.
    Examiners: W.W. Hauswirth, C.F. Graham.

    English Language and Literature

    P. KEWES, University: `Authorship and appropriation: conceptions of playwriting in England, 1660–1710'.
    Jesus, Friday, 25 October, 2 p.m.
    Examiners: A. Barton, D. Womersley.

     

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    Literae Humaniores

    P. JOHNSON, Balliol: `The constants of nature'.
    Philosophy Centre, Monday, 11 November, 2.30 p.m.
    Examiners: H.R. HarrÄ, N. Cartwright.

    Physical Sciences

    S. RAYNER, Wadham: `The stereodynamics of photo- initiated bimolecular collisions'.
    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Friday, 25 October, 10.30 a.m.
    Examiners: G. Hancock, M.N.R. Ashfold.

    P. TAYLOR, New College: `Observation of an extremely high Q resonance in a single ion of 172Yb+'.
    Clarendon Laboratory, Monday, 21 October, 2.15 p.m.
    Examiners: R. Blatt, P.E.G. Baird.

     

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    Social Studies

    M.L. LEVINSON, Nuffield: `Autonomy, schooling, and the reconstruction of the liberal educational ideal'.
    All Souls, Saturday, 2 November, 2.30 p.m.
    Examiners: G.A. Cohen, T.H. McLaughlin.

     

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    EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF LETTERS

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

    Social Studies

    F.J.B. DE KOK, Wolfson: `Economic rationality and political viability, prerequisites in economic reform? A case study of China 1978–95'.
    Nuffield, Thursday, 24 October, 2 p.m.
    Examiners: S.G. Breslin, I. McLean.

     

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies

    Contents of this section:

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    ELECTIONS

    Kellogg College

    To Honorary Visiting Fellowships:

    LAWRENCE PAUL BACHMANN, Distinguished MA status (BA USC)

    LADY CHADWYCK-HEALEY (BA Anglia PU)

    JOHN DUNCAN DRYSDALE, MA

    CRAIG HERRON (BA, DIP.ED. Durham), F.INST.DIR.

    SIR FRANK HENRY BURLAND WILLOUGHBY LAYFIELD, MA (HON. LL.D. Reading)

    To Supernumerary Fellowships:

    JONATHAN V.G. DARBY, MA status (B.SC. Edinburgh)

    WYN BRAMLEY, MA status

    STUART JOHN KEWLEY, MA status (BA McMaster, M.SC. Queens', M.PHIL. Cambridge)

    To an Emeritus Fellowship:

    BRIAN HITCH, MA (MA Cambridge), CMG, CVO, FRCO

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    Advertisements

    Contents of this section:


    How to advertise in the Gazette

    Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

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    One World Fair

    Oxford's sixth annual One World Fair, `a fair for fair trade', will be held in Oxford Town Hall on Saturday, 19 October, 10 a.m.--4.30 p.m. Presented by the Oxford Oxfam Group and other agencies concerned with development and the environment, in association with the Oxford and Swindon Co-operative Society. Admission free.

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    Oxford University Museum of Natural History

    Early birds can help to save the Dodo Pad Diary (£8.50), now in its 31st year, from extinction. Meanwhile, Richard Bawden's dodo tea-towels (£3.75) continue to thrive and are joined by exclusive new wooden dodo key-rings (£1.99) and children's coat-hooks (£5.75—dinos and dolphins too). Also, in association with the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, cards, calendars, posters, diaries, address books, and the Nature Photographer's Handbook. Museum and shop open Mon.–Sat., 12 noon–5 p.m. Admission free.

     

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    Oxford Humanists

    Oxford Humanists meet regularly to discuss a wide range of topical social and moral questions from a non-religious viewpoint. For details and current programme, contact Jean Woodman, 57 Delbush Avenue, Oxford OX3 8EA. Tel.: Oxford 60520.

     

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    Folk-dance Group

    Oxford International Folk-dance Group meets on Wed. throughout the year at 8.15 p.m. on St Giles' church hall, 10 Woodstock Road. All are welcome. The dances (mostly line and circle) are drawn from the authentic folk- traditions of countries such as Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, Israel, Turkey, and Armenia. Most dances are undemanding and easily learned; neither a partner nor experience are needed. For more information call David Mowat. Tel.: Oxford 310216.

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    Journey-share sought

    Do you commute from Birmingham to Oxford? I'm looking for someone to share the cost and perhaps the driving, too. Please ring me, Dr M.J. Kooy, in Birmingham, or drop me a note at Corpus Christi College. Tel.: 0121-454 1301.

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    Tuition Offered

    Sunningwell School of Art offers a wide range of daytime and evening classes in drawing, painting, sculpture, pottery, and history of art. After school and Saturday morning workshops for children aged 5–18 years. The Old School, Sunningwell, Abingdon, Oxon. OX13 6RD.

    English language. Academic writing, grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables including evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour, Cambridge exams., general English are best value in Oxford. Writing up? Private tuition available with experienced tutors. Free test/advice from the Director of Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5 p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9 Blue Boar Street (off St Aldate's by Christ Church), Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077, e-mail: OLT@dial.pipex.com.

    Piano tuition. Cheryl Younie, M.Mus. Piano Performance and Pedagogy, University of Michigan, and formerly teacher and examiner for the Sydney Conservatorium, now welcomes advanced and/or seriously committed pupils in Oxford or Wantage. Emphasis on technique and musicianship through a wide variety of repertoire. Tel.: 01235 861081.

    The Alexander Technique can help relieve stress and tension. Jan Steele, BA, and Janet Sherbourne, MA, both STAT qualified teachers of the Technique, offer lessons in Oxford. Please telephone for brochure and further information. Tel.: Oxford 770272.

     

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    Services Offered

    A La Carte? Finders Keepers' latest idea to enhance service to their tenants. If you seek a property to rent, call us first. Our 24 Oxford staff are dedicated to offering exceptional service. Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Carpentry, joinery, fitted cupboards, doors, etc., undertaken. Prompt, efficient, and sympathetic service at competitice prices. R.H. Sprot. Tel.: 01869 345060.

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

    Get a headstart with your research project. Let me do bibliographic searches on the Internet and if need be in person I will present you with documented (so you know where I searched and what keywords I used), printed lists to choose from. Refs. available. D. Hermans. Tel.: Oxford (2)89104.

    Counselling/Psychotherapy. British Association for Counselling Approved Member, Accredited Counsellor (Oxford graduate, 1959, woman working in North Oxford) offers counselling/psychotherapy. Fee normally £25 per session. Some concessionary places. Tel.: Oxford 554438.

    Frederick and Sudabeh Hine, Persian carpet importers. Dealers in hand-made eastern rugs and runners generally. We sell only the genuine article and at prices which are at probably the lowest anywhere for comparable quality. Visit our warehouse and browse undisturbed. Home trial and exchange. Free buyer's guide for all new customers. Usual opening hours: 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 559396.

    Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture designed and made by Richard Kay and Piers Roberts from local workshops. From tables, chairs, cabinets, desks, to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 238112.

    Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

     

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    Domestic Services

    Beech Tree Nursery School at Rye St Antony School: set in idyllic surroundings on Headington Hill; places for boys and girls from 2½ to 5 years old. Tel. for further information: Oxford 62802/229215, fax: 63611.

     

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    Situations Vacant

    Personal assistant/secretary required for busy academic; part-time; person with good secretarial skills, inc. computer/word-processing skills (Word for Windows) and ability to drive a car; knowledge of French and accounting advantageous; non-smoker preferred. Salary negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 557932.

    Office manager required for educational foundation in the centre of Oxford (an overseas study office working with several Oxford colleges). Graduate preferred, ideally about 24--8 with some experience in administration. The manager will report to the president (a senior academic) and supervise a staff of 5. Good prospects for advancement. Salary will probably in the region of £16,000--£20,000 with 5 weeks' vacation a year. Send c.v. to: OSAP, 33--5 George Street, Oxford OX1 2AY.

     

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    Houses to Let

    North Oxford : 3/4-bedroom house, modern kitchen, gas c.h., lock-up garage, garden, 2 miles north of city centre in quiet location. Available 1 Nov. Tel.: Oxford 310844 (evenings).

    North Oxford house available from 20 Oct. Modern, furnished, well-equipped house with 3 bedrooms, maintained garden and easy parking. Suit non-smoking family or sharers. £680 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 512816.

    North Oxford , Wolvercote (Meadow Prospect), immaculate 2/3-bedroom semi-detached house; fully furnished; en-suite shower; on Port Meadow; two gardens; off-street parking; washer/drier; on bus line (15 minutes to city centre). No pets. Long lease preferred. Available early Nov., £640 p.m. Mr Brugger. Tel.: Oxford 556017.

    Three-bedroom house in excellent condition with laminated wooden flooring, newly and fully furnished, in New Marston, close to both city centre and Headington. Ideal for professional/academic, for any period of time required. Sharers max. of three persons. Rent £800 p.m. To view, contact Dr Shaei, 48 Blandford Avenue, Oxford. Tel. Oxford 558848.

     

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    Finders Keepers, winners of the UK Best Letting and Management award for the second consecutive year, are dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to select accommodation. Up-dated, detailed information on the Internet, priority reservation system, welcome food pack, personal service, and much more---call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Cottage to let on Old Boar's Hill, 4 miles from Oxford; 3 bedrooms; c.h. plus Aga; fully equipped; large, natural garden in peaceful surroundings. Tel.: Oxford 735318 or 00 39 444 324729.

    North Oxford house-sit from 1 Nov. Quiet street about a mile from Carfax. Fully-furnished house with dedicated staff; 1 bedroom, study, bath, kitchen-cum-solarium, garden; includes utilities except phone/taxes; daily newspaper, dairy delivery; parking permit can be arranged. Prefer single, visiting fellow, or mature, married couple. Non-smokers only. With regrets, no children or pets. £850 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 559029.

    Witney: period cottages, 2/3-bedroom, fully furnished and well equipped. Short, i.e. weekly lets and longer lets up to 6 months. No smokers or pets. Good bus service to Oxford. Tel.: 01993 703035, fax: 01993 771014.

    Attractive converted barn with pretty garden in quiet village 10 miles west of Oxford. Fully furnished. Large galleried living-room. Study. Kitchen/breakfast room. 4 bedrooms (2 en-suite). Cleaning and some gardening included. Viewable and available for 1 year from 23 Sept. £1,250 p.c.m. Tel.: 0171-402 4330 (answer-phone).

    An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

     

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    Flats to Let

    Norham Road: delightfully situated in central North Oxford and close to the University Parks, a 2- bedroom first-floor flat with garage and car-parking. Enjoys open views yet close to city centre. To let furnished, £695 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 244089.

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    Accommodation Offered

    House-share with professional female: double bedroom available in furnished 2-bedroom period cottage in Witney (Oxford 12 miles); house includes garden, 2 reception (working fireplace), large bathroom, gas c.h., exposed beams and stone walls, private parking. £275 p.c.m. (some bills included). Non-smoking female professional preferred. David. Tel.: Oxford 784010.

    Mon.–Fri. accommodation: charming c.h. cottage in central Headington, 2 miles from central Oxford: large comfortable room, desk and storage. Non-smoker, share with 2 professionals. Short walk to hospitals, Brookes, and buses. £60 p.w. plus expenses. Danny. Tel.: Oxford 483985 or 60473, e-mail: 91443638@brookes.ac.uk.

    Premier are pleased to offer new apartments, ideal for the ring- road and city centre. Also North Oxford homes for careful couples/families. Shared houses often available. Premier. Tel. Oxford 792299.

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the comfortable home of a semi- retired academic couple in leafy, exclusive central North Oxford. Within easy walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, excellent pubs and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea- and coffee-making facilities, microwaves. Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 557879.

    Alternative medicine centre. Space available. Therapy and treatment rooms. Consulting and counselling rooms. Every facility. Very moderate rates. Central North Oxford. Tel. for further details: Oxford 54326 (9 a.m.–12 noon). n

     

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    Accommodation Sought

    Professional non-smoking male (30) seeks short-term accommodation in Headington, Mon.–Fri., while house purchase is in progress. Tel.: 01684 592 413.

    Studio, flat-let, or double bedsitting-room sought; self-contained; c.h., sunny, quiet; long let; North area. Tel.: Oxford 552452.

    Visiting academic and family seek 3–4- bedroom furnished house in central or North Oxford area, 1 Jan.–30 June. Patricia L. Jackson, Clinical Professor, University of California, School of Nursing, San Francisco, CA 94143-0606, USA. Tel.: 415 476 4698, fax: 415 753 2161, e-mail: nursing%pat_jackson@ccmail.ucsf.edu.

    Well-trained family of four (inc. 2 small children) seek accommodation (rent or house-sit), 15 Dec.–6 Jan. approx., in Oxford area. Will tend plants, pets, etc. References available. Tel.: Oxford 793378 (before 10 p.m.).

    North Oxford : self-contained 2-bedroom flat required for distinguished senior visiting US professor and wife. Non-smokers. Six months from mid-Jan. 1997. Contact Professor Armitage. Tel. Oxford (2)75299, e-mail: armitage@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

    Writer migrating from London seeks studio/workshop to rent or buy anywhere in or near Oxford. I may also need a small unfurnished flat, not necessarily near the studio. Andrew Duncan. Tel./fax: 0181-969 8332.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

     

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    Accommodation Exchange

    New York/London exchange: Manhattan apartment (57th Street and 2nd Avenue, 3 blocks from East River, walking distance of Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Centre, Bloomingdale's, etc.); fully equipped and furnished bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, living-room (with sofa-bed and small sofa for child). Excellent security: elevator manned round the clock. Available 15 Apr.--15 May or 23 June--23 July, in exchange for similar flat in central London, close to theatres, galleries, etc. No pets either way (hair allergy) and non-smokers preferred. Tel. Oxford (2)78916.

    Holiday Lets

    Andalucia: magical medieval village with stunning landscape; house at front of village with unobstructed views past Gibraltar and the Mediterranean to the Rif mountains of Morocco; terraces overhang the campo so that there is a feeling of being in the countryside; top terrace like a beach. Visit Granada, Cordoba, Ronda, Seville, Cadiz, Morocco. House divided into 2 parts. Reduction for long let. Dr Campbell. Tel.: Oxford 513935.

     

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    Flats for Sale

    Modern immaculate 2-bedroom first-floor apartment in east Oxford; one of 15 two-storey flats in attractive courtyard with communal gardens; fitted kitchen, curtains, carpets; low-cost energy and maintenance; off-street parking for 2 cars. £68,500. Fax/telephone: Oxford 723281, e-mail (Compuserve): 101716.721.

    Retirement flat, Eynsham. Modern, purpose- built 1-bedroom apartment, in quiet location but close to all amenities; Economy 7 heating; 24-hr. emergency call system; communal gardens and many other benefits. £35,000. Tel.: Oxford 791910.

     

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    Diary

    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.

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    Friday 18 October

    COLLOQUIUM: `Philosophical dialogues in performance' (until Sunday) (for information and registration, contact the European Humanities Research Centre: (2)80742).

    DR T. DRAGADZE: `Kinship and politics in the Caucasus' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The significance of kinship'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Pre-Raphaelites and the nineteenth century', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    PROFESSOR A. MILWARD: `Europe, empire, and dominion: Britain and the EEC 1961–3' (Sir Alec Cairncross Lecture), the chapel, St Peter's, 5 p.m.

    JULIAN GALLANT: piano recital including works by Bach, Granados, Scriabin, and David Scott, Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 8.15 p.m. (admission free).

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    Saturday 19 October

    MATRICULATION ceremony, Sheldonian (time to be announced).

    REFUGEE STUDIES PROGRAMME Round Table meeting: `The challenge of the new asylum legislation for religious leaders', St Philip and St James' Church, Woodstock Road, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

    THE ADELPHI TRIO: concert including works by Clementi, Beethoven, Stravinsky, and Pierné, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission free).

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    Sunday 20 October

    MR BRUCE KENT preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    Monday 21 October

    PROFESSOR C.A. ANGELL: `Polymorphism in glasses, liquids, and biopolymers: implications for protein folding and BSE' (Astor Lecture), Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Lecture Theatre, 2.15 p.m.

    PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE: `Dust bowls—past, present, and future!' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

    PROFESSOR R. GREGORY: `Pictures as paradoxical objects' (Joseph Beuys Lecture), Schools, 4.30 p.m.

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    Tuesday 22 October

    THE MEETING of Congregation, due to be held today, is cancelled.

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Induction programme for academic staff—Session II', 12 noon (see information above).

     

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The arts of Byzantium', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

     

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `Aspects of the political thought of St Paul. Political Augustinism and its repercussions in the fourteenth century' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    N. EINARSSON: `Anthropomorphism and the use of metaphor in environmental discourse: why pigs must fly and whales sing' (Oxford for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

    UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting (`Recent additions to the wine list'), 5.45 p.m. (admission £2).

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    Wednesday 23 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Medieval arts and the development of collecting', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Introduction to financial managment I', 2 p.m. (see information above).

     

    P. BAKER: `Who will be a refugee in Hong Kong?' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR P. EVANS: `Buñuel's dream narratives' (Film Studies lecture series: `European cinema and literary movements'), 47 Wellington Square, 5 p.m.

    THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET perform works by Haydn, Smetana, and Beethoven, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets £8/£6 from Blackwell's Music Shop; student tickets £4, from Blackwell's or the Music Faculty).

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    Thursday 24 October

    DR J. WALDREN: `Women and Christianity in contemporary Spain' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender, identity, and religion'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

     

    PROFESSOR G. JOSIPOVICI (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `Lightness and gravity' (lecture series: `On trust'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. HONEY: `Anagogic attitudes: authority, prescription, and chaos in language use' (OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR B. CUNLIFFE: `Landscapes with people' (Linacre Lectures: `Culture and environment'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR G.H. PETERS: `Starvation or plenty in 2020?' (public lecture), the Hall, Wolfson, 5.30 p.m.

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    Friday 25 October

    PROFESSOR R.H. BARNES: `Alliance and identity in an Indonesian fishing village' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The significance of kinship'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

     

    L. KASSELL: `Better than sex and Shakespeare: Simon Forman's manuscripts' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty- minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A walk through eastern art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    DR J. RAWSON lectures on the British Museum's `Chinese Treasures' exhibition (Friends of Rewley House lecture), the Lecture Theatre, Rewley House, 4.30 p.m. (admission £2; free to members).

    SIR ANTHONY KENNY: `William Tyndale and Thomas More' (Tyndale Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

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    Saturday 26 October

    DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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    Sunday 27 October

    THE REVD CHRISTOPHER JONES preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    Monday 28 October

    DR B. VIRA: `Trade liberalisation and environmental regulation—identifying the conflicts' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

    CONGREGATION election, 14 November: nominations by two members of Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

    MIKHAIL GORBACHEV: `Russia between the past and the future: a difficult path from totalitarianism to democracy' (special lecture, the Chancellor presiding), Sheldonian, 5 p.m. (entry free, but by ticket only, from the Campaign Office at St Antony's: (2)74496).

    PROFESSOR ALBIE SACHS delivers the Refugee Studies Programme's Annual Human Rights Lecture, Schools, 5 p.m.

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    Tuesday 29 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `English furniture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Tutorial teaching—general', 2 p.m. (see information above).

     

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `The theological–political problem' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    A. IRWIN: `Public responses to risk and environmental issues' (Oxford for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

    KRISTIN THOMPSON: `Storytelling in the new Hollywood: the case of Groundhog Day' (Graduate Film Studies Seminar), Lecture Room C, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

    THE DUKE STRING QUARTET: concert of works by Tavener, Lou Harrison, and Berg, the chapel, Trinity, 8.30 p.m. (admission free).

    Wednesday 30 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Renaissaince painting, sculpture, and decorative arts', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Introduction to financial managment II', 2 p.m. (see information above).

     

    R. CARVER: `Refugee protection in Africa' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

    KRISTIN THOMPSON: `The silent Lubitsch: German American styles' (Film Studies lecture series: `European cinema and literary movements'), 47 Wellington Square, 5 p.m.

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    Thursday 31 October

    DR HIROKO KAWANAMI: `Can women be celibate? Asceticism and sexuality in Theravada Buddhism' (Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender, identity, and religion'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

     

    PROFESSOR G. JOSIPOVICI (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `Dante: trusting the mother tongue' (lecture series: `On trust'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    THE RT. REVD RICHARD HARRIES: `The Church and homosexuality—recent writings' (Yvonne Workman Fund Lecture), the chapel, Mansfield, 8.15 p.m.

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    Friday 1 November

    DR C. IFEKA: `The production of power, kinship, and ethnicity in forest "warfare" on the Nigeria–Cameroon border' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The significance of kinship'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

     

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    Saturday 2 November

    THE RT. HON. GARY HART: `Reform or realignment: campaign 1996 (USA)' (R.B. McCallum Memorial Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11 a.m. (for further details, tel. (2)76417).

    CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery exhibition opens: `Four Foundations'—archive material illustrating the four institutions which have occupied the Christ Church site (until 1 December).

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    Sunday 3 November

    THE RT REVD ROBERT HARDY preaches, Lincoln College, 10 a.m.

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    Monday 4 November

    DR C. TOULMIN: `Dust bowls, drought, and desertification: what can a global convention do to help?' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

    CONGREGATION election, 14 November: nominations by six members of Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

     

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    Tuesday 5 November

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Time management', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

     

    CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `The Monarchy of Dante' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    M. COHEN: `Limits of rational environmentalism' (Oxford for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

     

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