15 July 1999 - No 4519



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4519: 15 July 1999<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

15 July 1999


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 July 1999: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 12 July


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on
30
July.

List of the decrees:


Decree (1): Removal of anomalies

Explanatory note

The following decree removes anomalies and makes consequential
amendments to existing decrees which have been overlooked in
recent
legislation.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. I, Sect. IV, cl. 3, concerning
membership of Convocation (Statutes, 1997, p. 204),
after `describe himself or herself as a Master of Arts nor'
insert
`(unless so entitled as the holder of the Degree of Master of
Biochemistry or Master of Chemistry or Master of Earth Sciences
or
Master of Engineering or Master of Mathematics or Master of
Physics)'.

[The need to introduce such a proviso was overlooked
when
it
was decided that the academic dress for the holders of these
degrees,
after admission to membership of Convocation, should be the same
as
that for the holders of the Degree of Master of Arts.
]

2 In Examination Decrees,
1998,
p. 1101, l. 11, concerning fees payable at matriculation, delete
`§ 7' and substitute `§ 8'.

[The need to change this cross-reference was overlooked
when a
new sub-section was introduced into Ch. VIII, Sect. I.
]

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section



Decree (2): Change of name for the
Environmental Change Unit

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Anthropology
and Geography Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board,
changes the name of the sub-department of the School of Geography
directed by Professor J.C. Briden from `Environmental Change
Unit' to
`Environmental Change Institute', to reflect more precisely the
expanded range of the activities undertaken by its members,
including
the Director, and for fund-raising purposes.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Ch. II, Sect. I, § 10, cl. 1 (2),
concerning the Committee for the Environment
(Statutes,
1997, p. 219), delete `Unit' and substitute
`Institute'.

2 In Ch. III, Sect. XXXV, concerning the
Environmental Change Unit (p. 306), delete `Unit' and substitute
`Institute'.

3 Ibid., cl. l, delete `a Unit' and
substitute
`an Institute'.

4 Ibid., cll. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 (pp.
306--7), in each case delete `unit' and substitute `institute'.

5 Ibid., cl. 4 (p. 307), delete `Unit' and
substitute `Institute'.

6 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 346, cl. 2
(3),
concerning the Trapnell Fund (p. 732), delete `Unit' and
substitute
`Institute'.

7 In Ch. XI, Sect. X, Appendix, concerning
harassment (p. 798), delete `Environmental Change Unit' and
substitute `Environmental Change Institute'.

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section



Decree (3): Cherwell–Simon Memorial
Lecturership

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physical
Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
revises
the membership of the Board of Management for the
Cherwell–Simon
Memorial Fund in order to ensure that each of the sub-departments
of
Physics is formally involved in appointments to one or other of
the
two main annual special lectures in the subject (the
Cherwell–Simon and the Halley Lectures). At the same time
opportunity is taken to remove two anomalies in the existing
decree.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 40, cl. 4 (6)
(Statutes, 1997, p. 418), delete `professor' and
substitute `person'.

2 Ibid., delete item (7) and substitute:

`(7)the person to whom for the time being the Sub-Department
of
Atomic and Laser Physics is assigned under Ch. III, Sect. LXII,
§ 4, cl. 2.'

3 Ibid., cl. 6 (p. 419), delete item
(c).

4 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999.

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section



Decree (4): Establishment of Jeremy
Griffiths Memorial Studentship

Explanatory note

Mr and Mrs John Griffiths have offered the University an
extremely
generous benefaction to establish a graduate studentship in
memory of
their son, Jeremy Griffiths. The following decree, made on the
recommendation of the English Board and with the concurrence of
the
General Board, provides for the acceptance of the bequest and the
establishment of the studentship.

Text of Decree (4)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I (Statutes, 1997, p. 648), insert
new
§ 133 as follows and renumber existing §§ 133--5
(pp.
648--9, as renumbered by Decree (5) of 10
December 1998, Gazette, p. 484) as §§
134--6:

`§ 133. Griffiths Memorial Studentship

1. The University accepts with gratitude from Mr and Mrs John
Griffiths a gift of assets to establish a fund in memory of their
son, to be known as the Jeremy Griffiths Memorial Studentship
Fund.

2. The board of management for the fund shall be the Board
of the
Faculty of English Language and Literature, which shall make
regulations concerning the award of the studentship.

3. The net income of the fund shall be used, if there is a
suitable candidate, to provide a studentship to a citizen of the
United Kingdom to study for a graduate degree in a field relating
to
the history of the book in the British Isles before 1625.

4. The selection committee for the studentship shall consist
of

(1) the Director of Graduate Studies of the Board of the
Faculty
of English Language and Literature;

(2) the Reader in Bibliography and Textual Criticism;

(3) the University Lecturer in Palaeography;

(4) the J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of Medieval English
Literature
and Language or his or her nominee;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the Governing Body of St
John's
College.

5. The studentship shall be tenable at St John's College.

6. The studentship shall normally be awarded for a period of
two
years but may be renewed for not more than one further year.

7. Holders of the studentship shall be required to submit an
annual report to the board of management, and continued tenure
of the
award shall depend upon satisfactory progress towards completion
of
the graduate degree concerned.

8. Income not expended in any year shall be carried forward
for
expenditure in subsequent years.

9. Council shall have power to amend this decree from time
to
time, provided that the purposes of the fund, as defined in cll.
1,
3, and 5 above, shall always be kept in view.'

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section


Decree (5): Establishment of Philology and Linguistics as a
separate branch of the Honour School of Literae Humaniores

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Literae
Humaniores Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
establishes Philology and Linguistics as a separate branch of the
Honour School of Literae Humaniores.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (5)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
245, l. 7 after `(V)' insert `Philology and Linguistics, (VI)'.

2 Ibid., l. 9, delete `(IV)' and
substitute
`(V)'.

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section



Decree (6): Supplementary Subjects in
the
Honour School of Natural Science

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Biological
Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Physiological Sciences Boards
and
with the concurrence of the General Board, replaces the list of
Supplementary Subjects in the Examination Decrees by provision
for
annual publication in the Gazette of a list of
Supplementary Subjects available to be taught and examined in the
following year. The change is desirable not only on account of
the
occasional unavailability of teaching in particular subjects but
also
on account of opportunities which present themselves to offer,
perhaps for a limited period, new subjects.

Text of Decree (6)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
406, delete ll. 1--9 and substitute:

`10. Candidates may, in addition to any one or more of the
above-mentioned subjects, offer themselves for examination in one
or
more Supplementary Subjects.

Candidates for Supplementary Subjects may offer themselves for
examination either in the academic year in which
they
take the Honour School or in the preceding academic
year. In the case of candidates offering Chemistry
in
the Honour School, Supplementary Subjects may be offered either
in
the year preceding that in which candidates take Part I of the
Second
Public Examination or in either of the years in which they take
Parts
I and II of the examination.

The Supplementary Subjects available in any year shall be
published,
together with the term in which each subject will be examined,
in the
University Gazette not later than the end of the
Trinity
Term of the academic year prior to delivery of the courses.'

2 Ibid., delete from p. 406, l. 34 to p.
406,
l. 7 and substitute:

`14. The examination in General Subjects: Chemistry, Geology,
Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics shall be under
the
supervision of the Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences. The
examinations in General Subjects: Molecular and Cellular
Biochemistry, and Biological Sciences, shall be under the
supervision
of the Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences. The
examinations
in General Subject: Physiological Sciences shall be under the
supervision of the Board of the Faculty of Physiological
Sciences.
The respective boards shall have power, subject to the provisions
of
these decrees, from time to time to frame and to vary regulations
for
the different subjects of examination, and in particular to
prescribe
the conditions under which a candidate shall be permitted to
offer a
Special Subject.'

3 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999.

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section



Decree (7): Honour School of Theology

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Theology
Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, brings up
to
date the list of subjects in the Honour School of Theology in
order
to reflect the content of the syllabus.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (7)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
503, delete l. 9 and substitute:

`(2) Christian Doctrine and its Historical Context.

(3) The Study of non-Christian religions.'

2 Ibid., l. 10, delete `(3)' and
substitute
`(4)'.

3 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999, provided that the first examination for the Honour
School of Theology under the provisions of this decree shall be
held
in Trinity Term 2001, and that candidates for the Honour School
in
Trinity Term 2000 shall, and candidates for the Honour School in
Trinity Term 2001 may, offer themselves for examination under the
provisions of the decree and regulations governing the Honour
School
as they stood at 30 September 1999.

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section



Decree (8): Establishment of Advanced
Diplomas (Continuing Education)

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Committee
on
Continuing Education and with the concurrence of the General
Board,
provides for the establishment of Advanced Diplomas (Continuing
Education). These are equivalent to one year's full-time study
at
undergraduate level 3 (i.e. equivalent to the third year of
undergraduate study).

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below. These establish two Advanced Diplomas, one in
Archaeological Practice, and one in British Studies (Language and
Society), both of which represent development of existing
successful
programmes of study offered by the Department for Continuing
Education.

Text of Decree (8)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 981, after l. 24
insert:

`ADVANCED DIPLOMAS (CONTINUING EDUCATION)

Ch. X, Sect. XXIII]

(i) DECREE

1. The Committee on Continuing Education shall have power to
grant Advanced Diplomas to candidates who have satisfied the
conditions prescribed in this section and any further conditions
which the committee may prescribe by regulation.

2. The examination for each Advanced Diploma (Continuing
Education) shall be under the supervision of the Committee on
Continuing Education, which shall have power, subject to the
approval
of the General Board, to make regulations governing the
examination.

3. Candidates, whether members of the University or not, may
be
admitted as students for an Advanced Diploma (Continuing
Education)
under such conditions as the committee shall prescribe, provided
that
before admission to a course of study approved by the committee,
candidates shall have satisfied the committee that they have
appropriate educational experience acceptable to the committee,
and
are well-equipped to enter the proposed course of study.

4. Any person who has been accepted as a candidate for an
Advanced Diploma (Continuing Education), and who has
satisfactorily
pursued a course, the character and length of which have been
approved by the committee, may be admitted to the examination.'

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section



Decree (9): Examination arrangements for
Degrees in Medicine and Surgery

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Clinical
Medicine and Physiological Sciences Boards and with the
concurrence
of the General Board, relieves the Director of Pre-clinical
Studies
(formerly known as the Pre-clinical Adviser) of the
responsibility of
chairing ex officio the examiners for the Qualifying
Examination in Medical Sociology for medical students; makes
provision for the appointment of two Second BM examiners in
Public
Health as well as in Primary Health Care; and ensures that there
is
provision for appropriate certification of examination lists for
Years 1 and 2 of the Second BM.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (9)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
1013, l. 1, delete `Two in Public Health and Primary Health Care'
and
substitute:

`Two in Public Health

Two in Primary Health Care'.

2 Ibid., p. 1014, l. 8, delete
`Pre-clinical
Advisor' and substitute `Director of Pre-clinical Studies'.

3 Ibid., l. 10, delete `chairman' and
substitute `one'.

4 Ibid., p. 1062, l. 27, delete `Stages
I--IV'
and substitute `Years 1 and 2'.

5 Ibid., l. 29, delete `chairman of
examiners'
and substitute `Director of Clinical Studies'.

6 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999.

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section



Decree (10): Payment of university
tuition
fees

Explanatory note

Following the imposition by the Government of means-tested
university
tuition fees for home and EU undergraduates with effect from
Michaelmas Term 1999, which it is the responsibility of each
university to collect, Council made a decree (Ch. VIII, Sect. I,
§ 5, cl. 14, Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
1107, as
amended by Decree (4) of 27 May 1999, Gazette, p.
1299)
setting out the requirements for the payment of these fees at
Oxford.
On reviewing the operation of this decree, Council has decided
that
it would be helpful for certain aspects of the arrangements to
be
further clarified. Council has therefore made the following
decree,
which (a) makes explicit the requirement for the Bursar
of
the college of a student who has failed to pay the fees due to
keep
the Registrar informed; (b) spells out the University's
right to suspend a student who has not paid the fees due in full
by
the deadline specified in the Bursar's notice to that student;
(c) makes it possible, if necessary, for Council to
appoint
another person (normally a former Assessor) in place of the
Assessor
to sit on a Fees Panel; and (d) prescribes that a period
of
suspension imposed for the non-payment of the fees due will not
count
towards the fulfilment of the student's statutory residence
requirement.

Text of Decree (10)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
1107, l. 22, after `paid.' insert `The Bursar shall also inform
the
Registrar that he or she has so notified the student concerned;
and
if the fees due have not been paid in full within the specified
four-week period, the Bursar shall inform the Registrar of the
position, whereupon, subject to the other provisions of this
clause,
the University shall have the right forthwith to suspend the
student
concerned from access to the premises and facilities of the
University.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 26--8 and substitute:

`(i) Each Fees Panel shall comprise three persons appointed
by
Council, one of whom shall normally be the Assessor or a former
Assessor, and one of whom shall be a college bursar (not being
the
Bursar of the student's college).'

3 Ibid., after l. 45 insert:

`(e) If a student is suspended from access to the
premises
and facilities of the University under (b) above, the
period
of suspension shall not count towards the fulfilment of that
student's statutory residence requirement.'

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section



Decree (11): Consent to amendment to
the
Statutes of Lincoln College

The consent of the University is given to the amendment to
Statute
III of Lincoln College approved by the Governing Body on 26 May
1999
in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the
Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effect of the amendment is to lower the
prescribed retiring age for the Rector.

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section



Decree (12): Consent to amendment to
the
Statutes of St John's College

The consent of the University is given to the amendment to
Statute
III of St John's College approved by the Governing Body on 22
June
1999 in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of
the
Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effect of the amendment is to lower the
prescribed retiring age for the President.

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section



2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts
under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1997,
p. 367) has been accorded to the following person who is
qualified
for membership of Congregation:

JULIAN MICHAEL BEDFORD MORRELL, Department of Psychiatry

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section



3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been
added
to the Register of Congregation:

Bull, A.R., MA, Harris Manchester

McKee, C.A., MA, St John's

Morrell, J.M.B., MA status, Department of Psychiatry

Shortland, A.J., MA, M.St., D.Phil., St Edmund Hall

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section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect
on
30 July, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 July 1999: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]


  • *CONGREGATION 14 October

  • *
    Note on procedures in Congregation
  • *
    List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • *
    List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CONGREGATION 19 July


    Degree by Special Resolution

    The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved
    at
    noon on 19 July, unless by that time the Registrar has received
    notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under
    the
    provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes,
    1997,
    p. 15) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
    Congregation.

    Text of Special Resolution

    That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
    following:

    ALEC STONE SWEET, Nuffield College

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    section



    CONGREGATION 31 July 2.30 p.m.


    Conferment of Honorary Degree

    The Degree of Master of Arts, honoris causa, approved
    by
    Special Resolution of Congregation on 19 January, will be
    conferred
    upon ZAIN AZAHARI BIN ZAINAL ABIDIN.

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    section



    CONGREGATION 12 October 2 p.m.

    ¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written
    notice of
    any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the
    enacting parts of the statutes at item (1) below, or of any
    intention
    to vote against the preambles of the statutes at item (2) below,
    signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation, must
    be
    given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 4
    October

    (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note
    at the
    end of `University Agenda').


    2 Promulgation of Statutes

    Statute (1): Establishment of Ernest Butten Professorship of
    Management Studies

    Explanatory note

    Balliol College has agreed to fund a Professorship of Management
    Studies, to be called the Ernest Butten Professorship of
    Management
    Studies. The following statute, and the decree to be made by
    Council
    if the statute is approved, which are promoted on the
    recommendation
    of the Management Board and with the concurrence of the General
    Board, establish the professorship.

    (1) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish an Ernest
    Butten
    Professorship of Management Studies, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS
    FOLLOWS.

    In Tit. XIV, Sect. II, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, p.
    110),
    after `Professorships (two) of Management Studies' insert:

    `Ernest Butten Professorship of Management Studies'.

    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

    1 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, SCHEDULE A, concerning
    professorships (Statutes, 1997, p. 392), after
    `Professors (two) of Management Studies' insert:

    `Ernest Butten Professor of Management Studies'.

    2 Ibid., Sect. III, concerning particular
    professorships (p. 469), insert new § 192 as follows and
    renumber existing §§ 192--216 (pp. 469--80, as
    renumbered
    by Decree (1) of 29 October 1998, Decree (1) of 14 January 1999,
    and
    Decree (1) of 18 March 1999, Gazette, pp. 276, 580,
    938)
    as §§ 193--217:

    `§ 192. Butten Professor of Management Studies

    1. The University accepts with gratitude the moneys offered
    by
    Balliol College to support the establishment of a Professorship
    of
    Management Studies, to be known as the Ernest Butten
    Professorship of
    Management Studies.

    2. The Ernest Butten Professor of Management Studies shall
    lecture and give instruction in Management Studies.

    3. The professor shall be elected by an electoral board
    consisting of:

    (1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the Master of Balliol College
    is
    Vice-Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

    (2) the Master of Balliol College, or, if the Master is
    unable or
    unwilling to act, a person appointed by the governing body of the
    college;

    (3) a person appointed by the Governing Body of Balliol
    College;

    (4) a person appointed by Council;

    (5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

    (7)--(9) three persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty
    of
    Management.

    4. The professor shall be subject to the General Provisions
    of
    the decree concerning the duties of professors and to those
    Particular Provisions of the same decree which are applicable to
    this
    chair.

    5. The professor shall be expected to act as Director of
    Studies
    for Management students within Balliol College for such time as
    the
    college wishes. The other duties of the professor shall, if
    necessary, be adjusted by the University accordingly.

    6. Council shall have power to amend this decree from time
    to
    time, subject to the concurrence of Balliol College.'

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    section


    Statute (2): Prize for an English Poem on a Sacred Subject

    Explanatory note

    The English and Theology Boards wish to amend the criteria
    governing
    eligibility for the prize competition for an English Poem on a
    Sacred
    Subject and to remove the specification of an exact closing date
    for
    the competition from the statute. The following statute, which
    is
    promoted on the recommendation of the two faculty boards and with
    the
    concurrence of the General Board, makes the necessary changes.

    (2) WHEREAS it is expedient to amend the terms of the
    prize competition for an English Poem on a Sacred Subject, THE
    UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

    1 In Tit. XV, Sect. XLI
    (Statutes,
    1997, p. 153), delete cl. 2 and substitute:

    `2. The candidates shall be members of the University who, not
    later
    than the closing date for entries for the competition, which
    shall be
    specified when the subject is announced, shall have qualified by
    examination for a degree of the University, or shall hold the
    Degree
    of Master of Arts by incorporation or by decree or special
    resolution
    or shall hold the status of Master of Arts, or shall have
    qualified
    by examination for a degree of any other university.'

    2 Ibid., delete cl. 6 and renumber
    existing
    cll. 7--12 (pp. 153--4) as cll. 6--11.

    3 Ibid., cl. 6 (as renumbered), delete
    `cl. 8'
    and substitute `clause 7'.

    4 This statute shall be effective from 25
    June
    1999.

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    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 July 1999: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or
    recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    ANDREAS IDREOS PROFESSORSHIP OF SCIENCE
    AND
    RELIGION

    JOHN HEDLEY BROOKE (MA, PhD Cambridge), Professor of the History
    of
    Science, Lancaster University, has been appointed to the
    professorship with effect from 1 October 1999.

    Professor Brooke will be a fellow of Harris Manchester
    College.

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    section



    PROFESSORSHIP OF SOCIOLOGY

    ANTHONY FRANCIS HEATH, MA, FBA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Official
    Fellow,
    Nuffield College, and Professor of Sociology, has been appointed
    to the
    professorship with effect from 1 September 1999.

    Professor Heath will remain a fellow of Nuffield College.

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    section



    WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSORSHIP IN
    EUROPEAN
    COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

    NIKE WAGNER has been appointed to the professorship for the
    academic year
    2001–2.

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    section



    CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING
    PROFESSOR

    On the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board, the
    General Board has
    conferred the title of Visiting Professor in Engineering Science
    on A. BLAKE,
    MA (MA Cambridge, PH.D. Edinburgh), currently Professor of
    Engineering
    Science and Fellow of Exeter College but shortly to take up a
    position with
    Microsoft Research at Cambridge, for a period of three years with
    effect from
    1 October 1999.

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    section



    DIRECTORSHIP OF THE INSTITUTE OF HEALTH
    SCIENCES

    J.A. MUIR GRAY, CBE, MA (MD Glasgow), FRCP (Glasgow and London),
    has been
    appointed as the first Director of the Institute of Health
    Sciences
    until April 2002.

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    section



    DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL NEUROLOGY

    On the recommendation of the Clinical Medicine Board, the General
    Board has
    assigned the Department of Clinical Neurology to G.C. EBERS (MD
    Toronto),
    Fellow of St Edmund Hall and Professor of Clinical Neurology, for
    a period of
    five years from 1 August 1999.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    E.K. CHAMBERS STUDENTSHIP IN ENGLISH
    LITERATURE 1999

    The Studentship has been awarded to ISOBEL HURST, Lincoln
    College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ROYAL BANK OF CANADA RESEARCH
    SCHOLARSHIP IN
    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 1999

    The Scholarship has been awarded to BEN ROWSWELL, Lincoln
    College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    STUTCHBURY SCHOLARSHIP IN PHARMACOLOGY
    1999

    The Scholarship has been awarded to HELEN C. GODDARD, Somerville
    College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    HARLEY PRIZE OF THE NEW PHYTOLOGIST
    TRUST
    1999

    The Prize has been awarded to LINDA GUTTRIDGE, Wadham College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION IN PHYSICAL
    SCIENCES


    BP Chemicals Ltd. Prize in Chemistry

    The Prize has been awarded to MARK STEPHEN SNOW, Merton College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MATTHEW ARNOLD MEMORIAL PRIZE 1999

    The Prize has been awarded to KIRSTIE BLAIR, St Anne's College.

    Proxime accessit: PHILIP CARDINALE, St Edmund Hall.

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    section



    VIOLET VAUGHAN MORGAN ESSAY PRIZES 1999

    Prizes have been awarded to:

    THOMAS DART, Somerville College

    ALEXANDER KANN, Lady Margaret Hall

    RUFO QUINTAVALLE, Lincoln College


    HELEN RADICE, Lady Margaret Hall

    DAVID SERGEANT, Lincoln College


    ADAM THIRLWELL, New College

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    section



    DECLAMATION PRIZES 1999

    Prizes have been awarded as follows:

    Greek Reading Prize

    First Prize: MARIE LOUISE VON GLINSKI, New
    College

    Second Prize: DAVID SYMINGTON, Brasenose College

    Latin Reading Prize

    First Prize: GABRIELLE HIGGINS, Merton College

    Second Prize: NICHOLAS WILSHERE, Trinity College

    Greek Recitation Prize

    DAVID SLATER, Trinity College

    Latin Recitation Prize

    DANIEL KISS, Corpus Christi College

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    section



    DOOLEY PRIZE IN ANATOMY 1998–9

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to DR CAROLINE COSTELLO and
    DR JAMES
    HAENEY.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    TURBUTT PRIZES 1998–9

    First year

    MISS CHRISTIE E. BAIRD, Worcester College

    PHILIP J. HODGES, Wadham College

    STUART A. NORMAN, Merton College

    MATTHEW A. REES, Lady Margaret Hall

    ALASTAIR J. TYNDALL, Oriel College

    MISS ANNA L. WELLINGS, St Catherine's College

    Second year

    MARTIN R. GALPIN, Keble College

    CASPAR D. GRAF VON MOY, St Hugh's College

    OLIVER J. KUNC, Corpus Christi College

    MISS HELEN K. SMITHIES, Keble College

    MISS EMMA J. SNOW, Jesus College

    PETER J. WELFORD, St John's College

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    section



    HONOUR MODERATIONS IN GEOGRAPHY 1999

    Shell Prizes

    Prizes for the best Fieldwork Notebooks have been awarded to the
    following:

    LEE J. ARNOLD

    GEOFFREY J. BRYANT

    YIUN L. CHONG

    SARAH-JAYNE CLIFTON

    STEVEN P. HAYWOOD

    CHRISTOPHER J. HENDERSON

    JULIA M. HOLGATE

    SARAH J. INGRAM

    BENJAMIN B. LLOYD

    BENJAMIN J. STEPHENS

    CLAIRE H. TOWNSEND

    John House Prize

    The Prize, for the best performance in Honour Moderations, has
    been awarded
    jointly to SARAH J. INGRAM, St Catherine's College, and BENJAMIN
    B. LLOYD,
    Mansfield College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BRITISH TELECOM RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY
    PRIZE 1999

    The Prize has been awarded to DOMINIC K. CHAN, Lady Margaret
    Hall.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    HOARE PRIZE 1999

    The Prize has been awarded to THOMAS G. WRIGHT, St Catherine's
    College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    HONOUR MODERATIONS IN CLASSICS 1999

    Hertford Prize

    The Prize has been awarded to PATRICK FINGLASS, St John's
    College.

    De Paravicini Prizes

    First Prize: KATHARINE BROWN, Corpus Christi College

    Second Prize: LUCIAN HOLLAND, Magdalen College

    Proxime accesserunt: JOANNA ORPIN, Magdalen College,
    and JOHN
    STEVENSON, University College

    Harold Lister Sunderland Prize

    The Prize has been awarded to PATRICK FINGLASS, St John's
    College.

    Proxime accessit: JANE HEATH, Balliol College

    Honourably mentioned: RICHARD ASHBY, Magdalen
    College, and
    JOANNA KOTZIAS, Queen's College

    Comparative Philology Prize

    The Prize has been awarded to PATRICK FINGLASS, St John's
    College.

    Proxime accessit: RICHARD ASHBY, Magdalen College

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MAURICE LATEY TRAVEL AWARD 1999

    The award has been made to BRENDAN DE SILVA, St Antony's College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PAVRY AND WINCHESTER THESIS PRIZES 1999

    The Board of the Faculty of Social Studies proposes to award two
    prizes in
    Michaelmas Term 1999, provided that there are candidates of
    sufficient merit.
    Both of these prizes are awarded for successful theses (M.Phil.,
    M.Litt. or
    D.Phil.) in the faculties of Social Studies, Law, or Modern
    History.

    The Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry Memorial Prize
    (£500)
    is
    for a thesis on a subject in the area of international peace and
    understanding.

    The Bapsybanoo Marchioness of Winchester Prize
    (£500)

    is for a thesis on international relations, with particular
    reference to the area
    of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

    Candidates should apply in writing to Mrs Marga Lyall, Secretary
    to the
    Managers of the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, Centre for
    International
    Studies, Social Studies Faculty Centre, George Street, Oxford OX1
    2RL, not
    later than 12 noon on Friday, 23 July. Applications must include
    a copy of the
    thesis, together with a short abstract, and a letter supplying
    (a) the
    candidate's name, college and degree; (b) the names of
    the
    candidate's examiners and supervisor(s) (not applicable to
    M.Phil. candidates);
    (c) a clear indication for which one of the two prizes
    the candidate
    is submitting the thesis; (d) an address for
    communication should
    the candidate not be returning to the University in Michaelmas
    Term.

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    section



    LANGUAGE CENTRE

    Details of language courses for 1999–2000, including the
    leaflet `Essential
    Registration Information', are now available at the Language
    Centre. They can
    also be obtained from the Information Officer (telephone:
    (2)83360, e-mail:
    admin@lang.ox.ac.uk). Students who require a course of study or
    research
    should obtain priority registration forms from the Registration
    Officer.

    Standard registration (except for English as a Foreign Language)
    will begin
    in noughth week. Places on courses are limited and priority is
    given to
    registered students of the University, and academic staff.
    Non-academic staff
    and spouses of University members should contact the Information
    Officer in
    advance of noughth week to be placed on a waiting list.

    Registered postgraduate students who require a course in English
    as a
    Foreign Language may register from Monday, 6 September. Open
    registration
    for English as a Foreign Language will begin in first week, on
    Monday, 11
    October.

    The Language Centre will be open for private study throughout the
    Long
    Vacation, from 8.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. New users must take a
    library induction
    tour; these normally take place at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

    Full information on Language Centre facilities and resources is
    available on
    the centre's World Wide Web site,
    http://units.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ORIENTAL INSTITUTE AND EASTERN ART
    LIBRARIES

    The Oriental Institute and Eastern Art Libraries will be closed
    on Monday, 19
    July, owing to essential electrical work associated with the
    construction of the
    Sackler Library. The Librarian apologises for the inconvenience
    to
    readers and asks them to refer any particular problems to library
    staff. The
    Institute for Chinese Studies Library in Walton Street is
    unaffected and will
    be open as usual on that day.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OPPORTUNITY 2000: IMPROVING
    OPPORTUNITIES FOR
    WOMEN


    A discussion paper on steps taken by
    the
    University

    Opportunity 2000 was set up with government backing in 1991. Its
    aim was `to
    increase the quality and quantity of women's participation in the
    workforce'.
    Oxford University joined in 1993 with this statement of intent:
    `The University
    is committed to increasing women's participation in all its
    activities. It will
    ensure fair treatment in recruitment and promotion. It will also
    provide
    support for working parents, review conditions of service and
    provide
    facilities to enhance career development for all its staff. This
    statement applies
    to all staff—non-academic, academic-related and academic
    staff, including
    those who are employed on fixed-term contracts and those who work
    part-time.
    Reference is also made to undergraduate and graduate students,
    as potential
    entrants into careers in higher education.'

    Joining Opportunity 2000 required the University to set
    published,
    monitored goals and to draw up action plans to achieve them.
    Although there
    has been little recent publicity about the University's
    achievements in this
    area, significant progress has been made. This discussion paper
    is published
    by the University's Equal Opportunities Committee with two
    aims:

    (i) To inform staff about progress towards our Opportunity
    2000 goals.

    (ii) To seek your ideas on the next steps towards increasing
    opportunities
    for women at Oxford.

    Those interested can contribute to this wider discussion by
    attending one
    of the lunchtime seminars being held around the University this
    summer (see
    schedule of dates below) or, if preferred, by e-mailing the
    University's Equal
    Opportunities Officer (judith.secker@admin.ox.ac.uk).

    Opportunity 2000 Seminars

    (All seminars booked from 12.30 to 2 pm; drinks provided;
    bring a `brown
    bag lunch')

    
    Date                               Venue       
    
    Wednesday, 21 July                 The Harrison Room, Merton
    
    Thursday, 29 July                  Classroom 6, Level 3, Academic
    Centre, the
                                       John Radcliffe
    
    Friday, 6 August                   The Centenary Room, the
    Careers Service
    
    Tuesday, 10 August                 Senior Common Room, St Cross
    Building
    
    Wednesday, 18 August               Room 321, Administrative
    Building,
                                       Wellington Square
    
    Thursday, 26 August                Seminar Room, Pharmacology
         
    
    

    Oxford University Opportunity 2000 objectives

    The goals set in 1993 fell into four main categories: promoting
    commitment,
    recruitment and promotions, conditions of work, and training and
    career
    development.

    Some goals included both short-term and longer-term
    proposals. In this
    context, `short-term' was defined as meaning that the target
    should have been
    met within a period of one or two years; `longer-term' means that
    significant
    progress should have been made by the benchmark year 2000.
    Progress made
    towards each of the goals is reviewed below and your comments and
    ideas
    welcomed.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Promoting commitment

    We said we would:

    —consult on the Opportunity 2000 goals;

    —reaffirm commitment to equality of opportunity at the
    highest levels;

    —work closely with university boards and committees;

    —offer support to colleges.

    To date the University has:

    –consulted widely in 1993, and again with this current
    initiative;

    —won the endorsement of the Conference of Colleges for this
    work;

    —included equal opportunity concerns in the terms of
    reference for
    university committees under the new governance arrangements.

    Should we now:

    —Publicise the University's goals and progress in other
    ways?

    —Develop equal opportunities work with individual
    departments/faculties—perhaps working towards
    departmental/faculty
    goals?; take other initiatives—if so what might these be?

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Recruitment and promotions

    We said we would:

    —research the differences between men's and women's degree
    results and
    take remedial action where appropriate;

    —survey staff for information on gender, ethnic origins and
    disability;

    —monitor the proportion of women applying for posts compared
    with their
    presence in the `recruitment pool', and take positive action
    where necessary;

    —review monitoring procedures and investigate ways of
    extending it to
    promotion, access to training and appointments to university
    boards and
    committees;

    —review the code of practice on equal opportunities in
    appointments and
    the guidance provided on recruitment and selection;

    —provide training in fair selection and the use of selection
    criteria for
    those responsible for both staff and student recruitment;

    —ensure that chairs of selection panels, and as many panel
    members as
    possible, are trained in fair recruitment.

    To date the University has:

    —commissioned the National Foundation for Educational
    Research to
    investigate possible causes of disparity between men and women's
    degree
    results;

    —carried out an annual equal opportunities survey of staff
    (and this year
    set up a working party to address subsequent concerns about
    ethnicity);

    —monitored applications by gender, established those areas
    such as posts
    at the most senior level and some academic disciplines, where
    women may be
    under-represented and begun an analysis of the recruitment-pools
    for those
    areas;

    —revised the code of practice on equal opportunities in 1994
    and 1997;

    —revised the guidance on fair recruitment and selection in
    1994 (further
    up-dating is currently underway);

    —provided annual training courses on staff recruitment and
    student
    admissions and monitored staff selection panels to ensure those
    involved are
    adequately trained;

    —adopted recommendations on governance which should result
    in fairer
    representation of women and made arrangements to monitor the
    proportions of
    men and women on university boards and committees.

    Should we now:

    —Take steps to publish more widely the results of equality
    monitoring—if so how?

    —Take positive action within the law (the Sex Discrimination
    Act permits
    advertisements encouraging women to apply for posts in which they
    are
    under-represented and allows women-only training to be provided
    too)?

    —Take other initiatives on recruitment and selection—if
    so what might
    these be ?

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Conditions of work

    We said we would:

    —review staff terms and conditions to ensure that they do
    not
    unwittingly create barriers to opportunities for women;

    —attempt to develop new, possibly more flexible,
    arrangements if existing
    conditions seem to create unfair barriers for women;

    —review arrangements for dealing with harassment;

    —open a second day nursery for under-fives;

    —promote provision of child-care for school aged
    children;

    —review child-care provision to identify how far needs are
    being met.

    To date the University has:

    —contributed to the national review of staff terms and
    conditions;

    —identified a need for greater flexibility for staff with
    caring
    responsibilities;

    —opened a second day nursery at Bradmore Road;

    —reviewed child-care needs and appointed a child-care
    officer who has
    developed a strategy for increasing the range of provision;

    —established a school holiday playscheme;

    —revised the code of practice and procedures for dealing
    with
    harassment, expanded the Advisory Panel on Harassment and
    re-launched the
    harassment advisory service.

    Should we now:

    —Consider introducing child-care vouchers for staff whose
    children do not
    have a university nursery place?

    —Develop a range of flexible working options to suit
    department and staff
    needs?

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Training and career development

    We said we would:

    —continue to make sure that training course content and
    delivery are
    consistent with commitment to equal opportunities;

    —include equal opportunities information in staff
    induction;

    —provide training for academic staff on issues relating to
    gender and
    teaching;

    —ensure that career development training meets the needs of
    women
    staff;

    —provide equal opportunities training for those who appraise
    other staff.

    To date the University has:

    —revised the induction programme to include information on
    sex, race and
    disability equality;

    —established a successful course on gender and teaching;

    —introduced a course on career review and planning for
    support staff;

    —offered training and consultancy to those who appraise and
    developed
    a model of appraisal which is geared to individual development
    and enables
    equality issues to be aired when necessary.

    Should we now:

    —Provide development opportunities for staff newly eligible
    to join
    university committees—if so, would some women-only courses
    be
    appropriate?

    —Build on the experience of the Women Tutors' Group to set
    up a wider
    network of women at Oxford through which information about
    training could
    be disseminated and women consulted about future developments?

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Next steps in improving opportunities for women

    Oxford's Opportunity 2000 goals were set six years ago. In that
    relatively
    short space of time, many of those goals have been achieved or
    exceeded. A
    few have still to be developed. We welcome your ideas both for
    achieving
    remaining goals and for new objectives to meet the new decade.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ACTION GROUP AT OXFORD ON TEACHING AND
    LEARNING ENHANCED BY NEW TECHNOLOGY (OxTALENT)


    OxTalent Web competition 1999

    The closing date for entries is 6 September (2 p.m.). Full
    details may be found
    at http://info.ox.ac.uk/oxford/seminars/webaward.html.

    OxTalent is running this competition for the second year to
    select and
    highlight the best Oxford Web sites in either of two categories:
    `Supporting
    Students' and `Supporting Staff'.

    Prizes, sponsored by the OUCS, are: for `Supporting Students',
    first prize
    £150, second prize £50; for `Supporting Staff', one
    prize of £100.

    The winner in each category will go forward to the national UCISA
    (Universities and Colleges Information Systems Association)
    competition. Last
    year the Oxford winner took the national prize (see
    http://info.ox.ac.uk/oxford/seminars/web989-Oxwinners.html).

    UCISA offers a prize in each category worth £1,000. Further
    details of
    the UCISA competition can be found at
    http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/docs/webawa.htm.

    Entries for the Oxford competition must comply with the
    requirements defined
    by UCISA—see
    http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/docs/awards/aims2000.htm.

    Nominations should be sent to webaward@ermine.ox.ac.uk, giving
    the Web
    address of the site, the name of the nominating person, and the
    name of the
    owner of the site.

    Enquiries may be directed to Tonia Cope Bowley (e-mail:
    tonia.copebowley@oucs.ox.ac.uk), until 3 August; thereafter,
    until the
    competition closes, to Peter Robinson (e-mail:
    peter.robinson@etrc.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 July 1999: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURE


    Goldsmiths' Professor of English
    Literature

    PROFESSOR HERMIONE LEE will deliver her inaugural lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 October, in Lecture Room 2, the
    St Cross Building. The Vice-Chancellor will be present.

    Subject: `Reading in bed.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PROFESSOR OF POETRY


    Inaugural Lecture and other
    lectures

    The end of the poem

    PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON will lecture at 5 p.m. on the
    following Tuesdays, in the Examination Schools.

    2 Nov.: `The end of the poem: "All
    Souls' Night" by W.B. Yeats.' (Inaugural
    Lecture
    )

    25 Jan.: `The end of the poem: "The
    Literary Life" by Ted Hughes.'

    2 May: `The end of the poem: "The
    Mountain" by Robert Frost.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE AND
    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on the following
    Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn
    School of Pathology.

    Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil.,
    Professor of Pathology.

    PROFESSOR A. BIRD, Edinburgh

    14 Oct.: `Interpretation of the DNA
    methylation signal by methyl CpG binding
    proteins.'

    PROFESSOR C. LEAVER

    21 Oct.: `Genetically modified plants
    and human health.'

    DR M. CLARK, Cambridge

    28 Oct.: `Antibody engineering of human
    IgC not just for clinical applications.'

    PROFESSOR D. MASON

    4 Nov.: `The third function of the
    thymus.'

    DR J. FRAMPTON

    18 Nov.: `c-Myb: an essential
    transcriptional regulator in haemopoietic
    progenitors.'

    M. DILLINGHAM

    25 Nov.: `The worm has turned. Structure
    and mechanism of DNA helicases.'

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    section



    MAGDALEN COLLEGE


    Rowe Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR T. CARTER, Professor of Music, Royal Holloway,
    University of London, will deliver the Rowe Memorial
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 November, in the
    Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Io la Musica son':
    Monteverdi and the problems of opera.'

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    section



    ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

    Colloquium: the history of St Hugh's in the twentieth
    century

    The Association of Senior Members of St Hugh's is holding
    a colloquium on `The history of St Hugh's in the
    twentieth century', on Saturday, 18 September, from 10.30
    a.m. to 4 p.m., at the college. Speakers will include
    Barbara Castle, Colin Matthew, Betty Kemp, Marjorie
    Reeves, and Marilyn Butler. All are welcome. Tickets
    (£25 or £15 for students) include a buffet
    lunch. Enquiries should be made to Trish Carter in the
    Development Office, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE
    (telephone: Oxford (2)74958).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 July 1999: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or
    recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 15 July 1999: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
    SCIENCES


    M.Sc. in Geometry, Mathematical Physics,
    and Analysis 2000

    Corrigenda

    The following list of additional courses in schedule 1 has been
    approved by the standing committee for examination in 2000.

    This list replaces that published in the Gazette of
    17 June, p. 1406.

    Manifolds and Differential Geometry

    Lie Groups

    General Relativity

    Further Quantum Theory

    Algebraic Topology

    General Relativity II

    Quantum Field Theory

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    COMMITTEE FOR THE M.SC. IN NEUROSCIENCE


    M.SC. IN NEUROSCIENCE

    The approved courses available in 1999--2000 for the specialist
    component of the M.Sc. in Neuroscience are listed below.
    Candidates will be required to take five courses, choosing at
    least one under each of the three series A, B, C.

    Series A

    Module A1—Strategies for monitoring and analysing
    neuronal circuits (Hilary Term)

    Organiser: Dr A.J. King.

    Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

    Recording and monitoring

    Manipulation

    Neuroanatomical techniques

    Cortical microcircuitry

    Field potentials in health and disease

    Module A2—Mapping and imaging techniques (Trinity Term)

    Organiser: Professor R. Passingham.

    Eleven lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

    Techniques for functional localisation

    Structural imaging

    Functional imaging

    Series B

    Module B1—Sensory systems (Hilary Term)

    Organiser: Dr Moore.

    Fourteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

    Sensory systems

    Sensory psychophysics

    Artificial vision

    Module B2—Motor systems (Hilary Term)

    Organiser: Professor J.F. Stein.

    Ten lectures (to be confirmed) and associated
    practicals/demonstrations.

    Proprioconception and spinal cord circuitry

    Basal ganglia, cerebellum and motor cortical systems

    Motor psychophysics

    Module B3—Neurocomputing and neural networks (Hilary and
    Trinity Terms)

    Organiser: Professor E.T. Rolls.

    Eight lectures and four practicals.

    Neurocomputing

    Connectionist approaches to cognitive function

    Module B4—Animal models and clinical aspects of
    neuroscience (Trinity Term)

    Organiser: Professor J.N.P. Rawlins.

    Eighteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

    The development and application of animal models

    Consciousness and cognition

    Non-affective neurological disorders

    Series C

    Module C1—Cellular signalling (Hilary Term)

    Organiser: Professor J. Jack.

    Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

    Membranes and channels

    Synaptic transmission and modifiability

    Module C2—CNS development and neuronal plasticity
    (Trinity Term)

    Organiser: Dr J. Taylor.

    Sixteen lectures.

    Early development

    Formation of a nervous system: vertebrate

    Formation of a nervous system: invertebrate

    Axonal growth

    Establishing connections between neuronal populations

    The modifiability of the brain

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    section



    SUPPLEMENTARY SUBJECTS IN THE HONOUR
    SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE 1999–2000

    Until recently approved changes in the Examination Decrees and
    Regulations the availabilityy of Supplementary Subjects in the
    Honour School of Natural Science will henceforward by announced
    on an annual basis in the Trinity Term of the preceding year.
    Subjects will no longer be listed in the published volume of the
    Examination Decrees and Regulations; instead a notice about the
    subjects available in the following year will be published in the
    Gazette in Trinity Term. The notice of availability
    will also be sent to colleges and included in the course
    handbooks for the various Natural Science courses.

    Subjects that will be taught and examined during
    1999–2000

    Anthropology

    Those interested in taking this course should arrange to see
    Professor V. Reynolds, Department of Biological Anthropology
    (telephone: (2)74693) in noughth week of Michaelmas Term.
    Examined: end of Trinity Term.

    History and Philosophy of Science

    Lectures: eight hours in Michaelmas Term, eight hours in Hilary
    Term. Examined: end of Hilary Term.

    Quantum Chemistry

    Lectures: sixteen hours in Michaelmas Term, sixteen hours in
    Hilary Term. Examined: end of Hilary Term.

    The Supplementary Subject Chemical Pharmacology will not be
    available during 1999–2000 but will be available in
    2000–1.

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    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
    regulations made by boards of faculties and committees come into
    effect on 30 July.


    1 Board of the Faculty of Clinical
    Medicine

    Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine

    With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 928, l.
    21, delete

    `Introduction to General Practice' and substitute `Primary
    Health Care'.

    2 Ibid., l. 37, after `his' insert `or her'.

    3 Ibid., p. 929, l. 3, after `Public Health'
    delete `and' and substitute `,'.

    4 Ibid., l. 8, after `his' insert `or her'.

    5 Ibid., l. 20, after `his' insert `or her'.

    6 Ibid., after l. 17, insert:

    `(f) Radiology.'.

    7 Ibid., p. 930, l. 21, after `his' insert
    `or her'.

    8 Ibid., l. 32, after `his' insert `or her'.

    9 Ibid., l. 34, after `himself' insert `or
    herself'.

    10 Ibid., l. 41, after `his' insert `or her'.

    11 Ibid., l. 44, after `he' insert `or she'.

    12 Ibid., l. 45, after `himself' insert `or
    herself'.

    13 Ibid., p. 931, l. 1, after `year' insert:

    `(with the exception of the examiners for the Laboratory
    Medicine course, who shall be required to attend the first
    assessment of candidates on no more than one occasion)'.

    14 Ibid., delete `In the second assessment
    of any candidate' and substitute:

    `In the reassessment of any candidate who has been deemed to
    have failed the whole assessment,'.

    15 Ibid., l. 2, after `he' insert `or she'.

    16 Ibid., l. 10, after `regard to his' insert
    `or her'.

    17 Ibid., l. 10, after `as to his' insert `or
    her'.

    18 Ibid., l. 15, after `he' insert `or she'.

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    section



    2 Board of the Faculty of English
    Language and Literature

    Honour School of English Language and Literature

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
    2001)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 201 (as
    amended by regulation (1) of 21 May 1999, Gazette,
    p. 1179), in cl. 3(a), after `B7 Special Topics' insert
    `(except any Course II papers available under B7() for
    which the Course II regulations specify that these shall be
    assessed by written examination)'.

    2 Ibid., p. 203 (as amended by same
    regulation, Gazette,
    p. 1180), in cl. 7.7 after `(extended essay)' insert footnote as
    follows:

    `This is with the exception of Course II papers available
    under B7() for which the Course II regulations specify
    that these shall be assessed by written examination'.

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    section



    3 Boards of the Faculties of English
    Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

    Honour School of English and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
    2001)

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 192 (as amended by
    regulation (3) of 21 May 1999, Gazette, p. 1182),
    in cl. 2, after `Subject B7 will be examined by extended essay',
    insert:

    `This is with the exception of Course II papers available
    under B7() for which the Course II regulations specify
    that these shall be assessed by written examination'.

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    section



    4 Board of the Faculty of Literae
    Humaniores

    (a) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    p. 245, l. 31, after `Archaeology;' insert `up to two subjects
    in Philology and Linguistics;'.

    2 Ibid., l. 36, delete `V' and substitute
    `VI'.

    3 Ibid., p. 246, l. 21, delete `III.11' and
    substitute `V.1'.

    4 Ibid., delete l. 37.

    5 Ibid., l. 38, delete `III.14(a)'
    and substitute `III.11(a).

    6 Ibid., l. 39, delete `III.14(b)'
    and substitute `III.11(b).

    7 Ibid., after l. 39, insert `V.2: Latin
    Historical Linguistics'.

    8 Ibid., l. 48, delete `VI' and substitute
    `VII'.

    9 Ibid., p. 255, l. 11, delete `III.15 or
    IV.5' and substitute `III.12, IV.5 or V.5'.

    10 Ibid., p. 256, l. 18, delete `15' and
    substitute `12'.

    11 Ibid., ll. 20Ð2, delete from `, save' to
    `Literature'.

    12 Ibid., l. 24, delete `V' and substitute
    `VI'.

    13 Ibid., ll. 25Ð7, delete from `, save' to
    `Literature'.

    14 Ibid., l. 28, delete `15' and substitute
    `12'.

    15 Ibid., p. 262, delete ll. 9Ð30.

    16 Ibid., l. 31, delete `III.14' and
    substitute `III.11'.

    17 Ibid., p. 263, delete ll. 28–33 and
    substitute:

    `III.12 Thesis in Literature

    Any candidate may offer a thesis in classical Greek and Latin
    Literature (excluding the subject in III.11) in accordance with
    Regulation on Theses below. This subject may not be combined with
    any of I.15, II.199, IV.5 or V.5'.

    18 Ibid., p. 264, l. 19, delete `II.199 or
    III.15' and substitute

    `II.199, III.12 or V.5'.

    19 Ibid., after l. 19, insert:

    `V. Philology and Linguistics

    Course I and Course II: Candidates may offer one or two of the
    following subjects 1Ð5. Each of subjects 1Ð4 will be examined in
    one paper (3 hours).

    V.1 Greek Historical Linguistics

    The paper will consist of two sections: (a) the dialects
    of Greek poetry; Greek dialect inscriptions; Linear B;
    (b) the history of the Greek language with special
    reference to the development of the literary languages.
    Candidates must answer questions from both sections. In
    (a) compulsory passages will be set for translation and
    linguistic commentary.

    V.2 Latin Historical Linguistics

    The paper will consist of two sections: (a) Oscan and
    Umbrian; Archaic Latin; the language of Plautus; Imperial Latin;
    Late Latin; (b) the history of the Latin language, with
    special reference to the development of the literary languages.

    Candidates must answer questions from both sections. In
    (a) compulsory passages will be set for translation and
    linguistic commentary. All candidates must answer questions from
    two of the five parts of (a). Lists and/or reproductions
    of the texts prescribed for section (a) are available
    from the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square.

    V.3 General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

    This paper will be divided into three sections: (a)
    General Linguistics; (b) synchronic/descriptive analysis
    of either the Greek language or the Latin language; (c)
    the reconstruction of Indo-European. Candidates must answer
    questions from two sections.

    V.4 Comparative Philology: Indo-European, Greek and Latin

    The paper will consist of two sections: (a) the methods
    and aims of historical and comparative linguistics, the
    reconstruction of the Indo-European protolanguage and its
    development into Latin and Greek (the questions set will require
    specific competence in one of the two classical languages, but
    not necessarily both); (b) linguistic commentary on
    passages of Greek or Latin. Candidates must answer questions from
    both sections.
    This subject may not be offered by any candidate who offered the
    Special Subject Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology
    in Honour Moderations in Classics or in the Preliminary
    Examination in Classics.

    V.5 Thesis in Philology and Linguistics

    Any candidate may offer a thesis in Philology and Linguistics in
    accordance with the Regulation on Theses below. This subject may
    not be combined with any of I.15, II.199, III.12 or IV.5.'

    20 Ibid., l. 20, delete `V' and substitute
    `VI'.

    21 Ibid., l. 22, delete `V.1 and V.2' and
    substitute `VI.1 and VI.2'.

    22 Ibid., l.30, delete `V.1' and substitute
    `VI.1'.

    23 Ibid., l.35, delete `V.2' and substitute
    `VI.2'.

    24 Ibid., l.40, delete `VI' and substitute
    `VII'.

    25 Ibid., l. 46, delete `and Special Theses
    (VI)' and substitute `Philology and Linguistics (V.5) and Special
    Theses (VII)'.

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    section


    (b) Pass School of Literae Humaniores

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 269, l. 15, delete
    `V' and substitute `VI'.

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    section



    5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
    Humaniores and English Language and Literature

    Honour School of Classics and English

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    p. 140, l. 15, delete `III.11' and substitute `V.1'.

    2 Ibid., l. 17, delete `III.12' and
    substitute `V.2'.

    3 Ibid., l. 21, delete `III.13' and
    substitute `V.3'.

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    section



    6 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
    Humaniores and Medieval and Modern Languages

    Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    p. 149, l. 18, delete `III.14(a)' and substitute
    `III.11(a)'.

    2 Ibid., l. 20, delete `III.14(b)'
    and substitute `III.11(b)'.

    3 Ibid., l. 34, delete `III.11' and
    substitute `V.1'.

    4 Ibid., l. 37, delete `III.12' and
    substitute `V.2'.

    5 Ibid., l. 45, delete `III.13' and
    substitute `V.3'.

    6 Ibid., p. 150, l. 37, delete
    `III.14(c)' and substitute `III.11(c)'.

    7 Ibid., l. 50, delete `V.1 and V.2' and
    substitute `VI.1 and VI.2'.

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    section



    7 Board of the Faculty of Modern
    History

    Honour School of Modern History

    With immediate effect (for first examination in 2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    p. 301, ll. 11Ð12, delete `including footnotes and references but
    excluding bibliography' and substitute `excluding footnotes,
    references, and bibliography'.

    2 Ibid., l. 28, after `Essays', insert `(two
    copies)'

    3 Ibid., l. 28, delete `5 p.m.' and
    substitute `12 noon'.

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    section



    8 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Literae Humaniores

    Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

    With immediate effect (for first examination in 2000)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 7 above).

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    section



    9 Board of the Faculty of Theology

    (a) Honour School of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
    2001)

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from p. 503,
    l. 19 to
    p. 515, l. 48, and substitute:

    `1. All candidates will be required to offer eight papers.
    Candidates must select one from each of the Core Subjects in
    Section A (A.I–IV), and four from any ONE of the Alternative
    Tracks in Section B (B.I–III).

    2. In Alternative Track B.I two papers, and
    in Alternative Tracks B.II and B.III one paper, may be chosen
    from amongst those not already offered in Section A, Section B
    (subject to any restrictions specified in each Alternative
    Track), and Section C (the Schedule of Further Optional
    Papers). With the permission of the Board an essay may be
    offered, either in place of one of these papers, or in addition
    to the eight required papers. The regulations governing essays
    are set out below.

    3. Candidates not offering paper (29) The New
    Testament in Greek, or (25) The Hebrew of the Old Testament as
    optional
    papers in Section B may, in addition to their eight papers, also
    offer the Optional Translation papers in Old Testament Hebrew
    and/or New Testament Greek.

    4. In Section B (the Alternative Tracks
    B.IÐIII) and in Section C (the Schedule of Further Optional
    Subjects) teaching may not be available every year on every
    subject.

    5. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.

    6. In the following regulations, the English
    version of the Bible used will be the Revised Standard Version.
    The Greek text used will be the text of the United Bible
    Societies,
    fourth edn., but in paper (3), The Synoptic Gospels, parallel
    texts will be taken from K. Aland, Synopsis Quattuor
    Evangeliorum (fifteenth edn., Stuttgart, Deutsche Bibel
    Gesellschaft, 1997). The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia
    Hebraòca Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).

    SECTION A: CORE SUBJECTS

    Candidates must offer ONE paper from EACH of the Core Subjects

    A.I to A.IV below.

    A.I THE OLD TESTAMENT

    All candidates must offer either paper (1) or paper (2).

    (1) Israel to the end of the Exile

    The paper will include historical, literary, and theological
    questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages
    from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at
    least three of the five groups of texts:

    (a) Exodus 1–3; 6; 12–15; 19; 20; 24.

    (b) Isaiah 1–12; 28–32.

    (c) Psalms 2; 18; 45–8; 72; 74; 77; 89; 93; 110;
    132;
    137.

    (d) 2 Kings 18–25.

    (e) Ezekiel 1–18.

    There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew
    from:

    Exodus 20; 24.

    Psalms 45–8.

    Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in
    Biblical Hebrew.

    (2) Israel from the beginning of the Exile to 4 BC

    The paper will include historical, literary, and theological
    questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages
    from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at
    least three of the five groups of texts:

    (a) Job 1–14; 38–42.

    (b) Nehemiah 1; 1–11; 2; 13.

    (c) Jonah; Ruth.

    (d) Daniel.

    (e) Isaiah 40–55.

    There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew
    from:

    Nehemiah 4–5.

    Isaiah 40–1.

    Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in
    Biblical Hebrew.

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    section


    A.II THE NEW TESTAMENT

    Candidates who choose Track B.I must offer paper (3). Candidates
    who choose Tracks B.II or B.III must offer paper (4), unless they
    are offering paper (7) as an optional paper, in which case they
    must offer paper (3).

    (3) The Synoptic Gospels

    Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of the
    Synoptic Gospels, their theology and ethics, literary and
    historical problems, and historical research concerning Jesus,
    and to comment on a passage in Greek from Matthew, and on a
    passage in Greek with English supplied from Matthew 3–13
    inclusive with parallels in Mark and/or Luke. Candidates may
    restrict their comment to English texts if their other papers
    include translation and/or comment on at least two passages of
    Hebrew.

    (4) The Theology and Ethics of the New
    Testament
    (with special reference to the gospels of
    Matthew and John, Romans, and I Corinthians).

    Questions will be set on the theology of the individual gospels
    (not just those specified), Pauline theology, the historical
    Jesus, the ethics of the New Testament, and the different methods
    of New Testament interpretation.

    There will be a compulsory question containing passages for
    comment from Matthew, John, Romans and 1 Corinthians, printed in
    both Greek and English. Candidates will be required to comment
    on at least three of the set texts. Candidates who have not
    passed either paper 6 (New Testament Greek) or paper 7 (Biblical
    Hebrew) in the Preliminary Examination for Theology will have to
    translate and comment on passages from Matthew 5–7,
    26–28 and John 1–6 which will be printed only in Greek,
    unless their other
    papers include translation and/or comment on at least two
    passages of Hebrew.

    The passages printed only in Greek will be optional for all
    other candidates.

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    section


    A.III PATRISTICS

    All candidates must offer paper (5)

    (5) The Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to AD 451

    Candidates will be expected to explain how early Christian
    thinkers undertook to clarify the teachings of the primitive
    Church and formulate a coherent system of thought in their
    cultural context. The paper will not only concern itself with
    formal pronouncements on the doctrines of the Trinity and
    Incarnation, but also with other controversies and the
    contributions of particular theologians.

    Questions relevant to the Gnostic, Arian, Nestorian and
    Pelagian controversies will always be set; other questions may
    relate, wholly or partly, to such topics as anthropology,
    soteriology, hermeneutics, ecclesiology, political theology, and
    the doctrine of creation and the fall. Candidates will be
    required to comment on quotations from the following texts,
    demonstrating, where appropriate, a knowledge of the history of
    the following terms: ousia, hypostasis, homoousios, prosopon,
    persona.

    The Creed of the Synod of Nicaea (in W.G. Rusch, The Trinitarian
    Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

    The Second Letter of Cyril to Nestorius (in R.A. Norris, The
    Christological Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

    The Tome (letter) of Leo the Great (in Norris).

    The Definition of the Council of Chalcedon (in Norris).

    Credit will be given to candidates who show knowledge (where
    appropriate) of the other texts contained in Norris.

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    section


    A.IV CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE AND INTERPRETATION

    All candidates must offer paper (6)

    (6) Christian Doctrine and Interpretation

    The paper will consist of questions on the major themes
    of Christian Doctrine and the norms and methods of Christian
    Theology. Candidates will be expected to show a critical
    understanding of twentieth-century theological discussion, and
    its use of the Bible and traditional formulations, and of some
    of the problems posed for such discussions by modern intellectual
    developments.

    SECTION B: ALTERNATIVE TRACKS

    Candidates must offer four papers from ONE of the Alternative
    Tracks B.I, B.II, and B.III below.

    ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.I

    Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

    ONE paper being Paul and John (paper 7);

    ONE chosen either from whichever of papers (1) or (2) has not
    been offered for Section A.I, or from amongst the following
    papers in Section C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers:

    Selected Topics (Old Testament) I;

    Selected Topics (Old Testament) II; The Hebrew of the Old
    Testament; Archaeology in relation to the Old Testament;
    Religions and Mythology of the Ancient Near East; and
    Varieties of Judaism 100 BC to AD 100;

    and TWO papers not already offered chosen from amongst the papers
    in Sections A and B (except paper 4 and any other papers that are
    otherwise prohibited by the regulations) and those in C, the
    Schedule of Further
    Optional Papers.

    (7) Paul and John

    Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the
    theological, ethical, literary, and historical issues posed
    by (a) the Gospel of John, and (b) Romans
    and/or 1 Corinthians. They will be required to comment on
    passages from these texts in English, and will have the
    opportunity to translate and comment on John 1–10; Romans
    3–8; and 1 Corinthians 1–7; 15 in Greek.

    ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.II

    Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

    ONE from papers (8), (9), and (10) below;

    ONE major theologian (an option from paper 11);

    ONE chosen from either papers (12) and (13) below or a second
    major theologian (another option from paper 11);

    and any ONE paper not already offered chosen from amongst the
    papers in Sections A and B (except those that are otherwise
    prohibited by the regulations) and those in C, the Schedule of
    Further Optional Papers. Candidates are not permitted to take the
    following combinations of papers; (3) and (4), and (4) and (7).

    (8) The History and Theology of Western Christianity,
    1050–1350

    The paper will consist of questions on the thought of the leading
    theologians (especially Anselm, Peter Abelard, Aquinas, Duns
    Scotus, and William of Ockham), and of questions on the main
    developments in the western church. It will be so set that any
    period of 150 years, with its theological writers, will provide
    sufficient coverage.

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    section


    (9) The History and Theology of Western Christianity,
    1500–1619

    The subject includes the work and thought of the leading
    reformers, especially Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, together with
    the radicals, and the development of the Reformation in European
    society. Questions will be set both on renewal in the Roman
    Catholic Church, and on religious change in England from the
    Henrician reforms to the reign of James I.

    (10) Candidates may offer EITHER

    A. Christian Life and Thought In Europe, 1789–1914

    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the life and
    thought of the Christian Church (with special reference to
    Britain) and the development of Christian theology in its
    historical context. Candidates will be given
    opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of the following texts:

    F.D.E. Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion

    L. Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity

    S. Kierkegaard, Philosophical Fragments

    J.H. Newman, Lectures on the Prophetical Office

    A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation, vol. III.

    OR

    B. Christology from Kant to Troeltsch 1789–1914

    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the impact of
    modern philosophy and of cultural and historical criticism on
    Christology, as reflected in some of the following writers: Kant,
    Schleiermacher, Hegel, Strauss, Baur, Kierkegaard, Thomasius,
    Ritschl, Kèhler, Nietzsche, Harnack, Wrede, Schweitzer,
    Kautsky and Troeltsch. Candidates will be required to comment on
    a selection of the following texts:

    I. Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Harper
    Torchbooks, 1960), pp. 85–138

    F.D.E. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark,
    1956), pp. 374– 475

    G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, ed. P.C.
    Hodgson (University of California Press, 1985), vol. III, pp.
    310–347

    D.F. Strauss, The Life of Jesus Critically Examined, ed. P.C.
    Hodgson (Fortress, 1972), pp. 40–63 and 757–84; The
    Christ of
    Faith and the Jesus of History, ed. L.E. Keck (Fortress, 1977),
    pp. 19–37 and 159–69.

    C. Thomasius, Christ's Person and Work, Part 2: The Person of the
    Mediator, in God and Incarnation in Mid-Nineteenth Century German
    Theology, ed. C. Welch (Oxford University Press, 1965), pp.
    31–88
    A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation (T. and T. Clark,
    1900, reprint 1966), vol. III, pp. 385–484

    M. Kähler, The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historic
    Biblical Christ, ed. C.E. Braaten (Fortress, 1964), pp.
    46–97.

    E. Troeltsch, `The Significance of the Historical Existence of
    Jesus for Faith' in Ernst Troeltsch: Writings on Theology and
    Religion, ed. R. Morgan and M. Pye (Duckworth, 1977), pp.
    182–207

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    section


    (11) Further Studies in History and Doctrine

    Candidates will be expected to study one major theologian in
    relation to the situation and problems of the time, with special
    attention to certain texts. In the Trinity Term of each year the
    Board of the Faculty of Theology will publish a list of
    theologians (with texts) on which teaching will be provided in
    the following academic year and
    on which the examination will be based. In the event of a
    candidate opting to take a year out after having studied a chosen
    theologian, the examiners will set questions on that theologian
    in the year of that candidate's examination, even if that
    theologian is not available for study that year. Texts will be
    studied in English. One or two additional questions may be set
    which will require knowledge of the texts in original languages
    when these are other than English.

    A candidate may offer a second major theologian from amongst
    those available in the year of his or her examination. In the
    event that a candidate does choose to offer a second major
    theologian, that candidate will offer paper 11 as two papers. To
    facilitate this, separate papers (11(a), 11(b)
    etc.) will be set for each major theologian (as required by
    examination entries).

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    section


    (12) Philosophy of Religion

    Candidates will be expected to analyse theological and
    religious language and concepts, and to include the historical
    and critical study of the following: the possibility of natural
    theology; the nature and grounds of religious belief; the idea
    and existence of God; religious views of the universe and of
    humanity's place in it. (`Religion' includes, but is not
    restricted to, the Christian religion).

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    section


    (13) Christian Moral Reasoning

    Candidates will be expected to elucidate and assess themes in the
    Christian tradition of ethical teaching and their contribution
    to contemporary moral and social debates. The paper will consist
    of four sections (a) Christian Moral Concepts;
    (b) Government and its tasks: (c) Medical
    Ethics: (d) Sexual Ethics. Candidate will be required
    to answer three or four questions, of which at least one question
    must be answered from section (a), and at least one from
    another section.

    (a) Christian Moral Concepts

    The major moral concepts in Christian thought, such as: love,
    natural and revealed law, the supreme good, conscience, virtues,
    sin, justification, and grace; and contribution to contemporary
    discussions. Candidate may treat questions on these subjects
    primarily with reference to their sources in the Bible, if they
    so wish.

    (b) Government and its tasks

    Theological interpretations of: justice, law, and authority;
    forms of government, local, national, and international;
    government, society, and the church; the coercive use of force
    in punishment and war; responsibilities for education,
    employment, economy, and environment.

    (c) Medical Ethics

    Such topics as: the doctor–patient relationship and its
    social context; planned parenthood, contraception, and abortion
    in both personal and social contexts; artificial
    reproduction, genetic manipulation; experimentation on humans;
    organ transplantation; priorities in treatment and research; the
    prolongation of life, terminal care, and the ending of life.

    (d) Sexual Ethics

    Such topics as: celibacy, the goods of marriage, the
    sacramentality of marriage, divorce, polygamy, homosexuality, the
    sexual sins, the social differentiation of the sexes, the
    connection of body and soul in sexual contexts, erotic affection.

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    section


    ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.III

    Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

    ONE paper being The Nature of Religion (paper 14);

    TWO papers on any one non-Christian religious tradition (i.e.
    EITHER papers (15) and (16) on Judaism; OR papers (17) and (18)
    on Islam; OR papers (19) and (20) on Buddhism; OR papers (21) and
    (22) on Hinduism).

    ONE paper not already offered, chosen from amongst the papers in
    Sections A and B (except those that are otherwise prohibited by
    the regulations) and those in C, the Schedule of Further Optional
    Papers. Candidates are not permitted to take the following
    combinations of papers; (3) and (4), and (4) and (7).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (14) The Nature of Religion

    The paper will consist of questions on the main classical and
    contemporary approaches to the study of religions; the main
    attempts to define religion; differing approaches to the study
    of religion in anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and theology;
    and the major explanations that have been offered for religious
    belief. Candidates should be aware of issues involved in claims
    for religious truth and rationality, and of
    twentieth-century-discussions of religious conflict and
    diversity.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (15) Judaism I: The Formation of Rabbinic Judaism

    The paper will include the study of:

    (a) Judaism in the first century. Rabbinic Judaism
    emerges from matrix of movements (Sadducees, Essenes, Samaritans,
    Christians) laying claim to the authority of the
    Hebrew Scriptures.

    (b) Primary sources of rabbinic Judaism:
    Mishna/Tosefta; Targum; Midrash; liturgy. Acceptance of the
    Mishna as authoritative code. The `eclipse' of the Alexandrine
    Jewish intellectual tradition of Philo.

    (c) Development of the primary sources in the
    Talmudim of Babylonia and the Land of Israel, noting the
    Zoroastrian and Pagan/Christian environments respectively.
    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in
    English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the
    Faculty of Theology in the eighth week of
    the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the
    examination.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (16) Judaism II: Judaism in History and Society

    Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the
    following three sections covered by the paper:

    (a) The Gaonic period in Islamic Babylonia. Final
    redaction of
    the classical texts. Development of the liturgy. Internal Jewish
    debates on the calendar and between Rabbinates and Karaites.
    Confrontation with other faiths, with rationalist philosophy,
    with serious critiques of both scripture and the rabbinic
    tradition. The following will be set for special study: Saadia
    Gaon; the impact of Geniza studies.

    (b) From Maimonides to the Zohar; tensions between
    rationalist philosophers and kabbalists in the High Middle Ages.
    The shift of the `centre of gravity' in Judaism from Babylonia
    to the West. Effects of the Crusades, the
    Inquisition, and the Renaissance on Judaism.

    (c) The impact of Jewish thought and society of the
    Enlightenment and the Emancipation. The growth of Hasidism in the
    eighteenth and Reform in the nineteenth century will be studied
    as a preliminary to an examination of the range of Jewish sects
    or denominations today. The contemporary Jewish scene; responses
    to the Holocaust, to the establishment of the State of Israel,
    to the women's movement. This paper may only be offered by
    candidates also offering paper 15.

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    section


    (17) Islam I: the Formative Period of Islam

    This paper examines the Islamic tradition as it emerged from the
    seventh to the twelfth centuries, paying particular attention to
    the issue of religious authority. Topics include: scripture,
    Islamic law, sectarianism, and political thought. Students will
    be required to read primary sources in English translation
    (Qur'an, Hadith; law, political thought) and critical secondary
    literature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such
    texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of
    the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic
    year preceding the examination.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (18) Islam II: Islam in the Modern Middle East

    This paper examines the development of Islam as a religion in the
    modern Middle East. Special attention is paid to Islamic
    religious thought. Topics include: the historical and political
    contexts; new interpretations of traditional sources; Islamic
    movements; Islamic modernism. Students will be required to read
    English translations of primary texts as well as secondary
    sources. This paper may only be offered by candidates also
    offering paper 17
    .

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (19) Buddhism I: Early Buddhist Doctrine and Practice

    The earliest Buddhist doctrine is studied against the background
    of the early Upanishads and other religious movements in
    north-east India about the fifth century bc. Practice includes
    both meditation and monastic life. The primary source is the Pali
    Canon supplemented by the commentarial literature of the
    Theravadin tradition. Candidates will be expected to show
    knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are
    prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the
    Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (20) Buddhism II: Buddhism in History and Society

    The paper falls into two main parts. The first part covers
    the history of Buddhism's diffusion through Asia, beginning with
    the emperor Asoka (third century bc); what forms of Buddhism have
    dominated which states and
    societies (and when), and their main similarities and
    differences; the development of Buddhist institutions. The second
    part deals with Buddhism in modern Asia. This paper may
    only be offered by candidates also offering paper 19.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (21) Hinduism I: Brahmanism

    The paper will include the study of the traditions of practice
    and belief that are held to rest on the authority of Vedic
    revelation, namely the Vedas proper (including the Upaniads), the
    Dharmasastras, the Epics, and the Puranas. They will be expected
    to understand the difference
    between the Srauta, Smarta, and Paurnnika domains of observance,
    the manner of their coexistence, and the relevant aspects of the
    Brahmanical institutions of the joint family, caste, and the
    stages or alternative forms of the religious life. In the field
    of doctrine they will be examined on the soteriologies of the
    Mimamsaka ritualists and the principal traditions of Upanis.adic
    exegesis, namely the Advaita of Sakara and his followers, the
    Visistadvaita of the Srivaisnnavas, and the Dvaita of the
    Madhvas.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (22) Hinduism II: Saivism, Vaisnavism, and Modern Hindu
    Movements

    The paper will include the study of the practices and beliefs of
    those who based their religious life on the authority of
    scriptures which they held to have been revealed by Siva or Visnu
    as teachings above the level of the Vedas. In the field of
    Saivism they will be expected to know the essentials of the
    observances and theologies of the Pasupatas and Saiddhantika
    Saivas, the practices of the Bhairava and Sakta (Kaula) systems,
    the doctrines of the Kashmirian exegetes of the cults of Bhairava
    and Kali the Tamil tradition of Saiva devotion, and Vira saivism.
    In the field of Vaisnavism they will be expected to show
    knowledge of the Pancaratra and the traditions of devotion to
    Krsna. They will also be expected to be familiar with the major
    Hindu religious movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. This
    paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 21.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    SECTION C: SCHEDULE OF FURTHER OPTIONAL PAPERS

    (23) Selected topics (Old Testament) I

    Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of
    the following topics. They will be required to comment on
    passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard
    Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the
    Hebrew text of certain specified chapters and sections.

    (i) Prophecy

    1 Samuel 9; 10

    2 Samuel 7

    1 Kings 13; 18; 22

    Isaiah 1; 5–8; 10; 40; 42–4; 49; 51–3; 55

    Jeremiah 1–5; 7–9; 11; 12; 26–8; 31

    Ezekiel 1–4; 8–11; 14; 18; 20; 23; 36; 37

    Amos 1–5; 6–9

    Zechariah 1–8; 13

    Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

    1 Kings 13; 18; 22

    Isaiah 42–4

    Amos 1–5

    (ii) Apocalyptic

    Isaiah 24–7

    Daniel

    Zechariah

    1 Enoch 1–16 (ed. H.F.D. Sparks, The
    Apocryphal Old Testament, OUP, 1984)

    2 Esdras 3–14

    Revelation

    Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

    Isaiah 24–7

    Zechariah 9–14

    (24) Selected topics (Old Testament) II

    Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of
    the following topics. They will be required to comment on
    passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard
    Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the
    Hebrew text of certain selected chapters and sections.

    (i) Wisdom

    Proverbs 1–9; 22:17–31:31

    Job 1–19; 38–42

    Ecclesiastes

    Wisdom of Solomon 1–9

    Ecclesiaticus (Sirach) Prologue; 1:1–25:12;
    36:18–43:33; 51

    Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

    Proverbs 1–9

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    section


    (ii) Worship and Liturgy

    Exodus 12–15; 19; 20; 24

    Leviticus 1–7; 16

    Deuteronomy 12–18

    1 Kings 5–8

    1 Chronicles 16

    Psalms 2; 18; 24; 27; 47–51; 68; 72; 78; 89; 95–100;
    110; 113–118; 122; 124; 126; 128; 130–2

    A.E. Cowley, Aramaic Papyri of the Fifth Century bc (OUP, 1923),
    nos. 21; 30–4

    Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

    Exodus 19; 20; 24

    Leviticus 16

    Psalms 24; 95–100

    (25) The Hebrew of the Old Testament

    Candidates will be required to show a general knowledge of the
    language, with a special study of the following prose texts from
    which passages will be set for translation and comment:

    Genesis 6–9

    Exodus 20; 24

    1 Kings 17–2 Kings 2

    Nehemiah 4–6

    Candidates will also be given an opportunity to show knowledge
    of Hebrew verse, and especially of the following texts, from
    which passages will be set for translation and comment:

    Joel

    Psalms 1;23; 24; 45–8; 96

    Isaiah 40–5

    Candidates who do not offer Hebrew verse will not thereby be
    penalised.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (26) Archaeology in relation to the Old Testament

    The subject includes the geography of Palestine and of the
    neighbouring lands; the history of the development of Canaanite,
    Hebrew and Jewish social life and culture; the history of places
    of worship and their furniture; and
    the general results of recent archaeological research in the
    Ancient Near East, insofar as they throw light on these subjects.

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    section


    (27) Religions and Mythology of the Ancient Near East

    The paper will include a wide range of questions. The following
    texts are prescribed for special study:

    (a) Akkadian Myths and Epics: The Epic of Gilgamesh
    (standard version) and the Creation Epic, in S. Dalley, Myths
    from Mesopotamia (OUP, 1989), pp. 50–125, 233–74.

    (b) Hittite Myths: The disappearance of Telepinu
    (version 1), The Song of Kumarbi, in H.A. Hoffner, Hittite Myths
    (Scholars Press, 1990), pp. 14–17, 40–3.

    (c) Egyptian Myths, Hymns and Prayers: in M.
    Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature (Berkeley, University of
    California Press, 1975–80), vol. I, pp. 51–7,
    131–3; vol. II,
    pp. 81–132, 197–9, 203–23.

    (d) Ugaritic Myths: Baal and Yam, The Palace of Baal,
    Baal and Mot, in J.C.L. Gibson, Canaanite Myths and Legends
    (second edn., T. and T. Clark, 1978)

    (e) The Sefire Inscriptions, in J.C.L. Gibson,
    Textbook of Syrian Semitic Inscriptions, vol. II (OUP, 1975) pp.
    18–56.

    (f) Philo of Byblos' Phoenician History, in H.W.
    Attridge and R.A. Oden, Philo of Byblos, The Phoenician History
    (Catholic Biblical Association of America, 1981).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (28) Luke–Acts, Epistles and Apocalypse

    Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the
    following three sections, including comment questions on the
    English passages selected, where the text will be that of the
    Revised Standard Version. The Greek texts also set for
    translation and comment (from United Bible Societies, fourth
    edn.) are optional.

    (a) Luke–Acts, with Luke 19–24 and Acts
    1–15 set in
    English for comment, and Luke 19–24 set in Greek for
    optional translation and comment.

    (b) The Pauline corpus (thirteen epistles), with
    Galatians, Philippians and Ephesians set in English for comment,
    and Galatians set in Greek for optional comment.

    (c) Hebrews to the Apocalypse, with Hebrews and 1
    John set in English for comment and Hebrews 1–2 and 1 John
    set in Greek for optional comment.

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    section


    (29) The New Testament in Greek

    Candidates will choose passages for translation from amongst a
    number taken from the Greek New Testament and will be required
    to show a knowledge of the critical and theological issues
    involved in some of the passages they translate. The text used
    will be that of the United Bible Societies, fourth edn. The
    selection of passages set will allow this detailed knowledge to
    be limited to the following texts and chapters: Acts 20–6,
    Colossians, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, Hebrews 7–10, James, 1
    and 2 Peter, Revelation 1–12. But there will also be
    opportunity to show such detailed knowledge outside these
    specified chapters.

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    section


    (30) Varieties of Judaism 100 BC–AD 100

    The paper will include a number of general questions and the
    following texts are prescribed for special study:

    Set texts in English:

    Qumran Community Rule, Commentary on Habakkuk, in G.
    Vermes, The Dead Sea Scrolls in English (second edn., Pelican
    Books 1975).

    Josephus, Jewish War II (Loeb, 1956); Antiquities XVIII,
    1–119 (Loeb, 1965); Against Apion II, 145–296 (Loeb,
    1956).

    IV Ezra, ed. B.M. Metzger in J.H. Charlesworth, ed., The Old
    Testament Pseudepigrapha (Darton, Longman and Todd,
    2 vols., 1983, 1985).

    Testament of Moses, ed. J. Priest, in Charlesworth, op. cit.
    Wisdom of Solomon (Revised Standard Version).

    Philo, Migration of Abraham, Life of Moses I, 1–84 (Loeb
    1958)

    Joseph and Aseneth, ed. C. Burchard, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

    Psalms of Solomon VIII, IX, XVII, tr. S.P. Brock in H.F.D. Sparks
    (ed.), The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP 1984).

    1 Enoch 37–71, tr. M.A. Knibb in Sparks,
    op. cit.

    Sibylline Oracles III, ed. J.J. Collins, in Charlesworth, op.
    cit.

    Any or all of the following texts may be offered in the original
    languages:

    Qumran Community Rule 1–4, in E. Lohse (edn.), Die Texte aus

    Qumran, Hebräisch und Deutsch (second ed., Darmstadt,
    Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1971).

    Qumran Commentary on Habakkuk, ed. E. Lohse, op. cit.

    Josephus, Antiquities XVIII, 1–28, 63–4, 109–19
    (Loeb 1965).

    Philo, Life of Moses I, 1–44 (Loeb 1958).

    Joseph and Aseneth, in M. Philonenko ed., Joseph et AsÄneth
    (E.J. Brill, 1968).

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    section


    (31) The Beginnings of the Church and its Institutions to AD
    170

    Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the history,
    worship, and institutions of the church in this
    period, including baptism, eucharist, forms of ministry, models
    of the church, house-churches, heresy and orthodoxy, apostolic
    tradition, appeals to scripture, relations with the synagogue,
    marriage, communications, diet. They will be required to comment
    on passages from the following texts in English translation:

    Set Texts:

    Ephesians, 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus, Jude, 1 Clement (Loeb
    Apostolic Fathers I 1912) Chs. 1–6, 36–65.

    Epistles of Ignatius (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I 1912) to The
    Ephesians, Smyrneans, Philadelphians.

    The Didache (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I 1912).

    The Epistle of Barnabas (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I 1912).

    Ptolemy's Letter to Flora. New Eusebius ed. J. Stevenson
    (revised ed. 1983).

    Shepherd of Hermas, Vision 3 (Loeb Apostolic Fathers II 1913).

    Justin First Apology 31–41, 61–7 (1997) L.W. Barnard
    in

    Ancient Christian Writers Vol. 56 (Paulist N.Y. 1997).

    Justin Dialogue with Trypho 47, 90–111 (Ante-Nicene
    Fathers rp. 1989).

    The following may also be offered in Greek:

    1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Ignatius to the
    Ephesians (Loeb):

    Didache 7–16 (Loeb); Justin First Apology 61, 65–7 (ed.
    M.Marcovich 1994).

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    section


    (32) Early Liturgy

    Candidates will be expected to study the rites of initiation and
    the eucharist with the development of the Christian liturgical
    year up to AD 451 and the theology of liturgical worship in the
    light of anthropological, sociological, artistic and linguistic
    considerations.

    The following texts are set for special study:

    E.C. Whitaker, Documents of the Baptismal Liturgy (second edn.,
    SPCK, 1970), pp. 1–19, 30–41, 44–50, 83–5,
    127–33.

    R.C.D. Jasper and G.J. Cuming, Prayers of the Eucharist: Early
    and Reformed (third edn., Pueblo, 1987), pp. 7–12,
    20–44, 52–81, 88–113, 129–37, 143–67.

    E.J. Yarnold, The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation (second edn.,

    T. and T. Clark, 1994) pp. 70–97.

    J. Wilkinson, tr. and ed., Egeria's Travels (SPCK, 1971),
    pp. 123–47 (section 24 to the end).

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    section


    (33) Early Syriac Christianity

    Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of
    symbolism in the theology of the early Syriac Church.

    The following texts are prescribed for special study:

    Odes of Solomon 6, 11, 17, 19, 21, 24, 30, 36, 42, tr. J. Emerton
    in H.F.D. Sparks.

    The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984)

    Acts of Thomas, secs. 1–29, 108–14, tr. A.F.J. Klijn
    (E.J. Brill, 1962)

    Aphrahat, Demonstrations 1, 4, 6, 12 (Dem. 1 and 6 tr. in

    J. Gwynn, ed. Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers
    II.13 (1898, repr. W.B. Eerdmans, 1956), Dem. 4, tr. S.P. Brock,
    The Syriac Fathers on Prayer and the Spiritual Life (1987), ch.
    1; Dem. 12, tr. in J. Neusner, Aphrahat and Judaism (E.J. Brill,
    1971))

    Ephrem, Sermon on Our Lord, tr. in E. Mathews and J. Amar, St
    Ephrem the Syrian.

    Selected Prose Works (1994);

    Hymns on the Nativity, nos. 1 and 2, tr. K. McVey, St Ephrem the
    Syrian. Hymns (Classics of Western Spirituality, 1989);

    Hymns on Faith, No. 10, Hymns on the Church, No. 36; Hymns on
    Epiphany, Nos. 1 and 6; tr. S.P. Brock in T. Finn, Early
    Christian Baptism and the Catechumenate (1992).

    The hymns, tr. S.P. Brock, The Harp of the Spirit: Eighteen Poems
    of St Ephrem (Fellowship of St Alban and St Sergius, second edn.
    1983).

    Letter to Publius, tr. S.P. Brock, Le MusÄon (1976)
    Book of Steps, Homily 12, tr. R. Murray, Symbols of Church and
    Kingdom (CUP, 1975).

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    section


    (34) Backgrounds to Early Christianity 30–529 AD

    Candidates will be expected to answer questions from two of the
    following sections, showing detailed knowledge of aspects of life
    and thought in the Roman Empire which are relevant to the
    understanding of the New Testament and early Christianity.
    Passages for comment will be set in English from the prescribed
    texts in all five sections. Texts will be read in the Loeb
    Classical Library edition, unless otherwise indicated.

    (a) Exegesis. Jewish, Christian and pagan forms of
    exegesis. The distinction between literal, tropological and
    psychagogic approaches. Theories of translation. Formation of
    canons.
    Philo of Alexandria, Who is the Heir of Divine Things?
    Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, Book II. ed. and trans. R.P.
    Green (Clarendon Press 1995)

    (b) Philosophy. The doctrines of the major schools.
    Philosophy and life. Relations between Christians and
    philosophers. The place of apologetic and polemic in philosophy.
    Epictetus, The Enchiridion (in vol. 2 of the Loeb edition)
    Plotinus, Enneads I.8

    (c) Religion. Personal, ethnic, civil and mystery
    religions. The place of religion in life. Rituals and images.
    Hierarchy and gender. Attitudes of political authorities to
    religion.

    Apuleius, Metamorphoses (Golden Ass), Book 11.

    Aristides of Athens, Apology. Ed. and trans. J. Armitage

    Robinson, Texts and Studies 26–44, 1891.

    (d) Literature. Rhetoric and education. Genre in
    pagan and Biblical literature. Christian knowledge of Greek and
    Latin classics. The production, circulation and readership of
    ancient books.

    Quintillian: selections in D.A. Russell and M. Winterbottom,
    Ancient Literary Criticism (OUP 1972), 372–422.

    Basil of Caesarea, On how a young man ought to read Greek
    literature (Letters, vol. 4 in Loeb edition).

    (e) Society. Labour and wealth. Ethnicity and gender.
    Attitudes to the body and sexuality. Hellenization and Romanitas.

    Clement of Alexandria, On the Rich Man's Salvation (in vol. 2 of
    the Loeb edition).

    Tertullian, De Spectaculis.

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    section


    (35) History and Theology of the Church in the Byzantine
    Empire from AD 1000 to AD 1453

    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the constitution
    and worship of the Church; monasticism; the development of
    mystical theology; the relations between Church and state and
    with the Western Church.

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    section


    (36) English Church and Mission 597–754

    Candidates will be expected to study the main lines of the
    history of the English Church in this period, and some
    aspects of its theology. There will also be an opportunity
    to study works of art. Candidates will be expected to have
    studied the texts in Group I, on which alone gobbets will be set,
    and in at least one of sections (a), (b),
    (c) in Group II.

    Group I

    (a) Bede Ecclesiastical History of the English
    People, Preface, Bks I, 23–4; II; III; IV; V, 9–10, 19.
    (trans. L. Sherley-Price,
    revised R.E. Latham, with introduction and notes by
    D.H. Farmer, Penguin Classics, 1990) pp. 41–3, 72–265,
    278–82, 300–06.

    (b) Bede's Letter to Egbert, trans. D.H. Farmer,
    ibid., pp. 337– 51.

    (c) Bede: On the Temple, trans. S. Connolly, in J.
    O'Reilly (Liverpool University Press: Translated Texts for
    Historians 21, 1995), Prologue and Book I to I, 8.4, pp.
    1–33; Book II, 18.8 to 20.9, pp. 76–100.

    (d) Eddius Stephanus, Life of Wilfrid in The Age of
    Bede, (ed. D.H. Farmer, trans. J. Webb, Penguin Classics 1988)
    pp. 105–82.

    (e) `The Dream of the Rood', in A Choice of
    Anglo-Saxon Verse, ed. and trans. R. Hamer (Faber 1970), pp.
    161–71.

    Group II

    (a) Adomnan of Iona, Life of St Columba, ed. and
    trans. R. Sharpe, (Penguin Classics, 1995)

    (b) Bede, Life of Cuthbert, in The Age of Bede
    (Penguin Classics, 1988), pp. 41–102.

    Bede, Lives of the Abbots of Wearmouth and Jarrow, ibid., pp.
    185–208
    Bede's Homily on the Gospel for the Feast of St Benedict Biscop,
    in Bede, Homilies on the Gospels, trans. L.T. Martin and D.
    Hurst, Preface by B. Ward, (Cistercian Studies Series, 110,
    1991), pp. 125–32.

    Letters of Aldhelm, in Aldhelm, The Prose Works, trans. M.
    Lapidge and M. Herren (Boydell and Brewer, 1979), pp.
    152–70.

    (c) Willibald's Life of St Boniface and The
    Correspondence of
    St Boniface, in C.H. Talbot, The Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in
    Germany, (Stead and Ward, 1954), pp. 25–62, 65–149.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (37) Christian Spirituality

    Candidates will be expected to discuss Christian prayer in its
    theological, psychological and historical aspects, paying
    particular attention to contemplation and mystical prayer. There
    will be four groups of texts, and candidates will be expected to
    have studied two of them.

    (a) Patristics

    Gregory of Nyssa, The Life of Moses, Book 2, tr. A.J. Malherbe
    and E. Ferguson, The Classics of Western Spirituality
    (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1978) pp. 55–137.

    Ps.-Macarius, Homilies 1, 5, 15, tr. G.A. Maloney, The Classics
    of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1992)

    Evagrius Ponticus, The Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer.
    (Translations available in Faculty Library)

    Ps.-Dionysius the Areopagite, The Mystical Theology.
    (Translations available in Faculty Library)

    (b) English Fourteenth-century Mysticism

    The Cloud of Unknowing, tr. J. Walsh, The Classics of Western
    Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1981)

    Julian of Norwich: Revelations of Divine Love, tr. E. Colledge
    and J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/ Paulist
    Press 1978)

    (c) Spanish Mysticism

    Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle, tr. Allison Peers in
    Complete Works, vol. II (Sheed and Ward, 1946), pp. 199–351
    John of the Cross, Living Flame of Love, second redaction, tr.
    Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. III (3 vols in one,
    Anthony Clarke, 1978) pp. 103–95.

    (d) The Wesleys and William Law

    Texts in A.C. Outler, ed., John Wesley, Library of Protestant
    Theology (OUP 1964), pp. 197–231, 251–98 (i.e. Sermons
    on Justification by Faith and on The Witness of the Spirit;
    Discourse II on The Law Established by Faith; Sermon on Christian
    Perfection; The Scripture Way of Salvation; Thoughts on Christian
    Perfection.)

    E.H. Sugden, ed., The Standard Sermons of John Wesley, vol. II
    (7th edn. Epworth Press, 1968). Sermons 32 (The Nature of
    Enthusiasm), 34 (Catholic Spirit), 39 (New Birth), 40 (Wilderness
    State).

    H.A. Hodges and A.M. Allchin, A Rapture of Praise: Hymns of John
    and Charles Wesley (Hodder and Stoughton, 1966). The following
    hymns: 3, 9, 22, 27, 38, 54, 55, 81, 84, 90, 105, 118, 124, 126,
    131.

    William Law: The Spirit of Prayer: Part 1, ed. S. Spencer (James
    Clarke, 1969)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (38) The Sociology of Religion

    The paper will consist of two parts. Candidates will be
    expected to answer at least one question from each part.

    (a) Texts

    Candidates will be expected to know at least two of the
    following in detail:

    (i) K. Marx, Theses on Feuerbach and The German
    Ideology ch. 1, ed. C. Arthur (Lawrence and Wishart, 1985),
    together with Capital, chapters 1 and 13 (Penguin Books, 1990)

    (ii) E. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life
    (Allen and Unwin, 1976)

    (iii) M. Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of
    Capitalism (Harper Collins, 1991)

    (iv) E. Troeltsch, The Social Teaching of the Christian
    Churches (2 vols., J. Knox, 1992)

    (v) Religion and History, ed. Adams (T. and T. Clark, 1991)

    (vi) Talcott Parsons, Action Theory and the Human Condition
    (New York, 1978)

    (b) Themes

    Candidates will be expected to be able to discuss the following
    issues in their relation to religious formations: class, gender,
    race, legitimation, power structures, violence, sects and cults.
    Questions will be set on sociological readings of other parts of
    the Theology syllabus, including Biblical studies, doctrine and
    Church history. Familiarity with contemporary sociological
    discussion will be assumed.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (39) Psychology of Religion

    The paper will cover theories about aspects of behaviour or
    experiences relevant to religion and the empirical evidence on
    these theories. Psychological research methods and their
    applicability to different aspects of religion such as
    conversion, prayer, worship. Cognitive and non-cognitive (i.e.
    psychoanalytic and affective) accounts of religion. Normal and
    abnormal religious behaviour. Origin and
    development of religious concepts. Moral development. Constructs
    of theological psychology (e.g. soul; conscience, sin and guilt;
    repentance; forgiveness; mercy) and their status in contemporary
    psychology. Psychology applied to pastoral concerns: religious
    education; marriage; health; death and bereavement; substance
    abuse.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (40) The Bible: Its Use and Influence

    Candidates for this paper will be expected to have an
    understanding of the authority and role of the Bible in
    theological and ethical discussion and in Christian practice and
    liturgy. There will also be an opportunity to consider theories
    of interpretation, the use of the Bible in non-academic as well
    as academic contexts, and visual, dramatic and musical, as well
    as literary explorations of the Bible. A wide range of questions
    will be set, allowing candidates to concentrate on particular
    periods and issues. The Board (through the Handbook for Students
    in the Final Honour School of Theology) may prescribe for more
    detailed study the interpretation of one or more biblical texts.
    The paper will be examined by three hour written examination and
    short essay of not more than 3,000 words.

    (41) Any other subject that may be approved by the Board of
    the Faculty of Theology from time to time by regulation published
    in the Gazette and communicated to college
    tutors by the end of the first week of the Trinity Full Term in
    the academic year preceding the examination in which the option
    will be available.
    Optional translation papers (2 hours each)
    The translation components of papers (25), The Hebrew of the Old
    Testament, and (29), The New Testament in Greek, may be offered
    individually as optional extra papers by candidates who are not
    taking one or both of the full papers.



    Regulations concerning essays

    1. In Alternative Track B.I two papers, and
    in Alternative Tracks B.II and B.III one paper, may be chosen
    from amongst those not already offered in Section A, Section B,
    and Section C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers, subject
    to the restrictions specified in each Alternative Track. A
    candidate may offer an extended essay in place of either one of
    these papers, as specified in the regulations governing his/her
    Alternative Track, or in addition to the eight required papers,
    provided that prior approval of the subject has been obtained
    from the Board of the Faculty of Theology. Candidates should in
    general aim at a length of 10,000 words, but must not exceed
    15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices, but
    excluding bibliography).

    2. The candidate's application should be
    submitted through and with the support of his or her college
    tutor or the tutor with overall responsibility for his or her
    studies, from whom he or she should seek guidance on whether the
    subject is likely to be acceptable to the Board.

    3. The Board's approval must be sought not
    later than Friday in the fourth week of Trinity Full Term in the
    year preceding the examination. The request for approval should
    be addressed to the Secretary of the Board of the Faculty of
    Theology, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford. The
    request must be accompanied by a letter from the tutor stating
    that this subject has his or her approval.

    The application should include, in about 100 words, an
    explanation as to how the topic will be treated, and a brief
    bibliography.

    4. The candidate is advised to have an
    initial discussion with his or her tutor regarding the proposed
    field of study, the sources available, and the method of
    presentation. He or she may also have one further discussion with
    his or her tutor on his or her approach to the subject. His or
    her tutor may also read and comment on a first draft.

    5. The subject of the essay need not fall
    within the areas covered by the papers listed in the Honour
    School of Theology. It may overlap any subject or period on which
    the candidate offers papers, but the candidate is warned against
    reproducing the content of his or her essay in any answer to a
    question in the examination. Subject to the provisions of cl. 4
    above, every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect
    that the essay is his or her own work and that it has not already
    been submitted (wholly or substantially) for a final honour
    school other than one involving Theology, or another degree of
    this University, or a degree of any other institution. This
    certificate shall be presented together with the essay. No essay
    shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being
    submitted for any prize of this University.

    6. The candidate must submit one typed copy
    of the essay (bound or held firmly in a stiff cover), addressed
    to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Theology,
    Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday
    of the eighth week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which
    he or she is presenting himself or herself for examination. The
    certificate signed by the candidate in accordance with cl. 5
    above must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed
    to the Chairman of the
    Examiners at the above address at the same time as the essay is
    submitted.

    7. The provisions of these regulations will
    also apply to candidates submitting an extended essay as part of
    paper (40).'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (b) Pass School of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
    2001)

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 516, delete from
    `1 (Israel to the beginning of the Exile)' on l. 9, to
    `1789–1914' on l. 15 and substitute: `1 (Israel to the end
    of the Exile), 2 (Israel from the beginning of the Exile to 4
    BC), 3 (The Synoptic Gospels), and 4 (The Theology and Ethics of
    the New Testament); and at least one from amongst papers 5 (The
    Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to ad 452), 6
    (Christian Doctrine and Interpretation), 8 (The History and
    Theology of Western Christianity 1050–1350), 9 (The History
    and Theology of Western Christianity 1500–1619) and 10
    EITHER (Christian Life and Thought in
    Europe 1789–1914) OR (Christology from Kant to Troeltsch
    1789–1914).'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (c) Bachelor of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2001)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    p. 525, l. 14, delete `either' and substitute `seventh'.

    2 Ibid., p. 529, ll. 43–4, delete `not
    later than the Friday of the fifth week of Michaelmas Term in the
    academic year in which he intends to take the examination'.

    Ibid., delete from `Not later than' on l. 47 to `his study' on
    l. 50, and substitute `The candidate shall submit his study'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    10 Boards of the Faculties of Theology
    and Literae Humaniores

    Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
    2001)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    p. 490, l. 48, delete `artificial insemination; eugenics' and
    substitute `artificial reproduction; genetic manipulation'.

    2 Ibid., ll. 7–8, delete `(except paper
    3)'.

    3 Ibid., after l. 8, insert `Candidates will
    be permitted to take paper 7 in place of paper 4 provided that
    they also offer paper 3'.

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    section



    11 Committee for Archaeology

    Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    p. 133, l. 36, after `... Anthropology and Geography.', insert:

    `To encourage a wide-ranging understanding of archaeology and
    anthropology, options shall be chosen in such
    a way that they constitute two independent, non-
    overlapping subjects.'

    2 Ibid., p. 134, after l. 47 (as amended by
    Gazette, 24 September 1998 and a subsequent
    editorial change), insert:

    `(r) The Archaeology of Minoan Crete: 7000–700 BC

    Because of the potential overlap in subject matter, approval will
    not be given to candidates who wish to select either two of
    papers 7(f), 7(g) or 7(j), or both
    papers 7(k) and 7(l).'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    12 Committee on Continuing Education

    Advanced Diplomas in Archaeological Practice and British
    Studies (Language and Society)

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
    delete from p. 979, l. 25 to
    p. 980, l. 8.

    2 Ibid., p. 981, after l. 24 after the decree
    establishing the course, insert:

    `Archaeological Practice

    1. Course

    (a) The course will consist of lectures, classes,
    seminars and tutorials in Archaeological Practice. The course,
    which is available on a part-time basis only, will normally be
    taken over a period of two, and no more than five, years.

    (b) The subjects of the course of study will include:
    pottery; human bones; animal bones; environmental evidence;
    metals; aerial photographs; flints; geophysical and surface
    surveying; landscape and maps; lithics; other sources of data and
    information; aspects of computing.

    2. Every candidate will be required to
    satisfy the examiners in the following:

    (a) Attendance at the taught courses and at one
    week's prescribed practical fieldwork;

    (b) Assignments based on the taught courses and
    practical fieldwork;

    (c) One long assignment of up to 5,000 words
    (excluding appendices);

    (d) A dissertation of up to 10,000 words (excluding
    appendices) on a topic agreed by the Board of Studies.
    Assignments under 2 (b)–2 (c) and the
    dissertation under (d) will be forwarded to the
    examiners for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall
    determine and shall notify candidates.

    3. Candidates may be required to attend a
    viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies.

    4. The examiners may award a distinction to
    candidates for the Advanced Diploma.

    5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the
    examiners in the assignments under 2 (b)–2
    (c), or the dissertation under

    2 (d), or both, may be permitted to
    re-submit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination
    which they have failed for examination on not more than one
    occasion which shall normally be within one year of the initial
    failure.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    British Studies (Language and Society)

    1. Course

    (a) The course will consist of lectures, tutorials,
    and classes in the culture of Britain, with accompanying study
    in English language. Every candidate must take the course under
    the supervision of the Committee of Continuing Education for at
    least one year. Such study shall be pursued at Oxford.

    (b) The course will consist of four core subjects as
    follows:

    (i) Pre-sessional course

    (ii) English language

    (iii) British Studies

    (iv) Extended essay option

    2. Candidates will normally be expected to
    pass an examination at the end of the pre-sessional course before
    being permitted to proceed to the remainder of the course.

    3. In addition, every candidate will be
    required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

    (a) A written portfolio of exercises based on the
    contents of the English language course, which will be of no more
    than 10,000 words in total;

    (b) Six assignments based on the theoretical courses
    in British Studies, each of a maximum of 2,000 words, which will
    in total be not more than 10,000 words;

    (c) An extended essay normally of between 4,000 and
    5,000 words in length (the limit to include notes) on a topic
    related to one of the core subjects of study.

    Assignments under 3(a)–(c) will be
    forwarded to the examiners for consideration by such dates as the
    examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

    3. Candidates may also be called for viva
    voce examination.

    4. The examiners may award a distinction to
    candidates for the Advanced Diploma.

    5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the
    examiners in the any part of the examination may be permitted to
    re-submit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination
    which they have failed for examination on not more than one
    occasion which shall normally be within one year of the initial
    failure.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    13 Joint Committee for Human Sciences

    (a) Preliminary Examination in Human Sciences

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 82 (as amended
    Gazette No. 4510, 6 May 1999, p. 1184), cl. 1, under
    `Paper 3. Society, Culture, and Environment', delete

    `One three-hour paper will be set, on which candidates will
    be required to answer four questions. The paper will be divided
    into two sections: (a) Social and Cultural Anthropology,
    which will account for two-thirds of the paper, and (b)
    Human Geography, which will account for one-third of the paper.
    Candidates will be required to display knowledge of both
    sections.'

    and substitute

    `One three hour paper will be set. The paper will be divided
    into two sections: (a) Social and Cultural Anthropology,
    and (b) Human Geography. Candidates will be required to
    display knowledge of both sections, and will be required to
    answer at least two questions from section (a) and at
    least one question from section (b).'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (b) Honour School of Human Sciences

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
    Michaelmas Term 2001)

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 230, after l. 33
    (as amended by Gazette No. 4510, 6 May 1999, p.
    1184, col. 1), delete

    `There will be...Final Honour School Examinations,' and
    substitute

    `There will be a practical examination for paper 4, Demography
    and Population, in which candidates will be
    required to demonstrate their ability to interpret demographic
    measures and to apply quantitative skills to demographic
    problems. The practical examination will count for 25 per cent
    of the marks available for paper 4, and will be combined with the
    marks obtained in the Final Honour School examinations for this
    paper. The Chairman of Examiners will be responsible for
    notifying the candidates of the arrangements for the examination
    which will take place in the Michaelmas Term preceding Final
    Honour School examinations.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

    The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave
    to E. MARTIN, Hertford, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor
    of Medicine.

    The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled:
    `Endovascular therapy in peripheral vascular disease'.

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    section



    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE

    The Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences has granted leave
    to T.N. PALMER, Wolfson, to supplicate for the
    Degree of Doctor of Science.

    A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available
    at the University Offices.

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    section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
    OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and
    committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Anthropology and Geography

    Z.G. EL-KHOURI KLINK, Exeter: `Beyond the tantur: female attire
    traditions in nineteenth-century Mount Lebanon'.

    Pitt Rivers Museum, Monday, 19 July, 10.30 a.m.


    Examiners: R. Barnes, M. Pavaloi.

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    section


    Biological Sciences

    M. GAL, St Hilda's: `Development of "in vivo
    expression technology" (IVET) and its use to isolate
    Pseudomonas fluorescens genes induced in the plant
    rhizosphere'.

    Department of Plant Sciences, Tuesday, 3 August, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: I.R. Moore, P.S. Pook.

    N.K. KAKKER, Wolfson: `Studies on bovine leukemia virus GAG
    polyprotein: assembly and compatibility with other
    retroviruses'.

    Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wednesday, 21 July,
    2 p.m.


    Examiners: A.J. McMichael, A. Burney.

    C.H. LAWRIE, Trinity: `The molecular basis of tick–host
    interactions'.

    Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 16 July, 9.30 a.m.


    Examiners: R.B. Sim, R. Kaufman.

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    section


    Clinical Medicine

    P. FIELD, St Cross: `The effects of insulin resistance on
    chylomicron metabolism'.

    Green College, Tuesday, 20 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: R.D. Evans, B.L. Knight.

    K.A. NITHI, Green College: `Mapping the cortical representation
    of upper limb muscles in man using transcranial magnetic
    stimulation'.

    Department of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Wednesday,
    28 July, 3 p.m.


    Examiners: P.M. Matthews, S. Boniface

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    section


    Law

    A. ROSLER, St Hugh's: `The authority of the state and the
    political obligation of the citizen in Aristotle'.

    Examination Schools, Thursday, 22 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M. Philp, J. Gardner.

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    section


    Literae Humaniores

    L.S. FOTHERINGHAM, Christ Church: `Repetition and unity in four
    of Cicero's judicial speeches'.

    Examination Schools, Wednesday, 29 July, 11.30 a.m.


    Examiners: C.S. Kraus, D.H. Berry.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Modern History

    E. FORD, Trinity: `Italian Renaissance design processes: theory
    and practice, observations of geometric and numerical design
    systems'.

    Department of the History of Art, Thursday, 22 July,
    2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: M.S. Kwint, F. Ames-Lewis.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Physical Sciences

    P.K. HOPKINS, Wadham: `Novel tripodal ligands designed to complex
    anions'.

    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 20 July, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, P. Pringle.

    G. JACOB, St Catherine's: `Quantifying regional left
    ventricular function using spatio-temporal tracking
    techniques'.

    Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 28 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J.M. Brady, R.W. Prager.

    J.F. LIBBY, Hertford: `The study of E+ E-
    —>M+M—[delta] and the
    measurement of trilinear gauge couplings at LEP2 using the Delphi
    detector'.

    Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Monday, 26 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A.R. Weidberg, J.C. Thompson.

    I.D. ROZDILSKY, Trinity: `3-D atomic-scale characterisation of
    growing precipitates'.

    Department of Materials, Monday, 26 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J.M. Titchmarsh, D. Blavette.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Physiological Sciences

    M.J. ROBBINS, Pembroke: `Effects of post-translational
    modifications of metabotropic glutamate receptors on
    receptor function'.

    Department of Pharmacology, Wednesday, 28 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D.R. Wing, R. Clegg.

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    section


    Social Studies

    S. EVERTS, St Antony's: `Adaptation in foreign policy: French and
    British reactions to German unification'.

    Wolfson, Monday, 27 September, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: A. Deighton, R. Morgan.

    C. MADGE, St Hugh's: `The Utopia as ethical thought
    experiment'.

    Nuffield, Friday, 23 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D.L. Miller, B. Goodwin.

    M. QVORTRUP, Brasenose: `Constitutional implications of the use
    of the referendum'.

    Nuffield, Friday, 23 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D.E. Butler, I. Budge.

    S. SKAR, Christ Church: `The British Conservative Party and
    European supranational integration, 1948–55'.

    Examination Schools, Thursday, 29 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M.E. Ceadel, A. Forster.

    C. WALLACE, Nuffield: `Evolutionary game theory in the social
    sciences'.

    Wadham, Monday, 26 July, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A.W. Beggs, M.W. Cripps.

    YI LEE WONG, Nuffield: `Family strategies: a study of
    intergenerational mobility in Hong Kong'.

    Institute for Chinese Studies, Monday, 27 September, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: F.N. Pieke, F. Devine.

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    section


    Committee for Comparative Philology and General
    Linguistics

    NAM-KIL KANG, Somerville: `Reflexives and the linking theory in
    universal grammar'.

    Examination Schools, Thurday, 5 August, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D.F. Cram, H. Hoji.

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    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 July 1999: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    OBITUARIES


    Corpus Christi College

    HIS HON. JOHN ROBINS WARDE, MA, 14 June 1999; commoner
    1938–40.
    Aged 79.

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    section



    St Hugh's College

    ANNIE MARY CARRUTHERS (née Morton), 20 June 1999;
    commoner 1931–4. Aged 90.

    SHEILA CATLYN HORKO (née Pridmore), 21 June
    1999;
    commoner 1936–9. Aged 80.

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    section



    ELECTIONS


    New College

    To Honorary Fellowships:

    CHARLES JOHN PERRIN, MA, Vice-Chairman, S.G. Hambros Bank &
    Trust
    Ltd.

    PROFESSOR IOAN MACKENZIE JAMES, MA, D.PHIL., FRS, Savilian
    Professor of Geometry Emeritus

    SIR MICHAEL (FRANCIS) ATIYAH, OM, KT., MA, PH.D., FRS, FRSE,
    Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge

    PROFESSOR SIR ROGER JAMES ELLIOTT, KT., MA, D.PHIL., FRS,
    Professor of Physics Emeritus

    PROFESSOR IAN MALCOLM DAVID LITTLE, CBE, AFC, MA, D.PHIL.,
    FBA,
    Professor of Economics of Underdeveloped Countries 1971–6

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    section



    Nuffield College

    To a Visiting Fellowship:

    MARTIN HARRY WOLF, MA,
    M.PHIL.,
    Associate Editor, The Financial Times

    To a non-stipendiary Research Fellowship:

    PATRICK
    DELBERT
    SCHMIDT (BA Minnesota, PH.D. Johns Hopkins), Centre for
    Socio-Legal
    Studies

    To Associate Membership:

    GEOFFREY FRANCIS DUDLEY (B.SC. London, MA Keele), Centre for
    European
    Politics, Economics, and Society

    SONIA PAULINE MAZEY, D.PHIL. (BA Leicester), Lecturer,
    Hertford
    College

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    section



    Oriel College

    To a Tutorial Fellowship in Physics (until HT 2000):

    PEDRO
    GIL FERREIRA, MA (Licendiado in Physics, Lisbon, PH.D. London)

    To the Isobel Laing Postdoctoral Fellowship in Biomedical
    Sciences:

    ERNEST ANDREW BOEHM, MA, D.PHIL.

    To the Hargreaves Senior Scholarship (from MT 1999):

    OLIVER
    POOLEY, BA

    To the Chaplaincy (from MT 1999):

    THOMAS HENRY CORFE
    MEYRICK, MA

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    section



    St Hilda's College

    To Honorary Fellowship (with immediate effect):

    MRS CATHERINE STEVENSON, BA

    PROFESSOR SUSAN GREENFIELD, MA, D.PHIL., FRS

    To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in English (from 1
    October 1999):

    MARGARET KEAN, MA, D.PHIL.

    To a Peacock Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Chemistry
    (from
    1 October 1999):

    LORNA JOYCE SMITH, MA, D.PHIL.

    To a Tucker Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Biochemistry
    (from 1 October 1999):

    SUSAN MARY LEA, MA, D.PHIL.

    To a Supernumerary Fellowship in Fine Art (from 1 October
    1999):

    SERA FURNEAUX (BA Maidstone, MA Royal College of Art)

    To a Rhodes Research Fellowship (from 1 January 2000):

    PULENG ALINA THETELA (BA Lesotho, MA Edinburgh, MA, PH.D.
    Liverpool)

    To a Schoolteacher Fellowship (HT 2000):

    MARGARET ANNE
    BURROW (BA Open, M.SC. Leeds), St Ninian's High School, Douglas

    To a Schoolteacher Fellowship (TT 2000):

    ANNE MARIA
    GUINAMARD (BA Dublin, B.SC. Open), Highdown School, Reading

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    section



    Trinity College

    To an Official Fellowship in Engineering Science (with effect
    from 1 October 1999):

    ALEXANDER KORSUNSKY, D.PHIL. (B.SC.,
    M.SC.
    Moscow), Lecturer in Materials Engineering, University of
    Newcastle
    upon Tyne

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    section



    WYCLIFFE Hall

    To a Tutorship in Ethics (part-time, from September
    1999):

    THE REVD ANDREW GODDARD

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    section



    PRIZES


    St Hugh's College

    Elizabeth Francis Prize:

    SARAH LOUISE BIDDLE


    Trinity College

    Stirling Boyd Prize:

    MELISSA CATHERINE CARSON

    JULIAN MARC ELLACOTT

    Cozens Hardy Moot Prize:

    KATE LOUISE FARRINGTON

    SARAH CATHERINE MARY GOVETT

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 July 1999: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to advertise in the
    Gazette


    Terms and
    conditions of
    acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    Tuition Offered

    Piano tuition: experienced teacher. Adults and
    children. All
    standards. Beginners welcome. Jericho. Tel.: Oxford 510904.

    Spanish lady (28), with degrees from the
    Universities of
    Barcelona and Paris, would like to give tuition/conversation in
    Spanish and
    French. She has experience with children, young students working
    for their
    exams or retakes, and mature students who wish to enjoy a new
    language. Tel.:
    Oxford 559408, e-mail: lantano@telelinc.es.

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    Services Offered

    SigmaMetrics. Consultants in statistics for the
    design of
    scientific experiments and clinical projects, grant applications,
    sample size
    calculations, data analysis, teaching and the improving of higher
    theses, chapters
    for books and manuscripts for submission to learned journals.
    Assistance also
    given with statistical peer review. Special projects undertaken
    by our higher
    graduate statisticians who are also graduates in medicine or
    biology. For further
    details, visit our Web site at www.sigmametrics.co.uk, or e-mail
    Dr N.T. James,
    B.Ch., BM, MA, M.Sc. (Oxon.) with initial enquiries and
    requirements. E-mail:
    n.t.james@sigmametrics.co.uk.

    Long-established Oxford builder (25 years).
    Property
    maintenance, renovations, extensions. Every aspect of the
    building trade covered.
    Free estimates. Academic references available. Richard Edwards.
    Tel.: Oxford
    343562.

    Town and Country Trees: professional tree
    surgeons. All aspects
    of arboriculture undertaken including orchard and shrub pruning,
    planting,
    hedge trimming, stump grinding, etc. Quality work at competitive
    prices. We are
    fully insured. For a free quotation, call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.:
    01869 351540.

    Personal Computer Consultants: we offer expert
    advice and
    tuition for both hardware and software. On-site service at home
    or in the office.
    We provide upgrades for most computers, or alternatively we now
    supply our
    range of personally-built to your own specifications K Tec
    computers. We will also
    supply or source software to match your requirements. For a
    quality service
    matched with competitive prices, contact Chris Lewis, tel.:
    Oxford 461222, fax:
    461333.

    Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New York to
    Newmarket. Today,
    tomorrow, next week? All the best options are at Mail Boxes Etc.
    Will collect from
    college, home, factory, or elsewhere. Also 24-hour photocopying,
    secure mailboxes,
    computer workstation, high-grade colour photocopying, faxing,
    laminating,
    binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7DL.
    Contact Justin
    Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
    summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

    Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
    specialises in
    assisting professionals and small businesses with tax problems
    including self-
    assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. To receive further
    information
    please tel.: Oxford 513381, e-mail: 100430.145@compuserve.com.

    Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the
    University
    Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material,
    typesetting, printing, and
    finishing. Output Bureau provides high-quality output from disc
    from all major
    DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour-separated positive or
    negative film;
    high-quality specialist colour copier service. For service,
    quality, and competitive
    prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great
    Clarendon Street,
    Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Retail Services

    Retirement? Graduation? Anniversary? We have a
    selection of
    Oxford or Bodleian-related items suitable for that special gift:
    some can be
    customised. Prices from
    £13.95 to £425. Consult our shop staff or tel.: Oxford
    (2)77091 or
    (2)77216. Open Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sat. 9
    a.m.–12.30 p.m., or
    see the Bodleian Shopping Arcade at
    http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/arcade/.

    The History House. Mail order bookshop:
    discounts available on
    all subjects. Post free in the UK. Research and Information
    Service. Enquiries to
    The History House, The Old Brewery, Priory Lane, Burford, Oxon.
    OX18 4SG. Tel.:
    01993 824754, fax: 01993 824129, e-mail:
    judith@history.u-net.com.

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    Domestic Services

    Nanny share offer: we seek a family who need a
    wonderful,
    reliable, experienced nanny. She has worked for us for over 6
    years. We would
    like our two schoolboys to share her after school and holidays
    with a family who
    need her full-time for baby/younger children. Lives out, own car,
    non-smoker,
    fabulous references. Tel.: Oxford 558583.

    Barnett House crèche: afternoon sessions
    currently
    available. A non-profit-making independent nursery for children
    from 6 months
    to 4 years in central North Oxford. Two experienced carers
    provide a happy and
    stimulating environment for a maximum of 6 children at any one
    session. Creative
    skills are encouraged and a wide range of toys and activities
    available. Tel.:
    Oxford 552366 (weekday daytimes, except Aug.) or 245089 for
    further details.

    Twenty-year-old Polish girl student seeks au
    pair position with
    friendly family for the month of Aug. She will be willing to
    accompany you if you
    are taking a holiday somewhere in Britain. Tel.: Oxford (2)70969
    (day), or 552729
    (evening/weekend).

    Nanny or shared nanny required to look after one
    child after
    school, with the possibility of further work during school
    vacations. Contact
    Professor Craig. Tel.: Oxford 277340 (w), or 01608 811145 (h).

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
    Grimebusters, your local
    specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic,
    commercial, college. Also
    carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood
    cleaning/drying,
    oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice,
    call Grimebusters.
    Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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    Situations Vacant

    Maison Française d'Oxford requires a
    bilingual
    Receptionist/Secretary, from 1 Sept. Candidates should be young,
    dynamic,
    motivated, and flexible, with good word-processing skills in both
    English and
    French. Good salary, 9 weeks' annual holiday. Applications, inc.
    a c.v. and the
    names and addresses of two referees, to the Bursar, Maison
    Française,
    Norham Road, Oxford OX2 6SE. Fax: Oxford (2)74225, e-mail:
    maison@sable.ox.ac.uk.

    Political research opportunity: bright,
    computer-literate
    researcher wanted to support Conservative front-bench MP on
    policy,
    parliamentary, and constituency work. Applicants should send a
    c.v. by 22 July.
    Archie Norman, MP, House of Commons, London SW1A 0AA.

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    Houses to Let

    Quiet modernised terrace house, fully furnished,
    central North
    Oxford; c.h., 2 bedrooms, garden. Suitable for visiting
    academics. Available to let
    to one or two persons only from mid-Sept. for the academic year.
    Tel.: Oxford
    512747, e-mail: rosaleen@community.co.uk.

    Furnished 18th-c. house, secluded garden, 3
    miles from centre
    of Oxford, on bus route; 3 bedrooms, 2 living-rooms, dining-room,
    fully equipped
    kitchen, bathroom, shower-room; off-street parking for 2 cars.
    Available late Aug.
    for 6 months. £750 p.c.m., utilities extra. Rent of car
    optional extra. No
    smokers, children, or pets. Tel.: Oxford 778768, fax:
    (2)86581.

    Spacious, light, well-appointed 2-bedroom
    Edwardian house, off
    Abingdon Road and close to city centre, with mature garden, c.h.,
    and heated
    conservatory, available from 1 Sept. for 10 months, 12 months,
    or longer.
    Unfurnished (washing-machine, fridge, freezer, cooker). £750
    p.c.m., exc.
    bills. Dr Francis O'Gorman. Tel.: Oxford 725435, or mobile: 07899
    917582; e-mail:
    francis.ogorman@btinternet.com.

    Self-contained, furnished cottage attached to
    old Cotswold
    house; beautiful 40-mile open view in quiet village 7 minutes
    from Charlbury
    station (11 minutes from Oxford); 1 double bedroom, 1
    single/office, 2 bathrooms,
    33-ft. (10 m.) long sitting-room, conservatory/dining-room,
    kitchen, utility room;
    extensive cupboard space. Suit visiting academic/professional,
    single or couple.
    Furnished. Long or short lets considered. Regret no children or
    pets. £625
    p.m. Available from Sept. Tel./fax: 01993 878700.

    Charming cottage, north-west of Oxford in a
    quiet corner of
    village by a ford; beams, inglenook fire, country antiques, small
    walled garden,
    garage. Double bedroom, spare bedroom/study, open fire, c.h., all
    mod. cons. From
    Sept. Tel.: Oxford 510542.

    Iffley Village, Oxford: spacious 3-bedroom
    bungalow available for
    next academic year. Gas c.h.; furnished; gardens; situated in
    attractive quiet
    location overlooking river, within easy access of city centre.
    £1,000 p.c.m.
    Brooks Property Management. Tel.: Oxford 728597, fax: 794606.

    Central Summertown, North Oxford: 3-bedroom
    modern house;
    furnished; gas c.h.; secluded garden; integral garage. Available
    for next academic
    year. £1,000 p.c.m. Brooks Property Management. Tel.: Oxford
    728597, fax:
    794606.

    Old Boar's Hill: charming Edwardian cottage in
    quiet, friendly
    cul-de-sac in this sought-after area. Idyllic setting with very
    easy access to
    Oxford city centre. Lots of lovely walks from the doorstep. Two
    reception rooms,
    modern kitchen, 2 bedrooms and bath. Fully furnished and
    equipped. Lovely small
    gardens. Available full or part of academic year 1999–2000.
    £750 p.m.
    Tel./fax: Oxford 735305.

    Period cottage available for academic year.
    Three bedrooms,
    fully furnished, all amenities. Large garden, quiet surroundings,
    tucked away on
    Old Boars Hill, just 4 miles from Oxford centre. £650 p.c.m.
    Tel.: 00 39 0444
    324729, e-mail: krksolomon@hotmail.com.

    North Oxford : well-furnished 3-bedroom house
    in a cul-de-sac
    quiet road available from Aug.; c.h. and all modern facilities
    inc. washer-drier,
    microwave, satellite TV; front and back gardens with a fish-pond;
    access to good
    local school, cycling distance to city centre and the University.
    Close to beautiful
    public park and sports ground. £720 p.c.m., professional
    family preferred.
    Tel.: +44 1732 454269, e-mail: w.j.wang@sussex.ac.uk, or
    zyxie@hotmail.com.

    Cotswolds house, Moreton in Marsh, 26 miles from
    Oxford, 35
    minutes by train; 3 bedrooms; fully equipped; stylish interior;
    garden. Available
    to let for a year immediately. £500 p.c.m. exc. water, gas,
    electricity,
    telephone, and council tax. Tel.: 01608 650336.

    Beautifully modernised house to let, east
    Oxford, for 9 months
    from end of Aug. Two double bedrooms, 2 studies, sitting-room,
    dining-room,
    1½ bathrooms; c.h., washing-machine, dish-washer; 20
    minutes' walk from
    Bodleian. Walled garden. £950 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 242966.

    Jericho (North Oxford): furnished house
    available from 1 Sept.,
    for 1 year or less. Walk to colleges, train station, bus station;
    near Port Meadow;
    c.h.; recently redecorated; desks, filing cabinet, several large
    closets, secluded
    garden, 2½ bathrooms, washing-machine, drier, telephone,
    linen, dishes, 2
    bicycles; quiet; suitable for visiting academics. Two bedrooms
    £950 p.m.;
    three bedrooms £1,250 p.m. (inc. bedsit with separate
    kitchen and entrance).
    Contact J. Mackrell (evenings), tel.: Oxford 775567, or A. Gaston
    (Canada), tel.: 613
    745 1368, fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail: Gaston@cyberus.CA.

    Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not a
    chore. Finders
    Keepers is dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to
    find the right
    property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
    information on
    properties available and make use of our interactive database,
    priority
    reservation service (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack,
    personal service,
    and much more. Call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. For
    further
    information contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road,
    Summertown, Oxford OX2
    7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail:
    oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
    http://www.finders.co.uk.

    An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
    saying goes. We
    cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you
    are seeking
    quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area
    we may be able
    to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting
    agents, specialising
    in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
    professionals. Our aim is
    to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford.
    Visit our Web site at:
    http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties
    that we have
    currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or
    e-mail us with details
    of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without
    obligation. Tel.:
    Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Flats to Let

    Two-bedroom modern apartment, Dovehouse Close,
    Wolvercote,
    North Oxford; large lounge, fitted kitchen, bathroom with bath
    and shower; gas
    c.h. to radiators; bedrooms both of good size; garage plus
    parking area; set in
    well-maintained grounds. Available now, £650 p.c.m. Tel.:
    01235 202077.

    Self-contained lovely ground-floor flat in large
    semi-Victorian
    house in central North Oxford; access to beautiful mature garden;
    off-street
    parking; 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university
    buildings, and
    parks and river. Available for Michaelmas Term only. Suit
    visiting academic or
    professional couple. £800 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford
    557919.

    Norham Gardens: 3-/4-bedroom apartment located
    near to the
    University Parks; spacious kitchen/dining and lounge room, second
    lounge, and
    2 bathrooms. Available Sept. for long-term let. £1,700
    p.c.m. English Homes.
    Tel.: 0802 876542, or Oxford 797817.

    From mid-Aug.: maisonette in Stanley Road,
    Oxford; 2 study-
    bedrooms; sitting/dining-room; third small bedroom; bathroom with
    power-shower;
    kitchen with washing-machine; telephone; gas c.h.; shared
    car-park and garden;
    quiet; view of Radcliffe Camera. Suit 2 single sharers or couple.
    £650 p.c.m.
    Tel./fax: Oxford 768874.

    Two-bedroom, part-furnished, ground-floor flat,
    with garage;
    off lower Cowley Road, secluded, green location, handy for city
    centre/university
    venues. Lease short (3 months, to end of Sept.) or at least one
    calendar year.
    Immediate occupation. Wells. Tel.: 01953 498121.

    Central North Oxford: spacious, attractive flat
    in Victorian
    conversion; comfortably furnished; 1 large double bedroom,
    study/bedroom,
    sittingp-room, large breakfast-room/kitchen; lovely views over
    gardens. Regret
    no children or pets. Non-smokers only. Ideal for academic couple.
    For 1 year or
    long from late July, but summer let to early/mid-Oct. considered.
    £875 p.c.m.
    Tel.: Oxford 514036.

    One-room basement studio flat in Victorian house
    south of
    Summertown; own access through patio; furnished and redecorated,
    with shower-
    room, kitchenette, own telephone, TV aerial. To let from 26 July.
    £370 p.w.
    inc. of c.h. but exc. electricity. Tel.: Oxford 511500.

    Summertown: furnished, self-contained
    first-floor flat in
    detached house in pleasant, quiet cul-de-sac, available 1 Aug.;
    1 double bedroom,
    1 small single bedroom/study, sitting-room, kitchen, bathroom
    with shower; gas
    c.h.; shared use of gardens; parking space. £500 p.c.m. plus
    bills. Tel.: 01482
    466548/668572 (answer-phone), e-mail:
    d.v.bagchi@theol.hull.ac.uk.

    Modern 2-bedroom apartment to rent with
    south-facing balcony
    off Banbury Road (Thackley End). Within short walking distance
    of Oxford city
    centre. £670 p.m. plus council tax and electricity.
    Available from 15 Aug. for
    1 year or longer. Tel.: Oxford 735679 (evenings).

    Woodstock Road, Oxford: to let 1 Oct.
    1999–31 May 2000.
    Large second-floor flat, overlooking St John's College sports
    field; lounge, 23 ft.,
    gas fire; bedroom same; large hall; kitchen, gas cooker, fridge,
    microwave, new
    washer; large bathroom with separate shower cubicle; 10 minutes
    from city centre
    by bus. Suitable for academics or professional people. No
    children. £550 p.m.
    Tel.: Oxford 556780.

    Central North Oxford: 1- and 2-bedroom
    apartments; very
    convenient for all university departments; above average standard
    of
    accommodation; space, parking, and security; best suited to
    mature professionals
    and visiting academics. Available for the next academic year and
    various earlier
    dates from July; rents £620–£720 p.c.m. Tel.:
    Oxford 516144, fax:
    437996.

    Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city
    centre, parks,
    all main university buildings, and very close to the river.
    Available for
    short/long let. Two exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable
    flats in extremely
    quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy,
    residential Victorian
    suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. Second-floor flat
    available end of Oct.;
    first-floor flat available Aug. Both with large double bedroom,
    large drawing-
    room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking; large secluded
    garden. Tel./fax:
    Oxford 552400.

    Central North Oxford, four minutes' walk from
    University Parks
    and easy walking to University Science Area, libraries, and city
    centre. Charming
    and spacious garden flat in quiet residential street, inc.
    sitting-room, double
    bedroom, kitchen with washing-machine, bathroom with shower,
    plentiful storage
    space. Gas c.h. Suit single person or couple. No smokers.
    Available from Aug.
    £725 p.c.m.. Tel.: Oxford 512138, e-mail:
    mdy@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

    North Oxford : prestigious 2-bedroom first-floor
    apartment
    available; fully furnished and equipped; ideal location for easy
    access to
    universities and city centre facilities; available beginning of
    Sept.–end of
    Mar. Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2
    7BY. Tel.:
    Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk,
    Internet:
    http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Summer Lets

    Oxford summer let: spacious traditional
    3-bedroom house with
    garden, fully furnished and equipped, all mod. cons., in the
    heart of academic
    North Oxford, 3 minutes' walk to Summertown shops and amenities;
    to let
    1–31 Aug. (negotiable). Tel.: Oxford 558254, e-mail:
    114611.1677@compuserve.com.

    Central Oxford: fully furnished large properties available
    for summer lets in
    Oxford. Ideal accommodation for visiting groups. Various
    locations within city,
    walking distance of city centre and all local amenities, and on
    bus route direct
    to city shops, universities, and city facilities. Available 8
    Aug.–1 Sept.
    Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY.
    Tel.: Oxford
    311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet:
    http://www.finders.co.uk.

    North Oxford /Summertown: substantial
    well-presented furnished
    4-bedroom family home; fully equipped spacious kitchen/dining
    area; 2 attractive
    lounges and garden. Very conveniently situated for Summertown
    shops. Available
    July. £700 p.w. English Homes. Tel.: 0802 876542, or Oxford
    797817.

    Central North Oxford: attractive 2-bedroom flat;
    fully furnished,
    conservatory, living-room, parking space, private patio. Ideal
    location. Available
    Aug. and Sept., £200 p.w. Tel.: O1993 811878.

    Central North Oxford: attractive 2-bedroom flat;
    fully furnished,
    conservatory, living-room, parking space, private patio; ideal
    location. Available
    Aug. and Sept., £200 p.w. Tel.: 01993 811878.

    Cosy Victorian house in quiet North Oxford
    street, available 31
    July–21 Aug.; large family kitchen with Aga; utility;
    sitting-room; sleeps 3
    adults, 2 children; close to Port Meadow; easy access to centre
    of Oxford.
    £840. Tel.: Oxford 512397/311904.

    Live in comfort near the Thames, close to city
    centre; Victorian
    house; c.h.; 4 bedrooms; large split-level living-room; bathroom,
    bidet and w.c.;
    shower room and w.c.; pretty south-facing garden; new
    fully-equipped kitchen.
    Available for 6 weeks, 24 July–5 Sept. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Offered

    Single room to let in spacious house shared with
    two other
    persons, 5 miles south of Oxford; quick access to A34; frequent
    buses. Available
    1 July for 1–12 months. £240 p.c.m. inc. tax. Tel.:
    01235 445124 (day),
    or Oxford 329051 (evening), e-mail: anne.de.rudder@rl.ac.uk.

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
    comfortable home of
    a semi-retired academic couple in exclusive, leafy, central North
    Oxford; within
    easy walking distance of the city centre and all main university
    buildings; a
    stone's throw from the river, parks, excellent pubs and
    restaurants and a
    9–9 corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea-
    and coffee-
    making facilities, c.h., and independent heating. Refrigerators
    available. Very
    moderate terms. Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Sought

    Visiting professor and wife from Vienna seek to
    rent a
    furnished flat or small house, preferably in central or North
    Oxford,
    Feb.–June 2000. Contact Richard Pring. E-mail:
    richard.pring@edstud.ox.ac.uk.

    Going away? Leaving behind an empty property?
    Professional
    couple seek house/cottage to house-sit from Sept. onwards
    (long-term), in the
    Oxon. area. In return for a modest rent, we are prepared to
    maintain all aspects
    of your property. References available. Tel.: 0181-877 3509.

    Author seeks quiet flat in North Oxford from
    late Sept./Oct. for
    one year (possibly longer). I would be happy to assist with
    gardening in return
    for more moderate rent. Tel.: Oxford 243296.

    Academic couple looking for a 1–3-bedroom
    apartment/house
    for 1 Sept.–30 Nov., in Oxford area. Contact Dr Grace Cheng.
    Fax: 86-10-
    65900962, e-mail: ycgrace@public.bta.net.cn.

    Female academic seeks to rent an inexpensive
    furnished flat
    with parking, preferably in Jericho or north-east central Oxford,
    from late Sept.,
    for long-term; will be in Oxford beginning of Aug. for viewing.
    Tel. (after 19
    July): 01265 834496, e-mail: H.Kaji@ulst.ac.uk.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
    property? QB
    Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and
    property managers.
    We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
    individuals and their
    families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality
    tenants seeking
    property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
    services, or if you
    simply need some informal help and advice without obligation,
    telephone us:
    Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
    Alternatively, we
    would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk
    and see how
    we could be marketing your property.

    Mallams Residential Letting is well placed to
    help with your
    letting and management requirements. Based in Summertown, we
    offer a
    professional service tailored to your individual requirements.
    If you are thinking
    of letting your property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006,
    fax: 311977.

    Finders Keepers specialises in managing your
    home or
    investment. We have celebrated 25 years in Oxford letting and
    managing
    properties—try us first! Many of our landlords have remained
    with us since
    we opened and are delighted with our service—why not pop in
    and read
    their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road,
    Summertown, Oxford
    OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail:
    oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet
    site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Sought to Rent or
    Exchange

    Due to a sabbatical: North Oxford house,
    2–3 bedrooms, or
    large flat, furnished, sought for 9 months plus from 1 Oct.; or
    exchange with a
    beach condominium, furnished, car port, in Santa Barbara,
    California, with
    swimming-pool, beach access, near University of California. Dr
    Sunalp, USA. Fax:
    559 636 9767, e-mail: sunalp@earthlink.net.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Offered to Rent or
    Exchange

    Due to sabbatical, North Oxford house available
    for 6 months
    plus from 1 October, for rent or exchange with accommodation in
    Munich,
    Germany; furnished; 4 bedrooms (1 with en-suite), 2 reception,
    breakfast kitchen,
    home extension, double entrance, bath, shower, wonderful
    south-facing garden.
    Tel.: Oxford 554015/273075, or 01235 464483; e-mail:
    arturo@btinternet.com.
    n

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    Holiday Lets

    Santa Barbara, CA, rental: elegant 1-bedroom
    beach apartment,
    bordering Montecito, Spanish style building, tropical gardens,
    security gate, pool
    (hot year-round), gym, tennis; marble floors; patio; sleeps 4
    with sofa-bed; newly
    furnished; own washer/drier, TV/VCR/CD. Suit academic visitor;
    wonderful base
    for CA sabbatical. Near whale-watching, boating, scuba,
    vineyards. $2,100 p.m.
    Available at regular intervals. Tel.: Oxford 558583.

    Cornwall: large, comfortable, exceptionally
    well-equipped house
    in moorland village within easy driving distance of the north
    coast; sleeps up to
    11—ideal for 2 families sharing. Tel.: 01869 340634, e-mail:
    rrecsa@compuserve.com.

    Island of Hyolze: restored 300-year-old
    traditional island house
    on 2 floors; offers spacious accommodation and sleeps 5—two
    bedrooms,
    shower, kitchen on ground floor with chapel at rear end; master
    bedroom with
    bathroom en-suite on first floor; 30 acres of garden. Available
    July–Aug.–Sept., £400 p.w. Photographs available.
    Tel.: 01235 848356
    (evenings).

    Exmoor National Park: peacefully located
    200-year-old cottage,
    recently modernised to a high standard with spacious family
    accommodation and
    private rear garden with frontage onto the Washford river;
    excellent location for
    walking and horse-riding, but only a few miles from the coast at
    Watchet; sleeps
    6 comfortably in 3 bedrooms, 2 with vanity units, beamed lounge
    and separate
    dining-room, newly fitted kitchen, and bathroom with shower.
    Shops and pubs in
    the village, approx. half-mile. Bed-linen and electricity inc.
    in rent. Sorry no
    pets. Tel.: 01491 651931, e-mail:
    hugh.dickinson@plants.ox.ac.uk.

    Paris studio: charming courtyard studio
    apartment, period
    building, in the fashionable and very central Marais (Rue St
    Paul). Quiet, light,
    well-equipped and attractively furnished. £30 per night or
    £175 per
    week for members of the University. Available from 1 Aug.
    throughout the year.
    Tel.: Oxford 248532.

    Ireland: follow in the footsteps of J.M. Synge
    to the fabled Aran
    Islands, the mysterious moonscape of the Burren, and the dramatic
    cliffs of Moher
    by renting a beautifully refurbished cottage or first-floor
    studio at a unique
    holiday and retreat centre in the rolling hills of East Clare.
    Hill walking, fishing,
    horse-riding, historic castles, Celtic island forts, monasteries,
    traditional Irish
    music, waterfall and bathing pool, all at your door. Eight-bed
    cottage ideal for
    families, £150–£300 p.w., studio suitable for
    couple,
    £75–£150, all rates seasonally adjusted. Stan and
    Clare de Freitas.
    Tel.: 00 353 61 367073, e-mail: sunyata_ireland@hotmail.com.

    Annual multi-trip holiday insurance. From as
    little as £26
    per year, you can travel as many times as you like. This
    insurance is arranged
    by Affinity Groups Advantage Limited, an independent intermediary
    for selling
    of general insurance. For further details, tel.: 0345 660453.

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    <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 17 July<br /> - 5 November

    Diary


    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff
    Development Seminars
    : places should be booked in advance
    through
    the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
    ProgrammeWeb site.

    Return to
    Contents Page of this issue



    Saturday 17 July

    DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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    Wednesday 21 July

    SHARDA SAHAI performs Indian music on the tabla, Ashmolean, 6.30
    p.m.
    (admission £15; tickets from the Playhouse Box Office,
    Beaumont Street,
    tel. 798600).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Monday 26 July

    UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY PLAYSCHEME begins, St Frideswide Middle School
    (until
    27 August).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Saturday 31 July

    DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Monday 23 August

    SPECIAL LECTURE LIST, Michaelmas Term: entries to be received by
    today (e-
    mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Tuesday 31 August

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `No day without a line: the
    Royal
    Society of Painter-Printmakers 1880--1999' (until 31 October).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Friday 1 October

    MICHAELMAS TERM begins.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Saturday 2 October

    DEGREE CEREMONY, Sheldonian, 2.30 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Sunday 10 October

    MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Saturday 16 October

    MATRICULATION CEREMONY, Convocation House (colleges to be
    informed of
    time).

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    Thursday 21 October

    PROFESSOR HERMIONE LEE (Goldsmiths' Professor of English
    Literature):
    `Reading in bed' (inaugural lecture), Lecture Room 2, St Cross
    Building, 5 p.m.

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    Saturday 23 October

    DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Tuesday 2 November

    PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the
    poem: "All
    Souls' Night" by W.B. Yeats' (Inaugural Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

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    Friday 5 November

    PROFESSOR T. CARTER: `Io la Musica son': Monteverdi
    and the
    problems of opera' (Rowe Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section