15 January 1998 - No 4460



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4460: 15 January 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

15 January 1998





University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 1998: University<br /> Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 22 December


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6
(Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the following
resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 22
December.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

ALAIN BERNARD-JEAN VIALA, Wadham College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of
Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1997, p. 367) has been accorded
to the following person who is qualified for membership
of Congregation:

PETER ANTHONY SARGENT, Department of Psychiatry

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2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have
been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bamborough, J.B., MA, Linacre

Butler, Sir F.E.R., MA, University

Goodwin-Gill, G.S., MA, D.Phil., Wolfson

Hanson, Sir J.G., MA, Green College

Sargent, P.A., MA status, Department of Psychiatry

Viala, A.B.J., MA, Wadham

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into
effect on
30 January, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 1998: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 10 February 2 p.m.

  • CONGREGATION 19 February

  • *
    Note on procedures in Congregation
  • *
    List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • *
    List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

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    issue



    CONGREGATION 20 January

    Notice

    The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole
    business comprises a question to which no opposition has
    been notified and in respect of which no request for an
    adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor
    will accordingly declare the preamble adopted without a
    meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl.
    11 (Statutes, 1997, p. 8).

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    CONGREGATION 10 February 2
    p.m.

    ¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that
    written notice of any opposition to the following
    resolutions, signed by at least two members of
    Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on
    Monday, 2 February (see the Guide to Procedures in
    Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University
    Agenda').


    Voting on Special Resolutions
    approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees

    (1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Civil Law, honoris causa, upon THE RT. HON. THE
    LORD MACKAY OF CLASHFERN, KT, PC (BA Cambridge; MA, LLB
    Edinburgh), FRSE, Honorary Fellow of Girton and Trinity
    Colleges, Cambridge, Chancellor of Heriot- Watt
    University, formerly Lord High Chancellor of Great
    Britain, be approved.

    (2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Civil Law, honoris causa, upon SADAKO OGATA (BA
    Sacred Heart, Tokyo; MA Georgetown;
    PH.D. California), United Nations High Commissioner for
    Refugees, be approved.

    (3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Letters, honoris causa, upon MARGARET ATWOOD, CC
    (BA Toronto; AM Radcliffe College),
    FRSC, writer, be approved.

    (4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Letters, honoris causa, upon NEIL MACGREGOR, MA,
    Honorary Fellow of New College, Director of the National
    Gallery, be approved.

    (5) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Letters, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR SIR JAMES
    MIRRLEES, MA (MA Edinburgh; MA, PH.D. Cambridge), FBA,
    Emeritus Fellow of Nuffield College, Fellow of Trinity
    College, Cambridge, Professor of Political Economy,
    University of Cambridge, formerly Edgeworth Professor of
    Economics, be approved.

    (6) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Letters, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR
    CHRISTOPHER RICKS, B.LITT., MA, FBA, Honorary Fellow of
    Balliol and Worcester Colleges, Professor at Boston
    University, formerly University Lecturer (CUF) in English
    Language and Literature, be approved.

    (7) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Science, honoris causa, upon SIR MICHAEL ATIYAH,
    OM, MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), FRS, FRSE, Honorary Fellow
    of St Catherine's College, Fellow (and formerly Master)
    of Trinity College, Cambridge, formerly Royal Society
    Research Professor in Mathematics, be approved.

    (8) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
    Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR ROBERT
    HINDE, CBE, MA, D.PHIL. (MA, SC.D. Cambridge), FRS,
    Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Fellow (and formerly
    Master) of St John's College, Cambridge, formerly Royal
    Society Research Professor, University of Cambridge, and
    Honorary Director of the Medical Research Council Unit on
    the Development and Integration of Behaviour, be
    approved.

    ¶ If the Special Resolutions are approved, the
    honorary degrees will be conferred at the Encaenia on 24
    June 1998.

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    CONGREGATION 19 February


    Election: Buildings Committee

    Vacancy: one

    Retiring member: Dr M.R. Airs

    Period from TT 1998: 4 years

    Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation
    will be
    received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices,
    Wellington
    Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 26
    Januayr
    , and similar
    nominations by six members of Congregation up to
    4 p.m. on
    Monday, 2 February.

    Council has decided that nominations should show for
    each
    signatory the name and college or department in block
    capitals.
    Any names which are not so shown may not be published.
    At least one nomination in respect of each
    candidate must be made on an official nomination
    form.
    Copies of the form are available from the
    Head Clerk (telephone: (2)70190, e-mail: "mailto:Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk">Philip.Moss@admi
    n.ox.ac.uk.

    Note on the body concerned

    The Buildings Committee is responsible to Council and the
    General Board, taking account of university policies and
    priorities, for formulating the University's programme
    for all building works, for the execution of all building
    projects, for maintaining university buildings in a
    satisfactory condition, and for allocating space within
    them. These responsibilities include making
    recommendations to Council and the Board: (a) on
    the choice of architects and the design, planning, and
    elevations of all major building projects; and
    (b) on the acquisition and allocation of new
    sites. The committee has control of a substantial budget.

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    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 1998: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

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    GOLDSMITHS' PROFESSORSHIP OF ENGLISH
    LITERATURE

    HERMIONE LEE, BA, B.PHIL., Professor of English Literature,
    University of York, has been appointed to the professorship with
    effect from 1 October 1998.

    Professor Lee will be a fellow of New College.

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    REUTERS PROFESSORSHIP OF INTELLECTUAL
    PROPERTY AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LAW

    DAVID VAVER (BA, LL.B. Auckland, JD Chicago), Professor of Law,
    Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Canada, has been
    appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 July 1998.

    Professor Vaver will be a fellow of St Peter's College.

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    WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSORSHIP IN
    EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

    ROBERTO CALASSO, author and publisher, Adelphi Edizioni, Milan,
    has been appointed to the professorship for the academic year
    1999--2000.

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    CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING
    PROFESSOR

    On the recommendation of the Board of the Faculty of Biological
    Sciences, the General Board has conferred the title of Visiting
    Professor in Zoology on D.C.S. WHITE, MA, D.PHIL., Director of
    Science and Technology at BBSRC, for a period of three years with
    immediate effect.

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    DIRECTORSHIP OF THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY
    MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

    KEITH STEWART THOMSON (B.SC. Birmingham, AM, PH.D. Harvard),
    University Distinguished Scientist-in-Residence, New School for
    Social Research, New York, and Adjunct Professor of Geology,
    University of Pennsylvania, has been appointed to the
    directorship with effect from 1 July 1998.

    Professor Thomson will be a fellow of Kellogg College.

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    PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

    On the recommendation of the Committee for the Pitt Rivers
    Museum, the General Board has appointed C. GOSDEN, MA, Fellow of
    St Cross, Curator of the Pitt Rivers Museum and University
    Lecturer in Prehistory, Acting Director of the Pitt Rivers Museum
    for the period until 13 April 1998.

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    VIOLETTE AND SAMUEL GLASSTONE RESEARCH
    FELLOWSHIPS IN SCIENCE 1997

    Fellowships have been awarded to DR SILVIA ZANE (Sub-department
    of Astrophysics), and DR ZHILIANG YUAN (Sub-department of
    Condensed Matter Physics).

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    PATRICK MALLAM MEMORIAL PRIZE IN
    CLINICAL MEDICINE 1997

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to DERRALYNN ARLENE HUGHES,
    Green College, and SIMON NICHOLAS MADGE, Magdalen College.

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    SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL: OUTLINE PLANNING
    APPLICATION

    After complex negotiations, the University is about to exchange
    contracts with Railtrack to buy the station forecourt site for
    the Said Business School. Railtrack are now to start the
    construction of the new station car park on the land between
    Becket Street and the railway. This will take about 500 cars and
    access from it to the station will be over a new footbridge
    alongside the Botley Road bridge. As soon as the new car park is
    ready, Thames Trains, which manages the car parking and the
    station will transfer all commuter car parking to the new site
    and Railtrack will then use the existing car park as a temporary
    forecourt area for the buses and taxis while the present
    forecourt is rebuilt. When this is ready, Railtrack will be able
    to grant possession of the site to the University which in turn
    will lease the majority of it to the Business School Foundation
    for the construction of the new buildings. The area not needed
    for the latter is being sold on to the Foundation and reserved
    for future expansion. This area includes part of the foundations
    of Rewley Abbey, recorded as providing the first communal
    accommodation for students in Oxford.

    An outline planning application has been submitted to Oxford
    City Council seeking approval to construct 22,000 square metres
    of floor space on the site for academic use. The application is
    supported by some illustrative drawings showing how the new
    School might look from Park End Street. The design is however at
    a very early stage and has not been approved by University and
    the Foundation. The purpose of the application is to seek
    agreement to the change of use of the site from the offices and
    a hotel included in the local plan to academic use and to form
    the basis for discussions with the City over the appearance of
    the building, traffic, and other planning matters. The design is
    being overseen by the Foundation's Building Committee with the
    Vice-Chancellor and the President of Magdalen College as the
    University's representatives. A full planning application is to
    be submitted in April and it is hoped that construction can start
    in September 1998.

    The design assumes that the proposed new junction in front
    of the Royal Oxford Hotel goes ahead and that the University will
    be required to dedicate some of the land on the Park End Street
    side for highway use. This will require the former LMS station,
    a Grade 2* listed building, to be moved. After taking advice from
    consultants specialising in heritage buildings, the University
    has concluded that the best way of preserving the station would
    be to re-erect it at a heritage railway society site where it
    would be brought back to its original use and accessible to the
    public. A study of possible sites is under way. Fortunately the
    building was designed to be demountable and can be moved without
    much damage. It was erected in 1851 by the same contractors who
    built the Crystal Palace and its cast-iron columns and girders
    are almost identical and thought to have come from the same
    moulds as the components for the Crystal Palace structure.

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    UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD STATEMENT OF
    HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY

    1 The general provisions of the Health and
    Safety at Work Etc. Act 1974 which came into force on 1 April
    1975 lay a duty on all employers to ensure, as far as is
    reasonably practicable, the safety of their employees at work by
    maintaining safe plant, safe systems of work, and safe premises,
    and also by ensuring adequate instruction, training and
    supervision. The University is also bound by the Act to ensure
    the safety, while on its premises, of all other persons, who
    (though not employees) are working or otherwise using the
    facilities there.

    2 By Decree (1) of 24 September 1981 the
    University has amended the University's safety organisation by
    making the Committee on Health and Safety a committee of Council
    with a duty to advise Council on the establishment and
    implementation of University safety policy. The decree also
    provides for a Joint Safety Advisory Committee which includes
    representatives of the recognised trades unions and which will
    advise the Council committee.

    3 The Act requires every employer to prepare
    a written statement of his general policy with respect to the
    health and safety at work of his employees and the organisation
    and arrangements in force for carrying out that policy, and to
    bring the statement to the notice of all his employees. Council,
    therefore, circulates the following statement of safety policy:

    `It is the policy of the University, and the responsibility of
    the Hebdomadal Council, to adopt all reasonably practicable
    measures:

    (a) To secure the health, safety and welfare of all
    employees at places of work under the University's control and
    elsewhere when performing their duties;

    (b) To protect students and other persons who are
    lawfully on University premises against risk to their health or
    safety which might arise out of activities in those places;

    (c) To maintain safe plant, machinery and equipment
    and a safe and healthy place of work.'

    4 It is also the policy of the University to
    ensure that all members of the University and its staff are aware
    of their individual responsibility to exercise care in relation
    to themselves and those who work with them. To this end
    individuals are enjoined to:

    (a) Familiarise themselves with University Safety
    Policy and any departmental safety requirements;

    (b) Take reasonable care that all procedures used
    are safely carried out, and seek expert advice in any case of
    doubt;

    (c) Warn of any special or newly identified hazards
    in present procedures or risks in new procedures about to be
    introduced;

    (d) Report accidents or incidents promptly;

    (e) Familiarise themselves with fire and emergency
    drills (including the location of emergency telephones) and
    escape routes.

    Where self-employed persons, or contractors and their
    employees, carry out work on University premises, they must
    comply with standards of safe working contained in any
    Regulations or Codes of Practice applicable to their operations,
    and in the University's safety rules.

    5. Heads of departments and institutions are responsible for
    the health, safety, and welfare of all people who are lawfully
    in the buildings under their charge and are required to bring to
    the notice of all employees a written statement describing the
    organisation and arrangements for safety within their
    departments.

    6. Responsibility for implementing University Safety Policy
    rests with heads of departments and institutions. In order to
    provide expert advice on matters of health and safety, the
    Hebdomadal Council has appointed the following officers:

    Director of Health and Safety Services;

    University Radiation Protection Officer;

    University Occupational Health Physician.

    The requirements of the University on specific legislative
    requirements and other matters are issued as University Policy
    Statements (previously known as University Guidance Notes).
    Advice on specific hazards and technical items is issued as
    Memoranda by the University Safety Office and by the University
    Occupational Health Service.

    Heads of departments may also appoint suitable members of their
    staff as Departmental Safety Officers to advise them and to
    liaise with the University Officers. Area Safety Officers are
    appointed in high risk science and clinical departments in order
    to enhance the Departmental Safety Officer system. Any department
    using ionising radiation must have a system of radiation
    protection management based on Departmental Radiation Protection
    Supervisors, whose task is to ensure compliance with statutory
    regulations and local rules.

    7 To advise on policy the University has
    established a Committee on Health and Safety consisting of
    members appointed by the University, while for consultation the
    University has established a Joint Safety Advisory Committee
    comprising members appointed by the Committee on Health and
    Safety and representatives of the recognised trade unions. There
    is also a Radiation Protection Consultative Committee which acts
    in a consultative role on all matters arising from the use of
    radioactive material or other sources of ionizing radiation in
    the University. A Biological Safety Advisory Group advises the
    Committee on Health and Safety on matters of biological safety.

    8 The Occupational Health Committee is a
    subcommittee of the Committee on Health and Safety and deals with
    matters relating to the management of the University's
    Occupational Health Service. The Working Group on Fire
    Precautions and Safety considers all matters relating to the
    programmes of work undertaken on the grounds of safety.

    9 This policy supersedes all previous
    versions of University Safety Policy. It will be reviewed
    annually by the Committee on Health and Safety.

    10 The names of the chairmen of the
    committees and of the University Officers are given in the
    Appendix.

    (Signed) C.R. Lucas

    Vice-Chancellor

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    APPENDIX

    Committee on Health and Safety

    Chairman: Mr D. Wood, St Hugh's College.

    Radiation Protection Consultative Committee

    Chairman: Professor C.K. Prout, Department of Chemistry.

    Joint Safety Advisory Committee

    Chairman: Mr D. Wood, St Hugh's College.

    Occupational Health Committee

    Chairman: Dr R. Mayon-White.

    Officers

    Director of Health and Safety Services: Dr K.W.
    Bowker.
    University Fire Officer: Mr K.J.
    Hewitt.

    Assistant Safety Officer: Mrs J.M. Stevenson.

    Assistant Safety Officer: Mr A.C. Kendall.

    University Biological Safety Officer: Dr J.
    Marshall.
    University Radiation Protection
    Officer
    : Dr K.V.R. Walker.
    University
    Occupational Health Physician
    : Vacancy.

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    WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE
    UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

    From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to
    individual cases of financial hardship among widows of former
    members of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities
    (FSSU) and the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme
    (EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate proven cases
    of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the
    Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square,
    Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest
    confidence.

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    GIBBS PRIZES 1998

    Prizes on the foundation of Mr Charles D.D. Gibbs will be offered
    in 1998 in Modern History, Law, Politics, Geography, Chemistry,
    Biochemistry, and Zoology. Candidates for prizes other than that
    in Law must be members of the University who, at the time of
    taking the public examination on which the prizes are awarded,
    have not exceeded the twelfth term from their matriculation.
    Candidates for the prize in Law must be members of the University
    who, at the beginning of the examination, have not exceeded their
    twelfth term from matriculation, and are reading for a final
    Honour School.

    In addition the board of management for the Gibbs Prizes has
    decided that, in 1998, Gibbs Prizes will also be offered in the
    following subjects: Earth Sciences, Engineering Science, English
    Language and Literature, Materials, Mathematics, Modern
    Languages, Music, Oriental Studies, Philosophy, Physics,
    Physiological Sciences, Psychological Studies, and Theology.
    There will be an additional Gibbs Prize for performance in
    Politics in the Preliminary Examination in Politics, Philosophy,
    and Economics. Candidates for these prizes must be members of the
    University who, at the time of taking the examination or
    submitting the coursework on which the prizes are awarded, have
    not exceeded the twelfth term from their matriculation.

    Further details of all the Gibbs Prizes will be published in the
    Gazette during Hilary Term.

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    BRIAN THOMAS STYLES MEMORIAL PRIZE

    The Brian Thomas Styles Memorial Prize is awarded from time to
    time for an outstanding D.Phil. thesis in the subject area of
    tropical or subtropical plant taxonomy. No special application
    is required.

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    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

    Arabic classes

    Classes in Modern Standard Arabic at levels 1, 2, and 3 are
    continuing to be held at the centre this term, starting on
    Monday, 19 January, at 5 p.m.

    Further details and registration information are available from
    the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street (first
    floor), Oxford OX1 2AR (telephone: Oxford (2)78730).

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    Arabic classes for the study of the Qur'an

    Classes are continuing to be held for those wishing to improve
    their Arabic for the Study of the Qur'an, starting on Friday, 23
    January, at 5 p.m.

    Further details and registration information are available from
    Dr Basil Mustafa, the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George
    Street (first floor), Oxford OX1 2AR (telephone: Oxford
    (2)78730).

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    CONCERT


    St John's College and Colin Carr

    JOHN GIBBONS (harpsichord) will perform J.S. Bach's Keyboard
    Exercise Part IV (`The Goldberg Variations'), at 8.30 p.m. on
    Monday, 2 February, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St
    John's College.

    Admission is by programme, which will be free and available from
    the Porters' Lodge from 24 January.

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    ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY TEACHERS

    The Association of University Teachers is both a professional
    association and a trade union, committed to the advancement of
    university education and research. At the national level, the AUT
    is the recognised union for academic and academic-related staff.
    Besides its concern for more general questions of university
    education and research, the AUT negotiates salary levels and
    conditions of employment with the Committee of Vice-Chancellors
    and Principals.

    The Oxford branch of the AUT is open for membership to
    university and college employees, whether academic or
    academic-related. It has over 900 members. It is the official
    body with which the University discusses priorities and problems
    bearing on education and research, and negotiates solutions to
    them. Discussions between the Oxford AUT and university officers
    occur formally once per term at a meeting of a Joint Consultative
    Committee, but there are many other informal meetings to discuss
    particular problems, including those affecting the conditions of
    employment of academic and academic-related staff, such as the
    `waiver clause' for those employed on contract grants. The local
    AUT also provides confidential advice on problems relating to
    terms and conditions of employment.

    Application for membership and other enquiries can be made to
    Mrs Anne Hendry, Administrative Secretary, Oxford AUT, New
    Barnett House, 28 Little Clarendon Street, Oxford OX1 2HY
    (telephone and fax: (2)70418, e-mail: aut@ermine.ox.ac.uk) (9.30
    a.m.--3 p.m., Monday--Friday).

    Enquiries may also be directed to the following: Kit Bailey
    (Honorary Secretary), Department of Plant Sciences (telephone:
    (2)75090); Denis O'Driscoll, Department of Biochemistry
    (telephone: (2)75260); Arthur Marsh (Personal Cases), St Edmund
    Hall (telephone: (2)74170).

    General meetings of the Oxford AUT take place on Tuesday of
    third week in each term. The Hilary Term meeting will be held on
    Tuesday, 3 February, 1.15--2.30 p.m., in Blackhall, Queen
    Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles'. All AUT members and non-members
    will be welcome.

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    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 1998: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

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    issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Jesus Professor of Celtic

    PROFESSOR T.M. CHARLES-EDWARDS will deliver his inaugural
    lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 23 January, in the Taylor
    Institution.

    Subject: `The death of Columba.'


    Professor of Management Studies

    PROFESSOR JOHN KAY will deliver his inaugural lecture at
    5 p.m. on Tuesday, 3 February, in the Examination
    Schools. The Vice-Chancellor will be present. Admission
    will be by tickets, which can be obtained by telephoning
    Oxford (2)88654.

    Subject: `The role of business in society.'

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    FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH
    HISTORY

    Beyond the English state: power, societies, and
    identities in the British Isles, 1093–1343

    PROFESSOR R.R. DAVIES will deliver the Ford's Lectures at
    5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools.

    23 Jan.: `The High Kingship of the British
    Isles.'

    30 Jan.: `Island mythologies.'

    6 Feb.: `The Anglicisation of the British
    Isles.'

    13 Feb.: `Political heartlands and political
    outbacks.'

    20 Feb.: ` "Sweet Civility" and
    "Barbarous Rudeness".'

    27 Feb.: `The limits of the English empire
    and the shaping of English exceptionalism.'

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    SPEAKER'S LECTURES IN BIBLICAL
    STUDIES 1997–9

    A theory of early Christian religion

    PROFESSOR GERD THEISSEN, Professor of New Testament
    Theology, University of Heidelberg, will deliver his
    first series of Speaker's Lectures during Hilary and
    Trinity Terms, in the Examination Schools. A lecture
    based on `Early Christian religion as a new system of
    signs' will be delivered at 5 p.m. on each of the
    following dates: Monday, 23 February; Tuesday, 24
    February; Wednesday, 25 February.

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    GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE
    SEPTUAGINT 1997–8

    The illustration of the Septuagint

    DR JOHN H. LOWDEN, Courtauld Institute of Art, will
    deliver his second series of Grinfield Lectures at 5 p.m.
    on the following Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

    24 Feb.: ` "Who is wise and shall
    understand": exegesis and commentary.'

    3 Mar.: ` "And he read the book before
    the king": owners and users.'

    10 Mar.: ` "Like apples of gold in
    pictures in silver": images and words.'

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    WILDE LECTURES 1997–8

    The religion of the apostle Paul

    DR JOHN ASHTON, formerly University Lecturer in New
    Testament Studies, will deliver the Wilde Lectures at 5
    p.m. on the following Mondays in the Examination Schools.
    Each lecture will be followed by discussion.

    19 Jan.: `On comparing religions.'

    26 Jan.: `Paul the enigma.'

    2 Feb.: `Paul the convert.'

    9 Feb.: `Paul the mystic.'

    16 Feb.: `Paul the apostle.'

    27 Apr.: `Paul the prophet.'

    4 May: `Paul the charismatic.'

    11 May: `Paul the possessed.'

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    section



    SLADE LECTURES 1998

    Michelangelo at the millennium

    PROFESSOR KATHLEEN WEIL-GARRIS BRANDT, Slade Professor
    1997–8, will deliver the Slade Lectures at 5 p.m. on
    the following Wednesdays in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor
    Institution.

    21 Jan.: `Seven myths about
    Michelangelo.'

    28 Jan.: `The "self-taught
    prodigy" .'

    4 Feb.: `The "reluctant painter"
    .'

    11 Feb.: ` The "primacy of
    sculpture" .'

    18 Feb.: `The "liberator of
    architecture" .'

    25 Feb.: `The "heroic rebel" .'

    4 Mar.: `The "misogynistic
    misanthrope" .'

    11 Mar.: `The "imprisoned image"
    .'

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    section



    CAMERON MACKINTOSH PROFESSOR OF
    CONTEMPORARY THEATRE

    PROFESSOR THELMA HOLT will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday,
    29 January, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St
    Catherine's College.

    Subject: `Skiing off the piste—the
    producer as maverick.'

    Professor Holt will introduce the following lectures,
    to be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Bernard
    Sunley Lecture Theatre.

    NICHOLAS DE JONGH, drama critic, London Evening
    Standard


    Fri. 20 Feb.: `Censorship
    (1901–68): its effect on contemporary
    theatre.'

    SIR JOHN DRUMMOND, CBE


    Thur. 5 Mar.: `Eurovision or tunnel
    vision? Our cultural links with Europe.'

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    section


    Saturday morning `surgeries'

    Professor Holt will hold a series of informal meetings in
    which undergraduates can discuss specific areas of
    theatre in which they are involved. Further information
    may be obtained from Holly Kendrick, University Drama
    Officer (telephone: Oxford 791577).

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    section



    ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

    The nature of nature

    The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in the Senior Common Room, the School of
    Geography.

    Convener: M. Williams, MA, Professor of
    Geography.

    PROFESSOR R.F. ELLEN, Kent

    21 Jan.: `Cognitive versus social
    constructions of nature.'

    PROFESSOR WILLIAMS

    28 Jan.: `Deforestation and
    biodiversity: the social construction of an
    environmental concept.'

    DR E. SWYNGEDOUW

    4 Feb.: `Modernity and hybridity: the
    production of nature—water and modernisation in
    Spain.'

    PROFESSOR D. LIVINGSTONE, Belfast

    11 Feb.: `Geographical inquiry, moral
    philosophy, and Englightenment discourses on the
    nature of human nature.'

    DR K. SOPER, North London

    18 Feb.:
    `Nature/"Nature?".'

    DR N. CASTREE, Liverpool

    25 Feb.: `Saving the seals: the cultural
    politics of nature in Alaska.'

    DR J. GERBER, Nottingham

    4 Mar.: `Making the invisible visible:
    ancient woodlands, British forest policy, and the
    social construction of reality.'

    PROFESSOR I. SIMMONS, Durham

    11 Mar.: ` "All coherence
    gone"? Humanity, nature, and time.'

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    section


    Seminar

    DR J. MCPEAK, Northern Ireland Housing Executive, will
    give a seminar at 9.30 a.m. on Friday, 23 January, in the
    Staff Common Room, the School of Geography.

    Convener: C.G. Clarke, MA, D.Phil., Professor
    of Urban and Social Geography.

    Subject: `Religion and owner-occupier
    residential search in the Belfast urban area.'

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    section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Department of Psychiatry

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Department of
    Psychiatry, the Warneford Hospital.

    Convener: G.G. Goodwin, DM, Handley Professor
    of Psychiatry.

    PROFESSOR P. TYRER, St Mary's Hospital, London

    3 Feb.: `Psychiatric beds: are we using
    them effectively?'

    PROFESSOR D. NUTT, Bristol

    10 Feb.: `What can drugs tell us about
    the nature of anxiety?'

    DR D. BLACKWOOD, Royal Edinburgh Hospital

    24 Feb.: `Schizophrenia—a search
    for genes.'

    PROFESSOR M. LADER, Institute of Psychiatry, London

    10 Mar.: `Medico-legal excursions in
    psychopharmacology.'

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    section


    Nuffield Department of Surgery

    The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of
    Surgery, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    An evidence-based surgical trial from the Department of
    Lower GI Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital, will be held
    in place of the seminar on 10 March.

    Convener: Sir Peter J. Morris, MA, Nuffield
    Professor of Surgery.

    B. WHIPP, St George's Hospital, London, and T. HUSSAIN

    20 Jan.: `Oxygen uptake kinetics:
    clinical implications.'

    C. BAIGENT

    27 Jan.: `Anti-thrombotic therapy in
    patients at high risk for vascular disease.'

    M. MERKENSCHLAGER

    3 Feb.: `Cross-priming, promiscuity, and
    thymic selection.'

    G. GRIFFITHS

    10 Feb.: `Why don't killer T cells kill
    themselves?'

    D. GRAY, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London

    17 Feb.: `Antigen-presenting cells and T
    cell memory.'

    P. OPENSHAW, Imperial College of Medicine at St Mary's,
    London

    24 Feb.: `T cells and virus-induced lung
    disease.'

    L. SENARATNE

    3 Mar.: `Atherosclerosis: do non-lipid
    genes matter?'

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    section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE,
    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn
    School of Pathology.

    Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil.,
    Professor of Pathology.

    DR D. ALTMANN, Hammersmith Hospital

    22 Jan.: `MHC class II biosynthesis and
    peptide presentation: DM, DO, and other players.'

    PROFESSOR R. GARDNER

    29 Jan.: `The embryonic stem (ES) cell
    route to transgenesis in animals—a personal
    perspective.'

    DR M. PEPPER, University of Geneva Medical Centre

    5 Feb.: `Balance and context: regulatory
    paradigms for angiogenesis.'

    PROFESSOR J. GORDON, Birmingham

    19 Feb.: `Life and death of B-
    lymphocytes.'

    DR F. WATT, ICRF, London

    26 Feb.: `Role of cell adhesion in
    regulating epidermal stem cell fate.'

    DR D. VAUX and PROFESSOR S. GREENFIELD

    5 Mar.
    : `A different approach to neuro-
    degeneration?'

    DR N. UNWIN, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
    Cambridge

    12 Mar.: `How ion channels open rapidly
    in response to neurotransmitter.' (Sixth Norman
    Heatley Lecture
    )

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    section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    Archive of performances of Greek and Roman drama

    PROFESSOR ERIKA FISCHER-LICHTE, Head of the Institute of
    Theatre Studies, Freie Universität, Berlin, will
    give an illustrated lecture (in English) at 5 p.m. on
    Monday, 19 January, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the
    Ashmolean Museum.

    Conveners: O. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
    Greek Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages.

    Subject: `From Max Reinhardt to Peter Stein:
    Greek tragedy projects in twentieth-century Berlin.'

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    section



    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

    Department of Statistics: Probability, Statistics,
    and Operations Research Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Department of Statistics.

    Conveners: P. Clifford, MA, Reader in
    Mathematical Statistics, and A.M. Etheridge, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics.

    DR. CLAYTON, MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge

    22 Jan.: `Testing for genetic
    association with highly polymorphic markers and
    multiple marker loci.'

    PROFESSOR P.J. GREEN, Bristol

    29 Jan.: `Exact sampling from continuous
    state space.'

    DR F. KOMAKI, Institute for Statistical Mathematics,
    Tokyo

    5 Feb.: `Information geometry of
    predictive distributions.'

    PROFESSOR B.D. RIPLEY

    12 Feb.: `Trees and nets in survival
    analysis.'

    PROFESSOR T. LYONS, Imperial College, London

    26 Feb.: to be announced.

    DR S.P. BROOKS, Bristol

    5 Mar.: `Markov chain Monte Carlo and
    its applications.'

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    section



    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    Graduate seminar in Spanish studies

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
    in the Taylor Institution.

    Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso
    XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and The Revd C.P.
    Thompson, MA, D.Phil., Faculty Lecturer in Spanish.

    DR J.D. RUTHERFORD

    20 Jan.: `Translating Don
    Quijote
    .'

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL

    27 Jan.: `A "duplicate", yet
    not a duplicate: the two Bodleian copies of Don
    Quixote
    , Part I (Madrid: Juan de la Cuesta,
    1605).'

    DR A. MIRA NOUSELLES

    10 Feb.: `Womanhood as symbol and symbol
    as womanhood in the poetic plays of the Machado
    brothers.'

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    section


    Art and literature

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Taylor Institution.

    Convener: J.R. Woodhouse, MA, D.Litt.,
    Fiat–Serena Professor of Italian Studies.

    PROFESSOR WOODHOUSE

    19 Jan.: `D.G. Rossetti's uxorious
    interpretation of Dante's Vita
    Nuova
    .'

    DR A.J. TOOKE

    26 Jan.: `Flaubert and Taine and the
    aims of art criticism.'

    DR D.G. FRANKLIN

    2 Feb.: `Polidoro da Caravaggio and
    Colagiacomo Alibrando's Spasmo de Maria
    Vergine
    (1534).'

    DR C. WHISTLER

    9 Feb.: `Literary reflections in Piero
    di Cosimo's Fire in the Forest.'

    DR N.E. CRONK

    16 Feb.: `Diderot's Jacques le
    fataliste
    and the art of the
    tableau.'

    DR J.J.L. WHITELEY

    23 Feb.: `Delacroix and the literary
    source.'

    DR F. QUIVIGER, Warburg Institute

    2 Mar.: `Renaissance depictions of arms
    and armour: the case of Ariosto.'

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    section


    French literature from the Renaissance to the
    Enlightenment

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Quickswood Room, Keble College.

    Conveners: J. Mallinson, Trinity College, M.
    Hawcroft, Keble College, and R. Goulbourne, Keble
    College.

    A. COWE

    22 Jan.: `Why politeness? Why
    Montaigne?'

    A. VIALA

    5 Feb.: `La galanterie.'

    K. TUNSTALL

    19 Feb.: `From illusion to fiction in
    the work of Diderot.'

    P. FRANCE, Edinburgh

    5 Mar.: `French classical literature and
    translation.'

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    section



    MODERN HISTORY

    From Reform to Reaction: the revolutions in Europe,
    1848

    This series of commemorative lectures will be given at 5
    p.m. on Thursdays in the Examination Schools.

    Conveners: R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius
    Professor of Modern History, and H.J.O. Pogge von
    Strandmann, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Modern History.

    R. GILDEA

    22 Jan.: `1848 in European collective
    memory.'

    G. ELLIS

    29 Jan.: `France.'

    D. MACK SMITH

    5 Feb.: `Italy.'

    L. MITCHELL

    12 Feb.: `England and 1848.'

    PROFESSOR POGGE VON STRANDMANN

    19 Feb.: `Germany.'

    D. SAUNDERS

    26 Feb.: `A Pyrrhic victory: the Russian
    Empire in 1848.'

    D. HOWE

    5 Mar.: `Responses to the revolutions of
    1848 in the United States.'

    PROFESSOR EVANS

    12 Mar.: `The Habsburg lands.'

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    section


    Seminar on later medieval France

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
    in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Convener: P.S. Lewis, MA, University Lecturer
    (CUF) in Modern History.

    PROFESSOR C.T. ALLMAND, Liverpool

    20 Jan.: `War in Le
    Jouvencel
    of Jean de Bueil.'

    DR K. DALY, Southampton

    27 Jan.: `Divided by a common past?
    History and identity in later medieval France.'

    C.D. TAYLOR

    3 Feb.
    : `The public role of women in later
    medieval political thought: the Salic Law and
    queenship.'

    DR G. SMALL, Glasgow

    10 Feb.: `Creating the present perfect?
    The role of the indicaire in the
    Burgundian theatre state.'

    M.J. BLANCHARD, Le Mans

    17 Feb.: `Commynes on kingship.'

    DR G. PROSSER, London

    24 Feb.: ` "Naître, vivre,
    servir": the cusp of nobility in later medieval
    Normandy (c.1440–c.1510).'

    DR M.K. JONES, London

    3 Mar.: `The siege of Orléans
    1428–9: a reappraisal.'

    PROFESSOR M.C.E. JONES, Nottingham

    10 Mar.: `Charles de Blois: sanctity and
    the state in later medieval Brittany.'

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    section


    Commonwealth History Graduate Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays
    in the Modern History Faculty.

    Postgraduate research presentations will be given at 4.30
    p.m. on 6 March (M. Newton, D. Salesa, and Z. Laidlaw),
    and 13 March (A. Dolan, R. Cox, and P. Docherty).

    G. WILLIAMS

    23 Jan.: `Co-operation, regulation, and
    monopoly: the South African wine industry in the
    twentieth century.'

    DR J. RYAN

    30 Jan.: `Picturing empire: photography
    and British imperialism, 1840–1914.'

    DR S. HEAP, International NGO Training and Research
    Centre, Oxford

    6 Feb.: `Indigenous and imported liquor:
    changing patterns of alcohol consumption in
    Nigeria.'

    DR W.G. CLARENCE-SMITH, SOAS

    13 Feb.: `Colonial protection and cocoa
    consumption, 1815–1914.'

    DR R. NEWMAN, SOAS

    20 Feb.: `Opium use and excise policy in
    India, c.1870–1910.'

    MRS R. RAZA

    27 Feb.: Patterns of English domestic
    consumption in early nineteenth-century India'
    (title to be confirmed).

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    section


    Seminar in Medieval History

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele
    Professor of Medieval History, and J.R.L. Maddicott, MA,
    D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History.

    DR I. WOOD, Leeds

    19 Jan.: `Kings in the hagiography of
    mission 600–1050.'

    DR V. BAINBRIDGE

    26 Jan.: `Prayer and power: the
    patronage of Syon Abbey by political and mercantile
    elites in fifteenth-century England.'

    PROFESSOR P. STAFFORD, Huddersfield

    2 Feb.: `The colloquy of ladies: the
    ruling women of north-west Europe c.1000
    AD.'

    S. O'SULLIVAN

    9 Feb.: `The Carolingian glosses on
    Prudentius's Psychomachia: the sources
    used.'

    PROFESSOR E. KING, Sheffield

    16 Feb.: `Stephen of Blois, count of
    Mortain and Boulogne. The route to the English throne
    in 1135.'

    A. BELL

    23 Feb.: `Communication and conquest:
    public works and private labours in the medieval
    fenland.'

    D. MORGAN, University College, London

    2 Mar.: `The household retinue of Henry
    V and the ethos of public life.'

    T. PEPPER

    9 Mar.: `Judgement, vengeance, and
    punishment: customary law and Catharism in
    thirteenth-century Languedoc.'

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    section


    Black people and British history (postgraduate
    seminar)

    The following seminars will be given at 11 a.m. on
    Thursdays in the New Room, the Hilda Besse Building, St
    Antony's College.

    Conveners: W. Beinart, MA, Rhodes Professor
    of Race Relations, P. Alexander (Ph.D. London), Research
    Fellow, St Antony's College, and S. Sandhu, M.St., Junior
    Research Fellow, Wolfson College.

    S. CREIGHTON

    22 Jan.: `John Archer—mayor,
    Edwardian progressive, and Panafricanist.'

    K. MALIK

    29 Jan.: `Why are we all
    multiculturalists now?'

    D. WILSON, Institute of Education, London

    5 Feb.: `Black workers, racism, and the
    CPGB, 1939–49.'

    M. SHERWOOD, Institute of Commonweath Studies, London

    12 Feb.: `Claudia Jones in Britain,
    1955–64.'

    N. MYERS, Merchant Taylors' School, Liverpool

    19 Feb.: `Reconstructing the black
    past.'

    M. DRESSER, University of the West of England

    26 Feb.: `Ethics, evidence, and memory:
    new approaches to the history of Bristol's African
    slave trade.'

    S. BOURNE

    5 Mar.: `Black in the British
    frame—black people in British film and
    television, 1896–1996.'

    L. TABILI, Arizona

    12 Mar.: `Reconstructing black migration
    to and through the imperial metropolis—problems
    and possibilities.'

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    section



    MODERN HISTORY, MEDIEVAL AND
    MODERN LANGUAGES


    European Humanities Research
    Centre

    Seminar on the History of the Book 1450–1800

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
    Fridays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R.G. Lewis, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, and I.W.F.
    Maclean, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Renaissance
    Studies.

    DR L.W.B. BROCKLISS

    23 Jan.: `The public use of private
    libraries in eighteenth-century Provence.'

    PROFESSOR A. PETTEGREE, St Andrews

    30 Jan.: `The sixteenth-century French
    religious book: establishing the parameters of a
    collaborative bibliographical project.'

    DR P. NELLES, Warburg Institute, London

    6 Feb.: `Books and teaching at the
    University of Helmstedt, 1690–1740.'

    DR R.A. COOPER

    13 Feb.: `Books in Lyon in the 1530s:
    the case of Symphorien Champier.'

    DR R.W. TRUMAN

    20 Feb.: `Censorship, the book, and
    intellectual life in sixteenth- and seventeenth-
    century Spain.'

    DR D. ZANCANI

    27 Feb.: `Early printed collections of
    poetry in Italy, 1470–1520.'

    DR N.S. SMITH

    6 Mar.: `Books and radicalism in
    England, 1558–1685.'

    M. PURCELL

    13 Mar.: `Richard Allestree
    (1619–81) and the Allestree Library.'

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    section



    MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

    The theory and practice of international
    organisations

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

    Conveners: Professor Robert O'Neill and Dr
    Mats Berdal.

    MR P. WINDSOR, Reader, LSE

    20 Jan.: `Globalisation, fragmentation,
    and Europe.'

    PROFESSOR M. LEIFER, LSE

    27 Jan.: `Co-operative security as a
    model for regional order in Asia Pacific.'

    MS A. BAILES, Political Director, Western European Union

    3 Feb.: `European security and defence
    identity: the role of institutions.'

    PROFESSOR N. MACFARLANE

    10 Feb.: `National interest and
    humanitarian action.'

    COL. T. TAYLOR, Assistant Director, IISS, and former
    UNSCOM Commissioner and Chief Inspector

    17 Feb.: `International organisations
    and the control of weapons of mass destruction: is
    the UNSCOM a model or an exception?'

    MR D. WILLIAMS

    24 Feb.: `Aid, donors, and sovereignty:
    international financial institutions in theory and
    practice.'

    DR P. WILSON, LSE

    3 Mar.: `Liberal internationalism and
    international organisations during the inter-war
    period.'

    LT.-GEN. R. SMITH, Force Commander, UNPROFOR (Bosnia),
    1995

    10 Mar.: `International organisations
    and the use of force.' (to be confirmed)

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    section


    Seminar in Economic and Social History

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: P.A. David, MA, Senior Research
    Fellow, All Souls College, C.H. Feinstein, MA, Chichele
    Professor of Economic History, J.S. Foreman-Peck, MA,
    University Lecturer in Economic History, and A. Offer,
    MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic
    History.

    K.D. KAUFFMAN, Wellesley College

    21 Jan.: `The market for paternalism:
    racial differences in cash tenancy rates across the
    US south.'

    L. BRUNT

    28 Jan.: `Food supply during the
    industrial revolution.'

    F. GALASSI, Warwick

    4 Feb.: `The price of culture: trust and
    defection in the Italian south.'

    D. BAINES and P. JOHNSON, LSE

    11 Feb.: `Like father, like son?
    Occupational mobility in the juvenile labour market
    in interwar London.'

    L. PRADOS, University Carlos III, Madrid

    18 Feb.: `The economic development of
    Spain since 1800—a reinterpretation.'

    C. FOHLIN, California Institute of Technology

    25 Feb.: `Does financial structure
    matter? Banking and industrial growth in pre-World
    War I Germany.'

    S. OGILVIE, Cambridge

    4 Mar.: `Efficient institution or
    obstacle to growth? Guilds in a German industrial
    region, 1580–1800.'

    J. TOMLINSON, Brunel

    11 Mar.: `Marshall Aid and the
    "shortage economy" of Britain in the
    1940s.'

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    section



    MUSIC

    JAMES CLAPPERTON will give a lecture-recital at 4.15 p.m.
    on Thursday, 29 January, in the Denis Arnold Hall, the
    Music Faculty. The lecture is open to the public.

    Subject: `A Well Older Than God: the
    influence of ancient myth and poetry on the contemporary
    piano music of Clapperton, Clemente, Ferneyhough, Franke,
    Radulescu, and Xenakis.'

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    section



    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman
    Period

    The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in Wolfson College.

    Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil.,
    Professor of Jewish Studies.

    PROFESSOR J. BLENKINSOPP, Notre Dame

    20 Jan.: `The biographical miracle: a
    comparison of Elisha and Hanina.'

    DR J. DAVILA, St Andrews

    27 Jan.: `The text of Genesis and Exodus
    at Qumran.'

    PROFESSOR D. BOYARIN, Berkeley

    3 Feb.: `Against syncretism: Rabbi
    Eliezer as a Christian?'


    10 Feb.: `Virgin rabbis/virgin
    fathers./

    PROFESSOR G. BROOKE, Manchester

    17 Feb.: `Miqdash Adam, Eden, and the
    Qumran community.'

    T. HORNER

    24 Feb.: `The portrayal of Trypho in
    Justin Martyr's Dialogue.'

    DR L. RUTGERS, Utrecht

    3 Mar.: `Jews in Roman Syria.'

    PROFESSOR M. GELLER, University College, London

    10 Mar.: `Cuneiform and the Jews:
    resistance to Hellenism.'

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    section



    ORIENTAL STUDIES, THEOLOGY

    Seminar in Eastern Christian Studies

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in the House of St Gregory and St Macrina, 1
    Canterbury Road.

    Conveners: S.P. Brock, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
    Syriac Studies, and K.T. Ware, MA, D.Phil., Spalding
    Lecturer in Eastern Orthodox Studies.

    DR B. ASHKELONI, Hebrew University, Jerusalem

    28 Jan.: `Once again: the attitudes of
    Gregory of Nyssa towards pilgrimage.'

    DR T. MGALOBLISHVILI, Tbilisi

    11 Feb.: `Jerusalem and Georgia:
    Jerusalem practice and Old Georgian liturgy.'

    PROFESSOR A. CAMERON

    25 Feb.: `Constantine and Moses.'

    THE REVD NIKOLAI SAKHAROV

    11 Mar.: `Kenosis according
    to Archimandrite Sophrony (Sakharov).'

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    section



    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Hinshelwood Lectures: Broadening electrochemical
    horizons

    PROFESSOR ALAN M. BOND, Professor of Chemistry, Monash
    University, will deliver the Hinshelwood Lectures at
    11.15 a.m. on the following Tuesdays and Thursdays in the
    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: J.P. Simons, MA, Dr Lee's Professor
    of Chemistry.

    10 Feb.: `The basics.'

    12 Feb.: `Applying a wide variety of
    electrochemical techniques to understand the redox
    chemistry of polyoxometalates: illustrating the
    basics.'

    17 Feb.: `Voltammetry of conducting and non-
    conducting microcrystals.'

    19 Feb.: `Voltammetric studies on organic,
    organometallic, and biologically important
    compounds.'

    24 Feb.: `Industrial applications with a
    purpose.'

    26 Feb.: `Voltammetry in electrochemically
    exotic media.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Theoretical Particle Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
    Fridays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

    Conveners: I.I. Kogan, MA, University
    Lecturer in Physics, and S. Sarkar (Ph.d. Bombay),
    Research Fellow, Wolfson College.

    J. GREENSITE, NBI, Copenhagen

    30 Jan.: `Casimir scaling, cooling, and
    centre vortices.'

    C. GOMEZ, CSIC, Madrid

    13 Feb.: `M-theory and the theta-
    puzzle.'

    S. HANDS, Swansea

    27 Feb.: `Fixed point behaviour in the
    3-D Thirring model.'

    L. COVI, Lancaster

    13 Mar.: `CP violation in leptogenesis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Theoretical Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
    Fridays in the Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

    Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham
    Professor of Physics.

    PROFESSOR J. HERTZ, Nordita, Copenhagen

    23 Jan.: `Exploring the neural code.'

    DR S. FRANZ, ICTP, Trieste

    6 Feb.: `Glassy transition and effective
    potential in the hyper-netted chain
    approximation.'

    DR P.M. SUTCLIFFE, Kent

    20 Feb.: `Skyrmions and monopoles.'

    DR R. RIVERS, Imperial College

    6 Mar.: `To what extent are phase
    transitions in condensed matter and the early
    universe alike?'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Seminar Room, the New Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor
    of Theoretical Chemistry.

    DR T. SOMMERFELD

    19 Jan.: `Gas phase dianions.'

    DR MAURO C.C. RIBEIRO, Sao Paulo

    26 Jan.: `Instantaneous normal modes of
    ionic liquids.'

    DR G.G. BALINT-KURTI, Bristol

    2 Feb.: `Wavepackets and molecular
    dynamics.'

    PROFESSOR M.H. ALEXANDER, Maryland

    9 Feb.: `Weakly bound complexes
    containing open shell atoms.'

    PROFESSOR D.E. LOGAN

    16 Feb.: `Insulators for the uninitiated
    (a general talk).'

    DR T. SEIDEMAN, NRC, Canada

    23 Feb.: `From nanoscale processes to
    time-resolved dynamics with intense laser fields.'

    DR D. BOWLER, Keele

    2 Mar.: `Order-N density functional
    theory and efficient implementation on massively
    parallel machines.'

    M.L. BREWER

    9 Mar.: `Some applications of
    semiclassical initial value methods.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Nonlinear and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Seminars

    Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be
    held at 2 p.m. on Mondays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the
    Atmospheric Physics Laboratory.

    Conveners: P.L. Read, MA, University Lecturer
    in Physics, and I.M. Moroz, MA, University Lecturer (CUF)
    in Mathematics.

    Further information may be obtained from the organisers,
    Dr Sue Gray (telephone: Oxford (2)72342), and Mr Michael
    Jameson.

    PROFESSOR R. HIDE

    19 Jan.: `Geomagnetic polarity
    reversals: free or forced?'

    DR S. HARRIS

    26 Jan.: `Magma equations,
    Painlevé analysis and integrability.'

    DR L. SMITH

    2 Feb., 3.15 p.m.: to be announced.

    PROFESSOR A. SOWARD, University of Exeter

    9 Feb.: `A nonlinear dynamo wave riding
    on a spatially varying background.'

    DR S. HOOD, Liverpool

    16 Feb.: `Using materially-conserved
    quantities to determine the profile function in
    generalised two-layer models.'

    DR P. HAYNES, Cambridge

    23 Feb.: `Stirring, mixing, and
    stratospheric chemistry.'

    DR I. ROULSTONE, UKMO

    2 Mar.: `Hamiltonian models of nearly
    geospheric flow: theory and applications.'

    DR G. CRAIG, Reading

    9 Mar.: `Moist convection in the
    atmosphere—theory and simulation.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Department of Human Anatomy: research seminars

    The following seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Fridays
    in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy.

    Convener: H.M. Charlton, MA, D.Phil., Reader
    in Neuroendocrinology and Acting Head of Department.

    PROFESSOR D. FEARON, Cambridge


    23 Jan.: `How lymphocytes evaluate
    biological and structural aspects of antigens.'

    DR R. FRANKLIN, Cambridge

    30 Jan.: `Can we explain CMS
    remyelination?'

    PROFESSOR P. HUMPHRIES, Dublin

    6 Feb.: `Genetics of degenerative
    retinal disease.'

    MR A. ROWSELL, Guy's and St Thomas's Hospital, London

    13 Feb.: `Embryology of facial
    anomalies.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    DR R. FOSTER, Imperial College, London

    20 Feb.: `The regulation of the
    mammalian biological clock by light: the
    identification of a novel photosensory pathway?'

    DR S. BLACKSHAW

    27 Feb.: `Isolation of genes from
    identified and regenerating neurons.'

    DR C. HOLT, Cambridge

    6 Mar.: `How axons are guided out of the
    retina and into their target.' (Jenkinson
    Seminar
    )

    DR P. HARRIS

    13 Mar.: `Polycistic kidney disease:
    clues to pathogenesis from gene identification.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Department of Experimental Psychology: seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Weiskrantz Room (C.113), the Department
    of Experimental Psychology.

    Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of
    Psychology, and P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of
    Psychology.

    DR D. SKUSE, Institute of Child Health, London
    >
    27 Jan.: `Imprinted genes, the X-chromosome, and
    the "male brain".'
    (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

    PROFESSOR O. BRADDICK, University College, London

    10 Feb.: `How does the infant brain
    process visual motion?' (McDonnell–Pew
    Seminar
    )

    DR K. WYNN, University College, London

    17 Feb.: `The nature of infants'
    numerical competence.'

    DR P. AZZOPARDI

    24 Feb.: `The neural basis of residual
    vision in blindsight.' (McDonnell–Pew
    Seminar
    )

    DR P.G. SCHYNS, Glasgow

    3 Mar.: `Diagnostic recognition
    information produces flexible scale perceptions.'

    PROFESSOR R. BENTALL, Liverpool

    10 Mar.: `Psychological processes in
    paranoia and mania: time for a unified theory?'

    DR B. MILNER, McGill

    17 Mar.: `Probing the brain for
    memories.' (McDonnell–Pew Visiting Fellow
    and Litchfield Lecturer
    )

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Summer School on Connectionist Modelling

    Applications are invited for this two-week residential
    summer school, to be held in Oxford, 19--31 July 1998.
    The course is aimed primarily at researchers who wish to
    exploit neural network models in their teaching and/or
    research and it will provide a general introduction to
    connectionist modelling, biologically plausible neural
    networks and brain function through lectures and
    exercises on Macintoshes and PCs. The instructors with
    primary responsibility for teaching the course are Kim
    Plunkett and Edmund Rolls.

    The cost of attendance will be £950 for faculty, and
    £750 for graduate students. A small number of
    partial bursaries may be available for graduate
    students.

    Further information can be found at
    www-cogsci.psych.ox.ac.uksummer- school. Information
    about the contents of the course is available from
    Steven.Young@psy.ox.ac.uk.

    Those interested in participating should contact Mrs Sue
    King, Department of Experimental Psychology, South Parks
    Road, Oxford OX1 3UD (telephone: Oxford (2)71353, e-mail:
    susan.king@psy.oxford.ac.uk), to whom a brief description
    of the applicant's background, with an explanation of why
    heshe would like to attend (one page maximum) should be
    sent by 31 January.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SOCIAL STUDIES

    The two majorities and the puzzle of modern American
    politics

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College.

    Conveners: Professor B.E. Shafer, Mellon
    Professor of American Government, and Professor E.G.
    Carmines, University of Indiana.

    PROFESSOR SHAFER

    22 Jan.: `The two majorities and the
    contours of the puzzle, 1932–98.'


    29 Jan.: `Partisan reversal within
    divided government, 1992–6.'


    5 Feb.: `The two majorities and postwar
    presidential elections, 1948–2000.'

    N.J. OXMAN, President, the Campaign Group, Inc.

    12 Feb.: `Designing campaign
    advertisements in the television age'
    (workshop).

    PROFESSOR P.M. SNIDERMAN, Stanford

    19 Feb.: `Social justice as a race-
    neutral ideal in postwar politics.'

    PROFESSOR CARMINES

    26 Feb.: `The New Deal party system
    meets racial issues.'


    5 Mar.: `The New Deal party system meets
    cultural and social issues.'


    12 Mar.: `Ideological polarisation and
    the decline of the New Deal party system.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Senior Research Seminar in American Politics

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Chester Room, Nuffield College.

    Conveners: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor
    of American Government, and N.W. Polsby, MA, Olin
    Professor of American Government.

    PROFESSOR A.J. WARE

    27 Jan.: `The National Conference on Practical
    Reform of Primary Elections, January, 1898: the
    significance of a "forgotten" conference
    100 years later.'

    PROFESSOR POLSBY

    10 Feb.: `A new encyclopaedia for the
    social and behavioural sciences.'

    DR Y.F. KHONG

    24 Feb.: `Would the US fight over
    Taiwan?'

    DR N.P. BOWLES

    10 Mar.: `Studying the presidency.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Nuffield Sociology Seminar: employment, unemployment,
    and social inequality

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: D.I.D. Gallie, MA, D.Phil.,
    Professor of Sociology.

    A. SORENSEN, Harvard

    21 Jan.: `Employment relations and class
    structure.'

    J. GERSHUNY, Essex

    28 Jan.: `Unemployment: blame the
    victim?'

    PROFESSOR GALLIE

    4 Feb.: `Unemployment and social
    exclusion in the European Union.'

    R. LAYTE

    11 Feb.: `Unemployment, insecure work,
    and cumulative disadvantage.'

    M. WHITE and J. FORTH, Policy Studies Institute

    18 Feb.: `Unemployment, flexible work,
    and family income.'

    B. BURCHELL, Cambridge

    25 Feb.: `The prevalence and effects of
    job insecurity 1986–7.'

    MARI SAKO

    4 Mar.: `The changing pattern of trade
    unionism in Japan.'

    A. FELSTEAD, Leicester, and F. GREEN, Leeds

    11 Mar.: `Changes in the skill profile
    of the British workforce.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    THEOLOGY

    Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be
    held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Keston Institute, 4
    Park Town.

    Convener: K.T. Ware, MA, D.Phil., Spalding
    Lecturer in Eastern Orthodox Studies.

    J. DEAN, United Bible Societies

    27 Jan.: `The development of new bible
    societies in the former Soviet Union.'

    S. HUGHES, Hawkesley Romania Christian Trust

    3 Feb.: `Health care and street children
    ministries in Romania.'

    THE REVD VALDIS TERAUDKALNS, Keston Scholar and Baptist
    pastor

    10 Feb.: `Latvian Baptist life
    today.'

    M. ROSHCHIN, Old Believer

    19 Feb.: `Religion in Dagestan and
    Chechnya today.'

    I. BONDARENKO, former dissident, evangelist

    Fri. 6 Mar., 3.30 p.m.: `Church planting
    in Siberia.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Ian Ramsey Centre

    Seminars in science and theology: brain, mind, and
    religious belief

    The following seminars will be given at 8.15 for 8.30
    p.m. on Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

    PROFESSOR R. SWINBURNE

    29 Jan.: `The soul.'

    THE REVD JOHN PUDDEFOOT, Head of Mathematics, Eton
    College

    12 Feb.: `Machines and persons: is the
    Turing test enough?'

    DR I. TRACEY

    26 Feb.: `Perceiving pain; functional
    neuroimaging studies of the human brain.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INTER-FACULTY SEMINARS

    Restoration to Reform, 1660–1832: British
    political, literary, intellectual, and social history

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Old Library, All Souls College. The series will
    continue in Trinity Term.

    The series is organised by Dr Marilyn Butler (Exeter
    College), Professor John Burrow (Balliol College),
    Professor Robert Darnton (All Souls College), Dr
    Christine Gerrard (Lady Margaret Hall), Professor Roger
    Lonsdale (Balliol College), Dr James Raven (Mansfield
    College), Dr Isabel Rivers (St Hugh's College), and Dr
    David Womersley (Jesus College).

    DR P. FARA, Cambridge

    26 Jan.: `Faces of genius:
    representations of Isaac Newton in the eighteenth
    century.'

    DR S. JARVIS, Cambridge

    9 Feb.: `Recluse from profession:
    Wordsworth and the politics of religious retirement
    from Bayle to Milner.'

    DR A. SECORD, Cambridge

    23 Feb.: `Artisans, gentlemen, and the
    work of early nineteenth-century botany.'

    PROFESSOR A. WINTER, California Institute of Techology

    9 Mar.: `The demagogue, the mesmerist,
    and the conductor: physiologies of leadership and
    common sense in the early nineteenth century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM, ORIENTAL
    STUDIES

    PROFESSOR YASSER TABBAA, Barakat Trust Visiting Fellow,
    St Cross College, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 23
    January, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean
    Museum.

    Subject: `Rationality and belief in the pre-
    modern Islamic hospital.'

    Professor Tabbaa will also lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 10 February, in the Medieval Studies Seminar,
    Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

    Subject: `Circles of power: palace, citadel,
    and city in medieval Aleppo.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

    Interdepartmental finance seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on
    Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Said Business School,
    the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Conveners: A. Ljungqvist, Said Business
    School, H.S. Shin, Economics, and P. Wilmott,
    Mathematics.

    Enquiries should be directed to Elaine Durham, Said
    Business School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE
    (telephone: Oxford (2)88650, e-mail:
    elaine.durham@obs.ox.ac.uk).

    J. VAN REENEN, University College, London

    19 Jan.: `Investments, R. & D., and
    financial constraints in Britain and Germany.'

    T. MILBOURN, London Business School

    26 Jan.: `Prestige, intrafirm
    tournaments, and failure aversion in corporate
    decisions.'

    A. MELNIK, Haifa

    2 Feb.: `The pricing of best-effort
    v. firm-commitment underwriting
    contracts.'

    M. TAYLOR

    9 Feb.: to be announced.

    R. KRAINER, Wisconsin–Madison

    16 Feb.: `Corporate governance and
    business cycles in the G-7 countries: do institutions
    really matter?'

    A. NEUBERGER, London Business School

    23 Feb.: `Rational bounds on prices of
    exotic options.'

    S. HURN

    2 Mar.: `Estimating the parameters of
    stochastic differential equations.'

    G. HUBBARD, Columbia

    9 Mar.: `Are dividend taxes and
    imputation credits capitalised into share values?'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CATHOLIC CHAPLAINCY


    Thomas More Lecture 1998

    THE RT HON LORD MICHAEL PATRICK NOLAN will deliver the
    annual Thomas More Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 19
    February, in the Newman Room, the Catholic Chaplaincy
    (opposite Christ Church Memorial Garden). The lecture is
    open to all members of the University.

    Subject: `Integrity and corruption in public
    life.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MCDONNELL–PEW AND MRC
    CENTRES FOR COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

    Cognitive Neuroscience Seminar

    PROFESSOR P. EKMAN, University of California, San
    Francisco, will give a seminar at 4.30 p.m. on Monday, 9
    February, in Lecture Theatre A, the Department of
    Experimental Psychology.

    Subject: `Darwin dismissed: why his book on
    "The Expression of the Emotions" was ignored
    for nearly a century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING
    EDUCATION

    Oxford Architectural History Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on
    Mondays in Rewley House.

    Conveners: M.R. Airs, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
    Conservation and the Historic Environment, and G. Tyack,
    MA, M.Litt., Fellow, Kellogg College, and Director,
    Stanford University in Oxford.

    D. CLARK

    2 Feb.: `In search of the medieval
    shop.'

    M. EVANS, Head of Collections, National Monuments Records
    Centre

    16 Mar.: `Victorian schools in west
    Oxfordshire.'

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    section



    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL
    STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in Lecture Room 1, the Department of Educational
    Studies.

    PROFESSOR M. BASSEY, British Educational Research
    Association

    19 Jan.: `A possible future for
    educational research—a cadre of professional
    researchers and a cadre of teacher researchers as an
    alternative to research assessment exercises in
    education?'

    DR T. MAYNARD, Swansea

    26 Jan.: `Primary student teachers'
    school-based learning and the limits of
    "standard cognition".'

    PROFESSOR A. RYAN

    2 Feb.: to be announced.

    MS C. LEE

    16 Feb.: `The TTA and research—a
    funded researcher's view.'

    DR P. ADEY, King's College, London

    23 Feb.: `Methodological issues in
    research around the cognitive acceleration
    project.'

    DR J. HURRY, Institute of Education, London

    2 Mar.: `Can schools influence young
    people's drug use: evidence from Project Charlie.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND
    JEWISH STUDIES

    The following public lectures will be given at 8.15 p.m.
    on Wednesdays in the Common Room, Yarnton Manor.

    PROFESSOR M. BODIAN

    21 Jan.: `The meaning of martyrdom:
    seventeenth-century Portuguese Jews on Converso
    martyrs.'

    PROFESSOR P. PULZER

    28 Jan.: `A minority in a democracy:
    Jews in the Weimar Republic.'

    PROFESSOR D. BOYARIN, Berkeley

    4 Feb.: `Quo vadis: tricksters v.
    martyrs.' (Lancaster/Yarnton lecture
    series
    )

    PROFESSOR E. MOONMAN, City University, London

    18 Feb.: `A major discovery: the
    family.'

    E. HOFFMAN, author

    25 Feb.: `Shtetl in context: a history
    of conflict and coexistence.'

    PROFESSOR L. RUTGERS, Utrecht

    4 Mar.: `Discoveries in the Jewish
    catacombs of ancient Rome: new solutions for old
    problems.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC
    STUDIES

    Aspects of Islamic history

    Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be
    held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the centre.

    PROFESSOR F. ROBINSON, London

    21 Jan.: `Muslim and Christian worlds:
    shapers of each other.'

    PROFESSOR A. KNYSH, Exeter University

    28 Jan.: `Writing a history of Islamic
    mysticism: methodological problems.'

    PROFESSOR S. FAROQHI, Munich

    4 Feb.: `Staking our claims to urban
    territory: Ottoman artisans and their workshops.'

    PROFESSOR W. KADI, Chicago

    11 Feb.: `The early Muslims' experience
    of displacement and its literary expressions.'

    PROFESSOR L.P. HARVEY

    18 Feb.: `Overseas military assistance
    for Muslims of the Iberian peninsula
    1500–1609.'

    PROFESSOR W.F. MADELUNG

    25 Feb.: `Velayat-e Faqih
    of Ayatollah Montazeri.'

    PROFESSOR C.E. BOSWORTH, Manchester

    4 Mar.: `Islamisation of the Caucasus
    and Central Asia.'

    PROFESSOR H. INALCIK, Bilkent

    11 Mar.: `Shariah and customary law in
    the Ottoman Empire.'

    PROFESSOR J. BOWEN, Washington University, St Louis

    Fri. 20 Mar.: `Contemporary Islamic law
    in Indonesia.'

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    section



    NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE
    STUDIES

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays
    in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute of Japanese
    Studies.

    DR KEIICHIRO KOMATSU, Action Japan, Department of Trade
    and Industry

    23 Jan.: `Anglo-Japanese industrial co-
    operation.'

    PROFESSOR IZUMI KOBAYASHI, Osaka Gakuin University

    30 Jan.: `Why does Japan distribute so
    much ODA in the South Pacific? A case study of
    foreign policy decision-making.'

    PROFESSOR HIROSHI ODA, University College, London

    6 Feb.: `Corporate governance in Japan:
    the Yamaichi Securities case.'

    PROFESSOR MICHIKO NAKAHARA, Waseda University, Tokyo

    13 Feb.: `Asian labourers and the
    Burma–Siam railway.'

    PROFESSOR TOKUOU KONISHI, Meiji University, Tokyo

    20 Feb.: `The judiciary and the
    executive: judge–prosecutor relationships and
    administrative courts.'

    PROFESSOR JUNKO TOMARU, Kobe

    27 Feb.: `Rapprochement without
    reparations: post-war Japan and Malaya,
    1945–61.'

    T. NELSON, Stirling

    6 Mar.: `Slavery in pre-modern
    Japan.'

    PROFESSOR M. PYE, Marburg

    13 Mar.: `Studying religions in Japan.'
    (Joint seminar with the Faculty of Theology
    `Study of religions' series
    )

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    section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


    Seminar in Contemporary South
    Asia

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
    House.

    Conveners: Dr B. Harriss-White and Dr N.
    Gooptu.

    M. ROBINSON, Sussex

    22 Jan.: `The politics of civil service
    reform.'

    H. MUKHOPADHYAY, National Institute of Public Finance and
    Policy

    29 Jan.: `India: economic reforms of the
    1990s, macroeconomic dimensions and
    ramifications.'

    S. BHATTACHARYYA, Vidyasagar University

    5 Feb.: `Class differentiation and
    agricultural credit: a study of West Bengal.'

    R. JENKINS, Birkbeck College, London

    12 Feb.: `Elections and the politics of
    social reform.'

    J. PFAFF

    19 Feb.: `Reactions and responses in
    ethnic politics: the Nepalese minorities in the
    public space.'

    B. ZACHARIAH, Cambridge

    26 Feb.: `The social context of
    "economic development" in India
    c.930–50.'

    K.T. RAMMOHAN, Centre for Development Studies, Trivandrum

    5 Mar.: `Commodity chain in a
    microeconomy: observations based on field-work in
    three Kerala villages.'

    R. CHOWDHARY, University of Jammu

    12 Mar.: `Understanding the Kashmir
    issue: the dynamics of ethnicity.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Seminar in Contemporary South Asia: Extraordinary
    Lecture

    A. BHARGAVA, Harvard, will lecture at 2 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 18 February, in the Library Wing Seminar Room,
    Queen Elizabeth House.

    Conveners: Dr B. Harriss-White and Dr N.
    Gooptu.


    Subject: `Family planning, gender
    differences, and child mortality: evidence from UP.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Centre for Cross-Cultural
    Research on Women

    Gender, culture, and development: new theoretical
    directions

    The following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
    Elizabeth House. Details of the 19 February meeting will
    be announced later.

    Conveners: Dr Helen Callaway and Dr Lidia
    Sciama.

    PROFESSOR D.O. HELLY, Hunter College, New York

    15 Jan.: `Gender and history: the modern
    British example.'

    DR E. REICHEL, Columbia

    22 Jan.: `Gender-based knowledge
    systems: indigenous ecopolitics in the north-west
    Amazon, Columbia.'

    DR C. LLOYD

    29 Jan.: `Theorising empowerment.'

    DR F. MACAULAY

    5 Feb.: `Women policy networks: local,
    regional, and international.'

    DR D. MILLS

    12 Feb: `Situating
    "development": reworking transnational
    feminisms in Uganda.'

    DR CALLAWAY

    26 Feb.: `Exploring feminisms.'

    C. SWEETMAN, editor, cGender and Development\,
    Oxfam

    5 Mar.: `Men, masculinity, and
    development.'

    DR SCIAMA

    12 Mar.: `Theme, plot, and gender in
    personal narratives.'

    DR A.M. GOETZ, Sussex

    30 Apr.: `Getting institutions right for
    women in development.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Refugee Studies Programme

    Seminars on Forced Migration

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
    Elizabeth House.

    For further information, contact the Education Unit,
    Refugee Studies Programme, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St
    Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (telephone: Oxford (2)70723, fax:
    (2)70721, e-mail: rsp@qeh.ox.ac.uk, Internet home page:
    www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsp/).

    PROFESSOR G. GOODWIN-GILL, Institute of European Studies
    and Amsterdam

    21 Jan.
    : `International organisations and
    refugees.'

    DR P. WEIL, Institut d'études politiques, Paris

    28 Jan.: `New immigration/asylum policy
    in France.'

    DR R. BLACK, Sussex

    4 Feb.: `Greening asylum?
    Humanitarianism v. environmentalism in
    mass displacement.'

    G. JAEGER, Comité belge d'aide aux
    réfugiés

    11 Feb.: `The new EU Refugee Law.'

    DR N. VAN HEAR

    18 Feb.: `The mass exodus, dispersal,
    and regrouping of migrant communities.'

    DR J. CRISP, UNHCR, Geneva

    25 Feb.: `Critiques of UNHCR.'

    DR V. LASSAILLY-JACOB, Centre d'études africaines,
    CNRS, Paris

    4 Mar.: `Land resettlement schemes for
    refugees and oustees in Africa: a comparative
    study.'

    DR S. GREEN, Portsmouth

    11 Mar.: `Citizenship and immigration in
    Germany.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Foundation Course

    Unless otherwise stated, the following courses will be
    given as shown in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen
    Elizabeth House.

    C. DOLAN

    Mon. 10 a.m.–12 noon: `Household
    livelihood and economy.'

    DR D. CHATTY

    Tue. 10 a.m.–12 noon: `Research
    Methods Course II.'

    DR E. VOUHIRA

    Tue. 2.30–4.30 p.m., Garden Room,
    QEH
    : `Identity: nationalism, regionalism, and
    ethnicity in the explanation of human displacement
    (eastern Europe).'

    DR J. HENRY

    Wed. 2–4 p.m.: `Nutrition.'

    DR A. SHACKNOVE

    Thur. 10 a.m.–12 noon, St Cross
    Building
    : `International human rights and
    refugee law I.'

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    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL
    STUDIES

    Visitors' programme

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College.

    Convener: D. Sandler, MA, Research Fellow of
    the Centre and Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

    DR J. PFAFF-CZARNECKA, Zurich

    26 Jan.: `Religious minorities in
    Switzerland. Forms of collective action and claims to
    collective rights.'

    DR B. BOGOCH, Bar-Ilan University, Israel

    2 Feb.: `The gendered construction of
    professional identity in the courtroom.'

    PROFESSOR J. SHAPIRO, Seattle

    9 Feb.: `Current legal issues facing
    lesbian and gay families in the USA.'

    DR M.M. JOARDER, Islamic University of Jushtia-Jhenaidha,
    Bangladesh

    16 Feb.: `Bangladesh's role in the world
    economy through its transition from GATT to the
    WTO.'

    PROFESSOR KIYOSHI AOKI, Nanzan University, Japan

    23 Feb.: `Tradition and modernisation in
    the South Korean family law "the family system
    governed by the principle of paternal blood
    lineage".'

    R. MOORE, US Attorney's Office, Alabama

    2 Mar.: `Comparison of the trial of
    complex criminal fraud cases in the USA and UK.'

    DR U. YANAY, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    9 Mar.: `The role of the state in
    reducing crime and victimisation locally.'

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    section



    INSTITUTE OF VIROLOGY AND
    ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY

    The following seminars will be given at 4 p.m. on the
    days shown in the institute. With the exception of the
    seminar to be held on Thursday, 29 January, the meetings
    will take place on Fridays.

    PROFESSOR J. CLARK, Roslin Institute, Edinburgh

    16 Jan.: to be announced.

    DR M. GIRARD, Institut Pasteur, Paris

    29 Jan.: to be announced.

    DR M. BOULOY, Institut Pasteur, Paris

    6 Feb.: `The Rift Valley fever virus:
    dissection of the ambisense RNA genome as a step
    toward parthogenesis analysis.'

    PROFESSOR H. KLENK, Marburg

    Feb., date to be announced: `Molecular
    studies on Marburg and Ebola viruses.'

    DR L. ENJUANES, National Centre for Biotechnology, Madrid

    27 Feb.: `Tissue-specific expression of
    genes from coronavirus vectors.'

    DR J. JANSSON, Stockholm

    6 Mar.: `Quantification of bacterial
    cell numbers and metabolic activity in environmental
    samples using biomarkers.'

    PROFESSOR B. RIMA, Belfast

    20 Mar.: to be announced.

    DR K. SMALLA, Institute for Plant Virology, Brunswick

    27 Mar.: `Application of denaturing
    gradient gel electrophoresis for microbial community
    analyses—potentials and limitations.'

    PROFESSOR S. MOLIN, Denmark

    3 Apr.: `Structure/function
    relationships in microbial communities.'

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    section



    WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY
    OF MEDICINE

    Oral History Workshops

    The following meetings will be held at 12.45 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in the Wellcome Unit.

    Convener: Dr Sarah Harper.

    PROFESSOR J. LEWIS

    28 Jan.: `Women and care.'

    K. FISHER

    11 Feb.: `Contraception and birth
    control.'

    K. FIELD

    25 Feb.: `Exploring childhood and
    health.'

    M. HOULBROOKE, Reading

    11 Mar.: `Children speak.'

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    section


    Clinical innovations and abuses in ethical and
    historical perspective

    Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be
    held at 2.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Wellcome Unit.

    Convener: P.J. Weindling, MA, Reader in the
    History of Medicine.

    DR WEINDLING

    22 Jan. : `Nazi medicine and its
    victims: reflections on Ernst Klee, Auschwitz,
    die NS-Medizin und ihre Opfer
    .' (Preceded by a
    showing of Ernst Klee's film Ärzte ohne
    Gewissen
    (Physicians Without a
    Conscience
    ) at 1.15 p.m.)

    DR C. AMBROSELLI, Centre George Canguilhem, Paris

    29 Jan.: `Medical ethics and human
    rights.'

    DR U. SCHMIDT

    5 Feb.: ` "Returning home":
    Leo Alexander's medical war crimes investigations and
    the origins of the Nuremberg Medical Trial,
    1945–7.'

    DR I. LÖWY, Wellcome Institute, London

    12 Feb.: `Experimentation as a routine
    treatment—clinical trials of anti-cancer and
    anti-AIDS drugs.'

    C. TIMMERMANN, Wellcome Unit, Manchester

    19 Feb.: `Hippocrates or Paracelsus?
    Medical role models in inter-war Germany.'

    DR J. HAZELGROVE, Melbourne

    26 Feb.: `The impact of the Nuremberg
    Code on Human Experimentation in Britain,
    1947–64.'

    PROFESSOR J. LOWENSTEIN, Wellcome Unit, Manchester

    5 Mar.: `Dead bodies for anatomical
    research in Germany before and during the Third
    Reich: the case of Hermann Stieve.'

    DR A. RICCIARDI-VON PLATEN, Rome; member of the German
    Medical Commission at the Nuremberg Medical Trial,
    1946–7

    12 Mar., 2.30 p.m., Pauling Human Sciences
    Centre
    : `Medical education in Nazi Germany:
    lessons for the present.'

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    section



    ALL SOULS COLLEGE

    Foreign Policy Studies Programme

    Germany, Europe, and the world

    Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be
    held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls
    College.

    S. CRAWSHAW, The Independent

    23 Jan.: `Germany today: the political
    landscape.'

    D. MARSH, Robert Fleming

    30 Jan.: `Germany today: the economic
    outlook.'

    T. GARTON ASH

    Thur. 5 Feb.: `Germany in central
    Europe.'

    J. ROPER, Royal Institute of International Affairs

    13 Feb.: `Germany in the European
    Union.'

    HE DR GEBHARDT VON MOLTKE, German Ambassador to the
    United Kingdom

    20 Feb.: `German national interests.'

    FIELD-MARSHAL LORD INGE, former Chief of the Defence
    Staff

    27 Feb.: `Germany in NATO.'

    PROFESSOR H. ADOMEIT, Forschungsinstitut für
    Internationale Politik und Sicherheit, Ebenhausen

    6 Mar.: `Germany and Russia.'

    THE RT. HON. SIR MALCOLM RIFKIND, formerly Secretary of
    State for Defence and for Foreign and Commonwealth
    Affairs

    13 Mar.: `Germany and Britain.'

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    section



    CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE


    F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture
    1998

    PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON, Creative Writing Program,
    Princeton University, will deliver the F.W. Bateson
    Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 19 February, in
    the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Getting round: notes towards an
    Ars Poetica.'

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    section



    GREEN COLLEGE


    Green College Lectures 1998

    Plagues

    The following lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    DR P. SLACK

    19 Jan.: `Plagues in history: the
    European experience.'

    PROFESSOR P. HAGGETT, Bristol

    26 Jan.: `The geography of plagues.'

    PROFESSOR R. ANDERSON

    2 Feb.: `Drugs and plagues:
    antimicrobial resistance.'

    SIR KENNETH CALMAN, Chief Medical Officer

    9 Feb.: `Plagues of the millennium.'

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    section



    LINACRE COLLEGE


    Linacre Lectures 1998

    The environment and historical change

    The Linacre Lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on
    Thursdays in Lecture Theatre A, the ZoologyPsychology
    Building.

    Linacre College acknowledges the generosity of Riche
    Monde (Bangkok) Ltd. in making the current lecture series
    possible.

    PROFESSOR A.S. GOUDIE

    22 Jan.: `The Ice Age in the tropics and
    its human implications.'

    PROFESSOR SIR TONY WRIGLEY, Cambridge

    29 Jan.: `Meeting human energy needs:
    constraints, opportunities, and effects.'

    PROFESSOR M.G.L. BAILLIE, Belfast

    5 Feb.: `The tree-ring records: putting
    some abrupt environmental changes back into human
    history.'

    DR O. RACKHAM, Cambridge

    12 Feb.: `Boundaries and country
    planning: ancient and modern.'

    PROFESSOR C.V. PHYTHIAN-ADAMS, Leicester

    19 Feb.: `Environments and identities:
    landscape as cultural projection in the English
    provincial past.'

    PROFESSOR C. VITA-FINZI, University College, London

    26 Feb.: `Climate and history in the Old
    World and the New.'

    PROFESSOR W. BEINART

    5 Mar.: `The re-naturing of African
    animals: film and literature in the 1950s and
    60s.'

    PROFESSOR H. MORPHY, University College, London

    12 Mar.: `Hunting to mining:
    transformations of the Australian landscape through
    time.'

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    section



    MAGDALEN COLLEGE


    Waynflete Lectures

    Parliament in a changing world

    SIR MICHAEL WHEELER-BOOTH, KCB, lately Clerk of the
    Parliaments and currently Visiting Fellow, Magdalen
    College, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on
    the following Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.
    Admission is free.

    3 Feb.: `The Crown in Parliament.'

    10 Feb.: `The House of Lords.'

    17 Feb.: `The House of Commons.'

    24 Feb.: `Westminster and the European
    Union.'

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    section



    MANSFIELD COLLEGE

    Religion and Democracy Programme

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in Rhodes House.

    DR A. BORAINE, Deputy Chair, the South African Truth and
    Reconciliation Commission

    19 Jan.: `Churches and apartheid in
    South Africa.'

    CHIEF JUSTICE MUHAMMED SAID AL-ASHMAWY, Egyptian High
    Court Judge

    2 Feb.: `Religion for new humanity.'

    PROFESSOR A. STEPAN

    23 Feb.: `Democracy and world religions:
    contra Samuel Huntington.'

    RABBI JULIA NEUBERGER, Director, the King's Fund;
    Chancellor, University of Ulster

    9 Mar.: `Inclusiveness and
    exclusiveness: Jews living with others in a pluralist
    society.'

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    section


    Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and
    Society

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m on Tuesdays
    in the Council Room, Mansfield College (ground floor,
    main building). Further information is available from the
    Administrator, OCEES, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF
    (telephone and fax: Oxford (2)70886, e-mail:
    ocees@mansf.ox.ac.uk).

    M. REDCLIFT, Keele

    20 Jan.: `Environmental security and
    global consumption.'

    J. ROBERTSON, Co-founder, New Economics Foundation

    27 Jan.: `Sharing our common heritage:
    resource taxes, green dividends, and a new social
    contract.'

    D. LOWENTHAL, University College, London

    3 Feb.: `Environmentalism from George
    Perkins Marsh to the millennium.'

    R. CLIFT, Surrey

    10 Feb.: `The emergence of industrial
    ecology.'

    D. SLATER, Department of the Environment, Transport, and
    the Regions

    17 Feb: `Environmental risk assessment.'

    B. SZERSZYNSKI, Lancaster

    24 Feb.: `Ecological rites:
    environmental politics as ritual action.'

    J. BURGESS, University College, London

    3 Mar.: `Rationalising (un)sustainable
    lifestyles.'

    T. HAYWARD, Edinburgh

    10 Mar.: `Constitutional environmental
    rights and their implications for democracy.'

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    section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    A Britain for the twenty-first century: the debate on
    constitutional change

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
    in the Lecture Theatre, the New Building, St Antony's
    College.

    Conveners: Professor Archie Brown, Mr Robert
    Jackson, MP, and Dr Phyllis Starkey, MP.

    MICHAEL WELSH, former Conservative MEP, now director of
    the Advisory Centre on Europe, AUSTIN MITCHELL, MP, and
    SIR MICHAEL BUTLER, former British Representative to the
    European Community

    20 Jan.: `What are the constitutional
    implications of European Union?'

    GRAHAM ALLEN, MP, ROBERT JACKSON, MP, and PHILIP
    STEPHENS, The Financial Times

    27 Jan.: `How should Parliament be
    modernised?'

    JONATHAN EVANS, former Conservative Parliamentary
    Secretary at the Home Office, JOHN LLOYD, Associate
    Editor, New Statesman, and PROFESSOR BROWN

    3 Feb.: `Will Scottish and Welsh
    devolution strengthen or weaken the union?'

    THE RT. HON. MICHAEL ANCRAM, MP, and ANDREW ADONIS,
    The Independent

    10 Feb.: `Is English regional government
    necessary?'

    THE RT. HON. DAVID CURRY, MP, former Conservative
    Minister for Local Government, DR PHYLLIS STARKEY, MP,
    and PROFESSOR JOHN STEWART, Birmingham

    17 Feb.: `Should local government be a
    partner of national government or its agent?'

    DR GEOFFREY MARHSALL and PROFESSOR ALAN RYAN

    24 Feb.: ` `Freedom of Information and a
    Bill of Rights.'

    THE RT. HON. STEPHEN DORRELL, MP, and PROFESSOR IAIN
    MCLEAN

    3 Mar.: `Would changing the British
    voting system empower the voters?'

    SIR PATRICK CORMACK, MP, DR CALUM MACDONALD, MP, and DR
    DAVID BUTLER

    10 Mar.: `Referendums—expanding or
    threatening British democracy?'

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    section



    ST CATHERINE'S COLLEGE


    Cameron Mackintosh Workshop

    PROFESSOR THELMA HOLT, MR KOLYBELNIKOV, and MR GEARIN-
    TOSH will be the speakers at this workshop, to be held at
    10 a.m. on Friday, 30 January, in the Bernard Sunley Room
    C, St Catherine's College. Two further lectures on
    Chekhov will be held in Trinity and Michaelmas Terms.

    Subject: `Chekhov's life: introduction.'

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    section



    WOLFSON COLLEGE


    Wolfson College Lectures 1998

    The idea of a university

    The Wolfson College Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
    the following Tuesdays in the Hall, Wolfson College. The
    lectures will be open to the public. Enquiries should be
    directed to Oxford (2)74103.

    THE REVD DR IAN KER

    20 Jan.: `Newman's Idea of a
    University
    : a guide for the contemporary
    university?'

    DR J. DUNBABIN

    27 Jan.: `The origins of the
    university.'

    DR N. KEOHANE, President, Duke University

    3 Feb.: `The American campus: from
    colonial seminary to global multiversity.'

    J. SAYER, Director, TEMPUS programmes

    10 Feb.: `Linking universities across
    Europe: principles, practicalities, and
    perspectives.'

    R. JACKSON, MP

    17 Feb.: `The universities, government,
    and society.'

    PROFESSOR C. BOOTH, formerly Vice-Chancellor, Oxford
    Brookes University

    24 Feb.: `The rise of the
    "new" universities in Britain.'

    PROFESSOR A. MACFARLANE, formerly Principal, Heriot Watt
    University

    3 Mar.: `Universities in a knowledge
    economy: the impact of technology.'

    SIR DAVID SMITH, President, Wolfson College; formerly
    Principal, University of Edinburgh

    10 Mar.: `The changing idea of a
    university.'

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    section



    OXFORD CARDIAC CLUB

    PROFESSOR SIR DAVID WEATHERALL will be the speaker at the
    inaugural meeting of the Oxford Cardiac Club, to be held
    at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 19 March, in the Margaret
    Thatcher Conference Centre, Somerville College.
    Clinicians, researchers, and students are welcome to
    attend.

    Further details may be obtained from Dr Sian Rees or Dr
    Anthony Wright, University Laboratory of Physiology,
    Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT (telephone: Oxford (2)72500,
    fax: (2)72469).

    Subject: `The activation of foetal genes: an
    alternative approach to gene therapy.'

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    section



    INTERDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL CLUB
    IN HUMAN POPULATION GENETICS

    The club will continue this term. Meetings are held every
    Monday in term (starting in second week) at 1 p.m. in
    Room 1.209, the Department of Statistics. Details of
    papers to be discussed are circulated in advance by e-
    mail.

    Anyone wishing to be added to the circulation list should
    contact Dr David Goldstein, Department of Zoology (e-
    mail: david.goldstein@zoology.ox.ac.uk).

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    section



    OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

    Talks

    The following talks will be given at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays
    in St Anne's College. The admission charge is £1 to
    members, £2 to non-members.

    DR D. BOSWELL

    4 Feb.: `The rebuilding of Catania after
    the Sicilian earthquake of 1693.'

    G. PIERI

    25 Feb.: `The influence of Pre-
    Raphaelitism in Italy.'

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    section


    Day-school: Rome from Renaissance to Baroque

    This day-school will be held jointly by the association
    and the Department for Continuing Education, at Rewley
    House, Wellington Square, 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., on
    Saturday, 7 March, and will include lectures on
    Michelangelo, Palestrina, Caravaggio and the Carracci,
    and Bernini.

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    section



    FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

    The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1
    p.m. on the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the
    Sheldonian Theatre. All are invited.

    Sandwiches and wine will be served after the lectures at
    a cost of £2.50 per person, for which bookings
    should be made in advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis,
    Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian
    Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234).

    S. MANDELBROTE

    Wed. 11 Feb.: `John Locke's books.'

    S. FLYNN

    Tue. 24 Feb.: ` "Through scorching
    clime and varied sea": Sir John Gardner
    Wilkinson, traveller, Egyptologist, and man of
    letters, 1797–1875.'

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    section



    FRIENDS OF REWLEY HOUSE

    Friends of Rewley House Annual Lecture

    SIR WALTER BODMER, FRS, President, Hertford College, will
    deliver the Friends of Rewley House Annual Lecture at 5
    p.m. on Wednesday, 11 February, in the Lecture Theatre,
    Rewley House. Tickets will be available from Rewley House
    after 1 February.

    Subject: `The Book of Man: genetics for
    health and welfare.'

    Lecture

    SIR JOHN JOHNSON, Director, Foreign Service Programme,
    and TOM PAKENHAM will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 26
    February, in the Lecture Theatre, Rewley House. Tickets
    will be available from Rewley House after 1 February.

    Subject: `A walk in northern Ethiopia.'

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    section



    INTERNATIONAL LAW ASSOCIATION
    (BRITISH BRANCH)

    Oxford Speakers Series

    Unless otherwise stated, the following lectures will be
    given at 8.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Habakkuk Room,
    Jesus College. Further information is available from Dr
    Michael Byers, Jesus College (telephone: Oxford (2)79680,
    fax: (2)79687, e-mail: michael.byers@jesus.ox.ac.uk).

    It is suggested that anyone travelling from outside
    Oxford confirm the meetings one or two days in
    advance.

    DR S. MARKS, Cambridge

    28 Jan.: `International law and the end
    of history?'

    PROFESSOR F. FRANCIONI, Siena

    11 Feb., 5 p.m., Seminar Room C, St Cross
    Building
    : `Reconciling trade and environmental
    protection: the World Trade Organisation.'
    (Organised jointly with the Centre for European
    and Comparative Law
    )

    PROFESSOR C. GREENWOOD, LSE

    25 Feb.: `The Security Council and the
    rule of law in the international community.'

    DR C. KRESS, Federal Ministry of Justice, Germany

    11 Mar.: `A Turkish safety zone in
    northern Iraq: where are the limits of collective
    efforts to maintain international peace and
    security?'

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    section



    OXFORD AMNESTY LECTURES

    The genetic revolution and human rights

    The Oxford Amnesty Lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on
    the days shown in the Sheldonian Theatre. Season tickets
    cost £18 (£12 unwaged), and may be obtained
    from the Playhouse Ticketshop at Blackwell's Music Shop
    (telephone for credit card bookings: Oxford 261384).

    PROFESSOR H. PUTNAM, Harvard

    Wed. 28 Jan.: `Genetics and human
    dignity.'

    DR I. WILMUT, Roslin Institute, Edinburgh

    Tue. 3 Feb.: `Dolly: the age of
    biological control.'

    PROFESSOR B. KNOPPERS, Chair, International Bioethics
    Committee, UNESCO

    Thur. 5 Feb.: `Who should have access to
    genetic information?'

    PROFESSOR J. HARRIS, Manchester

    Thur. 12 Feb.: `Clones, genes, and
    immortality.'

    PROFESSOR J. GLOVER, King's College, London

    Wed. 18 Feb.: `Eugenics and human
    rights.'

    PROFESSOR H. STEINER, Manchester

    Thur. 19 Feb.: `Silver spoons and golden
    genes: talent differentials and justice.'

    PROFESSOR S. BENATAR, Cape Town

    Tue. 24 Feb.: `A perspective from Africa
    on human rights and genetic engineering.'

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    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

    The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications
    from members of the University for grants towards the costs of
    research in economic history. Applications will be considered
    from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of academic
    staff, and may related to research into the economic history of
    any period or country.

    Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information
    about the general nature of their research to establish that it
    falls within the field of economic history; and (b)
    specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which
    a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one
    referee who might be consulted by the committee.

    It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be
    made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be
    exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional
    circumstances.

    The committee will consider applications twice in each year. The
    closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of
    Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week
    of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A.
    Macallister, Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks
    Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

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    section



    WYNDHAM DEEDES MEMORIAL TRAVEL
    SCHOLARSHIPS

    A small number of travel scholarships to Israel will be available
    to British graduates who are resident in the UK and normally
    under thirty-five years of age.

    Applicants must undertake to spend at least six weeks in Israel
    in order to make an intensive study of some aspect of life in
    Israel. A report on their project, of not less than 5,000 words,
    must be submitted within twelve months of their visit. Each
    scholarship is worth up to £2,000.

    Further details are available from the International Office
    (telephone: (2)70241). The closing date for applications is 1
    March.

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    section



    SAMSUNG/ROYAL BRITISH LEGION KOREAN
    SCHOLARSHIP 1998

    One scholarship will be available for relatives of past and
    present members of HM Forces, aged between twenty-one and thirty
    on 1 March 1999, to carry out postgraduate study in the Republic
    of Korea. The successful candidate will pursue a course of
    his/her choice at a university in Seoul.

    The scholarship will cover tuition fees, living expenses, and
    travel costs. An intensive Korean language course, to be
    completed in the UK before departure, will also be funded.

    Further details and application forms are available from the
    International Office (telephone: (2)70241). The closing date for
    applications is 3 July.

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    section



    RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL BEQUEST

    The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at
    Oxford who are citizens of the Republic of India, and who,
    because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to
    complete the qualifications for which they are registered. Grants
    will not normally be awarded to those near to the beginning of
    their course of study. Application forms may be obtained from the
    Secretary of the Radhakrishnan Memorial Bequest, the Oriental
    Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. the closing date for
    receipt of applications is Friday, 5 June.

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    section



    SASAKAWA FUND

    Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to
    be applied to `the advancement within the University of knowledge
    and understanding of Japan by way of academic contact and
    exchange between members of the University and citizens of
    Japan'. Further details may be obtained from the Secretary of the
    Board of Management of the Fund (Miss Emma Wilson), the Oriental
    Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, to whom applications
    should be returned by the end of the fourth week in each term.

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    section



    HAYTER FUND

    Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established
    university posts for travel and research purposes connected with
    the languages and the economic, social, and political development
    of the following areas: the former Soviet Union and eastern
    Europe, the Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east Asia, and Latin
    America. Application forms and further details may be obtained
    from the Secretary of the Hayter Committee, the Oriental
    Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. The closing date for
    applications is the end of fifth week in each term.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    GEORGE HERBERT HUNT TRAVELLING
    SCHOLARSHIP 1998

    Applications are invited for the 1998 George Herbert Hunt
    Travelling Scholarship. Candidates should either have been
    admitted to the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine of the University
    of Oxford or have passed the First Examination for the degree of
    Bachelor of Medicine of the University and hold a medical degree
    of another British university qualifying him or her to practise
    medicine. The scholarship is of the value of about £3,000
    and may be held with another award.

    Candidates are required to submit with their applications a
    statement of their academic record together with testimonials,
    and an undertaking that, if elected, they will travel abroad for
    a period of at least one month for the purpose of clinical study
    or research in medicine. In making the award, preference will be
    given to candidates who intend to engage in the practice of their
    profession either as surgeons or as general practitioners.

    The scholar will be required to complete his or her period of
    travel within twelve months from the date of election, and within
    a reasonable period thereafter to submit to the Secretary of the
    Medical School for the approval of the electors a detailed report
    of his or her tenure of the scholarship. Payment of nine-tenths
    of the scholarship will be made shortly before the period of
    travel, and the remaining one-tenth following approval of the
    report. The election will be made on 9 April 1998.

    Applications should be sent to Dr G.G. Fox, the Medical School
    Office, the John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU,
    by 27 February.

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    section



    PRENDERGAST BEQUEST

    Funds from the Prendergast Bequest are available to men and women
    born in the Republic of Ireland whose parents are citizens of the
    Republic of Ireland, to assist them to read for a degree, either
    graduate or undergraduate (or, in some cases, for a diploma) at
    the University of Oxford.

    Applications are invited for grants for the academic year 1998--
    9, from students either already on course or who will be
    commencing their studies at Oxford in October 1998. The grants
    are means-tested, and the amounts for the year 1998–9 are
    expected to be in the region of £500–£2,000.

    Applicants who intend to follow a postgraduate course must have
    been accepted by both a college and the faculty board concerned
    before a grant can be awarded, while applications from candidates
    who wish to read for a second honour school should be endorsed
    by the college.

    Further information and application forms are available from the
    Secretary to the Board of Management for the Prendergast bequest,
    University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. The
    closing date for applications is 31 July.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 15 January 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue


    GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

    With the approval of the General Board, the following appointments and reappointments have been made and titles conferred for the periods stated.

    Appointments

    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

    Mathematical Sciences

    DAVID J. WALKER, M.Sc., D.Phil. (B.Sc. Glasgow), Fellow-elect of St Hugh's. In Computation. From 1 April 1998 until 31 March 2003.

    Physiological Sciences

    KATE G. STOREY, MA status (B.Sc. Sussex, Ph.D. Cambridge), Student-elect of Christ Church. In Biomedical Science (Human Anatomy). From 1 November 1997 until 31 October 2002.

    TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

    Biological Sciences

    DAVID A. MIDDLETON, D.Phil. (B.Sc. Coventry Polytechnic). In Biochemistry. From 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2002.

    Physical Sciences

    PAUL D.A. LYNE, MA status, D.Phil. (B.Sc., M.Sc. Dublin), Fellow of Brasenose. In Physical Chemistry. From 1 October 1997 until 30 September 2000.

    KEYNA A.Q. O'REILLY, MA, D.Phil. In the Processing of Materials. From 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2000.

    SUBIR SARKAR, MA status (B.Sc., M.Sc. Kharagspur, Ph.D. Bombay). In Physics. From 1 October 1997 until 30 September 2000.

    Physiological Sciences

    WILLIAM S. JAMES, MA, D.Phil. (B.Sc. Birmingham), Fellow of Magdalen. In Experimental Pathology. From 1 October 1997 until 30 September 2002.

    Committee for the School of Management Studies

    LAURA EMPSON (B.Sc. London, MBA, M.Phil. London Business School). In Management Studies (Organisational Behaviour). From 1 January 1998 until 31 December 1999.

    ROBERT H. PITKETHLY, MA, D.Phil. (MBA INSEAD, M.Sc. Saitama, Japan). In Management Studies (Strategy). From 1 October 1997 until 30 September 1998. UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

    English

    CHRISTOPHER CANNON (BA, MA, Ph.D. Harvard), Fellow of St Edmund Hall. In English. From 1 October 1997 until 30 September 2002.

    RESEARCH OFFICER

    Social Studies

    JONATHAN R.W. TEMPLE, MA, D.Phil. (BA, M.Phil. Cambridge). In the Institute of Economics and Statistics. From 1 January 1998 until 30 September 2000.

    TUTOR IN FINE ART

    Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

    MARK DEAN (BA Brighton Polytechnic, MA Goldsmiths'). In Electronic Imaging, IT and Video. From 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2000.

    HEBREW CENTRE LECTURER

    Medieval and Modern Languages

    JOEL BERKOWITZ (BA Pennsylvania, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil. New York), Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies and Senior Research Fellow of St Cross. In Yiddish Studies. From 1 October 1997 until 30 September 2002.

    The following holder of the title of university lecturer (CUF) has been appointed to the substantive post

    English

    JOHN SLOAN, MA, D.Phil. (BA Newcastle), Fellow of Harris Manchester. In English. From 1 January 1998 until 30 September 2001.

    Reappointments

    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

    Modern History

    PETER J. THOMPSON, MA (BA Warwick, Ph.D. Pennsylvania), Fellow of St Cross. In American History (Sydney L. Mayer). From 11 January 1998 until the retiring age.

    Modern Languages

    ANDREW S. KAHN, MA, D.Phil. (BA Amherst, MA Harvard), Fellow of St Edmund Hall. In Russian. From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

    VICTORIA C. MARTIN, MA (BA Exeter, M.Phil., Ph.D. Cambridge), Fellow of St Anne's. In German Language and Literature. From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

    Physical Sciences

    MARK BROUARD, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Jesus. In Physical Chemistry. From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

    SHAMITA DAS, MA (M.Sc. Calcutta, MS Boston, Sc.D. MIT), Fellow of Green College. In Geology. From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

    C. RICHARD STONE, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Somerville. In Engineering Science. From 1 September 1998 until the retiring age.

    ROMAN WALCZAK, MA (M.Sc. Warsaw, Dr.rer.nat. Heidelberg), Fellow of Somerville. In Physics. From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

    Committee for Archaeology and Committee on Continuing Education

    GARY R. LOCK, MA (BA Leicester, Ph.D. CNAA), Fellow of Kellogg. In Archaeology (Computing and Statistical Methods and Continuing Education). From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

    SAMIR SHAMMA UNIVERSITY LECTURER AND ASSISTANT KEEPER IN ISLAMIC NUMISMATICS

    Oriental Studies

    W. LUKE TREADWELL, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil. (BA Cambridge), Fellow of St Cross. From 1 January 1998 until the retiring age.

    FACULTY LECTURER

    Modern Languages

    KAREN J. LEEDER, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of New College. In German. From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

    TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURER

    Biological Sciences

    MARY GREGORIOU, MA status (B.Sc., Ph.D. London). In Molecular Biophysics. From 1 January 1998 until 30 June 1998.

    INSTRUCTORS IN MODERN LANGUAGES (From 1 October 1998 until 30 September 2001.)

    Modern Languages

    MARY COULTON, MA status. In Modern Greek.

    C.M. FLORIO COOPER, MA status (Dott.lett. Turin). In Italian.

    Conferment of title

    VISITING LECTURER IN CELTIC

    Medieval and Modern Languages

    PAUL RUSSELL, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil. From 1 October 1997 until 30 September 2000.

    Reconferment of title

    VISITING LECTURERS

    Law

    J.D.R. ADAMS (LL.B Durham). In the Law of Taxation. From 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2000.

    G.D. CHILD, MA, Visiting Fellow of Lincoln. In European Business Law. From 1 October 1998 until 30 September 2000.

    Literae Humaniores

    M.E. HENIG, MA, D.Phil., D.Litt. (MA Cambridge). In Roman Art. From 1 May 1998 until 30 April 2001.

    Appointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

    CLINICAL LECTURERS

    NIGEL J.P. BEASLEY (B.Sc., MBBS London) FRCS. In Otolaryngology. From 1 April 1998 until 31 March 2001.

    ASHOK I. HANDA (MB BS London) FRCS. In Transplantation/Vascular Surgery. From 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2000.

    ANDREA R. HORVATH (MD Debrecen, Hungary, Ph.D. Budapest) MRCPath. In Clinical Biochemistry. From 1 January 1998 until 31 December 1999.

    ALISTAIR M. ROBSON (B.Sc,m MB, B.Chir. Birmingham). In Pathology. From 15 September 1997 until 14 September 2000.

    PREMILA N. WEBSTER (MB BS Vellone, India, M.Sc. London) FFARCS. In Health Services Research. From 10 December 1997 until 9 December 1999.

    PART-TIME TUTOR IN GENERAL PRACTICE

    LINDA M. WARE (BA, MB, B.Chir. Cambridge) MRCGP. From 1 November 1997 until 31 October 2000.

    Reappointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

    CLINICAL READERS

    WILLIAM L. LEDGER, MA, D.Phil., MRCOG, Fellow of Green College. In Obstetrics and Gynaecology. From 21 June 1998 until the retiring age.

    ALASDAIR H.R.W. SIMPSON, MA, DM (MA Cambridge) FRCS, Fellow of St Peter's. In Orthopaedic Surgery. From 1 January 1998 until the retiring age.

    Conferment of title by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

    HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURER

    ROWENA J.I. HITCHCOCK, BM, MA (MA, MD Cambridge) FRCS. In Paediatric Surgery. From 10 November 1997 until 9 November 2002.

    Reconferment of title by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

    HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS (the title is reconferred until the retiring age or resignation from the substantive post)

    JENNIFER E. BARRACLOUGH, BM (B.Sc. London). In Psychological Medicine. From 1 December 1997.

    MICHAEL K. D'A. BENSON, MA status (MB BS London) FRCS. In Orthopaedic Surgery. From 1 December 1997.

    P. JANE CLARKE, MA status (MB BS, MD London) FRCS. In Surgery. From 1 January 1998.

    DAVID W. CRANSTON, MA status, D.Phil. (MB, Ch.B. Bristol) FRCS. In Surgery. From 1 January 1998.



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND
    MODERN LANGUAGES


    Election of an ordinary member

    18 December 1997

    The following has been duly elected as an ordinary member, to
    hold office until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1999:

    C.J. DAVIS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

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    section



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL STUDIES


    Election of an ordinary member

    18 December 1997

    The following has been duly elected as an ordinary member, to
    hold office from 1 January 1998 until the beginning of Michaelmas
    Term 1998:

    E.J. FRAZER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

    TRINITY TERM 1998

    Preliminary Examination

    English and Modern Languages (Part 2: English: T.F.
    HOAD, MA, Fellow of St Peter's

    Moderations in English Language and Literature

    T.F. HOAD, MA, Fellow of St Peter's

    Master of Philosophy

    Eastern Christian Studies: S.P. BROCK, MA, D.PHIL.,
    Fellow of Wolfson

    Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature: A.S.
    HOLLIS, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow of Keble

    Master of Science

    Politics Research: D.B. GOLDEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
    of Lincoln

    Master of Studies

    Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature: A.S.
    HOLLIS, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow of Keble

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
    SCIENCES AND COMMITTEE ON CONTINUING EDUCATION


    M.Sc. in Software Engineering

    In accordance with the regulations for these courses, notice is
    hereby given that the list of Schedule B modules available in the
    period January to July 1998 will be:

    Software Engineering Mathematics

    Advanced Concurrency Tools

    Requirements Engineering

    Specification and Design

    Software Testing

    Practical Software Engineering

    Machine-assisted Software Engineering

    Functional Programming

    Critical Systems Engineering

    Scalable Parallel Programming

    Advanced Software Development

    Concurrency and Distributed Systems

    Specification Methods

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
    regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee on
    Continuing Education will come into effect on 30 January.


    1 Board of the Faculty of Literae
    Humaniores

    Honour Moderations in Classics

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 31, delete ll. 27–8,
    `Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set only
    from the texts prescribed in (a)' and substitute:

    `There will be a compulsory question containing passages for
    translation and comment from the texts prescribed in (a),
    and a compulsory question containing passages only for comment from
    the texts prescribed in (a) and from the texts in each of
    the groups prescribed in (b).'


    2 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and
    Modern Languages

    Honour School of Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 396, l. 10,
    delete `I. 31 (Des cannibales)' and substitute `II. 17 (De la
    praesumption)'.


    2
    Ibid., ll. 16–18, delete `La Critique de l'Ecole des
    femmes, L'Impromptu de Versailles', and substitute `Les Fourberies de
    Scapin', and delete `George Dandin' and substitute `Le Malade
    Imaginaire'.


    3
    Ibid., l. 20, delete `Phèdre' and substitute
    `Iphigénie'.


    4
    Ibid., ll. 21–2, delete `ed. F. Deloffre . . .
    Gallimard, 1992)' and substitute `ed. E. Guitton (Pochothèque,
    Livre de Poche, 1994): the following works: Zadig, Paméla (pp.
    138–96), Candide, Contes de Guillaume Vadé (pp.
    339–453), La Princesse de Babylone, Les Lettres d'Amabed, Le
    Taureau blanc'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    3 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and
    Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

    Honour School of English and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

    As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 2 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    4 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and
    Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

    (a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

    (b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

    As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 2 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    5 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and
    Modern Languages and Modern History

    Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

    As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 2 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    6 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and
    Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

    Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

    As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 2 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    7 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

    (a) Honour School of Modern History

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first
    examination in 1999)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 312,
    l. 28, delete `The Emergence of'.
    2 Ibid., after l. 37, insert `22. The Soviet Union,
    1928–41'.

    3 Ibid., l. 38, delete `21' and substitute `22'.

    4 Ibid., after l. 48, insert `5. Saint Francis and Saint
    Clare'.

    5 Ibid., p. 313, ll. 1–18, renumber papers `[5]' to
    `[22]' as `6' to `23' respectively.

    6 Ibid., p. 328, delete ll. 6–28 and substitute:

    `"Mama Meli" in Marcia Wright, Strategies of Slaves and
    Women: Life Stories from East and Central Africa (New York, 1993),
    pp. 91–125.
    Lord Hailey, An African Survey (London, 1945 edition), pp.
    382–93, 434–43, 452–65.

    George Simeon Mwase, Strike a Blow and Die: a narrative of race
    relations in colonial Africa, edited by Robert Rotberg (Harvard
    University Press, Cambridge Mass., 1967), pp. x– xlii and
    1–81.
    "Records of Maji Maji" in Robert O. Collins (ed.), Eastern
    African History: Vol. 11 of African History: Text and Readings (New
    York, Marcus Weiner Publishing, 1990), pp. 124–42.

    J. Clyde Mitchell, The Kalela Dance: Aspects of Social Relationships
    among urban Africans in Northern Rhodesia (Rhodes Livingstone
    Institute, Manchester University Press, 1952), pp. 1–49.

    E.K. Lumley, Forgotten Mandate: a British District Officer in
    Tanganyika (London, 1976), pp. 1–49, 60–74, 96–112,
    167–78.
    Sir Roy Welensky, Welensky's 4000 Days (London, 1964), pp.
    109–36.'.

    7 Ibid., delete from p. 329, l. 35 to p. 330, l. 18, and
    substitute:

    `16. MODERN JAPAN 1868–1972

    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the general
    development of Japan within the period 1868 to 1972. Candidates'
    answers should be illustrated, wherever possible, by reference to the
    prescribed texts.

    Prescribed Texts

    Centre for East Asian Cultural Studies, comp. The Meiji Japan through
    Contemporary Sources, Vol. I, pp. 93–105; Vol. III, pp.
    1–29, 220–48.

    Fukuzawa Yukichi, An Outline Theory of Civilisation (trans. David
    Dilworth and G. Cameron Hurst), pp. 1–45, 171–98.

    Mustu Munemitsu, Kenkenroku: A Diplomatic Record of the Sino-Japanese
    War, 1894–95 (trans. Gordon Mark Berger), pp. 2–202.

    J.M. Maki (ed.), Conflict and Tension in the Far East: Key Documents,
    1894–1960, pp. 16–18, 28–61, 63–76,
    78–105.

    N. Ike (ed. and trans.), Japan's Decision for War: Records of the
    1941 Policy Conferences, pp. 3–163.

    J. Tanizaki, The Makioka Sisters (trans. Edward Seidensticker).

    Government Section, Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, The
    Political Reorientation of Japan, Sept. 1945–Sept. 1948, Vol.
    II, pp. 411–39, 671–7.'

    8 Ibid., p. 335, after l. 10, insert:

    `22. THE SOVIET UNION, 1928–41

    The prescribed texts are:

    Diane P. Koenker and Ronald D. Bachman, Revalations from the Russian
    Archives. Documents in English Translation (Washington DC, 1997),
    Documents 13, 14, 25, 26, 28, 35, 36, 39–41, 48–50, 54, 55,
    58, 76, 121, 122, 169, 170, 172, 174, 177–9, 189.

    R. Daniels (ed.), A Documentary History of Russia (London, 1985),
    vol. i, pp. 205–8, 211–14; vol. ii, pp. 83–7,
    100–5.

    R. Schlesinger (ed.), Changing Attitudes in Soviet Russia. The Family
    in the USSR (London, 1949), PP. 251–4, 268–9.

    J. Degras (ed.), Soviet Documents on Foreign Policy (Oxford, 1952),
    iii, 363–71, 377–82.

    J.V. Stalin, Works (Moscow, 1954), viii, 124–51; xi, 3–11,
    30–68; xii, 11–72, 197–205; xiii, 53–82.

    J.V. Stalin, Works (London, 1978), xiv, 71–9, 241–96.

    Stalin's Letters to Molotov, ed. L.T. Lih, O.V. Naumov, and O.V.
    Khlevniuk (New Haven and London, 1995), Letters 42, 43, 50, 60, 62,
    65, 66, 67, 69, 75, 77, 79.

    Report of the Court Proceedings in the Case of the Anti-Soviet
    Trotskyite Centre (Moscow, 1937), pp. 462–73.

    The Soviet Writers' Congress, 1934. The Debate on Socialist Realism
    and Modernism in the Soviet Union (London, 1977), pp. 15–24.

    L.D. Trotsky, The Challenge of the Left Opposition (1926–27)
    (New York, 1980), pp. 301–94.

    L. Trotsky, The Revolution Betrayed. What is the Soviet Union and
    Where is it Going? (New York, 1970), pp. 86–114, 273–90.

    N.I. Bukharin, Selected Writings on the State and the Transition to
    Communism, ed. R. Day (Nottingham, 1982), pp. 209–62.

    J. Von Geldern, R. Stites (eds.), Mass Culture in Soviet Russia.
    Tales, Poems, Songs, Movies, Plays and Folklore, 1917–1953,
    (Bloomington, Indiana, 1995), pp. 123–7, 128–38,
    139–41, 153–6, 212–13, 216–27, 234–8,
    260–6, 271–2, 280–3, 283–5, 296–9,
    315–19, 320–1, 328–30.

    V. Garros, N. Korenevskaia, and T. Laushen (eds.), Intimacy and
    Terror. Soviet Diaries of the 1930s (New York, 1995), pp.
    112–21, 125–8, 158–63, 257–61, 273–83.

    V. Serge, Memoirs of a Revolutionary, 1901–1941, trans. P.
    Sedgewick (Oxford, 1963), pp. 209–25, 244–61.

    E. Lyons, Assignment in Utopia (London, 1938), pp. 114–33,
    413–27.

    M. Hindus, Red Bread (London, 1931), pp. 235–50.

    Lev Kopelev, The Education of a True Believer, trans. Gary Kern (New
    York, 1980), pp. 248–67.

    V. Kravchenko, I Chose Freedom. The Personal and Political Life of a
    Soviet Official (London, 1947), pp. 206–20.

    J. Scott, Behind the Urals. An American Worker in Russia's City of
    Steel (Bloomington, Indiana, 1973), pp. 137–70, 173–206.

    A. Orlov, The Secret History of Stalin's Crimes (London, 1954), pp.
    17–71.

    N.S. Khrushchev, Khrushchev Remembers, trans. by Strobe Talbott
    (London, 1971), pp. 75–89.

    R. Taylor and I. Christie, The Film Factory. Russian and Soviet
    Cinema in Documents (1988), pp. 198–200, 225–37,
    253–4, 259–64, 286–90, 325.

    D.P. Shostakovich, Testimony. The Memoirs of Dmitri Shostakovich
    (1981), pp. 106–22, 135, 183–4, 265–6.

    N. Mandelshtam, Hope against Hope. A Memoir, trans. M. Hayward
    (London, 1971), pp. 3–70.

    E.S. Ginzburg, Into the Whirlwind, trans. P. Stevenson and M. Harari
    (London, 1989), pp. 11–64.

    The following sources are also prescribed:

    S. Eisenstein, October (1927).

    S. Eisenstein, Alexander Nevsky (1938).

    D.P. Shostakovich, Symphony No. 5, opus 47 (1937).

    The Soviet Political Poster, 1917–1980, selected by N. Baburina
    (Harmondsworth, 1988), nos. 61, 73, 74, 58, 60, 66, 72, 68, 76, 79,
    83.

    Recommended further sources:

    Ilf and Petrov, The Twelve Chairs, trans. J. Richardson (London,
    1971).

    M.A. Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita, trans. M. Glenny (London,
    1992).

    V.P. Kataev, Time Forward, trans. C. Malamuth (New York, 1933).

    A. Barmine, One Who Survived (New York, 1945).

    Molotov Remembers: Inside Kremlin Politics. Conversations with Felix
    Chuev, ed. A. Reis (Chicago, 1993), pp. 159–328.'


    9
    Ibid., p. 336, delete ll. 6–8 and substitute:

    `5. Venantius Fortunatus, Personal and Political Poems, trans. J.
    George (Liverpool, 1995), IV. 26, 28; V. 2; VI. 1, 2, 5; VII. 1, 7,
    16; VIII. 2; IX. 1, 4, 5; XI. 6, 23; Appendix 2.

    Venantius Fortunatus, Poems, Preface; I. 20; II. 10; III. 5, 7, 12,
    18; IV. 4, 5; V. 3, 5; VIII. 12; X. 12; XI. 9; Appendix 1 (in
    typescript translation) (Xerox).

    King Chilperic, Poem in Honour of St. Medard (in typescript
    translation) (Xerox).'


    10
    Ibid., p. 337, delete l. 42 and substitute:

    `3. William of Poitiers, Gesta Guillelmi, ed. M. Chibnall

    (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1998).'.


    11
    Ibid., p. 338, l. 27, delete `221,'.

    12 Ibid., after l. 42, insert:

    `10. *Holme Lacy cyrograph.'.


    13
    Ibid., ll. 43, 44, 47, and p. 339, l. 1, renumber
    existing cll. 10–13 `11'–`14' respectively.


    14
    Ibid., p. 339, l. 2, delete `41–6' and insert
    `41–2, 44–6'.


    15
    Ibid., after l. 29 insert:

    `5. Saint Francis and Saint Clare

    All texts are in English translation

    1. Francis, `Rules I and II', `Rule for Hermitages', `Testament',
    in R.J. Armstrong and I.C. Brady (eds.), St Francis and St Clare. The
    Complete Works (SPCK, London, 1983), pp. 108– 45, 147–8,
    153–6.

    2.Francis. `Admonitions, Canticle of Brother Sun', ibid., pp.
    25–39.

    3. Francis. `Letter to the Entire Order, Letter to the Faithful',
    ibid., pp. 55–73.

    4. Francis. `Exhortations to Clare', ibid., pp. 44–6.

    5. Clare, `Rule' and `Testament', ibid., pp. 209–32.

    6. Clare, `Letters to Agnes of Prague and Ermentrude of Bruges',
    ibid., pp. 190–207.

    7. Thomas of Celano, `First Life' and `Second Life' of
    St Francis, in M.A. Habig (ed.), St Francis of Assisi. Omnibus
    of Sources (SPCK, London, 1973, third edn.), pp. 227–354,
    359–543.

    8. Bonaventura, The Longer Life of St Francis, ibid., pp.
    631– 787.

    9. Thomas of Clano, attr., `Life of St Clare', in R.J. Armstrong
    (ed.), Clare of Assisi: Early Documents (Paulist Press, New York,
    1988).

    10. `The Writings of Leo, Rufino and Angelo', in R. Brooke (ed.),
    Scripta Leonis, Rufini et Angeli sociorum s. Francisci: The Writings
    of Leo, Rufino and Angelo, Companions of St. Francis, Oxford Medieval
    Texts (Oxford, 1970), pp. 89–291.

    11. `The Life of Blessed Brother Giles', ibid., pp.
    318–49.

    12.

    Francis, `The Little Flowers', in Habig, Francis. Omnibus of
    Sources, op. cit., pp. 1301–500.

    13.

    Jordan of Giano, `Chronica', in R. Brooke, The Coming of the
    Friars, Historical Studies: Problems and Documents, 24 (Allen and
    Unwin, London, 1975), pp. 205–13.

    14.

    Extracts from Thomas of Eccleston, Robert Grosseteste, Matthew
    Paris, and the Annals of Dunstable, on the friars in England, in H.
    Rothwell (ed.), English Historical Documents, vol. 3 (London, 1975),
    pp. 680–7.

    15. `Canons of the Fourth Lateran Council', canons 10–16,
    20–1, 27–31, 63–7, in English Historical Documents,
    vol. 3,
    pp. 643–76.

    16. `The Ancient Constitutions of the Friars Preacher [c.1238]',
    extracts in Brooke, The Coming of the Friars, op. cit., pp.
    190–200.

    17. Jordan of Saxony, `The Beginnings of the Order of
    Friars Preacher', extracts in Brooke, ibid., pp. 162–76.

    18. Walter Map, `Courtier's Trifles', dist. 1, c. 31, ibid., pp.
    151–2.

    19. `Letters to Innocent III to the church of Tarragona, and to
    Durand of Huesca, in W.L. Wakefield and A.P. Evans, Heresies of the
    High Middle Ages, Records of Civilisation, 81 (New York, Columbia
    University Press, 1969), pp. 222–8.

    20. Burchard of Ursberg, `Chronicle', extract in Wakefield and Evans,
    op. cit., pp. 228–30.

    21. Pierre des Vaux-de-Cernay, `Hystoria Albigensis', Ibid., pp.
    235–41.

    22. The following papal bulls: Gregory IX, `Quo elongati' (1230);
    Nicholas III, `Exiit qui seminat' (1279); John XXII, `Quorundam
    exigit' (1317), `Quia nonnunquam' (1322), `Ad conditorem canonum'
    (1322), `Cum inter nonnullos' (1323). An English translation of these
    is available in the Modern History Faculty Library.'


    16

    Ibid., pp. 340–63, passim, renumber existing papers
    `[5]'–`[22]' as `6'–`23' respectively.


    17

    Ibid., p. 365, l. 37, delete `the Board of the Faculty' and
    substitute `the Examiners for the Honour School'.

    18

    Ibid., p. 366, delete ll. 20—6, and renumber cll. 7 and 8 as
    6 and 7 respectively.


    19

    Ibid., l. 48, delete `The top copy shall be submitted to the
    examiners.'


    20

    Ibid., after l. 48, insert new cl. 8 as follows:

    `8. All candidates must submit two copies of their theses,
    addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Modern
    History, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on Monday
    of the first week of Trinity Full Term in which they are presenting
    themselves for examination. Every candidate shall present a
    certificate, signed by him or herself and by a college tutor, in a
    separate envelope bearing the candidate's examination number,
    addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners. The certificate (forms
    are available from the Faculty Office) should declare that
    (a) the thesis is the candidate's own work, (b)
    that no substantial portion of it has been presented for any other
    degree course or examination, (c) that it does not exceed
    15,000 words in length.'

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 310,
    l. 48, after `as defined by decree of Council,', insert `and
    candidates who have passed the First Public Examination in a course
    other than Modern History,'.

    2 Ibid., p. 367, l. 6, after `their thesis.' insert:

    `No candidate may present a thesis in replacement of a
    period of General or of British History, the subject matter of which
    falls within the parameters of a Further or Special Subject paper
    which the candidate proposes to offer for the FHS examination.'

    (b) M.St. in Historical Research

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 697, l. 42, delete
    `sixth week of Hilary' and substitute `fifth week of Trinity'.

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    8 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and English Language and Literature

    Honour School of Modern History and English

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first
    examination in 1999)

    See 7 (a) (i) above.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    See 7 (a) (ii) above.

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    9 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Literae Humaniores

    Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first
    examination in 1999)

    See 7 (a) (i) above.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    See 7 (a) (ii) above.

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    10 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Medieval and Modern Languages

    Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first
    examination in 1999)

    See 7 (a) (i) above.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    See 7 (a) (ii) above.

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    11 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Social Studies

    Honour School of Modern History and Economics

    (i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first
    examination in 1999)

    See 7 (a) (i) above.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    See 7 (a) (ii) above.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    12 Committee on Continuing Education

    (a) Postgraduate Certificate in Evidence-based Health
    Care

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 965, insert the
    following as new clause 6:

    `A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in the assignments
    under 2(b)–2(c) above may be permitted to
    re-submit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination in
    which he or she has failed to satisfy the examiners on one further
    occasion only, normally not later than one year after the initial
    failure'.

    (b) Postgraduate Diploma in Evidence-based Health Care

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 968, insert the
    following as new clause 67:

    `A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in the assignments
    under 2(b)–2(d) above may be permitted to
    re-submit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination in
    which he or she has failed to satisfy the examiners on one further
    occasion only, normally not later than one year after the initial
    failure'.

    (c) M.Sc. in Evidence-based Health Care

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 765, l. 26, add the
    following:

    `This shall normally be within one year of the initial failure'.

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    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

    The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to
    N.S.R. BROOKE, Queen's, to supplicate for the
    Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

    The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `The study of
    human cerebral metabolism using 32phosphorus magnetic resonance
    spectroscopy'.

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    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
    of oral examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Anthropology and Geography

    E.J. ROBSON, Linacre: `Gender, space, and empowerment in rural
    Hausaland, northern Nigeria'.

    Jesus, Wednesday, 4 February, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: S. Jackson, P.O. Daley.

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    Biological Sciences

    P. STEWART, Lady Margaret Hall: `Social behaviour of the badger
    (Meles meles)'.

    Department of Zoology, Thursday, 5 February, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: T.H. Clutton-Brock, M.S. Dawkins.

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    Medieval and Modern Languages

    E.M.J. NYE, St Anne's: `From nuances to impertinence: linguistic and
    aesthetic theory in the French Enlightenment'.

    Trinity, Thursday, 29 January, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: G.J. Mallinson, R.E.A. Waller.

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    Modern History

    S. CAWSEY, Balliol: `Royal eloquence in the Spanish peninsula with
    particular reference to the crown of Aragon: c.1200–1410'.

    Examination Schools, Friday, 30 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J.I. Catto, J. Lawrence.

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    Physical Sciences

    J.M. BAILEY, Oriel: `Synthetic studies towards zaragozic acid A–
    Squalestin S1'.

    Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Thursday, 22 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A. Armstrong, G.W.J. Fleet.

    XIN CHEN, Balliol: `Monte Carlo simulation and analyses of
    backgrounds in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory'.

    Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Monday, 19 January, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: R. Walczak, C. Waltham.

    R. DAVIES, Somerville: `Structure and evolution of star formation in
    star-burst galaxies and AGN'.

    Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Monday, 19 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: P.W.J.L. Brand, L. Miller.

    YUSHENG DOU, St Hugh's: `The electronic structure of post-transition
    metal oxides studies by photoemission spectroscopy'.

    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 20 January, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: P.A. Cox, J.A.D. Matthew.

    I.N. HOUSON, Wadham: `Ring expansions in the synthesis of di- and
    tri-lactams'.

    Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Saturday, 7 February, 11.30 a.m.


    Examiners: E.J. Thomas, C.J. Schofield.

    C. MORGAN, Pembroke: `The optimisation of the heat treatment of
    BI-2212'.

    Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 22 January, 11.50 a.m.


    Examiners: C. Beduz, D. Dew-Hughes.

    L. PURTON, Hertford: `Geochemical approaches to the problems of
    Nummulitic life habit and habitat in the Eocene'.

    Department of Earth Sciences, Friday, 6 February, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: P. Pearson, H.C. Jenkyns.

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    Physiological Sciences

    J.R. HIGHLEY, Linacre: `The asymmetry, interhemispheric connectivity,
    and gyral structure of the brain in schizophrenia: a post-mortem
    study'.

    Department of Physiology, Monday, 16 February, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: J. Stein, W. Deakin.

    K. KIESSLING, Corpus Christi: `The importance of amino acids for red
    blood cells'.

    University Laboratory of Physiology, Friday, 16 January, 10.30 a.m.


    Examiners: C.C. Ashley, G.E. Mann.

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    Social Studies

    N. BATINI, St Antony's: `Alternative nominal anchors for the conduct
    of European monetary policy in the 1990s'.

    St Hilda's, Tuesday, 27 January, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: MB. Gregory, S. Wren-Lewis.

    J. BOONE, Nuffield: `Essays in growth theory'.

    All Souls, Friday, 30 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D. Ulph, J.S. Vickers.

    C. BRADDICK, St Antony's: `Japan and the Sino-Soviet alliance,
    1950–64'.

    St Antony's, Friday, 16 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: I. Nish, R.J. Foot.

    J.E. CASTRO, St Antony's: `Water, power, and citizenship.
    Contemporary social struggles in the Valley of Mexico: a long-term
    perspective'.

    Nuffield, Friday, 16 January, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: J. Goudsblom, L.A. Whitehead.

    H.F. WEEDS, Merton: `R&D, uncertainty and irreversibility'.

    Nuffield, Friday, 16 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M. Cripps, Hyun Song Slin.

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    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 1998: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    OBITUARIES


    Christ Church

    DR PAUL MARCUS ZULVER, BM, MA, 9 December 1997; commoner
    1967. Aged 48.

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    section



    Corpus Christi College

    LEONARD COOPER, 8 December 1997; commoner 1919–23.
    Aged 97.

    GORDON DOUGLAS THORNTON, 16 August 1996; commoner 1948.

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    section



    Magdalen College

    JOHN BICKLEY, 8 November 1997; exhibitioner 1931–5.
    Aged 85.

    GEORG HEINRICH HANSMANN, 18 September 1997; Rhodes
    Scholar 1929–31. Aged 89.

    THOMAS HENRY MAKEPEACE, 24 October 1997; exhibitioner
    1938–40. Aged 77.

    JOHN STAINER, 19 July 1997; commoner 1934–8.
    Aged 81.

    WILLIAM V. WHITEHEAD, 2 December 1997; Rhodes Scholar
    1952–4. Aged 69.

    NORMAN WOOLDRIDGE, 1996; demy 1942–3 and
    1947–9. Aged 72.

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    section



    St Anne's College

    MRS PERVIN EICHERT (née Mandiwalla),
    commoner 1960–3.

    SANJOY GHOSE; M.Sc. student 1984–5. Aged 39.

    MRS ALICE DOROTHY LEWIS (née Watt);
    member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
    1935–8. Aged 80.

    MRS MARION MELVIN (née Robertson); member
    of the Society of Oxford Home-Students 1927–30.

    MRS NELLIE LOUISE ORLEBAR (née Crowe);
    member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
    1926–9.

    MISS SOLVEIG OTTO; member of the Society of Oxford Home-
    Students 1920–1.

    MISS CHRISTINE SAVERY; member of the Society of
    Oxford Home-Students 1922–5. Aged 95.

    MRS ANNE SCOTT (née Renwick); member
    of the Society of Oxford Home-Students 1938–41.

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    section



    St Edmund Hall

    JOHN LESLIE LUTYENS, MA, 5 August 1997; 1939.

    DONALD HERBERT JOHN MARCHANT, MA, 12 September 1997;
    commoner 1924–8. Aged 92.

    PROFESSOR ANTHONY HUGH WADE NIAS, DM, 29 October
    1997; RN probationer 1948–52. Aged 71.

    BRIAN FRANK WARREN THOMAS, BA, 13 October 1997;
    1947–9. Aged 74.

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    section



    MEMORIAL SERVICES


    All Souls College

    A Memorial Service for ALFRED LESLIE ROWSE, CH, MA,
    D.LITT., DCL, FBA, F.R.HIST.S., FRSL, will be held at
    2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 7 February, in the college chapel.

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    section



    Lincoln College

    A Memorial Service for DR JOHN BERESFORD OWEN, MA, will
    be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 14 February, in the
    college chapel.

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    section



    COMMEMORATIVE EVENT


    New College

    A Commemorative Event for PROFESSOR GEORGE FORREST, MA,
    will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 7 February, in the
    ante-chapel and hall, New College.

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    section



    ELECTIONS


    All Souls College

    The following will be in residence for Hilary Term 1998
    as Visiting Fellows at All Souls College:

    PROFESSOR VINAY AMBEGAOKAR, Cornell University

    PROFESSOR ALBERT BOSWORTH, University of Western
    Australia

    PROFESSOR JAN DE VRIES, University of California,
    Berkeley

    PROFESSOR IAN HACKING, University of Toronto

    PROFESSOR IAIN MCCALMAN, Australian National
    University

    DR FRANK PROCHASKA

    DR ANDREW WATHEY, Royal Holloway College

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    section



    Green College

    To an Honorary Fellowship:

    SIR CRISPIN TICKELL,
    GCMG, KCVO, MA

    To a Nuffield Hospitals Trust Fellowship in Medical
    Mathematics:

    ASHWIN SRINAVASAN (BA, PH.D. New South
    Wales)

    To Graduate Awards:

    EMMA KATE AISBETT (B.SC. New South Wales)

    JOANNA LESLEY HAWORTH (BA Cambridge)

    CHRISTOPHER OWEN HENRY (BA Cambridge)

    LUCAS HUMINIECKI (M.SC. UAM Poland)

    IOANNIS KARYDIS (BA Cambridge)

    HASSANALI SACHEDINA THOMAS (BA Middlebury)

    KAREN TINLING RUTH (BA Cambridge)

    TAMSIN TRELAWNY ROSS (MA Edinburgh)

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    section


    To the Sir Richard Doll Computer Scholarship:

    DAVID ALEXANDER BIRDS (B.SC. London)

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    section


    To IBM Computer Scholarships:

    BERNHARD BAKKER (B.SC. Larenstein, M.SC. Wageningen)

    SIMON PETER SATTERLY HOWARTH (BA Cambridge)

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    section


    To elective essay awards:

    REBECCA LOUISE FORD, BM, B.CH.

    MARISA LE MASURIER, BM, B.CH.

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    section



    Merton College

    To a Visiting Research Fellowship (TT 1998):

    DR
    THOMAS MAUTNER, Austalian National University at Canberra

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    section



    St Hugh's College

    To an Organ Scholarship:

    DAVID JOHN LINDUP,
    formerly of Sir Bernard Lovell School

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    section



    PRIZE


    St Hugh's College

    Anna Haxworth Prize:

    ALASDAIR CHARLES FARQUHARSON TROTTER

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    section



    NOTICES


    Balliol College


    Julian Huxley Junior Research
    Fellowship

    In association with the Royal Society

    Balliol College in conjunction with the Royal Society offers a
    Julian Huxley Junior Research Fellowship in Biological Sciences.
    The fellowship is open to men and women from any country. It will
    be awarded to a scientist working in areas which were of interest
    to Julian Huxley. Emphasis will be given to evolutionary or
    developmental biology and related areas.

    Further details may be obtained from the College Secretary,
    Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, and applications should be
    received not later than 13 February.

    Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer and a charity
    which exists to promote excellence in education and research.

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    section



    Brasenose College


    Official Fellowship in Economics

    Applications are invited for the above post to commence on 1
    October 1998. The title of university lecturer (CUF) may be
    conferred on the holder of the fellowship. The combined college
    and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to
    £35,754 per annum. Additional college allowances are
    available.
    Further particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary
    (telephone: Oxford (2)77823). Applications should be sent to the
    Senior Tutor, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ, with details of
    career and publications, and the names and addresses of three
    referees, not later than Friday, 6 February. Applicants should
    ask their referees to write to the College Secretary by the same
    date, without request from the college.

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    section



    Appointment of Admissions Secretary

    Applications are invited for the post of Admissions Secretary.
    The main duties of the post are to administer undergraduate
    Admissions, to act as secretary to the Tutor for Admissions, and
    to participate in the college's active policy of seeking to
    encourage applications and select from the best candidates from
    all educational backgrounds. The successful candidate will be an
    energetic and effective administrator and a first-class
    communicator, capable of working independently and able to deal
    with confidential matters with discretion and efficiency. Besides
    the normal range of secretarial skills the Admissions Secretary
    needs to be familiar with the use of databases and other IT.

    The Admissions Secretary is also responsible for certain other
    areas of the college administration including the organisation
    of Degree Day ceremonies.

    The post is full-time and holidays will normally be taken during
    the university vacations (but not during the peak-times of the
    Admissions Exercise, viz. December to early January and during
    the last two weeks of August). The salary will be on the scale
    £12,595–£14,580 per annum. Free lunches are
    available.
    Further particulars may be obtained from the Senior Tutor,
    Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ (telephone: Oxford (2)77823),
    to whom applications should be sent to arrive not later than 30
    January, together with the names and addresses of two referees.
    Applicants should arrange for their referees to write direct to
    the Senior Tutor by the same date.

    Brasenose College is an equal opportunities employer.

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    section



    Exeter College


    Visiting Fellowship 1998–9

    Exeter College proposes to appoint a distinguished scholar to a
    Visiting Fellowship. The fellowship is intended for a scholar who
    is already provided with financial support, and who will be
    spending between one and three terms of the academic year
    1998–9 in Oxford.

    The Visiting Fellow will be expected during the term of the
    fellowship to engage in study which, in the opinion of the
    governing body, is likely to produce valuable results.
    The fellowship is open equally to men and women.

    The fellow will not be a member of the governing body of the
    college, but will be a member of the senior common room and
    entitled to daily free lunch and dinner at the common table. The
    college regrets it is unable to offer
    accommodation.

    Members of Congregation are invited to nominate visitors to the
    University for election to the fellowship and to invite their
    nominee(s) to apply direct to the college. Nominations and
    applications should be sent to the Rector,
    Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP, by Monday, 23 February.

    Applications should include a curriculum vitae and
    a brief outline of the research the applicant will be undertaking
    in Oxford.

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    section



    Alan Coltart Graduate Scholarship in
    Anthropology

    The scholarship is tenable at Exeter College from October 1998
    for one year, renewable for one or two further years, by a man
    or woman who will have been admitted by the University to study
    for a graduate degree of the University in Anthropology. It
    provides maintenance, college fees, and university fees at the
    Home/European Union rate. Further particulars may be had of the
    College Secretary,
    Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP (fax: Oxford (2)79630). The
    closing date for applications is 20 March.

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    section



    Hertford College


    Appointment of Summer School Tutor in
    Victorian History

    Hertford College wishes to recruit a pre- or postdoctoral
    historian as a tutor for its Summer School for the University of
    Hartford, Connecticut.

    The course will be team taught with a member of faculty from the
    University of Hartford and will run from 7 to 30 July 1998.
    A fee of £875 is payable for the course together with
    payment for preparation.

    Letters of application, together with a curriculum
    vitae
    , should be sent to the Conference Secretary,
    Hertford College, Catte Street, Oxford OX1 3BW (telephone: Oxford
    (2)79456).

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    section



    Keble College


    Education Fellowships 1998

    Keble College invites applications from seconded secondary
    schoolteachers (including teachers of 16–19 year-olds in
    Colleges of Further Education and equivalent institutions) for
    two Education Fellowships, each tenable for four weeks between
    30 June and 31 July 1998. Further particulars may be obtained
    from Mrs P. Long, Warden's Secretary, Keble College, Oxford OX1
    3PG. The closing date is Friday, 20 February.

    The college is an equal opportunities employer and exists to
    promote excellence in education and research.

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    section



    Linacre College


    Junior Research Fellowships

    Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three
    Junior Research Fellowships tenable for one year in the first
    instance from 1 October 1998 and renewable for a second year.

    These fellowships will be of a value of £250 per year,
    together with dining rights in college. The fellowships are open
    to men and women graduates of any university; there is no
    restriction of subject, but candidates should be intending to
    engage in research at postdoctoral level.

    Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a
    higher research degree before taking up a Junior
    Research Fellowship, and to be assured of adequate funding for
    the duration of a Junior Research Fellowship.

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    section



    EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research
    Fellowships

    Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three
    EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships tenable for one
    year in the first instance from 1 October 1998 and renewable for
    a second year. These fellowships will be of a value of £250
    per year, together with dining rights in college. The fellowships
    are open to men and women graduates of any university, but
    candidates should be intending to engage in research at
    postdoctoral level in the fields of the medical, biological, or
    chemical sciences.

    Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a
    higher research degree before taking up a Junior
    Research Fellowship, and to be assured of adequate funding for
    the duration of a Junior Research Fellowship.

    Application for any of the Junior Research Fellowships
    detailed above, on a form available from the College Secretary,
    should be made to the Principal, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA,
    giving details of the applicant's academic record and proposed
    course of research. Two referees should be asked to write
    directly to the Principal by the closing for applications, 31
    January.

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    section



    Lincoln College


    Appointment of College Accountant

    Lincoln College seeks a CCAB qualified accountant to run its busy
    finance department. Candidates should be computer literate. The
    software packages currently in use are Platinum, Excel, and Word.
    Strong interpersonal skills and administrative ability are also
    essential.

    Salary within range £25,552–£30,318, plus USS
    pension scheme and other benefits.

    Applications, including a curriculum vitae and
    details of two referees, addressed to the Bursar, Lincoln
    College, Turl Street, Oxford OX1 3DR, should be received no later
    than Friday, 30 January.

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    section



    Merton College


    Senior Scholarships 1998

    Merton College proposes, if candidates of sufficient merit
    present themselves, to elect in 1998 up to four Senior Scholars.
    The scholarship covers fees, accommodation and meals, and a
    contribution towards maintenance (currently £6,998 per
    annum). These awards are open to both men and women. Candidates
    should have completed their first degree between 1 May 1995 and
    1 October 1998 and should have spent no more than two years in
    postgraduate study or research. Those who are uncertain whether
    they qualify are invited to write to the Secretary of the
    Harmsworth Trust, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD, giving a full
    curriculum vitae. Undergraduates in their final year
    may apply.
    Details of, and method of applying for, these awards may be
    obtained by writing to the Assistant Tutorial Secretary, Merton
    College, Oxford OX1 4JD. Alternatively, you may fax the Assistant
    Tutorial Secretary on Oxford (2)86500 (international: ++ 44 1865
    286500). Closing date for applications is 1 April.

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    section



    Appointment of Graduate Trainee
    Librarian

    Applications are invited from persons with, or expecting to gain,
    a good honours degree (upper-second class or higher) and who
    intend to follow a postgraduate course in librarianship or
    informaiton science. The post is tenable for one year from
    September 1998. The appointee will
    be given experience in all major aspects of the Library's
    operations. Current salary: £9,117 per annum.
    Further particulars of the post are available from Dr A.S.
    Bendall, Fellow Librarian, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (fax:
    Oxford (2)76361), to whom candidates should send their
    applications accompanied by a full curriculum vitae.
    The closing date is Friday, 6 February, and applicants should
    also ask two referees to send references to arrive by that date.

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    section



    Merton College and St Peter's College


    Schoolteacher Studentships 1998–9

    If suitable candidates present themselves the two colleges above
    intend to elect four Schoolteacher Students between them for the
    academic year 1998–9 for the purpose of
    advanced study. The studentships are tenable for one term, and
    the electing college will provide for board and lodging but will
    pay no stipend. In not more than one term Merton would be willing
    to make funds available
    towards the stipend of a teacher in a state school which
    is unable itself to fund a term's leave.

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    section



    Schoolteacher Study Visits

    Merton College proposes also to accommodate up to six school
    teachers for three weeks in July 1998 for the purpose of advanced
    study.

    Candidates should be primarily engaged in sixth-form teaching,
    or housemasters/mistresses, or heads. Consideration will also be
    given to applications from candidates from other institutions
    that prepare students for their
    A-level examinations. Further information, and application forms
    for both colleges, may be obtained from the
    Tutorial Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD. Candidates
    should specify whether they wish to be considered for a
    studentship, or a Study Visit, or for both. The closing date for
    completed applications is Friday, 20 February.

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    section



    Oriel College


    Appointment of Librarian

    Oriel College invites applications for the post of Librarian, to
    take up office from 1 May 1998. The position is full-time and the
    salary is in the range of £15,159 to £18,494.
    Applications, including a full curriculum vitae
    (five copies),
    together with the names of three referees, should be sent not
    later than 29 January to the College Secretary, Oriel College,
    Oxford OX1 4EW, from whom further particulars may be obtained.
    Oriel College is an equal opportunities employer.

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    section



    St Hilda's College


    Schoolmistress Fellowships

    St Hilda's College invites applications for two Schoolmistress
    Fellowships, one tenable in Hilary (Spring) Term 1999 and one in
    Trinity (Summer) Term 1999. The college statutes, made under the
    Universities of Oxford and
    Cambridge Act, 1923, provide that all fellows must be women.
    Candidates for a fellowship must be practising teachers engaged
    in sixth-form work in either schools or colleges.
    Further particulars should be obtained from the College Office,
    St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815).
    The closing date for applications is
    Monday, 9 February.

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    section



    Junior Research Fellowships

    Applications are invited from women graduates for two Junior
    Research Fellowships, to be held at St Hilda's College from 1
    October 1998. The college statutes, made under the Universities
    of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, provide that all fellows of
    the college must be women.

    The Julia Mann Junior Research Fellowship is
    available for studies in Philosophy or History. The
    Randall-MacIver Junior Research Fellowship is
    available for studies in the Fine Art, Music, or Literature of
    any nation in any period.

    Further particulars and a cover sheet for applications should be
    obtained from the College Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4
    1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, fax: (2)76816, e-mail:
    college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). Applicants are asked to state
    clearly for which fellowship they are applying. The closing date
    for applications is Friday,
    13 February.

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    section



    Temporary Lecturership in Philosophy

    St Hilda's College proposes to appoint a Stidpendiary Lecturer
    in Philosophy for Trinity and Michaelmas Terms 1998 and Hilary
    Term 1999. The person appointed will be expected to give twelve
    hours of teaching per week, mainly in tutorials, throughout each
    of the three eight-week terms. The post is open to both men and
    women.

    Further particulars should be obtained from the College Office,
    St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone:
    Oxford (2)76815, fax: (2)76816, e-mail: college.
    office@st-hildas.oxford.ac.uk). The closing date is Friday, 6
    February.

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    section



    St Hugh's College


    Appointment of On-line Cataloguer

    Applications are invited for a fixed-term appointment of nine
    months, to start as soon as possible.

    The successful candidate will be required to assist with the
    completion of retrospective conversion of the college's holdings,
    ready to introduce a computerised issue system for the beginning
    of the new academic year. This will involve covering the full
    range of subjects offered as undergraduate courses. Familiarity
    with AACR2 MARC is essential and experience of the OLIS system
    would be an advantage.

    The post will be on the clerical and library staff grade 3 scale
    (salary £10,881–£12,243).
    Applications with a curriculum vitae giving details
    of relevant experience and the names of two referees should be
    sent to Miss Deborah Quare, Librarian, St Hugh's College, Oxford
    OX2 6LE, to arrive no later than 2 February. Further information
    is available from the Librarian (telephone: Oxford (2)74938, fax:
    (2)74912, e-mail: deborah. quare@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk).

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    section



    St John's College


    Visiting Senior Research Fellowship
    1999–2000

    The President and Fellows of St John's College invite
    applications for a Visiting Senior Research Fellowship for the
    academic year 1999–2000, or part thereof. The fellowship is
    intended to offer a scholar of outstanding distinction, from
    abroad or the United Kingdom, an opportunity to pursue his or her
    own study or research as a member of the college. The fellow will
    be expected to reside in Oxford during term, and accommodation
    (free of charge) for a married or unmarried fellow will be
    available. The fellow will have the right to lunch and dine in
    college, also free of charge. There is no stipend attached to the
    fellowship.

    Applications, in the form of a letter, should include a full
    curriculum vitae, the names of three referees, and
    a statement of the research or other work proposed during the
    fellowship. Applications should be received by the Academic
    Administrator, St John's College, Oxford OX1 3JP, not later than
    27 February.
    St John's College exists to support excellence in education and
    research, and is committed to equal opportunities.

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    section



    St Peter's College


    Bodossaki Graduate Scholarship in
    Science

    Applications are invited for a Graduate Scholarship established
    by the Bodossaki Foundation in any field of Sci-ence, including
    Mathematics, Engineering, and Medicine (especially Immunology and
    Oncology).

    The scholarship, which is open to Greek citizens who will be
    under the age of thirty on taking up the award, is tenable for
    a period of not more than three years from
    1 October 1998. The emoluments, totalling up to
    £10,500 per annum, cover university and college fees and a
    grant for maintenance. The successful applicant will be required
    to read for a higher degree of the University of Oxford.

    Applicants, who should have obtained a first-class
    degree of a British university or an equivalent Greek or other
    overseas qualification, should write to the Master, enclosing a
    curriculum vitae and outline of the research
    proposed, together with the names of three referees.

    Referees should be asked to send references direct to the Master,
    St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL. Applications and references
    should arrive by 31 January. Interviews are likely to be held in
    Oxford on 9 March.

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    section



    Somerville College


    Graduate Scholarships

    Somerville College proposes to award up to two Graduate
    Scholarships to graduates of any university who intend to work,
    or are already working, for a higher degree at
    Oxford. The awards are tenable for two years from 1 October 1998,
    with a possibility of renewal for a third, and are unrestricted
    as to subject.

    The value of each scholarship will be £1,500 per annum. At
    least for the first year, scholars will be offered a room
    at the standard rate in the Margery Fry and Elizabeth Nuffield
    Graduate House, which is within the college curtilage, and will
    also be entitled to dine free of charge once a week at high table
    during full term.

    Application forms and further particulars for these Scholarships
    are available from the College Secretary, Somerville College,
    Oxford OX2 6HD. The closing date for applications is 2 March, and
    candidates should ask two referees to write directly to the
    College Secretary by that date.

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    section



    Ruth Adler Scholarship

    Thanks to the generosity of the family of the late Ruth Adler
    (Somerville 1963–6) Somerville College proposes to award a
    Ruth Adler Scholarship for one year (in the first
    instance) from 1 October 1998. It is tenable only at Somerville
    College by a man or woman who is or will be reading for a
    graduate degree in the fields of philosophy, law, or subjects
    related to social work. Applications should be made by 2 March
    to the College Secretary, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD,
    from whom further information is available.

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    section



    Oxford Bursary for American Graduates

    Somerville College offers the Janet Watson Bursary (maximum of
    £3,500 per annum for two years only) to a US graduate
    wishing to read for a further degree at Oxford as a member of the
    college.
    The bursary is designed to provide marginal aid (approximately
    one-quarter of annual total costs for fees) to a candidate able
    to meet most of the fees from other sources. The closing date for
    applications is 2 March. Application form and further particulars
    are available from the College Secretary, Somerville College,
    Oxford OX2 6HD.

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    section



    Wadham College


    Six-hour Lecturership in Physical
    Chemistry

    Applications are invited for a Scale B Lecturership in Physical
    Chemistry, to run for three terms from 1 October 1998, at a
    stipend of £4,548. The successful candidate will be expected
    to provide tutorials in physical chemistry. Applicants should
    send a copy of their curriculum vitae
    to the Senior Tutor, Wadham College, Oxford OX1 3PN,
    before 4 February, and ask two referees to write to the
    Senior Tutor by that date. Brief further particulars may
    be obtained from Dr Jane Glover, Academic Administrator
    (telephone: Oxford (2)77946).

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    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 15 January 1998:<br /> Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to
    advertise in the Gazette

    "../../../stdg/conds.htm">

    Terms and conditions of
    acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    Asylum Welcome and Detainee
    Support

    Bengali, Punjabi, Urdu, and Eastern
    European language-speakers badly needed, and others too.
    Asylum Welcome is a charity which visits and befriends
    asylum-seekers in Campsfield Detention Centre. We also
    support refugees and asylum-seekers in Oxford, helping
    them with accommodation, social services, education,
    legal services, and their general welfare. We would
    welcome donations and volunteers. Please tel.: Oxford
    722082.

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    section



    E.H. New (d. 1932)

    Publisher seeks to make contact with
    descendants of this Oxford architect and artist. Would
    anyone with information about his family or estate please
    contact Richard Webster, tel.: Oxford 558596.

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    section



    Tuition Offered

    French conversation and tuition at all
    levels offered by French native speaker and experienced
    teacher. Tel.: Oxford 422673.

    A new option for co-education at the age
    of 13 in Oxford. Your son or daughter can now join
    d'Overbroeck's College at age 13 and go right through to
    A levels. To find out more, tel.: Oxford 310000, or come
    to our Open Morning on 14 Feb., 10 a.m.--12.30 p.m.

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    section



    Services Offered

    Bespoke Garden & Landscape Design: `one
    off' consultancy visits, or sketch and scaled layouts,
    planting schemes, construction details, and site
    supervision, as desired. Nation-wide service from
    Oxford/Gloucestershire base. Chelsea Gold Medal 1996 and
    1997. Jacquie Gordon BA Dip LA (Glos) ALI. Tel./fax:
    01531 822743.

    Oriental carpet dealers Frederick and
    Sudabeh Hine have additional stock comprising: a good
    quantity of Persian and Chinese rugs made over 50 years
    ago, faded but little sign of use; a few Afghan and
    Persian tribal carpets approx. 3m by 2m, in good
    condition for 30-plus years of age; armfuls of small
    colourful Persian tribal bits and pieces for use as mats,
    seat covers, hangings; large numbers of Beluch runners
    and tent bag/cushions. Come and see the full display,
    inc. new and antique pieces, in business hours, 10
    a.m.--6 p.m., Mon.-- Sat. Ring first if you can. Old
    Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North Oxford. Tel./fax:
    Oxford 559396.

    Town and Country Trees: professional
    tree surgeons. All aspects of arboriculture undertaken
    including orchard and shrub pruning, planting, hedge
    trimming, stump grinding, etc. Quality work at
    competitive prices. We are fully insured. For a free
    quotation, call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

    Oxuniprint, Oxford University
    Press—the University Printers: specialising in
    booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing,
    and finishing; Output Bureau provides high-quality output
    from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper,
    bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film;
    high-quality specialist colour copier service. For
    service, quality, and competitive prices contact
    Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon
    Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

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    section



    Domestic Services

    Wolfson College Day Nursery has places
    for children aged 3 years and over, available now and in
    Feb. Details and application forms from the Domestic
    Bursar's Secretary, Wolfson College, Linton Road, Oxford
    OX2 6UD. Tel.: Oxford (2)74071.

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    section



    Houses to Let

    Old Headington: award-winning spacious
    converted chapel in quiet and secluded position among
    beech trees. Pall oak and natural stone; 2 storey. Fully
    furnished; living-room, 1 double bedroom, bathroom,
    kitchen, larder, fridge/freezer, garden, and parking; gas
    c.h. £750 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 437750.

    North Oxford : furnished bungalow,
    available end Mar.--24 May. Four bedrooms (1 or 2 to
    remain closed), 2 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast,
    utility etc. Gas c.h.; gardens. Suits visiting academic
    couple. Tel.: Oxford 558790.

    Exceptionally pretty listed Elizabethan
    stone cottage (discretely modernised) in area of
    outstanding natural beauty. Open fire, beams, etc.
    Garden, garage, wonderful views, peace and quiet.
    Reasonable rent to careful considerate tenant. 20 minutes
    Oxford, 30 minutes Cheltenham. Ready now. Tel.: 01993
    822152.

    Attractive cottage and garden in South
    Oxford, 10 minutes walk from city centre. Fully furnished
    and well maintained; 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms; suitable
    for professional couple. Available for short lets during
    the year, or for the summer. £800 p.m.. Tel.: Oxford
    727671.

    Responsible tenant or couple sought for
    charming, well-maintained house, short walk from city
    centre. London-based academic owner visits at weekends,
    so would suit academic/professional person with a similar
    pattern. Three bedrooms, study, lounge, off-street
    parking, well-tended garden close to shops, handy for
    London coach. Tel.: 0171 586 1481, fax: 586 9016.

    Delightful 3-bedroom house; excellent
    access to city centre via cycle track to University
    Science Area, also close to John Radcliffe hospital.
    Fully furnished 3 bedrooms, sitting-room, dining-room,
    kitchen, bathroom with bath and shower. Gas c.h. and all
    modern appliances. Small garden. Non-smoking please.
    Available from Jan. 1998. £850 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
    554384, fax: 316659.

    North Oxford family house; close to
    schools, station, hospitals, and city centre. Fully
    furnished; large kitchen, sitting-room, 5 bedrooms;
    south-facing garden, parking, c.h. Available from Mar.
    1998. Tel.: Oxford 790640.

    East Oxford: academic working abroad
    seeks to let 3-bedroom house, up to the summer or beyond
    (flexible). £550 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 251328.

    Large North Oxford house to let for Jul.
    and Aug. Tel.: Oxford 556507.

    Central North Oxford, attractive family
    accommodation available soon, for 6 months plus;
    Victorian house, well equipped; gas c.h., 28- ft
    sitting-room, 3 double bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen/diner;
    excellent schools available; city centre 10 minutes'
    walk, plus Thames water meadows. £950 p.c.m. exc.
    bills. Tel.: Oxford 559911.

    Available now for a min. of 6 months'
    let: 2-bedroom fully-furnished 2-year-old house with
    garden, off-street parking, c.h.; situated in quiet
    wooded close; suitable for professional couple—non-
    smokers please. Tel.: Oxford 361494.

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    section



    Flats to Let

    Corner St Margaret's and Woodstock
    Roads: 2-bedroom flat; large living-room, kitchen with
    wash/drying machine, bathroom with shower. Available 20
    Mar.--24 Aug. 1998. £550 p.c.m., inc. electricity.
    Tel.: Oxford (2)74872, e-mail:
    jean.dunbabin@history.oxford.ac.uk.

    St Margaret's Road: large comfortable
    flat; double bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, living-room, gas
    c.h.; fully furnished. Non-smoker only. £600 p.c.m.
    Tel.: Oxford 557113.

    Woodstock Road, 2 miles from city
    centre. Self-contained, fully furnished, ground floor
    flat. Open-plan; living-room, double bedroom, bathroom,
    kitchen. Use of spacious garden; off-street parking. Next
    to bus stop. Available immediately, let of 6 months or
    longer preferred. £525 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.:
    Oxford 557684, after 6pm.

    Elegant 1-bedroom ground floor flat in
    St Margaret's Road, central North Oxford. Double bedroom,
    large sitting room, kitchen, and bathroom. Fully
    furnished; washing machine; gas c.h. Use of charming
    shared garden. Available late Jan./early Feb. Let of 6
    months or longer preferred. £700 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
    343384.

    Cumnor Hill, 3.5 miles from city centre.
    Self-contained, spacious, furnished, 1-bedroom flat.
    Sitting-room, kitchen, bathroom with shower, own
    telephone, T.V., private parking, non-smoking. £450
    p.m. inc. heating, electricity, and Council Tax. Tel.:
    Oxford 864241, e-mail: 101576.3506@compuserve.com.

    Horton-cum-Studley: picturesque village
    location approximately 7 miles north east of Oxford, easy
    access to A40 and M40. Top floor flat of an attractive
    Victorian property set in private grounds, with
    panoramic views over Otmoor. Large bed-sitting room,
    farmhouse style kitchen, bathroom. Perfect for single
    person seeking peace and quiet just 10 minutes drive from
    Oxford ring road. Available Mar. £395 p.c.m. inc.
    heating. Tel.: Oxford 200012, e-mail:
    stclement@finders.co.uk.

    Paris: flat, 30m squared, 11th
    arrondissement (Bastille area). Available Jan.--Jun.
    1998. £350 p.c.m. Contact T. Lalande, Linacre
    College. Tel.: Oxford 431416.

    Headington: comfortable fully furnished
    and equipped studio flat, convenient for central Oxford,
    and for John Radcliffe, Churchill, Brookes, etc.
    Self-contained, with own entrance, single bedroom,
    kitchenette, and shower etc. en suite. Metered gas and
    electricity, own c.h., and telephone with fax.
    Non-smoking. Suitable for mature postgraduate,
    professional, or academic. Shorthold tenancy. £365
    p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 768925.

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    section



    Accommodation Offered

    Complex of 4 rooms on one floor; large
    Victorian house in North Oxford on the Woodstock Road
    side near the Radcliffe. Telephone connections; c.h.,
    parking. Ideal as a main working HQ or as an annexe to
    another location. Tel.: Oxford 554326.

    Jericho: short lets, 1 week to 3 months.
    Comfortable refurbished 2-bedroom house; 1 twin, 1
    single, lounge, dining room, fitted kitchen with washing
    machine, bathroom and 2 separate w.c.'s; gas c.h.,
    security alarm. £224 p.w., £824 p.c.m. inc.
    bills. Also basement flat; 1 twin bedroom, bathroom,
    lounge/dinner, and fitted kitchen with washing machine;
    small patio, gas c.h., security alarm. £133 p.w.,
    £480 p.c.m. inc. bills. Suitable for academics,
    regret no children or pets. Tel.: Oxford (2)78334, office
    hours.

    Require 2 students to share room with
    two bunk beds, self-catering, with Continental breakfast,
    £40 p.w. each. No other bills except personal
    washing. North Oxford, 9 Blandford Avenue. Civilised
    behaviour required. Tel.: Oxford 511657.

    Short-term/holiday lets. Comfortable,
    well-equipped cottages, 12 miles west of Oxford on good
    bus route, in attractive Cotswold market town of Witney.
    Tel.: 01993 703035, fax: 01993 771014.

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm,
    comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
    exclusive central North Oxford; within easy walking
    distance of the city centre and all main university
    buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks,
    excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9 corner
    shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and
    coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating.
    Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel. and
    fax: Oxford 557879.

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    Accommodation Sought

    Visiting Canadian academic seeks
    self-contained single accommodation (eg. study bedroom
    with en suite shower) for approximately 3 weeks at the
    beginning of May.
    Tel.: Oxford (2)76019, e-mail:
    gordon.claridge@psy.ox.ac.uk.

    Visiting scientist couple seeks
    flat/house in Oxford, available as soon as possible.
    Please reply to: Dr Eva Palsgard-Jones, SPM Unit, Keble
    Road. Tel.: Oxford (2)73412/(2)73414, e-mail:
    e.palsgard1@physics.oxford.ac.uk.

    Recently retired Canadian academic
    couple seeks 2-bedroom apartment for early May to end
    Aug. 1998. Preferably North or central Oxford. Careful
    tenants, local references. Tel.: Oxford 553294, e-mail:
    marina.dealarcon@prm.ox.ac.uk.

    Home exchange wanted in Oxford or region
    by four senior Canadians for 2 to 4 weeks starting
    mid-May. Comfortable home available in Guelph, Ontario,
    50 minutes to Toronto airport, close to universities; car
    included. E-mail: kking@uoguelph.ca for details and Web
    site.

    Law lecturer and clinical psychologist
    (non-smokers) seek 2-bedroom property in or around Oxford
    for min. of 3 months, from mid-Jan. Prepared to
    house-sit. Contact Celia Hinton. Tel.: Oxford 358972
    (evenings).

    Wanted to rent, 3--4 months from 6 Jan.,
    by Danish translator and wife: furnished cottage/house, 3
    bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen with appliances, utility
    room, etc., within 15--20 mile radius of Oxford.
    £500--£600 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 316936 or 01256
    892010.

    Mature Oxford graduate, professional,
    responsible, non-smoking, seeks quiet flat or reasonably
    independent house-sharing situation; preferably in North
    Oxford, but other areas considered. David Mowat, 7 Mount
    Street, Oxford OX2 6DH. Tel.: Oxford 310216, fax:
    559298.

    d'Overbroeck's College invites enquiries
    at any time of year from families in North Oxford who may
    consider offering accommodation to our A-level students.
    We offer excellent rates and are sensitive to individual
    needs. Telephone Christine Cox or Sylvia Hurst for
    further information. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

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    section



    Holiday Lets

    Gaunt Hill Cottage and Fisherman's Loft
    offer charming accommodation; each sleeps 4, on the edge
    of the pretty village of Standlake, equidistant from
    Oxford and the Cotswolds. Situated in 4 acres of idyllic
    gardens by the river Windrush with resident kingfishers,
    swans, ducks, and moor hens. Private trout and coarse
    fishing also available. Tel.: Oxford 300227 or 01235
    847494, fax: 01235 848204.

    Keravel in the heart of Brittany.
    Cottages round the cobbled courtyard of a 15th-c. manoir.
    Hills, woods, silence. One hour from numerous beaches and
    harbours, and near the standing stones of Carnac. Details
    from Penny Allen, tel.: Oxford 556507.

    Looking for value for money overnight
    accommodation in the UK? Then call Home from Home who
    specialise in arranging luxurious bed and breakfast
    accommodation around the country with personal service,
    friendliness, and a comfortable environment at no extra
    cost! Our aim is to keep prices under £50 p.p. per
    night with a nominal booking fee payable. For details,
    call Priscilla, tel.: Oxford 794727, or Jane, tel.: 0498
    808502.

    Andalucia, Gaucin: house or part to let;
    magical medieval white village; panoramic views from
    house to Morocco; stunning landscape, wonderful
    butterflies and birds; walking, fishing, and windsurfing;
    visit Ronda, Granada, Cordoba, Seville, Cadiz, Jerez, and
    Morocco. For brochure and photos: Dr Campbell. Tel./fax:
    Oxford 513935, e-mail: L.Lustgarten@soton.ac.uk.

    Itazly---Umbria, Assisi National Park,
    and Lake Como. Assisi: 2 double bedrooms,
    kitchen/dining-room, big bathroom; own road; superb
    views; wildlife. Lake Como: village house apartment
    closely overlooking lake; 1 double bedroom, kitchenette,
    dining/sitting-room, terrace, 20 minutes Como city. For
    either let: £300 p.w., £550 per fortnight,
    £900 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 763886.

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    Houses for Sale

    Detached bungalow, North Oxford: 3
    bedrooms, lounge, diner adjoining, good-size garden,
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    drive, 10 minutes train; London 40 minutes (from Didcot).
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    section



    Properties for sale at Oxford
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    <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 16 January<br /> - 5 February

    Diary


    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff
    Seminars
    : places should be booked in advance through
    the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
    Office Web site.

    Return to
    Contents Page of this issue



    Friday 16 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Venetian
    painting—east meets west', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30
    p.m.)

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    section



    Saturday 17 January

    ST ANNE'S COLLEGE: fifth evening of words and music, `A
    Rich Nostalgia', with Penelope Lively, novelist,
    Elizabeth Jennings, poet, and Charles Owen, piano, Mary
    Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, 6.30 p.m., followed by buffet in
    hall (tickets £30 each, from the Development Office,
    St Anne's).

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    section



    Sunday 18 January

    DR S.J. HARRISON preaches (Latin Litany and Sermon), St
    Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    section



    Monday 19 January

    DR J. ASHTON: `On comparing religions' (Wilde Lectures:
    `The religion of the apostle Paul'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    DR A. BORAINE: `Churches and apartheid in South
    Africa' (Mansfield College Religion and Democracy
    Programme), Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

    DR P. SLACK: `Plagues in history: the European
    experience' (Green College Lectures: `Plagues'), Witts
    Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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    section



    Tuesday 20 January

    THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is
    cancelled.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Samuel Palmer', 1.15
    p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.--12.30 p.m.)

    THE REVD DR IAN KER: `Newman's Idea of a
    University
    : a guide for the contemporary
    university?' (Wolfson College Lectures 1998: `The idea of
    a university', the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m.).

    M. REDCLIFT: `Environmental security and global
    consumption' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics,
    and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Wednesday 21 January

    PROFESSOR K. WEIL-GARRIS BRANDT: `Seven myths about
    Michelangelo' (Slade Lectures: `Michelangelo at the
    millennium'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR G. GOODWIN-GILL: `International
    organisations and refugees' (Refugee Studies Programme
    Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room,
    Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Thursday 22 January

    DR E. REICHEL: `Gender-based knowledge systems:
    indigenous ecopolitics in the north-west Amazon,
    Columbia' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
    seminars: `Gender, culture, and development—new
    theoretical directions'), Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    R. GILDEA: `1848 in European collective memory' (`From
    Reform to Reaction: the revolutions in Europe,
    1848'—a series of commemorative lectures), Schools,
    5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR A.S. GOUDIE: `The Ice Age in the tropics and
    its human implications' (Linacre Lectures: `The
    environment and historical change'), Lecture Theatre A,
    Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

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    section



    Friday 23 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Tapestries in the
    Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30 p.m.)

    PROFESSOR T.M. CHARLES-EDWARDS (Jesus Professor of
    Celtic): `The death of Columba' (inaugural lecture),
    Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Sunday 25 January

    THE REVD DR WILLIAM HORBURY preaches the Macbride Sermon,
    Hertford, 10 a.m.

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    section



    Monday 26 January

    DR J. ASHTON: `Paul the enigma' (Wilde Lectures: `The
    religion of the apostle Paul'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR P. HAGGETT: `The geography of plagues'
    (Green College Lectures: `Plagues'), Witts Lecture
    Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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    section



    Tuesday 27 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Hawksmoor and the re-
    planning of Oxford' (until 13 April).

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Negotiation and dealing with
    conflict' (second of three meetings for research team
    leaders), 9.15 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Greeks and their
    gods', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
    (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30 p.m.)

    DR J. DUNBABIN: `The origins of the university'
    (Wolfson College Lectures 1998: `The idea of a
    university', the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m.).

    J. ROBERTSON: `Sharing our common heritage: resource
    taxes, green dividends, and a new social contract'
    (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society
    seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Wednesday 28 January

    PROFESSOR K. WEIL-GARRIS BRANDT: `The "self-taught
    prodigy" ' (Slade Lectures: `Michelangelo at the
    millennium'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

    DR P. WEIL: `New immigration/asylum policy in France'
    (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration),
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Thursday 29 January

    DR C. LLOYD: `Theorising empowerment' (Centre for Cross-
    Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender, culture,
    and development—new theoretical directions'), Queen
    Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    J. CLAPPERTON: `A Well Older Than God: the influence
    of ancient myth and poetry on the contemporary piano
    music of Clapperton, Clemente, Ferneyhough, Franke,
    Radulescu, and Xenakis' (lecture-recital), Denis Arnold
    Hall, Music Faculty, 4.15 p.m.

    PROFESSOR THELMA HOLT (Cameron Mackintosh Professor of
    Contemporary Theatre): `Skiing off the piste—the
    producer as maverick' (lecture), Bernard Sunley Lecture
    Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

    G. ELLIS: `France' (`From Reform to Reaction: the
    revolutions in Europe, 1848'—a series of
    commemorative lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR SIR TONY WRIGLEY: `Meeting human energy
    needs: constraints, opportunities, and effects' (Linacre
    Lectures: `The environment and historical change'),
    Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

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    section



    Friday 30 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The materials of Asian
    sculpture: 2', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Sunday 1 February

    CANON MARTIN PEIRCE preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

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    section



    Monday 2 February

    OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY exhibition
    opens: Wildlife Photographer of the Year—winning
    pictures (until 7 March).

    DR J. ASHTON: `Paul the convert' (Wilde Lectures: `The
    religion of the apostle Paul'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    CHIEF JUSTICE MUHAMMED SAID AL-ASHMAWY: `Religion for
    new humanity' (Mansfield College Religion and Democracy
    Programme), Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR R. ANDERSON: `Drugs and plagues:
    antimicrobial resistance' (Green College Lectures:
    `Plagues'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6
    p.m.

    JOHN GIBBONS: harpsichord recital of Bach's
    Goldberg Variations, Garden Quadrangle
    Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free
    programme, available from college lodge from 24 January).

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    section



    Tuesday 3 February

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Disability awareness', 9.30 a.m.
    (see information above).

    PROFESSOR JOHN KAY (Professor of Management Studies):
    `The role of business in society' (inaugural lecture),
    Schools, 5 p.m. (admission by ticket only—tel.
    (2)88654).

    SIR MICHAEL WHEELER-BOOTH: `The Crown in Parliament'
    (Waynflete Lectures: `Parliament in a changing world'),
    Schools, 5 p.m.

    DR N. KEOHANE: `The American campus: from colonial
    seminary to global multiversity' (Wolfson College
    Lectures 1998: `The idea of a university', the Hall,
    Wolfson, 5 p.m.).

    D. LOWENTHAL: `Environmentalism from George Perkins Marsh
    to the millennium' (Oxford Centre for the Environment,
    Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5
    p.m.

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    section



    Wednesday 4 February

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Paintings from Mughal
    India' (until 29 March).

    PROFESSOR K. WEIL-GARRIS BRANDT: `The "reluctant
    painter" ' (Slade Lectures: `Michelangelo at the
    millennium'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

    DR R. BLACK: `Greening asylum? Humanitarianism
    v. environmentalism in mass displacement'
    (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration),
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Thursday 5 February

    DR F. MACAULAY: `Women policy networks: local, regional,
    and international' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on
    Women seminars: `Gender, culture, and
    development—new theoretical directions'), Queen
    Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    D. MACK SMITH: `Italy' (`From Reform to Reaction: the
    revolutions in Europe, 1848'---a series of commemorative
    lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR M.G.L. BAILLIE: `The tree-ring records
    :putting some abrupt environmental changes back into
    human history' (Linacre Lectures: `The environment and
    historical change'), Lecture Theatre A,
    Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

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    section