15 May 1997 - No 4437



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 127, No. 4437: 15 May 1997<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

15 May 1997





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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 May 1997: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into
effect on 30 May.

List of the decrees:

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section



Decree (1): Establishment of
Degree of Master of Earth Sciences

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-
Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the
meeting of Congregation on 20 May, Statute (1)
establishing the Degree of Master of Earth Sciences (to
be awarded to candidates successfully completing the
four-year course which is being set up in parallel to the
three-year course leading to the existing qualification
of BA in Natural Science (Geology)), which was
promulgated on 29 April (see `University Agenda' below).
Council has accordingly made the following decree, which
gives effect to consequential changes.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

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section


Text of Decree (1)

[For text of decree see annexe to
Statute (1) in Agenda, Gazette
20
March 1997.]

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section



Decree (2): Establishment of
Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of Natural
History

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr
Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the
meeting of Congregation on 20 May, Statute (2) replacing
the Committee for the Scientific Collections with
Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of Natural
History, which was promulgated on 29 April (see
`University Agenda' below). Council has accordingly made
the following decree, which gives effect to consequential
changes.

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section


Text of Decree (2)

[For text of decree see annexe to
Statute (2) in Agenda, Gazette
20
March 1997, with the addition of cl. 11 below:]

11 This decree shall have immediate
effect, provided that the initial periods of office of
the appointed members of the Visitors shall be so varied
as to procure a regular rotation of subsequent
appointments.

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section



Decree (3): Bampton and Sarum
Lecturerships

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr
Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the
meeting of Congregation on 20 May, Statute (3) changing
the arrangements for the Bampton Lectures and abolishing
the Sarum Lectures, which was promulgated on 29 April
(see `University Agenda' below). Council has accordingly
made the following decree, which gives effect to
consequential changes.

Text of Decree (3)

[For text of decree see annexe to
Statute (3) in Agenda, Gazette
20
March 1997.]

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section



Decree (4): Establishment of
three-term Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Modern Languages Board and with the concurrence of the
English, Literae Humaniores, Modern History, and Oriental
Studies Boards and of the General Board, makes a minor
change consequential upon the replacement of the existing
two-term Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages with
a three-term Preliminary Examination, and of
corresponding changes to the Preliminary Examinations in
English and Modern Languages and in Philosophy and Modern
Languages. This lengthening of the course leading to the
First Public Examination has been considered necessary
because of the effects of changes in school syllabuses on
the preparedness of undergraduates for the Oxford course.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees,
1996, p. 94, l. 44, delete `Prescribed books' and
substitute `Literature papers'.

2 This decree shall be effective
from 1 October 1997.

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Decree (5): Format of class
lists for university examinations

Explanatory note

As required by Congregation following a postal vote on
the form of publication of class lists for university
examinations, in Michaelmas Term 1991
(Gazette, Vol. 122, p. 462), Council made a
decree to provide that, for a trial period of five years,
such lists should not specify the names of the colleges
or other societies of the University (Decree (5) of 23
January 1992, ibid., p. 593). It was agreed that Council
would review the position in the final year of the trial
period, i.e. in 1995--6. Council has reconsidered this
matter. While it has noted that the exclusion of college
names has not in the event prevented the continued
publication of `Norrington Tables', it has agreed that,
before a final decision is reached, there should be
further consultation with colleges, both individually and
through the Conference of Colleges. In order to allow
time for such further consultation, it has made the
following decree extending the exclusion of college names
until the end of the next academic year.

Text of Decree (5)

The provisions of Decree (5) of 23 January 1992
(Gazette, Vol. 122, p. 593) are hereby
extended until 1 October 1998.

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section



Decree (6): Headship of the
School of Geography

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VII, Sect. I,
§ 5. B, cl. 5 (Statutes, 1995, p. 367),
the School of Geography is assigned to C.G. Clarke, MA,
D.Phil., Fellow of Jesus College and University Lecturer
in Urban/Social Geography, for four years from 1 January
1998.


Decree (7): Dispensation from
prescribed duties (Dr T.C. Barnard)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to T.C.
Barnard, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Hertford College and
University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, for two
years from 1 October 1997 to enable him to hold a British
Academy Research Readership.


Decree (8): Dispensation from
prescribed duties (Mr A.W.M. Graham)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to A.W.M.
Graham, MA, Fellow of Balliol College and University
Lecturer (CUF) in Economics, for the academic years 1997-
-8 to 2000--1 inclusive in order that he may act as
Master of Balliol during Dr Lucas's tenure of the office
of Vice-Chancellor.

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Decree (9): Dispensation from
prescribed duties (Dr J.R. Rook)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to J.R.
Rook, MA (Ph.D. Manchester), Fellow of Pembroke College
and University Lecturer in Physics, for three years from
the first day of Trinity Term 1997 in order that he may
act as the college's Director of Development.


Decree (10): Dispensation from
prescribed duties (Dr H. Watanabe-O'Kelly)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to H.
Watanabe-O'Kelly, MA (MA NUI; Dr Phil. Basle), Fellow of
Exeter College and Faculty Lecturer in German, for two
years from 1 October 1997 to enable her to hold a British
Academy Research Readership.


Decree (11): Remission of
university fees (Mr S. Rehnman)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I,
6, cl. 3 (a) (Examination Decrees,
1996, p. 1060), Mr S. Rehnman, Pembroke, shall not be
required to pay composition fees for the year 1996--7 in
respect of his studies for the degree of D.Phil.

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Decree (12): Amendments to
college statutes (Corpus Christi)

The consent of the University is given to the amendments
to Statutes I, II, V, VII, XI, and XXI of Corpus Christi
College approved by the Governing Body on 12 March 1997,
in so far as such consent is required by section 7 (2) of
the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are

(1) to remove inconsistencies arising out of the
enactment of the new Commissioners' statute;

(2) to provide for the appointment of a Dean of
Degrees;

(3) to alter the arrangement for appointment to the
Libraries Committee;

(4) to alter the constitution of the Estates and
Finance Committee;

(5) to amend the provisions relating to the election
of the Bateson Lecturer.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of
Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded
to the following persons who are qualified for membership
of Congregation:

JONATHAN VIVIAN GILES DARBY, Kellogg College

KATHLEEN ANNE ELDRIDGE, University Offices

JEFFREY ALAN WOOL, Faculty of Law

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have
been added to the Register of Congregation:

Darby, J.V.G., MA status, Kellogg

Eldridge, K.A., MA status, University Offices

Fairhead, J.R., MA, St John's

Stevens, R.H, BCL, MA, Lady Margaret Hal

Temple, J.R.W., MA, Hertford

Wool, J.A., MA status, Faculty of Law

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THE PROCTORS

For a change in regulations concerning conduct at
examinations, with immediate effect, see `Notices' below.

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section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into
effect on 30 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 May 1997: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 19 May


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be
approved at noon on 19 May, unless by that time the
Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more
members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II,
Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that
they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

ASHLEY JAMES WALKER JACKSON, M.ST., Mansfield College

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CONGREGATION 20 May


Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole
business comprises questions to which no opposition has
been notified and in respect of which no request for an
adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor
will accordingly declare the statutes approved without a
meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl.
11 (Statutes, 1995, p. 8).

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CONGREGATION 3 June 2 p.m.

Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention
to vote against the preambles of the following statutes, signed by at least
two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on
Monday, 26 May.


Promulgation of Statutes

Statute (1): Establishment of Professorship of
Mathematics and its Applications and Professorship of
Pure Mathematics

Explanatory note

The General Board has recently made available funds to
enable the Mathematical Sciences Board to upgrade two
Readerships in Mathematics to chairs. The following
statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the
statute is approved, establish a Professorship of
Mathematics and its Applications and a Professorship of
Pure Mathematics accordingly.

(1) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish a
Professorship of Mathematics and its Applications and a
Professorship of Pure Mathematics, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS
AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. XIV, Sect. II, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1995, p. 107), after `Wallis Professorship of
Mathematics' insert:

`Professorship of Mathematics and its Applications

Professorship of Pure Mathematics'.

Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
approved

1 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, SCHEDULE, concerning
official members of faculty boards
(Statutes, 1995, p. 231), under Mathematical
Sciences, after `Mathematics, Wallis.' insert:

`Mathematics and its Applications.

Mathematics, Pure.'

2 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B,
SCHEDULE A, concerning professorships (p. 369), after
`Wallis Professor of Mathematics' insert:

`Professorship of Mathematics and its Applications

Professorship of Pure Mathematics'.

3 Ibid., Sect. III, concerning
particular professorships (p. 445, as renumbered by
Decree (1) of 31 October 1996, Gazette, p.
244), insert new §§ 200--1 as follows and
renumber existing §§ 200--11 (pp. 445--50, as
renumbered by the same decree) as §§ 202--13:

`§200. Professor of Mathematics and its
Applications

1. The Professor of Mathematics and its Applications
shall lecture and give instruction in some branch of
Mathematics and its Applications.

2. The professor shall be elected by an electoral
board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the head of the
college specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-
Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

(2) the head of the college to which the
professorship shall be for the time being allocated by
Council under any decree in that behalf, or, if the head
is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the
governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the
college specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) a person appointed by Council;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7)--(9) three persons appointed by the Board of the
Faculty of Mathematical Sciences.

3. The professor shall be subject to the General
Provisions of the decree concerning the duties of
professors and to those Particular Provisions of the same
decree which are applicable to this chair.

§201. Professor of Pure Mathematics

1. The Professor of Pure Mathematics shall lecture and
give instruction in some branch of Pure Mathematics.

2. The professor shall be elected by an electoral
board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the head of the
college specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-
Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

(2) the head of the college to which the
professorship shall be for the time being allocated by
Council under any decree in that behalf, or, if the head
is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the
governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the
college specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) a person appointed by Council;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7)--(9) three persons appointed by the Board of the
Faculty of Mathematical Sciences.

3. The professor shall be subject to the General
Provisions of the decree concerning the duties of
professors and to those Particular Provisions of the same
decree which are applicable to this chair.'

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Statute (2): Establishment of Professorship of
Transplantation

Explanatory note

Council, on the recommendation of the General Board, has
accepted a case made by the Clinical Medicine Board for
the upgrading of the Clinical Readership in
Transplantation Surgery into a Professorship of
Transplantation. The cost of the post would continue to
be covered from National Health Service funds. The
following statute, and the decree to be made by Council
if the statute is approved, establish a Professorship of
Transplantation accordingly.

(2) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish a
Professorship of Transplantation, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS
AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. XIV, Sect. II, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1995, p. 107), after `Regius Professorship of Moral and
Pastoral Theology' insert:

`Professorship of Transplantation'.

Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
approved

1 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, SCHEDULE, concerning
official members of faculty boards
(Statutes, 1995, p. 230), under Clinical
Medicine, after `Surgery, Orthopaedic, Nuffield.' insert:

`Transplantation.'

2 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B,
SCHEDULE C, concerning professorships (p. 370), after
`Nuffield Professor of Surgery' insert:

`Professor of Transplantation'.

3 Ibid., Sect. III, concerning
particular professorships (p. 483), insert new § 314
as follows and renumber existing §§ 314--21
(pp. 483--8) as §§ 315--22:

`§ 314. Professorship of Transplantation

1. The Professor of Transplantation shall lecture and
give instruction in Transplantation and shall engage in
advanced study and research.

2. The professor shall be elected by an electoral
board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the head of the
college specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-
Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

(2) the head of the college to which the
professorship shall be for the time being allocated by
Council under any decree in that behalf, or, if the head
is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the
governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the
college specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) a person appointed by Council;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7) the Nuffield Professor of Surgery;

(8) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of
Clinical Medicine;

(9) a person holding a clinical appointment appointed
by the Oxfordshire Health Authority.

At least three members of the board, of whom one shall
be a professor, shall hold clinical appointments.

3. The professor shall be subject to the General
Provisions of the decree concerning the duties of
professors and to those Particular Provisions of the same
decree which are applicable to this chair.'

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CONGREGATION 19 June


Election

Vice-Chancellorship, Nominating Committee for the

Vacancy: One (not being also a member of
Council)

Retiring member: Professor C.M. Perrins (not
re-eligible)

Period from MT 1997: 4 years

Nominations in writing for the election on 19 June, by
two members of Congregation, will be received by the Head
Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to
4 p.m. on Monday, 26 May, and similar
nominations by six members of Congregation up to
4 p.m. on Monday, 2 June.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each
signatory the name and college or department in block
capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be
published. At least one nomination in respect of
each candidate must be made on an official nomination
form.
Copies of the form are obtainable from the
Head Clerk (telephone: (2)70190, e-mail: "mailto:philip.moss@admin.ox.ac.uk">philip.moss@admi
n.ox.ac.uk.

Note on the body concerned

The Nominating Committee for the Vice-
Chancellorship
is responsible for deciding the
name to be proposed to Congregation for the appointment
of the Vice-Chancellor. The next such proposal is due to
be made in Trinity Term 1999 in respect of a Vice-
Chancellor to serve from October 2001.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 May 1997: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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COMMISSION OF INQUIRY

Members of the University will recall that the Commission
of Inquiry has been working on the basis that it would
aim to submit its final report to the University during
Trinity Term 1997. Drafting of the Commission's report,
taking account of the many responses to recent
consultation undertaken by the Commission, is now in
progress, but for several reasons it has been decided to
delay finalisation and publication of the report until
Michaelmas Term 1997.

The most important factor in this decision has been a
clear indication from the National Review Committee on
Higher Education, chaired by Sir Ron Dearing, that it
intends to publish its report at the end of June. The
Commission believes that it would be undesirable for its
own report to appear at about the same time and has
concluded that it would be sensible to delay publication
to enable members of the Commission to give preliminary
consideration to any implications which the conclusions
of Sir Ron Dearing's review might have for the
Commission's own report. Although it will not be possible
to delay publication of the Commission's report until the
government's response to the Dearing proposals is known,
this revised timetable will at least enable the
Commission to make an initial assessment of the Dearing
proposals and take these into account.

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NOTICE FROM THE PROCTORS

The Proctors draw the attention of all members of the
University to an amendment to their regulations
concerning Conduct at Examinations. The following
amendment (indicated in italic) has been made with
immediate effect:

Regulation (xi): Candidates may not take unnecessary
articles into examination rooms. Candidates who
bring unnecessary articles to a building in which
examinations are being held must not take them beyond the
areas designated for the deposit of bags and other
personal belongings.

(Examination Decrees and Regulations,
1996, p. 1045.)

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TRAVEL SURVEY

The University has commissioned consultants to undertake
a survey on Thursday, 22 May, on the the means of travel
used by all persons holding university appointments. The
results of the survey will be used to assess the demand
for car parking against the number of places likely to be
available in the future and to consider ways of
encouraging people to use other forms of transport. A
questionnaire is being sent out which asks that those
wishing to participate fill in a log of their travel on
22 May. On that day the consultants will survey the use
of the University's car parks. Anyone wishing to complete
a travel log and who does not receive a copy may obtain
one from the University Surveyor's Office.

The co-operation of all in completing and returning the
questionnaire is actively sought.

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UNIVERSITY CATHOLIC CHAPLAINCY

A Memorial Mass for the repose of the soul of THE REVD
MICHAEL HOLLINGS, MC, MBE, will be held at 11.30 a.m. on
Wednesday, 21 May, in the Catholic Chaplaincy, St
Aldate's, Oxford. Bishop Crispian Hollis, former
assistant and successor to Fr Michael, will preside. The
address will be given by Dr Barry Nicholas, former
Principal of Brasenose College. All are welcome to
attend.

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CIRCULATION OF FLYSHEETS

Ten or more members of Congregation may arrange to have a
flysheet circulated with the Gazette
(a) on matters before Congregation, or
Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of
Poetry, or (b) relating to matters of general
interest to the University, subject to the following
general conditions:

(i) no flysheet will be circulated which in the
opinion of the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors might be
defamatory or otherwise illegal;

(ii) the right is reserved on behalf of the
University and its employees, without prior consultation
with the signatories, to publish an apology in respect of
any statement in a flysheet which is complained of as
defamatory or otherwise illegal (whether or not the
statement can be shown to be true);

(iii) the signatories shall jointly and severally
indemnify the University and its employees against any
costs or damages payable in respect of their flysheet
and, unless a Queen's Counsel (to be mutually agreed on
by the signatories and the University) shall advise
within four months of the making of any claim in respect
of a flysheet that any proceedings could be contested
with the probability of success, such damages shall
include any sum paid by the University in settlement of
any claim arising out of the flysheet;

(iv) the flysheet shall consist of one leaf only
(though text may appear on both sides of the leaf); the
text shall include the name and college or department of
each of the signatories;

(v) a copy of the text of the flysheet shall be
delivered to the Registrar before 10 a.m. on the Monday
of the week in which circulation is desired; it shall be
accompanied by an indemnity in accordance with condition
(iii) above drawn up on a form obtainable from the
Registrar and signed by each of the signatories of the
flysheet; the Registrar shall be informed at the same
time which of the signatories is to be notified whether
the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have authorised
circulation;

(vi) the Registrar shall arrange for the production
by the University Press of copies of a flysheet the
circulation of which has been duly authorised.

Though every effort will be made to circulate on
the day desired flysheets so received, it must be
understood that this cannot be guaranteed.

(a) Matters before Congregation or
Convocation

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is a formal
agendum for Congregation, or for Convocation in regard to
the election of the Professor of Poetry, or the subject
of a report published in the Gazette, the
production costs will be met from university funds.

(b) Matters of general interest to the
University

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is not a formal
agendum for Congregation or the subject of a report
published in the Gazette, the
Vice-Chancellor will decide whether it is of sufficient
general interest to warrant circulation with the
Gazette; the production costs for such a
flysheet will be the responsibility of the signatories.

Oxford University Student Union

The Executive and the Graduate Committee of the Oxford
University Student Union may have flysheets circulated
with the Gazette under the arrangements and
subject to the conditions set out above, provided that:

(1) the number of names to be included on the
flysheet under condition (iv) shall be not less than a
majority of the total number of members of the Executive
or the Graduate Committee of OUSU, as the case may be,
and each of the persons named shall sign the indemnity
required under condition (v);

(2) the maximum number of flysheets to be
circulated as of right, whether on matters before
Congregation (to be paid for by the University) or on
matters of general interest to the University (to be paid
for by OUSU and to be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's
decision as prescribed under (b) above) shall be
three per term for each of these bodies, save that the
Vice-Chancellor shall have discretion to permit further
flysheets.

Subject to proviso (1) above, the Executive and the
Graduate Committee of OUSU may also support flysheets
signed by not less than ten members of Congregation.

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OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING
SERVICES


Lending of computer videos to
members of the University

The University has taken out a subscription to a computer
video training group, Computer Channel, who have a large
selection of videos about current computer topics.

The following videos will be shown on Monday lunch-times
at 1 p.m. in Lecture room A at OUCS, 13 Banbury Road. The
videos last for up to an hour. There is no need to book.

19 May: Client/Server Architecture
Development

2 June: Internet: Putting Audio and Video on
the Web

9 June: Security Series: Issues for Networks
and Distributed Systems

16 June: C++ for High Performance
Computing

23 June: Database on the Internet/Intranet:
Part 1—Web-enabled Databases

OUCS has about 250 videos which are available to full
University members to borrow. Details about the loan
scheme are available from the LaRC Co-ordinator at OUCS
(e-mail: larc@oucs.ox.ac.uk).

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UNIVERSITY OFFICES

The University Offices will be closed for normal business
on the public holiday on Monday, 26 May.

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EIGHTS WEEK: ENTRY IN
UNIVERSITY POCKET DIARY

Members of the University are asked to note that the
dates for Eights Week are listed incorrectly in the main
body of the University Pocket Diary. The
correct dates appear at the end of the diary under the
heading `Sports Fixtures 1996/1997': they are 28--31 May
1997.

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CONCERTS


St John's College Musical
Society

JULIAN MILFORD will give a piano recital at 8.30 p.m. on
Thursday, 22 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St
John's College. The programme will include works by
Fauré, Ravel, Dukas, and Beethoven. Admission is
free.


Trinity College

THE DUKE STRING QUARTET, the resident quartet at Trinity
College, will perform works by Schnittke, Barber, and
Schoenberg, at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in the
chapel, Trinity College. Admission is free.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 May 1997: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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issue



INAUGURAL LECTURES


Professor of the Romance
Languages

PROFESSOR M.D. MAIDEN will deliver his inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Where's the Romance?'

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Professor of Biological
Anthropology

PROFESSOR R.H. WARD will deliver his inaugural lecture at
5 p.m. on Friday, 23 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Golden Apples and a Golden Bough:
future prospects for
biological anthropology?'

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section



THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1997

PROFESSOR J.D. NORTH, FBA, University of Gröningen,
will deliver the 1997 Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 22 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel College.

Subject: `Stars and atoms.'

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section



GAISFORD LECTURE 1997

PROFESSOR C. CAREY, Royal Holloway College, London, will
deliver the Gaisford Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 22
May, in St John's College.

Subject: `Dying in the theatre of Dionysos:
clouds, comics, and sophists.'

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section



ROWE MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR C.N.J. MANN, FBA, Director of the Warburg
Institute and Professor of the History of the Classical
Tradition, University of London, will deliver the first
Dorothy Rowe Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 19
May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Petrarch: the Life of Letters.'

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section



INTERDISCIPLINARY LECTURE SERIES


History and Philosophy of
Biology

Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Department of Physiology. The 20 May
meeting will be chaired by Dr Paul Slack; the 3 June
meeting by Dr Rom Harré.

Further details may be obtained from Dr T.J. Horder,
Department of Human Anatomy (telephone: (2)72189).

PROFESSOR R. PORTER, Wellcome Institute, London

20 May: `Philosophies of science in pre-
war Cambridge: evolving attitudes to science as
defined through C.P. Snow's influence.'

DR A. HOPE, Lecturer in Medical Ethics, Oxford Medical
School

3 June: `Dementia, identity, and advance
directives: key philosophical issues exemplified in
medical practice.'

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section


Debate: `The public must understand science'—but
how?

This round-table discussion on the aims, and the
difficulties, involved in selling science to the public,
with opportunities for questions from the audience, will
be held at 5 p.m. on Monday, 26 May, in the University
Museum. The panel will be Professor R. Dawkins, Professor S.
Greenfield, and Professor C. Blakemore. The meeting will
be chaired by Professor Sir Walter Bodmer.

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section



COMMITTEE FOR COMPARATIVE
PHILOLOGY AND GENERAL LINGUISTICS

PROFESSOR R. LASS, University of Cape Town, will lecture
at 5 p.m. on Monday, 26 May, in the Centre for
Linguistics and Philology, Walton Street.

Convener: A. Morpurgo Davies, MA, Professor
of Comparative Philology.

Subject: `A sweet disorder: competing stress
systems in Early Modern English.'

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section



MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

Special Lecture

PROFESSOR HUGH GRAHAM, Vanderbilt University, will give a
special lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in
Lecture Room VII, Brasenose College.

Subject: `The Carter Administration and Civil
Rights.'

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section


Economic History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College.

Conveners: C.H. Feinstein, MA, Chichele
Professor of American History, J.S. Foreman-Peck, MA,
University Lecturer in Economic History, T. Leunig, MA,
D.Phil., Nuffield College Prize Research Fellow, and A.
Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic
History.

PROFESSOR L. NEAL, Illinois–Urbana

20 May: `John Law's speculative attack
on the South Sea Bubble: international capital
movements in the first emerging markets.'

PROFESSOR K. HARLEY, Western Ontario

27 May: `Cotton textile exports: prices,
profits, and welfare.'

PROFESSOR M. THOMAS, Virginia

3 June: `How the US labour market worked
one hundred years ago.'

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section



MUSIC

RUTH HACOHEN, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will
lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 May, in the
Holywell Music Room.

Subject: `Sympathetic echoes: musical
responsesx to Narcissus's reflections.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Department of Engineering Science: Maurice Lubbock
Memorial Lecture

DR J.R. FORREST, Chairman, Brewton Group Ltd., will
deliver the twenty-third Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture
at 5 p.m. on Friday, 30 May, in Lecture Theatre 1, the
Department of Engineering Science.

Subject: `Digital broadcasting overtakes
rocket science.'

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section


Particle Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Fridays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

Conveners: I.I. Kogan, MA, University
Lecturer in Physics, and S. Sarkar (Ph.D. Bombay),
Research Fellow, Wolfson College.

A. ZHITNITSKY, Vancouver

23 May: `What we can learn from 2D QCD:
lessons, problems, experience.'

S. MALLIK, Bern/Saha Institute

6 June: `Density fluctuations in
extended inflation.'

M. SHIFMAN, Minnesota

20 June: `New nonperturbative results in
SUSY gauge theories.'

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section



BODLEIAN LIBRARY


Oxford Seminars in Cartography

LT.-COL. NICK RIGBY, Chief Geographic Officer, HQ ACE
Rapid Reaction Corps, and ANDY FAGG, Head of Libraries
Division, Military Survey, will give a seminar at 5 p.m.
on Thursday, 22 May, in the Schola Astronomiae et
Rhetoricae, Schools Quadrangle, the Bodleian Library.

Subject: `Mapping for peace: the challenges
of 250 years of crisis support.'

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section



COMPUTING LABORATORY

Departmental seminars

The following non-specialist lectures will be given at
4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the
Computing Laboratory. The co-ordinators are Professor
K.W. Morton (telephone: (2)73885), and Professor W.F.
McColl (telephone: (2)73829).

DR J. DEWYNNE, Southampton

20 May: `Numerical methods in
finance.'

DR A. HODGES

17 June: `Alan Turing.'

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section



PHONETICS LABORATORY

PROFESSOR JOAN BYBEE, University of New Mexico, and Astor
Visiting Lecturer 1997, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on
Tuesday, 10 June, in Room 2, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `The reduction of "don't"
in American English: frequency, constituency, and
processing units.'

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section



CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in the Buttery, Wolfson College.

DR W. LEONARD, formerly of Harvard Law School; President,
Fisk University

26 May: `The ghosts of Roger Brooke
Taney: cavorting with apparitions of Dred Scott. A
glimpse of race and law in the United States.'

PROFESSOR L. SEBBA and MS V. SCHIFFA, Hebrew University
of Jerusalem

2 June: `Closed communities and the
right to education: the case of Israel (Haredim).'

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section



GREEN COLLEGE


Jan Brod Memorial Lecture 1997

PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD DOLL will deliver the Jan Brod
Memorial Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the
Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `Tobacco: a medical history.'

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section



LADY MARGARET HALL

Canada seminars

EDWARD BROADBENT, former leader of the New Democratic
Party of Canada, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday,
21 May, in Lady Margaret Hall. There will an opportunity
to meet Mr Broadbent informally over drinks. Further
information is available from Ruth Martin, Lady Margaret
Hall (telephone: (2)74302, e-mail:
ruth.martin@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The 1995 Quebec Referendum—why
Canada almost lost.'

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section



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture
1997

PROFESSOR A. DUFF will deliver the H.L.A. Hart
Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: `Law, language, and community:
preconditions of criminal responsibility.'

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section



WOLFSON COLLEGE


Public lecture

PROFESSOR DENIS GALLIGAN will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on
Thursday, 22 May, in the Haldane Room, Wolfson College.
Tickets are not required for admission.

Subject: `Civil rights at risk—judicial
protection in the twenty-first century.'

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section



Isaiah Berlin Lecture 1997

PROFESSOR SIMON SCHAMA, Columbia University, will deliver
the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday,
29 May, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture is open
to the public.

Subject: `History and the literary
imagination.'

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section



OXFORD SIGNALLING GROUP

The following lectures will be given at the meeting to be
held at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 May, in the Department of
Pharmacology.

J. MATTHEWS, Cardiff: `SHP-1 deficient T
cells are hyperproliferative: why?'

J. FRAMPTON, Institute of Molecular
Medicine
: `The role of myb in haemotopoietic
commitment and development.'

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section



SOCIETY FOR THE HISTORY OF
MEDIEVAL TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE

DR HÉLÈNE LA RUE will lecture at 2.45 p.m.
on Saturday, 14 June, in the Wellcome Unit for the
History of Medicine.

Subject: `The Cymbala: technology out of
proportion?'

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section



OXFORD VIROLOGY AND AIDS
RESEARCH CLUB

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be
given at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Sir William Dunn
School of Pathology. Two papers will be given at the
meetings on 21 May and 18 June.

The Oxford Virology and AIDS Research Club is an open
forum for AIDS research and general virology in the
Oxford area. Further details of OVARC can be found at
http://www.path.ox.ac.uk/wsj/ovarc.htm

G. ELLIOTT

21 May: `Novel intercellular transport
of a herpes virus structural protein: implications
for gene therapy.'

C. SANDERSON

21 May: `Virus-induced cell
motility.'

G. SHELLAM, Western Australia

11 June: `The battle for supremacy
between murine cytomegalovirus and its host: genetic
analysis of virus virulence and host resistance.'

K. ARIYOSHI

18 June
: `Studies on the HIV epidemic in West
Africa.'

S. ROWLAND-JONES

18 June: `Update on the studies of
resistance to HIV infection in Nairobi
prostitutes.'

D. HO

Fri. 4 July, Institute of Molecular Medicine,
1 p.m.
: `Dynamics of HIV infection.'

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 May 1997: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 15 May 1997: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all
examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1,
clauses 1–3 (Examination Decrees, 1995, pp.
1002–3), which require examiners in all university
examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman,
to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
it in the University Gazette.

He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the
Clerk of the Schools who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see
that notice of them is duly published in the University
Gazette
.

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section



APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINERS

The following have been appointed.

MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY

Oriental Studies

Modern Middle Eastern Studies Qualifying Examination

Persian

J.D. GURNEY, MA, D.PHIL., Wadham (vice Meisami,
granted leave of
absence)

For Trinity Term 1997

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section


MASTER OF STUDIES

Oriental Studies

Sanskrit

J.W. BENSON, MA, Wolfson

R.F. GOMBRICH, MA, D.PHIL., Balliol

Both for Trinity Term 1997

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section



APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINER PRO HAC
VICE

The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have appointed A.N. KINGSNORTH

(B.SC., MS London), FRCS, Professor of Surgery at Deriford
Hospital,
Plymouth, as an Additional Examiner in Surgery for Year 3 of the
Second Examination for the degree of Bachelor of Medicine to be
held
in Trinity Term 1997 pro hac vice (vice
Mr D.C. Dunn, M.Chir.,
FRCS, granted leave of absence).

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section



EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


Accommodation for Lectures

Michaelmas Term 1997

The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if
Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture
at the Schools in Michaelmas Term 1997 could inform the Clerk of
the Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to
know whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one
hundred persons is required; only the three large writing-schools
will accommodate more than that number.

Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection
equipment and 35-mm projectors are available. When these
facilities are required the Clerk of the Schools should be
notified in advance.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on
30 May.


1 Boards of the Faculties of
Anthropology and Geography, Biological Sciences, and Social
Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
81, l. 6, delete `The Biology of Organisms including Man' and
substitute `The
Biology of Organisms including Humans'.

2 Ibid., l. 18, delete `chromosome mapping'
and substitute `mapping the human genome'.

3 Ibid., ll. 22–3, delete `The nature
and origin of species: man's relationship to the animal kingdom;
an introduction to the evidence for human evolution' and
substitute:

`Mechanisms of evolutionary change: selection and adaptation,
evolution of sex, altruism, kin selection and co-
operation. Alternative models of evolution. The role of culture
in human evolution.

The nature and origin of species. Human relationships with the
animal kingdom. An introduction to the evidence for human
evolution.'

4 Ibid., l. 24, after `One three-hour paper
will be set.' insert `The paper will be divided into two
sections: (a) Genetics and (b) Evolution.
Candidates will be required to answer four questions with at
least one question from each section.'

(b) Honour School of Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
242, delete ll. 30–46 and substitute

`(1) Animal Behaviour and its Evolution

(2) Human Genetics

(3) Human Ecology

(4) Demography and population

(5a) Social Anthropology or (5b) Sociological Theory

Candidates may answer questions from either (5a) or (5b), but not
from both

(6) Essay

Candidates will also be required to offer any two of the
following subjects:

(7a) Developmental Psychology or (7b) Social Behaviour

Candidates may answer questions from either (7a) or (7b), but not
from both

(8) Brain and Behaviour

(9) Human Evolution

(10) The Biology of Infectious Disease

(11) Health and Disease

(12) Urban and Social Geography

(13) Sociology of Industrial Societies

(14) Social Anthropology of a Selected Region

(15) Language

(16) Quantitative Methods'.

2 Ibid., l. 47, delete `For Paper 14,' and
substitute `For Paper 16,'.

3 Ibid., p. 243, delete ll. 12–23 and
substitute:

`1. Animal Behaviour and its Evolution

Introduction to the study of behaviour. Adaptation: behaviour and
natural selection. Kin selection. Advantages and disadvantages
of group living. Evolutionary stable strategies. The problems of
development. Nature or Nurture: genes and behaviour. Evolutionary
views of human social behaviour and the sociobiology controversy.
Behaviour applied to conservation, management and welfare. Animal
intelligence: pattern recognition, behavioural rhythms,
perception of time, animal learning, cognitive ethology. Sexual
selection. Behavioural ecology: mating systems, aggression,
parent–offspring conflict, communication,
parent–offspring communication and conflict. Optimality and
decision-making, co-operation, cultural evolution and imitation,
evolutionary psychology.

Theoretical perspectives on primate behavioural evolution.
Primate communication and cognition. Deception. Reproductive
decisions and behaviour. Case studies of
primate socioecology.'

4 Ibid., l. 30, delete `restriction fragment
length polymorphisms;'.

5 Ibid., l. 37, after `prenatal diagnosis;'
insert `gene
therapy;'.

6 Ibid., delete `genetic engineering' and
substitute

`genetic manipulation'.

7 Ibid., l. 38, after `social implications
of human genetics', insert `; major international initiatives in
genetics'.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 40–9 and substitute:

`General ecology. Evolution of material culture and its impact
on human ecology. Physiological aspects of reproductive profiles
(from conception to birth) and how they are influenced by
nutrition and the interaction between nutrition and cultural
practices. Nutrition, ecology, and growth. The human ecology of
infectious disease. The human ecology of chronic disease: the
interaction between diet, and other aspects of the human
environment as they contribute to cardiovascular disease, cancer,
rheumatic disease, and birth defects. Interactions between
culture and the natural environment: subsistence patterns and
environmental interactions—hunting and gathering to
pre-urbanised agriculture; urbanisation, agriculture and
socio-political exploitation, cultural
diversity and ecological awareness. Ecological ethics:
beliefs and aspirations from a multicultural perspective.'

9 Ibid., p. 244, in ll. 22–3, delete `In
the essay the candidate will be required to show knowledge of
more than one of the basic approaches to the study of human
sciences' and substitute `In the essay the candidate will be
required to focus on material from within the Honour School, and
must show knowledge of more than one of the basic
approaches to the study of Human Sciences.'

10 Ibid., l. 29, delete `(i) an
explanation of the subject in about 100 words' and substitute
`(i) an explanation of the subject in about 100 words
explicitly mentioning the two or more basic approaches to the
study of Human Sciences that will be incorporated in the essay.'

11 Ibid., p. 245, after l. 32 delete ll. 33–48 and
substitute:

`8. Brain and Behaviour (As prescribed as a paper in Group A
in the examination in the Honour School of Experimental
Psychology.)

9. Human Evolution

General evolution: the theory and facts of evolution. Human
evolution: evidence from fossils and artefacts;
aspects of palaeolithic archaeology; molecular evidence of human
evolution; relationships to other primates; comparison of fossil
and molecular evidence. Human nature: from animals to humans;
human life histories, sex and reproductive strategies; human
brains, behaviour and cognition; origins of human social
behaviour. Human culture: genes, minds and culture; evolutionism;
social Darwinism; sociobiology; evolutionary psychology, social
learning; language and the origins of culture; gene-culture
coevolution.

10. The Biology of Infectious Disease

Introduction to parasitism including the evolution of virulence.
Biology of microparasites: life histories of
bacteria, viruses, protozoa and helminths. Introduction to
parasite genetics and the molecular taxonomy of parasites. The
innate and adaptive immune systems. Immunity to micro- and
macroparasites. Parasite immune evasion strategies. Genetic
susceptibility to disease. Host gentics and resistance to
infection. Introduction to parasite ecology. Population biology
of microparasites and macroparasites. Vaccination and
chemotherapy. Insects and ticks as vectors. Vectors: habitats and
climate. Vector-borne disease models.

11. Health and Disease

The nature of health and consequences of disease. Design and
analysis of epidemiological studies. Variation in occurrence of
disease with time, geography, age, and other personal
characteristics. Epidemiology of common diseases, including
variation, causes, and biological mechanisms. The role of
medicine in cure and prevention. The role of health promotion and
screening, and their costs and benefits. Organisation of health
services—history, geographic differences, and current
issues. Aspects of treatment of common conditions. Clinical
trials. Effectiveness, efficiency and use of resources in health
care.'

12 Ibid., l. 49, and p. 246, ll. 3, 11, 21,
and 31 renumber paper numbers 10–14 as 12–16.

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section



2 Board of the Faculty of Biological
Sciences

Honour School of Natural Sciences (Biological Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
416, delete ll. 21–42 and substitute:

`1. Candidates will be required to offer themselves for
examination in five subjects chosen from the following

1. Evolution and Systematics

2.Quantitiative Methods

3. Animal Behaviour

4. Plant and Microbial Biology

5. Environmental Biology

6. Cell and Developmental Biology

7. The Biology of Animal and Plant Disease

All candidates will be required to offer subjects 1 and 2 and
three out of subjects 3–7. In all subjects knowledge of
first-year coursework will be assumed.

2.The examination shall be conducted as follows.

(a) Part A

Each candidate will be required to offer

(i) Subject 1: One three-hour
written paper, to be taken on the Wednesday of the week before
the start of Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year in which
the examination is taken.

(ii) Subjects 3–7: An extended essay in
one of the five subjects. It shall be on a topic selected from
a list approved by the Sub-faculty of Biology and published in
the Gazette not later than the end of the first week
of Trinity Full Term of the academic year preceding the
examination. Candidates may not offer themselves for examination
in Part A in a subject which they also intend to offer in Parts
B and C.

(b) Part B

Each candidate must complete a course assignment on each of the
two subjects, from within 3–7, which they
intend to offer in Part C. This will be

(i) an extended essay on a topic proposed by the
student and approved by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of
Biology; or

(ii) any other assignment individually approved by the
Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Biology.

The approval of assignments under (i) and (ii) shall be
given not later than Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas
Full Term of the academic year in which the examination is taken.

The course assignments shall be submitted on or before 12 noon
on the Friday of the week before the start of the Trinity Full
Term in which the examination is taken.

(c) Part C

Each candidate will be required to offer written papers in three
subjects, as follows:

(i) One paper in subject 2;

(ii) Two papers in each of two subjects chosen from subjects
3–7.
Each written paper shall be of three hours duration. For subjects
3–7, one paper shall consist of short answer questions,
problems and questions based on the interpretation of
observations, and data analysis; the other will consist of essay
questions.
No candidate may take the written papers in the subject in which
his or her Part A essay has been written.

(d) Part D

2 Ibid., l. 43, delete `2' and substitute
`(i)'.

3 Ibid., l. 45 delete `sixth week of the term
preceding that in which' and substitute `week before the
commencement of Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which'.

4 Ibid., p. 417, in l. 1 delete `3' and
substitute `(ii)'.

5 Ibid., in l. 2, after `practical work'
insert `and exercises in Quantitative Methods'.

6 Ibid., in l. 9, after `practical work'
insert `and exercises in Quantitative Methods'.

7 Ibid., p. 417, after l. 10 insert:

`3. Extended Essays must be the candidate's own work. In the
case of the Part A essay, candidates will be expected to work
completely independently. In the case of essays and other
assignments submitted in Part B, candidates may discuss the
proposed topic, the sources available, and the method of
presentation with an adviser. This adviser may also read and
comment on a first draft.

Essays shall be of not more than 3,000 words, excluding any
tables, figures, or references.

Essays (two copies) must be legibly typed or word processed on
one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and
submitted as follows:

Part A: by noon on Friday of the first week of
the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year in which the
examination is taken;

Part B: by noon on Friday of the week before the
Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which the examination
is taken;

addressed to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1
4BG for the Chairman of the Examiners in the Final Honour School
of Natural Science (Biological Sciences).

Candidates shall not deal with substantially the same material
in their Part B essays as is covered in their project report.
Candidates must sign a certificate stating that
the essay is their own work. This certificate must be submitted
at the same time as the essay in a sealed envelope addressed to
the Chairman of Examiners. Each essay, and the envelope
containing the certificate, must be clearly
labelled with the candidate's number. The name and college of the
candidate must not appear on the essay or on the envelope. No
essay will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly
or substantially, for a degree in the University or elsewhere;
and the certificate must also contain a confirmation that the
essay has not already been so submitted. No essay shall be
ineligible because it has been submitted, in whole or in part,
for any scholarship or prize in this University. All sources used
in the essays must be fully documented. Each essay shall clearly
indicate on the first page the part of the examination and the
subject under which the essay is submitted.'

8 Ibid., l. 11, after `4.' insert `Field
Work'.

9 Ibid., delete l. 13, and substitute:

`5. Viva voce Examinations. All candidates will be examined
viva voce. Discussion of the project will be included in the viva
voce examination.'

10 Ibid., l. 14, after `6.' insert `Use of
Calculators'.

11 Ibid., l. 26, delete `and 4.'

12 Ibid., l. 34, delete `5. and 6.' and
substitute `4.'

13 Ibid., l. 40, delete `7. and 8.' and
substitute `5.'

14 Ibid., l. 46, delete `9. and 10.' and
substitute `6.'

15 Ibid., p. 418, l. 3, delete `11. and 12.'
and substitute `7.'

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3 Boards of the Faculties of English
Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
77, l. 40, delete `Prescribed books' and substitute `Literature
papers'.

2 As for the Preliminary Examination for
Modern Languages (see 5 below).

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4 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Medieval and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 95, l. 36, delete
`Prescribed books' and substitute `Literature papers'.

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section



5 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and
Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
86, after l. 2 insert `Not more than two languages may be
offered.'

2 Ibid., l. 5, delete `for the purposes of
regulations 3 and 4 below'.

3 Ibid., l. 8, delete `Prescribed books' and
substitute `Literature papers'.

4 Ibid., ll. 12–14 delete `(with
such...permitted below)'.

5 Ibid., l. 20 delete `(1)' and run l. 19 on
with l. 20.

6 Ibid., l. 23 delete `; and' and substitute
`,'.

7 Ibid., delete ll. 24–8.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 44–7.

9 Ibid., delete p. 87, l. 1 to p. 91, l. 45
and substitute:

`5. Candidates must offer:

Either: I, IIA, IIB, III, IV in two modern
languages:

Or: I, IIA, IIB, III, IV in a modern language
together with V, VI, and VII in Latin and/or Greek;

Or: I, IIA, IIB, III, IV in a modern language
together with VIII, IX, and X in Linguistics.'

6. a. Language papers

Modern Languages

I. Language I. 3 hours.

French:

The paper will consist of: (a) monolingual exercises,
instructions for which will be written in French; and
(b) comprehension of a passage of modern prose with
questions to be answered in French (one question will require
candidates to write a short piece of continuous prose).

German:

`Deutsche Gesellschaft und Kultur seit 1890.' Reading
comprehension (in German) on a passage which relates to the theme
of the paper. One essay in German on a topic
relating to the theme of the paper.

Italian:

The paper will consist of: (a) audio or video listening
comprehension exercises; (b) reading comprehension
exercises; (c) one guided essay in Italian.

Spanish:

The paper will consist of: (a) translation into Spanish;
(b) a guided essay of approximately 500 words (i.e.
guidance to be given as to aspects of the topic addressed). 1H
hours will be allowed for each part.

Portuguese:

The paper will consist of: (a) translation into
Portuguese; (b) guided composition in Portuguese;
(c) monolingual
exercises.

Russian:

Translation into Russian and/or exercises in Russian.

Modern Greek:

Translation into Modern Greek and exercises in Modern Greek.
Czech (with Slovak):

(a) a modern English prose passage; and (b)
English sentences testing basic grammar, both to be translated
into
either Czech or Slovak.

II. Language II. The paper will be in two parts
of 1H hours each.

French:

IIA. Translation from French of a prose passage.

IIB. Translation into French of a prose passage.

German:

IIA. Translation into German of a prose passage.

IIB. Translation from German of a prose passage in a modern
literary register.

Italian:

IIA. Translation into Italian of a prose passage or sentences.

IIB. Translation from Italian. A passage of modern prose will be
set.

Spanish:

IIA. Translation from Spanish.

IIB. A passage of Spanish prose on which candidates will
be tested for comprehension by a series of questions to be
answered in English.

Portuguese:

IIA. Translation from Portuguese of a prose passage in a modern
literary register.

IIB. Translation from Portuguese of a prose passage in an
informal register such as journalism, and an exercise or
exercises in reading comprehension.

Russian:

IIA. Translation from Russian. A passage of modern prose will be
set.

IIB. Translation from Russian or, at the discretion of the
Moderators, comprehension exercises. Either (i) a
passage of modern prose will be set for translation, or (ii) a
modern passage or passages in the language will be set to test
comprehension. All answers in this paper will be in English.

Modern Greek:

IIA. Translation from Modern Greek. A passage of modern prose
will be set.

IIB. Comprehension exercises. A modern passage or passages in the
language will be set to test comprehension. All answers in this
paper will be in English.

Czech (with Slovak):

IIA and IIB. One passage of modern prose in each paper for
translation from Czech into English.

Latin and Greek

V. Unseen translation. 3 hours.

Candidates may offer either Latin or Greek or both. Two passages
must be offered, and in each language one prose passage and one
verse passage will be set.

b. Literature papers

Modern Languages

III. Literature I. 3 hours.

French:

Short texts. Candidates will be required to study six brief but
self-contained works arranged in three contrasting pairs:

A Montaigne, `Des cannibales' from the Essais


Voltaire, L'Ingénu

B Baudelaire, `Spleen et Idéal' from Les Fleurs du Mal,
with thirty poems to be identified for detailed study

Aimé Césaire, Cahier d'un retour au pays
natal

C Racine, Phèdre

Beckett, En attendant Godot

The paper will be examined by commentary only, with all texts
set, and candidates required to offer three passages, one from
each of sections A, B, and C.

German:

Commentary. Two commentaries on a choice of poems taken from an
anthology, which will include some medieval poems. One commentary
on an extract from one of the set texts listed under paper IV.
Each year two such texts will be designated as the ones from
which an extract for commentary may be taken.

Italian:

Aspects of Italian lyric poetry. Compulsory passages for
explanation and detailed comment will be set.

The sonnet from the Middle Ages to the present. (Copies of the
list of sonnets for the examinations in the academic year
concerned will be available in the Modern Languages Faculty
Office, 37 Wellington Square, from the beginning of the
Michaelmas Full Term of the year.)

Ungaretti, Selections from L'Allegria and Sentimento del tempo
(in Giuseppe Ungaretti, Vita d'un uomo, 106 poesie
1914–1960, Mondadori Oscar).

Spanish:

Prescribed texts to be studied in relation to various possible
approaches to literature. One compulsory passage will be set for
translation into English and one for commentary. Candidates will
also be required to undertake two essays, to be written on texts
other than the one
from which the passage chosen for commentary was taken.

M. Vargas Llosa, La ciudad y los perros.

Antonio Machado, Campos de Castilla (excluding `La tierra de
Alvargonzález', but including `Elogios': in Poesías
completas, Selecciones Austral).

Calderùn de la Barca, El médico de su honra (ed.
D.W.
Cruickshank, Clásicos Castalia).

Cervantes, `Rinconete y Cortadillo', from vol. 1 of Novelas
ejemplares, ed. H. Sieber, 2 vols. (Madrid: Cátedra,
1989).

Portuguese:

Prescribed texts to be studied in relation to various possible
approaches to literature. Compulsory passages for explanation and
detailed comment will be set. There will be a compulsory essay
or commentary question on each of the set texts.

Mário de Sá-Carneiro, A confissão de
Lúcio

Carlos de Oliveira, Casa na duna

Clarice Lispector, Laìos de família.

Russian:

Poetry. The examination will consist of three commentaries, each
on a different author, on the set works by five authors detailed
below. One commentary passage will be compulsory.

Derzhavin, Felitsa

Pushkin, Mednyi vsadnik

Lermontov, Mtsyri

Blok, Na pole Kulikovom and Dvenadtsat'

Akhmatova, Rekviem

Examiners may give some guidance to candidates about how to
approach the passages set for commentary; they may also require
candidates to translate some portion of the passages set for
commentary into English.

Modern Greek:

War, society, and culture in twentieth-century Greece. Candidates
will be examined on their knowledge of two topics. For each topic
there is also one prescribed novel that deals with the topic. The
topics and prescribed texts are: (1) The Asia Minor Disaster: its
political and cultural background and its repercussions (Text:
Dido Sotiriou, Matomena chomata); and (2) Dictatorship and War:
Greek history,
society and culture 1936–49 (text: Kostas Tachtsis, To trito
stefani).

The paper will consist of a choice of questions on topics 1 and
2. Candidates must answer three questions. Each candidate must
answer either one question relating to each of the historical
topics and one to a literary text, or one question on history and
one on each of the two literary texts.

Czech (with Slovak):

Prescribed texts to be studied as literature. Three compulsory
passages for commentary will be set.

Short stories:

Milan Kundera, Falesny autostop

Bohumil Hrabal, Pábitelé

Ota Pavel, Zlatí úhori

Jan Neruda, Doktor Kazisvet

IV. Literature II: Prescribed texts. 3 hours.

French:

French prose fiction:

Laclos, Les Liaisons dangereuses

Balzac, La Fille aux yeux d'or

Proust, Combray

Sarraute, Le Planétarium

The paper will be examined entirely by essay, with candidates
required to answer on three novels. There will be
a choice of questions on each novel, and candidates will
be encouraged to make connexions and comparisons
between texts where appropriate.

German:

Three essays from a choice of questions on the set texts covering
genre, themes, and period:

Prose:

Fontane, Die Poggenpuhls

Kafka, Die Verwandlung

Thomas Mann, Mario und der Zauberer

Toller, Eine Jugend in Deutschland

Drama:

Wedekind, Fruhlings Erwachen

Schnitzler, Liebelei

Kaiser, Von morgens bis mitternachts

Brecht, Die Dreigroschenoper

Italian:

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of four of the six
set texts listed below. Candidates will be expected to have such
knowledge of the literary, intellectual, and historical
background as is necessary for the understanding of these texts.
Compulsory passages for commentary will not be set in the
examination.

Modern Italian Narrative:

Primo Levi, Se questo è un uomo

Cesare Pavese, La luna e i falò

Leonardo Sciascia, A ciascuno il suo

Natalia Ginzburg, Lessico famigliare

Italo Calvino, Palomar

Antonio Tabucchi, Sostiene Pereira

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section


Spanish:

Prescribed texts to be studied in relation to general trends in
literature or thought or to historical background. Compulsory
passages for explanation and detailed comment will not be set.

The Spanish Ballad Tradition:

Traditional romances:

El romancero viejo (ed. M. Díaz Roig, Cátedra,
Madrid, 1979), poems Nos. 1–3, 5–6, 8–9, 11,
13–14, 23–4, 29–32, 38–59, 63–6, 68,
71–3, 76, 78, 83, 85–6, 88, 91, 94, 96–9, 101,
104, 111, 115–19, 121, 125–8.

Golden Age:

Lope de Vega, Lírica (ed. J.M. Blecua, Clásicos
Castalia), poems Nos. 1–2, 6–10, 125, and 126.

Gùngora, Romances (ed. Antonio Carreûo,
Cátedra, Madrid, 1982), poems Nos. 3, 10–11,
15–16, 18, 23, 27, 48, 52, 58, and 79.

Francisco de Quevedo, Poemas escogidos (ed. J.M. Blecua,
Clásicos Castalia, Madrid), poems Nos. 155, 160, 165, 167,
and 172.

Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries:

Duque de Rivas, El conde de Villamediana; El Alcázar de
Sevilla; El fratricidio; Bailén (from Romances
histùricos, ed.
S. García, Cátedra).

Antonio Machado, `La tierra de Alvargonzálex' (from
Poes’as completas, Selecciones Austral).

F. García Lorca, Romancero gitano (ed. Mario
Hernández, Alianza).

Portuguese:

The examination will consist of:

(a) a commentary on passages chosen from two of the
set texts given below; (b) an essay, on one of the
remaining three texts; (c) an essay on the historical
development of the auto.

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of at least one
text from each of groups A, B, and C below.

A Gil Vicente, Auto da Barca do Inferno; Auto da India

B Almeida Garrett, Um auto de Gil Vicente

C Suassuna, Auto da Compadecida

Cabral de Melo Neto, Vida e Morte Severina

Russian:

The paper will consist of: (a) one compulsory
commentary; and (b) two essays each from a choice of two
covering the other two set authors. Examiners may give some
guidance to candidates about how to approach the passage set for
commentary; they may also require candidates to translate some
portion of the passage set for commentary into English.

Pushkin, Pikovaya dama

Chekhov, Sluchai iz praktiki; Anna na shee; Dom s mezoninom.

Trifonov, Obmen

Modern Greek:

Twentieth-century Greek poetry and prose. The syllabus will
consist of a selection of poems and short stories by a variety
of authors. (A list of the selection for the examinations in the
academic year concerned will be available in the Modern Languages
Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, from the beginning of the
Michaelmas Full Term of that year.) (Specific sections of the
prescribed texts may be designated as including the passages
which will be set for commentary.)

The examination paper will be divided into two sections. Section
A will consists of two compulsory commentary passages from
prescribed texts (one poetry passage and one prose passage).
Section B will consist of a choice of essay questions, from which
each candidate must choose one.

Czech (with Slovak):

Prescribed texts to be studied as literature. Essay-type
questions will be set on the plays, and a compulsory passage for
commentary from the poem. Candidates will be required to answer
on all three texts.

Capek, Bíáá nemoc

Havel, Vyrozumení

Mácha, Máj

Latin and Greek

VI. Prescribed books. 3 hours.

The paper will consist of passages for translation and comment.

VII. Prescribed books. 3 hours.

The paper will consist of essay questions.

Papers VI and VII.

Candidates must choose two of the following four groups of texts,
and state on their examination entry form which two groups they
propose to offer. They must offer the same two groups for both
papers.

(a) Aristophanes, Frogs 1–268,
674–15331;[1] Euripides,
Bacchae; Plato, Symposium 189c–end1;[1]

[1]Note: for the purposes of the essay paper (VII),
candidates who offer these texts will be expected to have
knowledge of the whole work and not merely the prescribed
portions.

(b) Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Sophocles, Antigone;
Herodotus 1.1–119;

(c) Cicero, pro Murena; Sallust, Catiline; Tacitus,
Annals 4;

(d) Terence, Adelphoe; Catullus 1–17,
21–60, 69–70, 72–3, 75–9, 83–8,
92–6, 100–1, 109, 115–16; Ovid, Metamorphoses 8.

The following editions of Greek and Latin texts will be used in
the examination. Where no publisher's name is given, the book is
published by the Clarendon Press. An asterisk (*) indicates texts
in the Oxford Classical Texts series; where more than one edition
has appeared, the latest will be used.

Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound: Griffith (Cambridge University
Press).

Aristophanes, Frogs: Dover.

Catullus: *Mynors.

Cicero: *Clark.

Euripides, Bacchae: Dodds.

Herodotus: *Hude.

Ovid, Metamorphoses 8: Hollis.

Plato, Symposium: Dover (Cambridge University Press).

Sallust: *Reynolds.

Sophocles: *Lloyd-Jones and Wilson.

Tacitus, Annals 4: Martin and Woodman (Cambridge University
Press).

Terence, Adelphoe: Martin (Cambridge University Press).

c. Linguistics

VIII. General Linguistics. 3 hours.

Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the development
of contemporary linguistic theory, both synchronic and
historical, and be able to discuss problems and issues in areas
including semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics,
psycholinguistics, language acquisition and language change.

IX. Phonetics and Phonology. 3 hours.
Candidates will be expected to be familiar with principles and
practice in the analysis, classification, and transcription of
speech, as applied to languages in general, but with an emphasis
on European languages.

X. Grammatical Analysis. 3 hours.

Candidates will be expected to be familiar with modern
grammatical theory, in particular as applied to the analysis of
European languages.'

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section



6 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Modern History

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern
Languages

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
85, l.19, delete `Prescribed books' and substitute `Literature
papers'.

2 As for the Preliminary Examination for
Modern Languages (see 5 above).

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section



7 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Preliminary Examination in European and Middle Eastern
Languages

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
79, after l. 18, insert:

`(1) The European Language

Candidates will be required to offer:'.

2 Ibid., l. 19, delete `(1)' and substitute
`(i)'.

3 Ibid., after l.22, insert:

`(ii) Literature paper in the European Language (one paper of
three hours).

As specified either for Paper III or for Paper IV in the
regulations for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages
(Paper III may not be offered in German).'

4 Ibid., p.80, l.2, delete `Language papers
in the European Language' and substitute `The European Language'.

5 Ibid., ll. 6–7, delete `A
candidate...subsequent examination' and substitute `A candidate
who has failed (i) or (ii) of subject (1) may resit the
paper or papers at a subsequent examination in accordance with
the regulations for the Preliminary Examination for Modern
Languages.'

6 As for the Preliminary Examination for
Modern Languages (see 5 above).

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8 Board of the Faculty of Modern
History

Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 315, delete ll.
1–7 and substitute:

`V. Comparative History and Historiography: an extended essay.
Candidates shall be examined in Comparative History and
Historiography by means of an extended essay, which shall not
exceed 7,500 words (including footnotes and
references but excluding bibliography) and shall be on a topic
or theme chosen from a list circulated by the examiners by the
end of the Fifth Week of the Trinity Term of the year prior to
the examination. The examiners' list shall be drawn from a
syllabus approved by the Modern History Faculty Board, details
of which shall be circulated to candidates at the beginning of
the first Michaelmas Term of their work for the Honour School.
Candidates will be expected to demonstrate a detailed knowledge
of either at least two societies or historical
periods or a representative number of relevant historians.

Candidates will have the opportunity of two meetings with their
tutors in the preparatory stages of work on the chosen essay; but
colleges will not offer seminar or tutorial teaching on the
themes of comparative history and historiography after the
posting of the titles by the examiners, and tutors will not see
or comment on the essays, either at draft or final stage.
Essays should be typed and should conform to normal standards of
academic presentation as set out on the
Faculty style sheet. All references must be appropriately
footnoted.

Essays must be delivered by hand to the Examination Schools by
5 p.m. on the Friday of the Eighth Week of the Hilary Term
immediately preceding the examination; candidates delivering
essays will be required to complete a receipt form, which will
only be accepted as proof of
receipt if it is countersigned by a member of the Examination
Schools staff. Each essay must be accompanied by
a sealed envelope (bearing only the candidate's examination
number) containing a formal declaration signed by the candidate
that the essay is his or her own work. The University's
regulations on Late Entries, as set out in the
Examination Decrees under the section Examination Times and Entry
of Names, will apply; candidates are warned
that late entries require the prior permission of the
Vice-Chancellor and Proctors and will, if permission is granted,
result in a late entry fee (plus, in particular cases, the
possible reduction of the mark by up to one class).'

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section



9 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 125, delete ll.
23–9 and substitute:

`6. Comparative History and Historiography (extended essay).
Each candidate shall be examined in Comparative History and
Historiography in accordance with regulation V of the Honour
School of Modern History.'

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section



10 Board of the Faculty of Physical
Sciences

(a) Honour School of Natural Science (Geology/Earth
Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first Part A
examinations

in 2000 and first Part B examination in the case of the
three-year course in 2000 and in the case of the four-year course
2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, delete from p. 419,
l. 49 to
p. 420, l. 33 inclusive and substitute:

`GEOLOGY (THREE-YEAR COURSE)

1. The examination shall be in two parts.

2.In Part A: A candidate shall be required to offer:

(i) five written papers on the fundamental principles
of Geology; and

(ii) either two practical papers on observational and
interpretational techniques, or one practical paper on
observational and interpretational techniques and one paper in
mathematics; and

(iii) a report on an individual practical project.

The Head of Department of Earth Sciences, or deputy, shall
provide the examiners with information showing the extent to
which each candidate has satisfactorily
completed the practicals and field courses. In addition,
practical notebooks containing records of both field and
laboratory courses must also be made available to the examiners.
Such evidence will be taken into consideration by the examiners
in awarding classes.
Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiners'
discretion.

3. In Part B a candidate shall be required to offer:

(i) a written paper on one subject chosen from a list
published by the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences; and

(ii) either an extended essay on a subject approved by the
Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences, or deputy, or a
report on practical work completed subsequent to Part A of the
examination, the subject of the practical work to be approved by
the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences, or deputy.

The list of subjects and syllabuses for the written paper in
3(i) will be published in the Gazette by
the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences not later than the end of
Trinity Full Term for examination six terms thence.

EARTH SCIENCES (FOUR-YEAR COURSE)

1. The examination shall be in two parts.

2.Part A of the examination shall be the same as the Part A
of the examination for the three-year course in Geology and the
same conditions, arrangements, and examination timings shall
apply.

3. Part B of the examination shall be taken at a time not less
than four terms after Part A. In Part B a candidate shall be
required to offer:

(i) three written papers; and

(ii) either an extended essay, or a report on an advanced
practical project or other advanced work.

4. The detailed requirements and arrangements for clause 3 and
the list of subjects and the syllabuses from which the written
papers may be selected shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of
Earth Sciences with the agreement
of the Head of the Department of Earth Sciences or deputy and
published in the Gazette not later than the end of
Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year preceding the year of
Part B of the examination. The proposed nature of the practical
or other advanced work and its duration shall be submitted for
approval to the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences or
deputy with the agreement of the Head of the Department of Earth
Sciences or deputy.

Times of examinations

The Part A examination for both three- and four-year courses will
be taken during weeks 8 and 9 of Hilary Term of the third year.
The written paper for Part B of the three-year course will be
taken in week 8 of Trinity Term of the third year, by the Friday
of which the extended essay or report on practical work must also
have been submitted.

The written papers for Part B of the four-year course will be
taken in week 8 of Trinity Term of the fourth year. The extended
essay or report on practical work must have been submitted by the
Friday of week 6 of Trinity Term of the fourth year.'

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(b) Pass School of Natural Science (Geology/Earth
Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
2000

in the case of the three-year course and 2001 in the case
of the four-year course)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, delete from p. 432,
l. 32 to
p. 433, l. 2 inclusive and substitute:

`Pass School of Natural Science (Geology)

Three-year course

1. Candidates shall be required to satisfy the examiners in
five papers on the fundamentals of Geology as specified in Part
A of the three-year course for the Honour School of Natural
Science (Geology) and also in practical examinations at the
discretion of the examiners.

2.Candidates are required to attend such field courses during
each year of study as are approved annually by the Sub-faculty
of Earth Sciences.

3. Practical notebooks containing records of both field and
laboratory courses must also be made available to the
examiners.

Four-year course

Candidates shall be required to satisfy the examiners:

(a) as prescribed in sections (1), (2) and one of
(3), (4), and (5) of Part A of the four-year course for the
Honour School of Natural Science (Earth Sciences);

(b) in one of the written papers on major options as
prescribed in section (3)(i) of Part B of the four-year
course for the Honour School of Natural Science (Earth Sciences);

(c) in an extended essay or report on practical
option work or project as prescribed in section (3)(ii) of Part
B of the four-year course for the Honour School of Natural
Science (Earth Sciences).'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give
notice of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Anthropology and Geography

MENGYU HU, Hertford: `Plio–Pleistocene environmental
variations inferred from thick sediment sequences in the North
China Plain'.

School of Geography, Wednesday, 21 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A.S. Goudie, E. Derbyshire.

Biological Sciences

A.E. RAMBAUT, Merton: `The inference of evolutionary process from
molecular phylogenies'.

Department of Zoology, Monday, 19 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: R. Page, M. Pagel.

Clinical Medicine

J. O'LEARY, Green College: `Molecular analysis of Kaposis Sarcoma
associated herpes virus (KS HV) in immunocompromised
patients'.

John Radcliffe Hospital, Wednesday, 9 July, 1 p.m.


Examiners: J.C.E. Underwood, K.A. Fleming.

Modern History

V. BUCKLEY, Wolfson: `Birth control and the English Catholic
family, 1950–95'.

Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Tuesday,
27 May, 9.30 a.m.


Examiners: J.E. Lewis, S. Szreter.

S. PENNELL, St Catherine's: `The material culture of food in
early modern England, c.1650–1750'.

Jesus College, Cambridge (with the permission of the Proctors),
Tuesday, 27 May, 4 p.m.


Examiners: J.M. Innes, K. Wrightson.

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section


Physical Sciences

M. BESHARA, Pembroke: `Energy flows in structures with compliant
non-conservative couplings'.

Department of Engineering Science, Tuesday, 3 June,
2.15 p.m.


Examiners: R.S. Langley, R. Eatock Taylor.

M. WALTER, Merton: `Synthesis of metallo-B-lactamase
inhibitors'.

Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Friday, 30 May, 9 a.m.


Examiners: H. Waldmann, D.M. Hodgson.

K.M.W. ZEPF, St John's: `A study of harmonic generation from
laser interactions with gaseous and solid targets'.

Clarendon Laboratory, Thursday, 12 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S.M. Hooker, M.H.R. Hutchinson.

Social Studies

A.V. LUKIN, St Antony's: `"Democratic" groups in
Soviet Russia (1985–91): a study in political cultures'.

St Antony's, Wednesday, 28 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: G. Hosking, A. Pravda.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 May 1997: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

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issue



OBITUARIES


Balliol College

KENNETH WILLIAM ALLEN, MA, 2 May 1997; Professor of
Nuclear Structure and Fellow 1963–9, Emeritus Fellow
1991–7.

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section



Christ Church

THE REVD DR ARTHUR W. ADDAMS, MA, 11 March 1997; commoner
1938–40.

MAJOR DONALD H. BROWNE, October 1996; commoner
1923–6.

ERROLL B. CHRISTIE; Westminster Exhibitioner
1937–9.

KENNETH FLETCHER, ISO, MA, 31 January 1997; commoner
1948–51.

THE REVD ARTHUR E. FORD, BA; commoner 1923–6.

DR GERRARD M.P. GARDINER, BA, April 1997; commoner
1972–5. Aged 43.

CHRISTOPHER R. HAMMERSLEY, BA, 1995; commoner
1921–4.

GILES FRANCIS HARWOOD, JP, BA, April 1997; commoner
1952–9. Aged 63.

SIR DAVID HILDYARD, KCMG, DFC, BA, April 1997; Timmis
Exhibitioner 1935–8. Aged 80.

WILLIAM D.H. KRESSLER, BA, late 1980s; commoner
1932–5.

GILBERT J.T. PARR, BA, late 1980s; scholar
1938–9.

DR JEAN P. PETTAVAL, 1987 (approximately); commoner
1942–3.

ROGER G. PETTIWARD, BA, 1939–45; commoner
1925–8.

RALPH SELBY, CMG, BA, 21 February 1997; commoner
1933–6. Aged 81.

LT.-COL. GEORGE L. STEERS, BA, 25 December 1944;
commoner 1929–32. Aged 35.

GERSHAM J. STEWART; commoner 1953–6.

THE REVD CANON CYRIL V. TAYLOR, BA, 1991; commoner
1926–9. Aged 84.

LT.-COL. MALCOLM V.A. WOLFE-MURRAY, BA; commoner
1927–31.

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Lincoln College

IAN DOUGLAS FREEMAN COUTTS, 4 May 1997; commoner
1948–51. Aged 69.

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section



St Anne's College

LADY ELIZABETH MEADE (née Scott); member
of the Society of Oxford Home-Students 1922–5; aged
94.

MISS ERICA EVERETT; member of the Society of Oxford
Home-Students 1927–30.

MISS JOYCE LENTON; member of St Anne's Society
1942–5.

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section



ELECTIONS


Balliol College

To Reynolds Scholarships:

CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH HICKS, formerly of Lady Eleanor
Holles School, Hampton

CAROLINE ELIZABETH PEARCE, formerly of Prior Park
College, Bath

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Brasenose College

To Open Scholarships:

GEORGE R. MCPHERSON, formerly of Winchester College

CLARISSA N. WORSDALE, formerly of Moira House School,
Eastbourne

To Open Exhibitions:

GAVIN A. ALEXANDER, formerly of Bradfield College

RICHARD D. CARTER, formerly of Rugby School

EMMA E. CLOUGH, formerly of Durham Sixth-Form College

DARIO G. DAGOSTINO, formerly of St John's College,
Southsea

JAMES A. KNIGHT, formerly of Abingdon School

CAROLINE R. MURPHY, formerly of Cheltenham Ladies'
College

ANGHARAD M. PARRY, formerly of Coleraine High School

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section



Corpus Christi College

To a College Scholarship:

SAM J. GILBERT,
formerly of Haberdashers' Aske's School, Elstree

To a Hugh Oldham Scholarship:

SOPHIE F. BENNETT,
formerly of St Swithun's School, Winchester

To Haigh Scholarships:

THOMAS C. CAREY, formerly of Abingdon School

ALEXANDER B.G. THORNTON, formerly of Winchester
College

To a Charles Oldham Scholarship:

FATEMA AHMED,
formerly of the Henrietta Barnett School

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Magdalen College

To Visiting Fellowships:

SIR MICHAEL WHEELER-BOOTH (1 October 1997–15
April 1998
)

PROFESSOR J.B. CONNELLY (1 January–15
April 1998
)

PROFESSOR I.T. MCGOVERN (16 April–30
September 1998
)

PROFESSOR J.C. HAFFENDEN (mid-June–mid-
September 1998
)

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Oriel College

To a Scholarship:

THOMAS CHARLES MACMILLAN,
formerly of Eton College

To an Exhibition:

WILLIAM JAMES DANIELS,
formerly of the London Oratory School

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section



Queen's College

To a Randall MacIver Studentship in Archaeology:

TYLER W. BELL (BA Carlton), Wolfson College

To a Clifford Norton Studentship in the History of
Science:

VIVIANE QUIRKE (Maîtrise-ès-
Lettres, Paris X), St Antony's College

To Florey EPA Studentships:

FAUSTO BRITO E. ABREU (LIC.BIOL. Lisbon), Wolfson College

HESTER KORTHALS ALTES (M.BIOL. Leiden), Queen's
College

To Howell Studentships in Theology:

JEREMY DUFF (BA Cambridge), Jesus College

GARRY J. WILLIAMS, BA, Christ Church

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St Hilda's College

To an Honorary Fellowship (with immediate
effect):

PROFESSOR SARAH POMEROY, City University,
New York

To a Barbara Pym Official Fellowship in English
Literature (from 1 October 1997):

RACHEL HELENA
BOWLBY, MA (PH.D. Yale)

To a Julia Mann Junior Research Fellowship (for two
years from 1 October 1997):

MIRANDA FRICKER, BA,
D.PHIL. (MA Kent)

To a McIlrath Research Fellowship (for two years,
with immediate effect):

HAZEL ASSENDER (MA, PH.D.
Cambridge)

To Schoolmistress Fellowships:

JACQUELINE ANDREWS (B.SC. Glasgow, PH.D. London), High
School of Dundee (HT 1998)

HELEN ELIZABETH LINES (BA Bristol, BA Open),
Kingsbridge School, Devon (TT 1998)

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 May 1997: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to
advertise in the Gazette

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Exhibition

Etchings and engravings: `Collectors'
Choice', offered for sale, mainly from two contrasting
private collections. Old Master prints with an emphasis
on Mannerism, iconography, religion, and architecture.
`Contemporary' British prints acquired through the annual
exhibitions of the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers and
the affiliated Print Collectors' Club, 1920–40. On
exhibition in North Aston over the late May Bank Holiday,
and, if still available, at the Olympia Fine Art and
Antiques Fair (5–15 June). Fully illustrated
catalogue available (£7.50). Also see full-page
advertisement in May `Oxford' issue of
Apollomagazine. Elizabeth Harvey-Lee, 1 West
Cottages, North Aston, Oxon. OX6 3QB. Tel.: 01869
347164.

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section



United Oxford and Cambridge
University Club

The London club for all University
members. Special rates for those with college or
University appointments or University residence.
Modernised and reasonable bedroom accommodation.
Excellent library facilities. Restaurant and squash
courts. Full service at weekends. Reciprocal
arrangements with over 125 clubs world-wide. Further
details from Derek Conran, Hertford College, or
Membership Secretary, 71 Pall Mall, London SW1Y 5HD.
Tel.: 0171-930 5151, fax: 0171-930 9490.

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section



Oxford Asian Textile Group

Deryn O'Connor, formerly of the Surrey
Institute of Art and Design, will lecture on `Guizhou
Province, China: further textile encounters', at 6 p.m.
on Tue., 20 May, in the Pauling Human Sciences Centre, 58
Banbury Road. Refreshments will be served. Visitors
welcome: admission £1.

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section



Tuition Offered


Classical guitar

and clarinet tuition.
Any standard. Highly experienced tutor. LRAM, ARCM. Tel.:
Oxford 375526.

English language. Academic writing,
grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables
including evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour,
Cambridge exams., general English are best value in
Oxford. Writing up? Private tuition available with
experienced tutors. Free test/advice from the Director of
Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5 p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9
Blue Boar Street (off St Aldate's by Christ Church),
Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077, e-mail:
OLT@dial.pipex.com.

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Tuition Sought

Businessman interested in Middle Eastern
affairs seeks teacher of Arabic. Aim to reach level to
read Arab newspapers. Once weekly intensive lessons
envisaged in Oxford if suitable location available. S.
Newman, `Seatons', Hinton-in-the-Hedges, Brackley, NN13
5NF.

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section



Services Offered

Portraits: experienced Russian artist
will paint fine quality portraits in pencil, watercolour,
or acrylic from good clear photos. Reasonable prices. No
obligation to buy, if you are not completely satisfied.
For further information and samples contact Galina
Kravchenko, 310 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7ED. Tel.:
Oxford 516630.

Frederick and Sudabeh Hine sell, buy,
and exchange all types and sizes of oriental carpets,
rugs, and runners. Also expert conservation repairs and
specialist cleaning. Visit our gallery/warehouse without
notice in business hours, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.,
Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford.
Tel./fax: Oxford 559396.

Furniture restoration and cabinet-
making: professional workshop undertakes antiques
restoration, design and make, and replica production.
Estimates/proposals, with no obligation, are given prior
to any work starting. Forman Fine Furniture, 26 High
Street, Brill, Bucks. Tel./fax: 01844 238389.

Mallams Book Auctions. Regular
specialist sales of books and prints including
antiquarian literature, science and natural history,
atlases and maps, fine bindings, first editions,
engravings, and related items. Mallams, Bocardo House, St
Michael's Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 241358.

Town and Country Trees: professional
tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and
hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully
insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call
Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

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Domestic Services


Carpet/upholstery/curtain

cleaning by
Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
For free estimates and friendly advice, call
Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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section



Situations Vacant

Keston Institute, the research and
information centre on religion in the post-Communist
world, seeks a Research Assistant for a 3-year research
project on the subject `Evolving roles for Orthodox lay
believers in Russia, Bulgaria, and Romania'.
Qualifications include word-processing skills and a
knowledge of at least one of the relevant languages,
preferably Russian. Starting salary up to £12,000
depending on skills and experience. Applications by Fri.,
30 May, to Dr Philip Walters. Keston Institute, 4 Park
Town, Oxford OX2 6SH.

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Houses to Let

North Oxford : 3-bedroom detached house
in secluded drive; washing- machine, drier, garage,
maintained garden backing onto playing fields; convenient
for shops and schools. Available 1 Sept.–30 June.
Suitable for visiting academics. £925 p.c.m. inc.
council tax. Tel.: Oxford 722630.

Cosy Victorian house

in east Oxford;
fully furnished and equipped; 3 bedrooms (inc. 1 study-
bedroom), fireplace, small garden, patio; 5- minute walk
to shops, 15-minute walk to city centre/colleges.
Available 1 Sept. 1997–30 June 1998. £700
p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 798156, e-mail:
ersac@csv.warwick.ac.uk.

Academic couple on sabbatical for one
year starting end of Aug. Detached house in Jack Straw's
Lane close to the John Radcliffe Hospital (5-minute walk)
and 1½ miles from city centre on foot/cycle path
through University Parks. Furnished; 4 bedrooms (1 with
en-suite and studying area), living- and dining-rooms,
large additional breakfast room, study, kitchen,
cloakroom; rear garden 165 by 65 ft with summerhouse;
front garden 105 by 70 ft; 2 telephone lines; Comtel
cable TV; ample parking space. £1,500 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford 433819.

Attractive family accommodation, central
North Oxford, available July onwards. Victorian house.
Sleeps 6–7. Well equipped; quiet; street-parking
permit; excellent schools; 15 minutes' walk to city
centre, 5 minutes to countryside. Photographs available.
£210 p.w. exc. bills. Apply: 123 South Avenue,
Abingdon, Oxon.

Sutton Courtenay village, 8 miles from
Oxford, ideal for European School, Culham; convenient for
Harwell, JET, Culham, and Rutherford Appleton
Laboratories and Didcot Station. Warm, comfortable,
modern architect-designed family home; 3/4 bedrooms, gas
c.h., fully furnished, labour-saving modern kitchen,
bathroom and utility/shower-room with second w.c. Very
spacious, sunny open-plan ground floor. Integral garage.
Sheltered south-west facing garden with sun-terrace.
Fruit trees, lawn, grape vines. Available end of May,
£700 p.c.m. Tel.: Abingdon (01235) 847329.

Charming central North Oxford

house, one
street from St Giles', Radcliffe Infirmary, and St
Antony's College. Just modernised, extended and
refurbished to the highest standards. Two bedrooms, plus
study or guest room; basement study/bedroom; living room
leading to large, light conservatory dining-room and
kitchen. Bathroom with shower and w.c., plus separate
w.c. Luxuriously furnished and fully carpeted. Fully
equipped kitchen with washing-machine, drier, dish-
washer. Burglar alarm system linked to station. Gas c.h.
Three telephones. Beautiful garden, with parking space at
rear. Rent includes various services. Viewing highly
recommended. £1,500 p.m. Available from June. Tel.:
Oxford 559614.

Luxurious, well-lit, newly refurbished
accommodation on two floors in central North Oxford. Near
Port Meadow; convenient for University, schools, shops.
Three bedrooms (2 double, 1 single); sitting-room;
dining-room; modern kitchen; 2 bathrooms (inc. separate
shower); own small paved, well-stocked garden.
Beautifully furnished and decorated, with new carpets
throughout. Gas c.h., washing machine, drier,
dish-washer, 2 telephones, TV points. £1,400 p.m.
Families only. Available Sept. onwards. Tel.: Oxford
559614.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so
the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many
castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be
able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost
letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics,
medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford.
Please telephone or fax us with details of your
requirements and we will do whatever we can without
obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777.

Mallams is a long-established
independent company offering a letting service tailored
to the needs of the discerning landlord. If you would
like further details or professional advice on any aspect
of the letting market please call our Summertown office.
Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax: 311977.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
information on properties available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service
(credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Two minutes' walk from St Giles':
maisonette available for rent; living-room, kitchen,
double bedroom, single bedroom/study, garage. Newly
decorated, fully furnished, electrical appliances, c.h.
Suit professionals or a small visiting family. £660
p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 554015 (evenings).

Central North Oxford:

two 2-bedroom
spacious apartments of standard not often found, 1 and 2
bathrooms, lounge, kitchen; well-placed for the
University and business centre; best suited to
professionals or mature visiting academics. £675 and
£720 p.c.m.; one available 20 June, other 3 July.
Tel.: Oxford 516144.

Basement studio flat in St John Street,
with off-street parking space. Suit single person.
£550 p.c.m., plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 559666.

Bardwell Road: attractive ground-floor
flat in Victorian house in prime North Oxford location.
Double bedroom plus study/spare bedroom. Well equipped
(dish-washer, etc., linen provided) and attractively
furnished. South-facing onto pretty communal gardens.
Off-street parking. Suit couple. From Sept. Tel./fax:
Oxford 510542.

Wytham Abbey, Oxford: spacious 3- and 4-
bed apartments, with use of walled garden. Part of grade
1 listed manor house, situated 3 miles from city centre
and set in 3,000 acres of park and woodland. Fully
equipped and luxuriously appointed. Available from Sept.
Tel.: Oxford 247200, fax: 724762.

North Oxford : 1 Oct. 1997 to 30 June
1998, £530 p.m.; fully equipped ground-floor flat
suitable for 2 adults; dining-room/study,
living-room/study, double bedroom, shower-room, kitchen
with dish-washer, washing/drying machine, electric stove;
c.h., carport, small garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street,
Princeton, NJ 08540, USA.

Recently refurbished, luxurious
ground-floor flat in central North Oxford. Near Port
Meadow, convenient for shops, schools, University;
separate dining and sitting rooms with oak flooring; one
large carpeted bedroom; basement; fully fitted kitchen
with dish-washer, washing-machine, and drier. Bathroom
with separate shower. Gas c.h. Telephone. TV point. Own
entrance and charming paved gardens front and back.
£850 p.m. Available from Oct. Tel.: Oxford
559614.

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Summer Lets

North Oxford house in quiet street close
to city centre and Port Meadow; 3 bedrooms, 1
study/bedroom (sleeps 7), 2 bathrooms; superb large
modern kitchen, washer-drier, dish-washer, c.h.; garden
with patio, furniture, hammock, and bicycles. Weekly
cleaner. Free parking. Available 4–25 Aug. £270
p.w. inc. Tel.: Oxford 513933.

Large house, 5 minutes from the centre
of Oxford: 3 bedrooms, sitting-room, kitchen/dining-room,
gas c.h., 2 full bathrooms, canal frontage. Available 24
July–1 Sept. Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 559644
(5–9 p.m.).

Summer let in Oxford, 5 minutes from
city centre: live in comfort near the Thames. Centrally
heated, 4-bedroom Victorian house. Large split-level
living-room; bathroom, bidet, and w.c.; shower-room,
power-shower, and w.c.; fully-equipped kitchen;
south-facing garden. Available for 6 weeks, 18 July--31
Aug. Price negotiable. Tel./fax: Oxford 725193, e-mail:
JXT18@dial.pipex.com.

Wolvercote: 2-bedroom Edwardian house,
village location—ideally located for Port
Meadow—but only 10-minute drive from Oxford centre,
fully furnished, available for one month from mid-July.
Tel.: Oxford 553297; e-mail: mike.clarke@ctsu.ox.ac.uk.

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Accommodation Offered

North Oxford , within the ring-road:
self-contained luxury accommodation, available now; very
quiet with lovely views and patio; near convenient bus
route; suit visiting academic, single or couple. Regret
no children, smokers, or pets. £550 p.c.m. inc. for
single, £600 for couple. Tel.: Oxford 515085.

Premier: apartments and houses. Long or
short lets. From £600 p.c.m. North Oxford,
Headington, and rural locations. Tel.: Oxford 792299,
fax: 798087.

Rooms to let in Grandpont. A quiet
house, within walking distance from the city centre.
Shared kitchen and sitting-room. Available from Sept.
onwards for long-term occupancy. Would suit professionals
or postdoctoral academics. Non-smokers only. Tel.: Oxford
727826 (evenings), e-mail:
spanu@trans.plants.ox.ac.uk.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the home
of a semi-retired academic couple. Warm, comfortable
house in exclusive central North Oxford within easy
walking distance of city centre, all main university
buildings, parks, river, shops, pubs, and restaurants.
Every room has tea- and coffee-making facilities,
microwave, and colour television. Very moderate terms.
Tel. and fax: Oxford 557879.

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Accommodation Sought

Visiting Swiss academic seeks furnished
2-bedroom flat or small house in central Oxford, 16
June–30 Sept. Contact David Coleman, Dept. of
Applied Social Studies, Wellington Square. Tel.: Oxford
(2)70345, fax: (2)70324, e-mail:
david.coleman@socres.ox.ac.uk.

Two- or 3-bedroom houses wanted for
Mexican academics visiting the UK with their families for
a sabbatical. Needed for 3 months, early June–early
Sept., in or near Oxford and in reasonable distance of
public transport. Telephone Anne. Tel.: Oxford (2)71587,
e-mail: ebuckmas@worf.molbiol.ox.ac.uk.

Visiting American professor and wife
seeking furnished house or flat to rent in central Oxford
for a.y. 1997--8 (1 Oct.--30 June). Local references
furnished on request. Contact Charles Shaw, Assistant
Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square. Tel.:
Oxford (2)70036, e-mail: Charles.Shaw@admin.ox.ac.uk.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of
letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's
foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and
advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford
764533, or fax: 764777.

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Accommodation Exchange

Detached house with 5 bedrooms and a
huge garden, Boar's Hill (quiet village 5 minutes from
Oxford), to exchange for a flat in Munich, Sept.
1997–end of June 1998. Tel./fax: Oxford 735332.

Two French academic physicians with 4
children, working in Paris, seek furnished
accommodation—flat or house—during a sabbatical
year at Radcliffe Hospital, Headington. To exchange for
flat located in Vanves, small city close to Paris, near
tube station, 25–30 minutes to centre of Paris;
faces (south) large public garden, nursery, primary
schools; double living-room inc. double bed, 2 bedrooms
(bunks), bathroom, kitchen, car-parking. Available Sept.
1997–Aug. 1998. Furnished. Value c.
£650–£750 p.m. Tel.: 33 1 4108 9575
(evenings).

Yorkshire Dales/Oxford: 3-bedroom
house/flat wanted in Oxford town from mid-Aug. for 1--2
years in exchange for 17th-c. cottage with garage in
Upper Wharfedale (ideal for writing, sabbatical,
walking); within easy reach Leeds/Bradford airport, Lake
District. Tel./fax: 01756 760265.

Wanted during Michaelmas Term (but could
begin earlier and extend later), house or small apartment
in Oxford preferably convenient to St Antony's, to
exchange for small 1½-bedroom condo on the beach in
Monterey, California, inc. care of 2 cats; magnificent
views, close to downtown, piers, lake, woods, Monterey
Institute, Naval Postgraduate School. Write Martin
Needler and Jan Black, 4 La Playa, Monterey, CA 93940. E-
mail: mneedler@uop.edu or jblack@miis.edu.

Long vacation: Eleanor Briggs, 54 Rue
Magasin, 33000 Bordeaux, France, wants to `swap' with a
university or college student with a flat in Oxford, 2
June–11 July (essential) with possible exension to
end of Aug. The fully furnished flat is close to the
Place de la Victoire, with easy access to train and bus
stations; in quiet street, on first floor; living-room
with kitchenette alcove and small balcony overlooking
inner courtyard; double bedroom, bathroom with shower,
basin, w.c.; fridge, electrically heated water. Near
university restaurant with economically priced meals.
Tel. (France): 5 5691 4115.

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Accommodation Offered to Rent
or Exchange

University widow seeks to exchange
fully-furnished modern completely equipped house, good
garden, in central North Oxford on bus route, near shops,
schools, etc., for a flat/house in London or Israel.
Would consider suggestions of exchange in any other
university centre with easily accessible adult Jewish
education. Would consider rental. Available autumn 1997
or later. Min. 6 months. Contact Lewis. Tel.: Oxford
515440, fax: 511568.

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Meeting sought to arrange
exchange

A professor (Sorbonne) and her husband
(CNRS) wish to meet a family in Oxford this summer
(1997). The objective: to arrange an exchange for their
son in summer 1998. Age: nearly 13 now. Jane Burrett, The
Laurels, Wendlebury, Oxon. OX6 8PJ. Tel.: 01869 241823.
n

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Holiday Lets

Provence: bed-and-breakfast 30 km from
Avignon; newly restored 19th-c. farmhouse; 4 large
bedrooms with en-suite bathroom/w.c.; evening meals
available. Run by American/English couple. From 390FF 2
persons, breakfast included. Mar./Nov. Tel./fax: 00 33
04.90.69.78.69.

New Haven apartment: huge, furnished, 1-
bedroom apartment, overlooking Yale Campus; very safe,
very central, beautiful views. £100 p.w. (neg.).
Available 1 July–15 Aug. Tel.: Oxford 557752, or e-
mail: dmarkov@fas.harvard.edu.

Farmhouse accommodation in beautiful
Dordogne countryside between Angoulème and
Perigueux. Sleeps 6. Available to rent Aug./Sept. from
£130 p.w. Tel.: 01295 780641.

Central North Oxford,

15 minutes' walk
from centre, 5 minutes from water meadows: family holiday
accommodation for 6–7, in well-equipped attractive
Victorian house. Sat. to Sat., £300 p.w. exc. bills.
Position as above: studio flat for 2, £180 p.w. exc.
bills. Apply: 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon.

Villa and garden with wonderful views,
40 minutes from Florence; all mod. cons.; swimming and
sports facilities nearby; sleeps 8; available
mid-July--mid-Sept. £350 p.w. Lukes. Tel. (Italy):
00 39 55 8428317.

Greek islands: charming villas, many
with enclosed courtyards, on the islands of Skiathos,
Skopelos, and Alanissos, from £59 p.p. p.w. Also
available: walking and cooking holidays in unspoilt
surroundings. Tel. for brochure: 00 30 424 22947 (24
hours); fax: 00 30 424 23057.

Verona outskirts: in exceptionally beautiful 15th-c.
villa, self-contained ground-floor flat; large double
bed-sitting room, kitchen/dining room, bathroom; garden
area, parking, frequent buses from door to city centre;
£300 p.w. inc. services and weekly cleaning.
Available 7--21 June and 28 June--18 July. Tel. Contessa
da Sacco: 00 39 452 6499; or Moore: 01844 238247.

Duras, south-west France, 1 hour
Bordeaux airport: 300-year-old farmhouse, set amidst
vineyards, with beautiful views; sleeps 6; 2 bedrooms
en-suite. Lovely garden and terrace. Brand new 15m
swimming-pool with jacuzzi. Available from 1 June.
£500 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 553685.

SW France (Tarn-et-Garonne),
traditionally restored farmhouse and outbuildings in
hilltop hamlet with fine views over unspoilt countryside,
close to medieval market town on River Aveyron. Sleeps
8+, small pool, semi-circular garden facing south with
trees and some shade. Tel.: 0118 987 3095.

Andalucia, Gaucin: house or part to let.
Magical medieval white village. Panoramic views from
house towards Morocco. Stunning landscape, wonderful
butterflies and birds. Walking, golf, fishing and
wind-surfing. Visit Ronda, Cordoba, Seville, Granada,
Cadiz, Jerez, Morocco. From £95 p.w. Brochure and
photos from Dr Campbell. Tel. and fax: Oxford 513935,
e-mail: l.lustgarten@soton.ac.uk.

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House for Sale

Wheatley: substantial semi-detached
Victorian house; many original features; 4 bedrooms,
bathroom, kitchen, 3 reception rooms, cloakroom, 2
cellars, garden, garage, gas c.h. OIRO £195,000.
Tel.: Oxford 873247.

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 16 May<br /> - 2 June

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Seminars
: places should be booked in advance through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/1_4410.htm">Staff Development
Programme supplement.

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Friday 16 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Athenian Acropolis',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR J. CANNON: ` "We have the power": the
English Ascendancy 1707–1801' (James Ford Special
Lecture in British History), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N.D. SEN: `Lady sings the blues: twentieth-
century women singing the Rama tale in Bengali, Marathi,
and Telugu' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `The hero
and his clay feet: a gendered view of the
Ramayana'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. EYRE (Cameron Mackintosh Visiting
Professor of Contemporary Theatre): `National theatre'
(lecture), Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St
Catherine's, 5 p.m.

LORD HABGOOD: `Waiting for God' (Eric Symes Abbott
Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

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Sunday 18 May

THE REVD DR HENRY CHADWICK preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

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Monday 19 May

PROFESSOR C.N.J. MANN: `Petrarch: the Life of Letters'
(Rowe Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

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Tuesday 20 May

THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is
cancelled.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: a personal
selection by the retiring Director of acquisitions made
during his directorship, 1985–97 (until 13 July).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Some seventeenth-
century paintings', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Lecturing skills
practice—video playback', 2 p.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

CLINICAL MEDICINE Faculty Board elections, 13 June:
nominations by two electors to be received at the
University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.D. MAIDEN (Professor of the Romance
Languages): `Where's the Romance?' (inaugural lecture),
Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

THE REVD PROFESSOR JAMES BARR: `Story, historicity,
and theology' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `History,
theology, biblical criticism: the end-of-century
interactions'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Literature and the state'
(Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Policing literature in
eighteenth-century Paris'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR J. LIPNER: `Religious identity and the dynamics of
religious encounter' (seminar), Oriental Institute, 5
p.m.

J. RAVETZ: `Post-normal science' (Oxford Centre for
the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council
Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. MOMMSEN: `Hitler as a ruler: the National
Socialist system of government' (lecture series:
`Lectures on the Nazi dictatorship'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. PORTER: `Philosophies of science in pre-
war Cambridge—evolving attitudes to science as
defined through C.P. Snow's influence' (lecture series:
`History and Philosophy of Biology'), Department of
Physiology, 5 p.m.

THE DUKE STRING QUARTET perform works by Schnittke,
Barber, and Schoenberg, the chapel, Trinity, 8.30 p.m.
(admission free).

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Wednesday 21 May

DR G. DICKSON: `Pentecostalism, politics, and theocratic
populism in the Middle Ages' (Wilde Lectures in Natural
and Comparative Religion: `Medieval
Pentecostalism—the tradition of charismatic
Christian enthusiasm in Western Europe,
c.1000–1500'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. DAVIES: `The Great Schism: British versus
Continental history' (Waynflete Lectures: `Reflections on
European History'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. NOZICK: `The place of consciousness'
(John Locke Lectures: `Invariance and objectivity'),
Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR M. HODES: `Psychiatric issues in young refugees in
the United Kingdom' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars
on Forced Migration: `Children and adolescents in forced
migration'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 5 p.m.

A. PROCHIANTZ: `Des gènes de
développement pour toute la vie' (lecture),
Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

RUTH HACOHEN: `Sympathetic echoes: musical responses
to Narcissus's reflections' (lecture), Holywell Music
Room, 5.15 p.m.

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET perform quartets by
Schubert (D.94), Mendelssohn (op. 12), and Beethoven (op.
59, no. 2), Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets
£8/£6/£4 from Blackwell's Music Shop or at
the door).

PROFESSOR H. TIROSH-SAMUELSON: `Eudaimonia as
hermeneutics: Maimonides' conception of happiness'
(Jacobs Lectures in Rabbinic Thought: `The pursuit of
happiness in pre-modern Judaism: between philosophy and
Kabbalah'), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies,
Yarnton Manor, 8.15 p.m.

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Thursday 22 May

DR J.T. AGBASIERE: `The image of womanhood among the Igbo
of Nigeria' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research Women
seminars: `Gender and development: current research'),
Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. CAREY: `Dying in the theatre of Dionysos:
clouds, comics, and sophists' (Gaisford Lecture), St
John's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. DUFF: `Law, language, and community:
preconditions of criminal responsibility' (H.L.A. Hart
Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.D. NORTH: `Stars and atoms' (Thomas
Harriot Lecture), Champneys Room, Oriel, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N.D. SEN: `The hero and his clay feet:
differing perceptions' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures:
`The hero and his clay feet: a gendered view of the
Ramayana'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. TIROSH-SAMUELSON: `The Maimonidean
enigma: ambiguity and interpretation' (seminar related to
Jacobs Lectures in Rabbinic Thought: `The pursuit of
happiness in pre-modern Judaism: between philosophy and
Kabbalah'), Committee Room, Wolfson, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. MOMMSEN: `The German resistance: was
there an alternative to Hitler?' (lecture series:
`Lectures on the Nazi dictatorship'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. GALLIGAN: `Civil rights at
risk—judicial protection in the twenty-first
century' (public lecture), Haldane Room, Wolfson, 5.30
p.m.

PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD DOLL: `Tobacco: a medical
history' (Jan Brod Memorial Lecture), Witts Lecture
Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

JULIAN MILFORD performs piano works by Fauré,
Ravel, Dukas, and Beethoven, Garden Quadrangle
Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission free).

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Friday 23 May

COLLOQUIUM: `Corps-esprit-machine' (Franco-British
meeting, various speakers), Maison Française (all
day).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Legacies: treasures of
Palestine and Mesopotamia', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50.
Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR R.H. WARD (Professor of Biological
Anthropology): `Golden Apples and a Golden Bough: future
prospects for biological anthropology?' (inaugural
lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

S. MANDELBROTE: `All Souls from the Civil War to the
Restoration' (Chichele Lectures), Old Library, All Souls,
5 p.m.

E. GUYON: `French higher education: Grandes
Écoles for Europe?' (European Affairs Society
lecture, admission £2 to non-members, £4 to
non-University members), Saskatchewan Room, Exeter, 8.30
p.m.

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Saturday 24 May

DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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Sunday 25 May

THE RT. REVD DR MICHAEL NAZIR-ALI preaches, All Souls, 10
a.m.

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Monday 26 May

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed for normal business (today
only).

JOURNAL CLUB meeting (Human Population Genetics), Room
209, Department of Statistics (1 South Parks Road), 1
p.m.

CONGREGATION election, 19 June: nominations by two
members of Congregation to be received at the University
Offices by 4 p.m.

DEBATE, with Professor Dawkins, Professor Greenfield,
and Professor Blakemore (chaired by Sir Walter Bodmer):
`The public must understand science—but how?'
(lecture series: `History and Philosophy of Biology'),
University Museum, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. LASS: `A sweet disorder: competing stress
systems in Early Modern English' (lecture), Centre for
Linguistics and Philology, 5 p.m.

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Tuesday 27 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Small treasures of the
Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

FACULTY BOARD elections, 5 June: nominations by six
electors to be received at the University Offices by 4
p.m.

P. SCHNEIDER: `La réception des oeuvres: Manet'
(Maison Française lecture series), Ashmolean, 4.30
p.m.

DR J. LIPNER: `Religious identity: a vision for the
future' (seminar), Oriental Institute, 5 p.m.

J. MEADOWCROFT: `Implementing sustainable development
in high consumption societies: a research design' (Oxford
Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society
seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

K. HABSBURG: `A pan-European vision of Europe'
(European Affairs Society lecture, admission £2 to
non-members, £4 to non-University members), Harris
Building, Oriel, 8.30 p.m.

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Wednesday 28 May

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Financial management: budget
preparation', 9.30 a.m. (see
information above
).

DR M. MAW: `Promises and pictures: the Conservative
Party and the the birth of modern political advertising'
(Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil
Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. NOZICK: `The world according to quantum
mechanics' (John Locke Lectures: `Invariance and
objectivity'), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross
Building, 5 p.m.

R. BRETTS: `Children: the invisible soldiers' (Refugee
Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration: `Children
and adolescents in forced migration'), Library Wing
Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

P. SCHNEIDER: `Peinture et déluge' (lecture),
Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. TIROSH-SAMUELSON: `Human felicity and the
pursuit of holiness: between philosophy and Kabbalah'
(Jacobs Lectures in Rabbinic Thought: `The pursuit of
happiness in pre-modern Judaism: between philosophy and
Kabbalah'), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies,
Yarnton Manor, 8.15 p.m.

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Thursday 29 May

S. HENDERS: `Exclusion under international agreements:
the case of Hong Kong' (Centre for Cross-Cultural
Research Women seminars: `Gender and development: current
research'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 2 p.m.

CLINICAL MEDICINE Faculty Board elections, 13 June:
nominations by six electors to be received at the
University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. TIROSH-SAMUELSON: `Human perfection: the
interplay of the intellect and the will in
post-Maimonidean Jewish philosophy' (seminar related to
Jacobs Lectures in Rabbinic Thought: `The pursuit of
happiness in pre-modern Judaism: between philosophy and
Kabbalah'), Committee Room, Wolfson, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. SCHAMA: `History and the literary
imagination' (Isaiah Berlin Lecture), the Hall, Wolfson,
6 p.m.

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Friday 30 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `French porcelain', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

DR J. BENNETT: `Wren' (Chichele Lectures), Old
Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. KNICK HARLEY: `Globalisation and the
Industrial Revolution in Britain and America' (Sir John
Hicks Lecture), Social Studies Faculty Centre, 5 p.m.

F. GEORGEON: `Les buveurs d'Istanbul: la consommation
de boissons alcoolisées de l'Empire ottoman
à la République de Turquie' (Maison
Française lecture series), Middle East Centre, St
Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR J.R. FORREST: `Digital broadcasting overtakes
rocket science' (Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture),
Lecture Room 1, Department of Engineering Science, 5 p.m.

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Monday 2 June

CONGREGATION election, 19 June: nominations by six
members of Congregation to be received at the University
Offices by 4 p.m.

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