14 May 1998 - No 4474



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4474: 14 May 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

14 May 1998





University Health and
Safety
information


Return to Gazette
Home Page





<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 1998: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 11 May


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into
effect on 29 May.

List of the decrees:



Decree (1): Establishment of
Andreas Idreos Professorship of Science and Religion

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr
Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the
meeting of Congregation on 19 May, Statute (2)
establishing the Andreas Idreos Professorship of Science
and Religion, which was promulgated on 28 April (see
`University Agenda' below). Council has accordingly made
the following decree, which gives effect to consequential
changes.

Text of Decree (1)

[see `University Agenda' in Gazette "../190398/agen.htm">19 March, Statute 2.]


Decree (2): Griffith
Egyptological Fund

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Committee of Management of the Griffith Institute and the
Oriental Studies Board and with the concurrence of the
General Board, transfers the management of the Griffith
Egyptological Fund from the committee of management to
the faculty board.

Text of Decree (2)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 132 (Statutes,
1997, p. 647), delete cl. 2 and substitute:

`2. The Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies shall be
the board of management of the fund.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Decree (3): Establishment of
First and Second Public Examinations in Egyptology and
Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Oriental Studies Board and with the concurrence of the
General Board, establishes First and Second Public
Examinations in Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern
Studies, which will form an intrinsic part of the Honour
School of Oriental Studies. The course for the new
examinations is intended to exploit Oxfordþs unique
library and teaching resources for the study of the whole
Ancient Near East, including Egypt, and to create an
improved structure for the study of these civilisations
of the Near East. It will enable students to study core
elements, together with a range of options, based on the
study of the region and on the acquisition of at least
two ancient languages. The First Public Examination will
be in the form of Moderations, but those candidates who
have failed to satisfy the examiners in one or more
papers will be able to take the Preliminary Examination.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Text of Decree (3)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1997, p. 23, after l. 25 insert:

`Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern
Studies),'.

2 Ibid., p. 24, l. 36, delete
`Ancient Egyptian,'.

3 Ibid., p. 25, after l. 26 insert
new cl. 13 as follows and renumber existing cll. 13--16
(pp. 25--6) as cll. 14--17:

`13. A candidate may enter his or her name for
Moderations in Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient
Near Eastern Studies) not earlier than the third term
from matriculation.'

4 Ibid., p. 25, ll. 37--8, delete
`, or Ancient Egyptian'.

5 Ibid., p. 26, after l. 36
insert:

`Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern
Studies);'.

6 Ibid., p. 66, after l. 35
insert:

`Moderations in Oriental Studies
(Egyptology and Ancient
Near Eastern Studies)

1. The subjects and papers in the examination shall
be as prescribed by regulation from time to time by the
Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.

2. A candidate shall be deemed to have passed the
examination when he or she shall have satisfied the
Moderators in all the papers specified in the
regulations.

3. Candidates must offer all the papers at the same
time, except that a candidate may offer in the
Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies (Egyptology
and Ancient Near Eastern Studies) any paper or papers in
which he or she has previously failed to satisfy the
Moderators.

4. In the case of candidates who have satisfied the
Moderators in all the papers at a single examination, the
Moderators may award a distinction to those of special
merit.'

7 Ibid., p. 433, l. 5, after
`Egyptology' insert `and Ancient Near Eastern Studies'.

8 Clauses 1--6 of this decree
shall be effective from 1 October 1999; clause 7 shall be
effective from 1 October 2000.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Key to Decree (3)

Cll. 1 and 3 provide for the new Moderations in Oriental
Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies).

Cll. 2 and 4 remove Ancient Egyptian from the list of
Preliminary Examinations.

Cl. 5 provides for candidates who have failed one or more
papers in the new Moderations to enter for the
Preliminary Examination.

Cl. 6 defines the scope of the new Moderations.

Cl. 7 removes Egyptology from and inserts Egyptology and
Ancient Near Eastern Studies into the list of main
subjects for the Honour School of Oriental Studies.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Decree (4): Introduction of
residence requirements for full-time B.Th. students and
institution of a part-time mode of study

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Theology Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board,

(a) introduces residence requirements for
the full-time B.Th. and for the two years of full-time
study for those pursuing the full-time/part-time route;

(b) provides for those schemes run by
certain of the theological colleges whereby candidates
undertaking the full-time course continue their studies,
under the supervision of a tutor or tutors appointed by a
college, whilst residing in a context that is suitable
for theological reflection on pastoral experience, such
as an Urban Priority Area parish (such schemes greatly
enhance the original purpose of the degree as a broadly
based professional qualification, and both the Theology
Board and the colleges responsible are keen that such
programmes should continue to be offered);

(c) introduces the possibility of taking the
degree on a part-time basis, either over six years wholly
part-time, or two years full-time and two years
part-time.

There will be no residence requirements for students
registered as part-time.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1997, p. 535, after l. 14 insert new cll.
3--7 as follows and renumber existing cll. 3--6 (pp.
535--6) as cll. 8--11:

`3. No full-time Student for the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology shall be granted leave to supplicate unless,
after admission, he or she has kept statutory residence
and pursued his or her course of study at Oxford for at
least nine terms. Time spent outside Oxford as part of an
academic programme approved by the faculty board shall
count towards residence for the purposes of this clause.

4. No full-time Student for the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology shall retain that status for more than twelve
terms in all.

5. Part-time Students for the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology shall in each case be required to pursue their
course of study for twice the number of terms required of
an equivalent full-time student. Students taking the
course wholly part-time may hold the status of Student
for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology for up to
twenty-one terms. Students may also pursue their course
of study for two years full-time followed by part-time
study, and in this case may hold the status of Student
for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology for up to fifteen
terms.

6. Part-time students shall not be required to keep
statutory residence, but must attend for such instruction
at their colleges for such times during full term as
shall be required by the faculty board, and must also
attend at least one week's residential course each year,
the total hours of attendance in each year of the course
being as prescribed by the faculty board.

7. Students for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology
may supplicate for the Certificate in Theology after two
years, provided that they have satisfied the course
requirements as specified in the regulations made by the
faculty board for the Two-Year Certificate in Theology
under the provisions of Ch. X, Sect. VI.'

2 This decree shall be effective
from 1 October 1998.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Decree (5): Monetary penalties
under Title XIII

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr
Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the
meeting of Congregation on 19 May, Statute (1) revising
Title XIII (concerning university discipline), which was
promulgated on 28 April (see `University Agenda' below).
This statute will, however, still be subject to the
approval of Her Majesty in Council and is therefore
unlikely to come into effect before the end of Michaelmas
Term at the earliest.

Under the existing provisions of Title XIII, cl. 12
(b) (Statutes, 1997, p. 100),
Council is required to determine by decree every three
years the maximum monetary penalty and charge for damages
which the Proctors may impose for `minor university
offences', provided that no such determination may result
in a proportionate increase greater than the
proportionate increase in the maximum undergraduate
maintenance grant over the preceding three years. Changes
in the arrangements for student financial support have
accordingly meant that the maximum penalties have been
fixed since 1989 at £60. The current decree
determining them (ibid., p. 586) expires on 30 September
1998, and Council has therefore made the following
decree, which retains the present maximum until such time
as the new statute comes into effect. (Under the new
statute, the maximum to be determined every three years
by Council by decree will be limited by increases in the
Retail Price Index instead of the level of the
undergraduate maintenance grant—see
Gazette, p. 936.)

Text of Decree (5)

The amount of the maximum penalty and charge for damages
which the Proctors may impose for `minor university
offences' under Title XIII shall be £60 until such
time as the new provisions of clause 9 (d) of
that Title which were approved by Congregation on 19 May
1998 are approved by Her Majesty in Council and Council
has made a decree under that clause determining a
different maximum.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts
under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1997,
p. 367) has been accorded to the following persons who are
qualified
for membership of Congregation:

ANJA FLENDER, University Offices

SARAH HOWARD, D.PHIL., St Antony's Collge

BELA KOGAN, Faculty of Modern Languages

ROEL STERCKX, Wolfson College

CANDADI V. SUKUMAR, Mansfield College

Return to List of Contents of this
section



3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been
added
to the Register of Congregation:

Flender, A., MA status, University Offices

Howard, S., MA status, D.Phil., St Antony's

Kogan, B., MA status, Faculty of Modern Languages

Sterckx, R., MA status, Wolfson

Sukumar, C.V., MA status, Mansfield

Titterington, J.C., MA, Lady Margaret Hall

Return to List of Contents of this
section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect
on
29 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 1998: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



CONGREGATION 18 May


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be
approved at noon on 18 May, unless by that time the
Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more
members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II,
Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15) that
they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

JOEL BARUCH BERKOWITZ, St Cross College

HANNA PICKARD, All Souls College

DAVID JAMES WALKER, M.SC., D.PHIL., St Hugh's College

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONGREGATION 19 May


Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole
business comprises questions to which no opposition has
been notified and in respect of which no request for an
adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor
will accordingly declare the the statutes approved, the
preamble adopted, the general resolution carried, and the
special resolutions carried without a meeting under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11
(Statutes, 1997, p. 8).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONGREGATION 2 June 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that
written notice of any intention to vote against the
preamble of the following statute, signed by at least two
members of Congregation, must be given to the Acting
Registrar by noon on Monday, 25 May (see the Guide to
Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end
of `University Agenda').


Promulgation of Statute

Statute: Michael Daly Memorial Fund

Explanatory note

In 1992 the University accepted a generous benefaction
from Mr and Mrs Allen Daly to endow a fund in memory of
their late son, Michael, who was a former member of the
staff of the Bodleian Library. The income of the fund is
to be used to make awards to members of staff of the
Bodleian and of other libraries of the University to
enable them to study the languages or cultures of either
(a) the Turkic-speaking world and the Caucasus
or (b) the Slavonic and Eastern European worlds,
preference being given to (a). In view of a
recent dearth of applicants for such awards, the board of
management has proposed, with the full endorsement of the
benefactors, that the purposes of the fund should be
extended to include wider Oriental Studies while
retaining the preference for (a) above expressed
at the time of the original benefaction. The following
statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the
statute is approved, provide accordingly.

WHEREAS it is expedient to extend the purposes of
the Michael Daly Memorial Fund, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF
OXFORD, in exercise of the powers in that behalf
conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and
Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it,
ENACTS, subject to the approval of Her Majesty in
Council, AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. XV (Statutes,
1997, p. 165), insert Sect. LXIII:

`Section LXIII. Of the Michael Daly Memorial Fund

1. The net income of the fund established by the
gift made to the University in 1992 by Mr and Mrs Allen
Daly as a memorial to their son, Michael, shall be
applied in awards, to be known as Michael Daly Awards, to
members of staff of the Bodleian Library or, in default
of suitable applicants in any year, to members of staff
of other libraries of the University. The awards shall be
used by the recipients to enable them to study the
languages or cultures of the Turkic-speaking world; the
Caucasus; the Slavonic and East European worlds; the
Middle East; the Far East; or South and South-East Asia;
with preference given whenever possible to applicants
studying some aspect of the Turkic-speaking world and the
Caucasus.

2. The fund shall be administered by a board of
management comprising Bodley's Librarian and the Keeper
of Oriental Books, or their respective nominees or
deputies, one of the Curators of the Bodleian Library to
be chosen from time to time by the curators,1 and a
person to be chosen from time to time by the Board of the
Faculty of Oriental Studies from among the holders of
academic posts in Turkish. The board shall determine
which of the eligible candidates shall receive the
awards, their several value, and any conditions governing
their use.

3. Congregation shall have power from time to time to
alter clause 2 of this statute.'

2 Ibid., insert footnote:

`1 See Appendix to Title VIII.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
approved

1 In Ch. IX, Sect. I (Statutes, 1997, p.
621), delete § 71 and renumber existing §§
72--80 (pp. 622--6) as §§ 71--9.

2 This decree shall be effective
from the date on which Statute (...) approved by
Congregation on ... is approved by Her Majesty in
Council.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONGREGATION 18 June


Election

Nominating Committee for the Vice-Chancellorship: one vacancy,
for 4 years from MT 1998

The Nominating Committee for the Vice-Chancellorship is
responsible for deciding the name to be proposed to
Congregation for the appointment of the Vice-Chancellor.
The next such proposal is due to be made in Trinity Term
1999 in respect of a Vice-Chancellor to serve from
October 2001.

¶ Nominations in writing for the election on 18
June, by two members of Congregation, will be received by
the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington
Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 25 May, and similar
nominations by six members of Congregation up to 4 p.m.
on Monday, 1 June.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each
signatory the name and college or department in block
capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be
published. At least one nomination in respect of each
candidate must be made on an official nomination form.
Copies of the form are obtainable from the Head Clerk
(telephone: (2)70190; e-mail:
Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 1998: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



PROFESSORSHIP OF OPTOELECTRONIC
ENGINEERING

EDWARD PETER RAYNES, FRS (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Director
of Research, Sharp Laboratories of Europe, and Visiting
Professor of Engineering Science, University of Oxford,
has been appointed to the professorship with effect from
1 October 1998.

Professor Raynes will be a fellow of St Cross College.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF
VISITING PROFESSOR

On the recommendation of the Physiological Sciences
Board, the General Board has conferred the title of
Visiting Professor in Developmental Biology and Genetics
on S.D.M. BROWN (PH.D. Cambridge), Director of the MRC
Mammalian Genetics Unit and the Mouse Genome Centre at
Harwell, for a period of three years from 11 May 1998.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



UNIVERSITY OFFICES

The University Offices will be closed for normal business
on Monday, 25 May.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



UNIVERSITY MESSENGER SERVICE

The University Messenger Service will not operate on
Monday, 25 May.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SHELDONIAN THEATRE

The Sheldonian Theatre will be closed on Monday, 25 May.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SPEAKING BY JUNIOR MEMBERS IN
CONGREGATION

Mr Vice-Chancellor has, with the agreement of Council,
approved the following arrangements for junior members to
speak in Congregation under the terms of Ch. I, Sect x
(Statutes, 1997, p. 208), which reads as
follows:

`Any junior member as defined in Tit. XIV, Sect. iv,
§ 1, cl. 2, may speak at a meeting of Congregation,
if called upon to do so by the Chairman at the Chairman's
discretion, provided that the Chairman may at any time
terminate a debate on the floor of the House and proceed
to the final speeches and the taking of a vote.'

The Chairman of Congregation will normally expect to
call upon nominated representatives of the Oxford
University Student Union if they wish to speak in debate,
and will normally expect to call upon junior members to
speak only from among those who have given advance notice
of their wish to be called. Should the Chairman consider
that the number of junior members who have given such
notice is excessive, he or she will have to be selective
in calling upon them. The Chairman will try to ensure a
balanced debate in relation to the apparent spread and
strength of views held by junior members. If informed
selection is to be possible it is desirable that when
giving notice of the wish to be called a junior member
should indicate (a) whether he or she intends to
support or oppose the motion before the House,
(b) whether he or she would speak on behalf of
any club, committee, group, or association, (c)
whether he or she is supported by other junior members
(up to twelve of whom might sign the notice).

If the number giving notice is small they will all
be admitted to the floor of the House although this does
not ensure their being called. In other cases some
selection may be necessary at the stages of both
admission and calling of speakers. If there is to be time
to tell applicants whether they will be admitted notice
will have to be received in good time. Junior members
should therefore send in such notice, in writing, to the
Registrar to be received at the University Offices not
later than 10 a.m. on the Monday preceding the debate in
question. The name of any representative nominated by
OUSU should also be communicated to the Registrar, in
writing, through the President by that time. A notice
will then be posted in the University Offices and on the
gate of the Clarendon Building not later than 10 a.m. on
the morning of the debate, indicating whether all
applicants will be admitted to the floor of the House or,
if selection has had to take place, the names of those
selected for admission to the floor.

Junior members not admitted to the floor of the
House will normally be permitted to listen to the debate
from the gallery. Junior members on the floor of the
House will be asked to remain in their places while a
vote is being taken.

Under Tit. XIV, Sect. IV, § 1, cl. 2, junior
members are defined as `those persons who, having been
admitted to matriculation, are residing to fulfil the
requirements of any statute, decree, or regulation of the
University or reading for any degree, diploma, or
certificate of the University and who have not proceeded
to membership of Convocation'. (Membership of Convocation
is normally obtained by taking the MA degree.)

Return to List of Contents of this
section



ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the
University, was established in 1988. The company has been
formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded
by the UK Government through the Research Councils and
funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The
function of the company is to ensure that the results of
research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors,
who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or
royalties for the use of know-how arising out of
research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of
the University by setting up individual companies using
venture capital or development capital funds.

Isis' services are also available to individuals who
wish to exploit the results of research supported by non-
Research Council sources, when there are no prior
conditions on the handling of the intellectual property
rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a small pre-
seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting
intellectual property rights and for taking work to a
stage where its potential can be assessed.

Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new
ideas can be developed for market requirements. The
company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for
major industrial companies, so that they can have a
window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license
and invest where appropriate.

A brochure explaining Isis' activities is
available. Please contact the above address, or the
telephone and fax numbers given below.

Members of the University should contact the Managing
Director if they wish to take advantage of the services
that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONCERTS


Music Faculty

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET will perform Haydn's Quartet
in C major, op. 54, no. 2, Borodin's Second Quartet in D
major, and Beethoven's Quartet in F major, at 7.45 p.m.
on Wednesday, 27 May, in the Holywell Music Room.
Tickets, costing £8 (£6/£4), are available
from Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the door.

Friends and admirers of the Quartet are most welcome to
attend a post-concert reception, held in honour of
cellist Bruno Schrecker, on his retirement.

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS (with Mary Nelson, soprano)
perform cantatas by Vivaldi, at 8.15 p.m. on Saturday, 30
May, in New College Ante-Chapel. Tickets, costing £7
(£5), are available from Blackwell's Music Shop, or
at the door.

Return to List of Contents of this
section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 1998: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



HUSSEY LECTURES ON THE CHURCH AND THE
ARTS

JOHN W. COOK, Director, Henry Luce Foundation, New York, will
deliver the Hussey Annual Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 May,
in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `What is sacred about sacred art?'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR P.J. BRYANT, Development Biology Center, University of
California, Irvine, will deliver a Jenkinson Memorial Lecture at
5 p.m. on Monday, 18 May, in Lecture Theatre B, the
Zoology/Psychology Building.

Subject: `Genetic approaches to understanding the
control of growth during development.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



GAISFORD LECTURE

DR C. SOURVINO-INWOOD, Reading, will deliver the Gaisford Lecture
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St
John's College.

Subject: `Euripidean tragedies and Athenian religion.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



O'DONNELL LECTURES 1998

DR NICHOLAS WILLIAMS, Department of Modern Irish, University of
Dublin, will deliver the O'Donnell Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
following days in the Hall, the Taylor Institution.

Thur. 21 May: `Gaeilge, Gàidhlig,
Gaelg—the origins of Manx.'

Fri. 22 May: `Nebbaz Gerriau dro tho
Carnoack—a few words about Cornish.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



BESTERMAN LECTURE 1998

PROFESSOR ROBERT DARNTON will deliver the inaugural Besterman
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 May, in the Hall, the Taylor
Institution.

Subject: `Policing poetry in Paris, 1749.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



HALLEY LECTURE 1998

PROFESSOR VERA C. RUBIN, Carnegie Institution of Washington, will
deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 May, in the
Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

Subject: `What Halley didn't know about the
universe.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



DAVID LEWIS LECTURE

PROFESSOR P. BRIANT, Toulouse, will deliver the third annual
David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the Garden
Quad Auditorium, St John's College.

Convener: Dr A.K. Brown, Christ Church.

Subject: `Greek epigraphy and Achaemenid history:
from Sardis to Xanthos.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



RODNEY PORTER MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR J. WALKER, Head of the Dunn School of Nutrition, Cambridge,
will deliver the first Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture at 4 p.m.
on Monday, 1 June, in the University/Pitt Rivers Museum. The
lecture will be followed by a champagne reception. Further
details may be obtained from Pauline Rudd (telephone: Oxford
(2)75340), Fran Platt (telephone: (2)75725), or Kieran Clarke
(telephone: (2)75255).

Subject: `The rotary mechanism of ATP synthesis.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Plant Sciences: G.E. Blackman Lecture

PROFESSOR ROLAND DOUCE, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire
Végétale, Grenoble, will deliver the twenty-third
G.E. Blackman Lecture at 4 p.m. on Thursday, 11 June, in the
Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

Subject: `Plant subcellular metabolism and the design
of new herbicides.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CLINICAL MEDICINE

Clinical Pharmacology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Mondays in the
Cairns Seminar Suite, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

PROFESSOR I.C. REID, Dundee

18 May: `Mood, memory, and plasticity.'

DR L. OBOSI, Brookes University

22 June: `The baculovirus expression vector
system as a tool in the study of serotonin receptors.'

DR N. SINGEWALD, Innsbruck

29 June: `Functional interplay of
neurotransmitters in the locus coeruleus.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Department of Clinical Neurology: guest lectures

The following guest lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on
Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR G. SCHOTT, National Hospital

17 July: `Managing central pain.'

PROFESSOR R. DOLAN, Institute of Neurology

18 Sept.: `Neurobiology of human
emotion—perspective from functional imaging.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



LITERAE HUMANIORES

Gareth Evans Memorial Lecture 1998

PROFESSOR W. KUENNE, Hamburg, will deliver the Gareth Evans
Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 26 May, in the Gulbenkian
Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Simple truth and alethic realism.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Lorca Centenary (II)

PROFESSOR A. ANDERSON, Michigan, will lecture as follows in Room
3, the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII
Professor of Spanish Studies, and D.G. Pattison, MA, D.Phil.,
Reader in Spanish.

Tue. 19 May, 12 noon: `Federico García Lorca
and William Butler Yeats: some unsuspected parallels.'
(Public lecture)

Wed. 20 May, 5 p.m.: `Federico García Lorca
y Sebastiá Gasch, 1927–8: influencias
recíprocas y la construcción de una
estética vanguardista.' (Graduate Seminar in
Spanish Studies
)

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Lecture (German studies)

DR N. SAUL, Trinity College, Dublin, will lecture at 2.15 p.m.
on Thursday, 21 May, in Room 2, the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: K.F. Hilliard, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in German Literature, and C.J. Wells, MA, University
Lecturer in Germanic Philology and Medieval German Literature.

Subject: `Kleist's bodies.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Department of Atomic and Laser Physics

The following seminars will be held at 1.45 p.m. on Mondays in
the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

DR S. HOPKINS

18 May: `Light induced coherence effects in
laser cooled Rubidium.'

PROFESSOR L. ALLEN, Essex

1 June: `The orbital angular momentum of
light.'

PROFESSOR P. EWART

8 June: `Quantum mechanics, bio-mechanics, and
auto-mechanics: a sampler of the Oxford Institute of Laser
Science.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SOCIAL STUDIES, NUFFIELD COLLEGE, ST
JOHN'S COLLEGE

Colloquium: myopic choice

This interdisciplinary colloquium, which will discuss the
evidence that choice deviates from orthodox decision theory, and
that it has a temporal bias towards the present, will be held on
Friday and Saturday, 22 and 23 May, in Nuffield and St John's
Colleges.

Conveners: A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent
Social and Economic History, and G.L. Mackie (MS Oregon), Junior
Research Fellow in Politics, St John's College. For further
information, telephone Oxford (2)785979, or e-mail:
avner.offer@nuffield.ox.ac.uk.

Friday, 22 May: Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College

PROFESSOR A. KACELNIK
4–4.30 p.m.: `Rationality, Risk Sensitivity and Myopic
Discounting in Animal Choice.'

PROFESSOR G. AINSLIE, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical
Center, Coatesville, Pa, USA
5–6 p.m.: `Myopic Choice: What Good are Other People?'

Saturday, 23 May: morning session, Large Lecture Room,
Nuffield College

PROFESSOR S. LEA and DR P. WEBLEY, University of Exeter

9 a.m.: `The Economic Self.'

PROFESSOR M. CASSON, Reading

10 a.m.: `Myopic Choice and the Economics of Decision-making.'

PROFESSOR J. ELSTER, Columbia/Paris

11.30 a.m.: `Resisting temptation.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Afternoon session: New Seminar Room, St John's College

PROFESSOR C. BRADSHAW, Nottingham

2.15 p.m.: `Prospects for Developing a Psychopharmacology of
Self-Control.'

MR MACKIE

3.15 p.m.: `On the binding nature of promises.'

DR OFFER

4.15 p.m.: `Self-control and Well-being in the USA and UK since
1945.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SOCIAL STUDIES, GREEN COLLEGE

PROFESSOR STEIN RINGEN will lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 14
May, in the E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College. All are
welcome to attend.

Subject: `Precariousness, social assistance, and
social work.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

Oxford Architectural History Seminar

J. ASHDOWN will speak at the seminar to be held at 6 p.m. on
Monday, 8 June, in Rewley House.

Conveners: M.R. Airs, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
Conservation and the Historic Environment, and G. Tyack, MA,
M.Litt., Fellow, Kellogg College, and Director, Stanford
University Centre in Oxford.

Subject: `Another place: the university and college
buildings of Coimbra, Portugal.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

Archive of performances of Greek and Roman drama

PROFESSOR DR H. FLASHAR, Professor Emeritus of Greek, the
University of Munich, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10
June, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

Conveners: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Greek
Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF)
in Classical Languages.

Subject: `Sophocles and Mendelssohn—the
Antigone of 1841' (with visual and musical
illustrations
).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE


Delta Lecture

PROFESSOR J.D. NORTH, Groningen, will deliver the Delta Lecture
at 6 p.m. on Friday, 22 May, in the Museum of the History of
Science. Admission is by free tickets, available in advance from
the Museum.

Subject: `The Ambassadors' Secret: a new study of
Holbein's painting.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES

China Research Seminar

PROFESSOR ZHU CHUZHU, DR LI SHUZHUO, and MRS JIN ANRONG, Xi'an
Jiaotong University, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Thursday,
21 May, in Room 207, the Institute for Chinese Studies.

Subject: `Gender difference in child survival and
training in community reproductive health to improve female child
survival.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Feed the fury: art meets science

This symposium will be held on Wednesday, 20 May, 2–5.30
p.m., in the Museum. The symposium is open to the public, and
admission is free.

The symposium relates to the Museum's current exhibition of work
by artists Peter Chatwin and Pamela Martin. The exhibition is the
culmination of their working and researching alongside natural
scientists at the Museum.

The symposium will be chaired by Dr Sian Ede of the Calouste
Gulbenkian Foundation.

PETER CHATWIN and PAMELA MARTIN

2 p.m.: `Feed the fury—art meets science:
background to the exhibition.'

PROFESSOR RICHARD DAWKINS

2.40 p.m.: `Growth and form in the
computer.'

CHRISTOPHER O'TOOLE, University Museum of Natural History

3.20 p.m.: `On being a member of the oldest
profession.'

A.S. BYATT, novelist, with the other speakers

4 p.m.: Discussion of the issues raised in the
afternoon's talks.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Special Lecture

CLARE SHORT, MP, Secretary of State for International
Development, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May, in Keble
College.

Subject: `The White Paper on the Government's new
approach to international development.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Barbara E. Ward Commemorative Lecture

DR M. JASCHOK, Monash University, will deliver the Barbara E.
Ward Commemorative Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the
Taylor Institution. Further details may be obtained from the
Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)73644, fax: (2)736707, e-mail:
ccrw@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `A mosque of one's own—Chinese women,
Islam, and sexual equality (nan-nu pingdeng).'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



GREEN COLLEGE


Alan Emery Lecture

PROFESSOR V. DUBOWITZ, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics,
University of London, will deliver the Alan Emery Lecture at 6
p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the
Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `The floppy infant: from the cradle to the
genes.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Blackstone Lecture

LORD NOLAN will deliver the twenty-second Blackstone Lecture at
11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 16 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture
Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Government, ethics, and the law.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Middle East Centre

Hamid Enayat Lecture

PROFESSOR NASSER PAKDAMMAN, Professor of Economics, University
of Paris, will deliver the fifteenth Hamid Enayat Lecture at 5
p.m. on Thursday, 21 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's
College.

Subject: `History, tapes, and memory—the class
of 1950 at Dar ol-Fonoun.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER, Regius Professor of Modern History,
Cambridge, will deliver the sixteenth Henry Rowlatt Bickley
Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 May, in the Mordan
Hall, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `The imagery of government in the Italian
Renaissance.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



WOLFSON COLLEGE


Annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture

PROFESSOR JONATHAN Z. SMITH, Professor of the Humanities,
University of Chicago, will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin
Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May, in the Hall, Wolfson
College. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Close encounters of diverse kinds.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Public lecture

DR J. JOHNS, University Lecturer in Islamic Archaeology, will
deliver a public lecture at 6.30 p.m. on Thursday, 28 May, in the
Buttery, Wolfson College.

Subject: `Tales of the Alhambra: architecture,
poetry, and meaning in fourteenth-century Granada.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



WOLFSON COLLEGE FORUM FOR THE STUDY OF
JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY, AND THE OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND
JEWISH STUDIES

Jewish and Christian cultures in Renaissance Italy

This colloquium will be held on Tuesday, 9 June, in the Committee
Room, Wolfson College.

Conveners: Dr Daniel Frank and Dr Adena Tanenbaum.

PROFESSOR E. HOROWITZ, Bar-Ilan

2.30 p.m.: `Processions and piety in the
Venetian Ghetto.'

DR J. WEINBERG, Leo Baeck College

3.30 p.m.: `Confronting the New Testament;
Azariah De'Rossi and the beginning of Syriac
scholarship.'

S. CAMPANINI, Venice

5 p.m.: `Francesco Zorzi as a Christian
Hebraist.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

DR MARIKA KEBLUSEK will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May,
in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: ` "A man very vnhappie in books."
The publishing perils of an English royalist exile in The
Netherlands (1550–1660).'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD VIROLOGY AND AIDS RESEARCH CLUB

The following seminars will be held at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Dunn School Lecture Theatre. Further details may be obtained
by contacting OVARC@Path.ox.ac.uk, or
http://www.path.ox.ac.uk/wsj/ovarc.htm.

20 May (Chair: S. Rowland-Jones)

S. SHAUNAK, RPMS, Hammersmith: `Targeting the lymphatic system
in HIV.'

T. HANKE, Molecular Immunology Group: `Towards a vaccine for
HIV.'

3 June (Chair: R. Phillips)

Details of speakers to be announced.

17 June (Chair: G. Smith)

Details of speakers to be announced.

1 July (Chair: A. McMichael)

A. GALLIMORE and P. KLENERMAN: `Recent studies done in the Zurich
laboratory of Rolf Zinkernagel.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

PROFESSOR F. SFORZA, Venice, will lecture at 8 p.m. on Thursday,
28 May, in the Lecture Theatre, Rewley House.

Subject: `Building for the Italian theatre
1737–1992: theatrical architecture from Naples to Genoa.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



PHILIP BAGBY STUDENTSHIP IN SOCIAL
ANTHROPOLOGY 1998–9

Applications are invited for the Philip Bagby Studentship, which
is open to graduates of any university who are suitably qualified
in social anthropology. The tenure will not normally exceed two
years, and be for a maximum of three years. The award will
contribute towards university fees (at the rate for UK and EC
students) and college fees, if applicable, plus a maintenance
grant, for a total of up to £8,000 per year. Further details
are obtainable from Miss Emma Wilson, the Oriental Institute,
Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE (telephone: Oxford (2)78226, e-mail:
angela.norman@orinst.ox.ac.uk). Closing date for applications:
Monday, 1 June.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



PETER LIENHARDT MEMORIAL FUND AND PHILIP
BAGBY BEQUEST

The Board of Management for these funds is considering making
small grants to applicants in the following categories: students
registered for degrees at the Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology who need funds for research purposes; and, from the
Peter Lienhardt Memorial Fund only, other individuals working in
the field of social anthropology who wish to carry out some
particular project within the University. The terms of reference
of the Philip Bagby Bequest specify that grants from that fund
must encourage the comparative study of the development of urban,
literate cultures in accordance with anthropological principles
and methods. Application forms may be obtained from Miss Emma
Wilson, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE.
Closing date for applications: Monday, 1 June.

Return to List of Contents of this
section






<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 14 May 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



LECTURE LISTS: MICHAELMAS TERM 1998

Timetabling arrangements

Copy for the Michaelmas Term Lecture Lists from faculties and
departments not supplying on disk should be received by Friday,
15 May.

Those faculties and departments supplying on disk are asked to
provide the disk by Monday, 13 July.

The lecture lists will be distributed in late September, so as
to be available in the week before Noughth Week.

Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be
forwarded to Miss E. Williamson, Gazette and Lecture
Lists Assistant, Press Office, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street,
Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail:
lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Entries shared between lists

Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture
list of another faculty or department is asked to forward the
information as soon as possible directly to the other faculty.

If necessary, Miss Williamson can advise on the name of the person
to contact in the appropriate faculty or department.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7    Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5-7    Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7    Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5-7    Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7    Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be
given at the following hours whenever possible:

Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;      
                     Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)

Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

The Board of the Faculty recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the
following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by    
            Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on
compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or
four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics,
and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12 
Economics   11
Philosophy  10

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty
are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those
reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology
at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday to Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12

Tuesday 10

Wednesday 10 and 12

Thursday 10

Friday 10 and 12

Saturday 10

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SPECIAL LECTURE LIST


Michaelmas Term 1998

The Special Lecture List for Michaelmas Term 1998 will appear
shortly before term, at the same time as the ordinary Lecture
Lists. It will include all appropriate lectures for Michaelmas
Term published in the Gazette during Trinity Term,
and also lectures of which details are received by Monday, 24
August
.

Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are
asked to note that this is a firm deadline, and that items
received after it are unlikely to be included.

Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to Miss
E. Williamson, Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant,
Press Office, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB
(telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail:
lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all
examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1,
clauses 1-3 (Examination Decrees, 1997, pp.
1047-8), which require examiners in all university
examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman,
to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
it in the University Gazette.

He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the
Clerk of the Schools who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see
that notice of them is duly published in the University
Gazette
.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


Accommodation for Lectures

Michaelmas Term 1998

The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if
Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture
at the Schools in Michaelmas Term 1998 could inform the Clerk of
the Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to
know whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one
hundred persons is required; only the three large writing-schools
will accommodate more than that number.

Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection
equipment and 35-mm projectors are available. When these
facilities are required the Clerk of the Schools should be
notified in advance.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINERS

The following have been appointed:

SECOND PUBLIC EXAMINATION

Honour School

Oriental Studies

e.l. rogan, ma, St Antony's

For the examination to be held in Trinity Term 1998


MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY

Classical Archaeology

j.j. coulton, ma, Merton

d.c. kurtz, ma, d.phil., Wolfson

r.j.a. wilson, ma, d.phil., Wadham

All for the examinations to be held in Trinity Term 1998

Comparative Social Research

m.t. maclean, ma, Wolfson (vice Lewis, resigned)

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 2000

Development Studies

f.j. stewart, ma, d.phil., Somerville

m.a. vaughan, ma, Nuffield

j.s.j. toye (ma Cambridge; m.sc., ph.d., London)

European Archaeology

b.w. cunliffe, ma, d.phil., Keble

a.g. sherratt, ma, d.phil., Linacre

r.j. harrison (ma Cambridge; ph.d., Harvard)

European Literature

r.a. cooper, ma, d.phil., Brasenose

j.a.e. curtis, ma, d.phil., Wolfson

k.f. hilliard, ma, d.phil., St Peter's

n.j. luckhurst, ma, d.phil., Somerville

d. zancani, ma, Balliol

l.p.e. edwards, ma, St Hugh's

j. sloan, ma, d.phil., Harris Manchester

a. webber (ma, ph.d., Cambridge)

All for the examinations to be held in Trinity Term 1998

International Relations

s.n. macfarlane, ma, m.phil., d.phil., St Anne's (additional by
Decree)

Until Michaelmas Term 2000

Russian and East European Studies

a. pravda, ma, d.phil., St Antony's

d.r. priestland, ma, St Edmund Hall

h. shukman, ma, d.phil., St Antony's

r.j. service (ma, ph.d., Essex)

All for the examinations to be held in Trinity Term 1998


MASTER OF SCIENCE

Comparative Social Research

m.t. maclean, ma, Wolfson (vice Lewis, resigned)

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 2000

Educational Research Methodology

k.d. sylva, ma, Jesus (vice Haywood, granted leave
of absence)

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 1998

International Relations Research

s.n. macfarlane, ma, m.phil., d.phil., St Anne's (additional by
Decree)

Until Michaelmas Term 2000

Politics Research

m. anderson, ma, d.phil., University

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 1999
g.a. cohen, b.phil., ma, All Souls

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 2000

Public Policy in Latin America

m.d. deas, ma, St Antony's

j. foweraker, b.phil., d.phil., Brasenose

Both for the examination to be held in Trinity Term 1998


MASTER OF STUDIES

Anthropological Archaeology

c.h. gosden, ma, St Cross

p.j. mitchell, ma, d.phil., St Hugh's

p.z. dransart, m.st., d.phil., Linacre

Classical Archaeology

j.j. coulton, ma, Merton

d.c. kurtz, ma, d.phil., Wolfson

r.j.a. wilson, ma, d.phil., Wadham


European Archaeology

b.w. cunliffe, ma, d.phil., Keble

a.g. sherratt, ma, d.phil., Linacre

r.j. harrison (ma, Cambridge; ph.d., Harvard)

European Literature

r.a. cooper, ma, d.phil., Brasenose

j.a.e. curtis, ma, d.phil., Wolfson

k.f. hilliard, ma, d.phil., St Peter's

n.j. luckhurst, ma, d.phil., Somerville

d. zancani, ma, Balliol

j. sloan, ma, d.phil., Harris Manchester

a. webber (ma, ph.d., Cambridge)

Korean Studies

y.-h. chi, ma status, m.phil., St Antony's

Research Methods in Modern Languages

c.m. howells, ma, Wadham

t.j. reed, ma, Queen's

a. webber (ma, ph.d., Cambridge)

Slavonic Studies

j.c.a. baines, ma, d.phil., Magdalen

g.c. stone, ma, Hertford

p. herrity (ba, ph.d., London)

Study of Religion

m.d. goodman, ma, d.phil., Wolfson

a. jones, ma, Pembroke

j.s.k. ward, b.litt., ma, Christ Church

Theology

c.m. jones, ma, St Peter's

d.j.n. macculloch, ma, d.phil., St Cross

j.b. muddiman, ma, d.phil., Mansfield

o.m.t. o'donovan, ma, d.phil., Christ Church

c.c. rowland, ma, d.phil., Queen's

e.j. yarnold, dd, Campion Hall

World Archaeology

c.h. gosden, ma, St Cross

p.j. mitchell, ma, d.phil., St Hugh's

r.j. harrison (ma, Cambridge; ph.d., Harvard)

All for the examinations to be held in Trinity Term 1998


EXAMINATIONS OPEN TO NON-MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Continuing Education (Diploma in Biblical and Theological
Studies)

j. macquarrie, dd, Christ Church

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 1998
s.e. gillingham, ma, d.phil., Worcester

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 1999
v.n.h. strudwick, ma status, Kellogg

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 2000

Postgraduate Diploma in Management Studies

l.p. willcocks, ma, Templeton (vice Rands, resigned)

From Hilary Term 1998 to Michaelmas Term 1998


CERTIFICATE

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (at the University)

b. jaworski, ma, Worcester (vice Pendry, ex
officio
, granted leave of absence)

g.d. mills, ma status (vice Watson, granted leave
of absence)

Both for the examination to be held in Trinity Term 1998

Note: in the periods of office shown above reference
to any term should be understood as indicating the first day of
full term.



BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Optional Subjects in the Honour School of Modern Languages
and
the related joint honour schools

The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages gives
notice, under the provisions of the regulations in
Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 398, ll. 9-11, that
the following Optional Subjects will be available in the
examination in Trinity Term 2000.



104  [1] Modern Literary Theory. Candidates will be expected to
be familiar with major theories in this field since 1918.

105 European Cinema and Literary Movements from 1920 to the
present. Candidates will be expected: (a) to show evidence of
having worked on film study and analysis, using D. Bordwell and
K. Thompson, Film Art, 3rd edition (McGraw Hill, London, 1990);
P. Cook, The Cinema Book (BFI, London, 1985); M. Liehm, Passion
and Defiance (University of California Press, Berkeley-Los
Angeles, 1984); (b) to have studied two of the following, up to
four of which will be available in the examination: Expressionism
and the Early Avant-garde; Realism,
Socialist-Realism,-Neo-Realism; Auteurism; Filmic Adaptations of
Literary Texts/Literary Authors writing for the screen;
Totalitarianism in Literature and Film; Surrealism;
Representations of Gender and Sexuality; The New Avant-garde and
Post-modern Film. A list of the topics which will be available
in the examination wil be available in the Modern Languages
Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the
Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the examination.

150 Syntax.

151 Semantics.

152 Phonetics/Pholology.

153 Sociolinguistics.

154 Translation Theory.

200 Romance Philology and Linguistics. Candidates will be
expected to show a detailed knowledge of the methods of
Comparative Romance Philology and to illustrate their answers
with examples from more than one Romance language. A section on
`Vulgar Latin' will be set, including passages for linguistic
comment from one or more of the following: Early Glosses,
Appendix Probi, Aetheriae Peregrinatio ad Loca Sancta. The
section will be compulsory for candidates offering Modern
Languages Paper IV in any two Romance languages, and optional for
all other candidates, with the exception of those offering the
Classics and Modern Languages paper in Late Latin Philology, who
will be precluded from answering it.

201 Anglo-Norman Language and Literature.

202 Old Provencal. Prescribed text: F.R. Hamlin, P.T. Ricketts,
J. Hathaway, Introduction a l'etude de l'ancien provencal, Geneva
1967 and 1985, with particular reference to nos. 2, 3, 4, 8, 10,
12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28, 31, 33, 34, 36, 39, 40,
42, 44, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 56, 57, 59, 65, 67, 70, from which
passages will be set for translation. In addition, candidates may
answer questions on either literary or linguistic topics or both.

203 The twelfth- and thirteenth-century Grail Romances.

204 French historical writing up to 1515.

205 French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century.

206 Dramatic theory and practice in France from 1605 to 1660,
with special reference to Corneille.

208 [2] Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

209 Honore; de Balzac.

210 French Poetry 1870 to 1918.

211 French literature and the First World War.

212 [3] Marcel Proust.

213 Surrealism.

214 The `Nouveau Roman', with special reference to the work of
Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute and Butor.

215 Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.

216 French women writers.

217 Advanced French Translation: Theory and Practice.

218 The Old French Epic.

219 French Satire from Rabelias to Beaumarchais.

300 Old Norse. Candidates will be expected to have made a special
study of F. Ranke and D. Hofmann, Altnordisches Elementarbuch
(Sammlung Goschen No. 1115), pp. 80-135. Candidates will also be
expected to have read the Vosungasaga and related material from
the Poetic Edda.

301 Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old
English. Prescribed texts: Gothic, Gospel according to St Mark,
chapters 1-9; Old Saxon, Heliand, ll. 4025-5038; Old English,
Beowulf, ll. 1-1049.

302 The German Minnesang. Candidates will be expected to have
made a special study of Friedrich von Hausen, Lieder (ed.
Schweikle) (Reclam); Reinmar, Lieder (ed. Schweikle) (Reclam);
Heinrich von Morungen, Lieder (ed. Tervooren) (Reclam).

303 Wolfram von Eschenbach.

304 Martin Luther.

305 German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century.

306 Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to
Schiller.

307 Holderlin, Hyperion, Empedokles (ed. M. B. Benn, Clarendon
German Series) and the poetry written after 1797.

308 The Bildungsroman from Wieland to Keller.

309 German political thought from 1780 to 1830. Candidates will
be expected to have read: Kant,  Idee zu einer allgemeinen
Geschichte in weltburgerlicher Absicht, 1784; Zum ewigen Frieden,
1795; Humboldt, Ideen zu einem Versuch, die Grenzen der
Wirksamkeit des Staates zu bestimmen, 1792; Novalis, Die
Christenheit oder Europa, 1799; Fichte, Reden an die deutsche
Nation, 1808; Hegel, Vorlesungen uber die Philosophie der
Geschichte, Einleitung (ed. Th. Litt, Reclam); Grundlinien der
Philosophie des Rechts, Vorrede, 1821.

311 The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and
Rainer Maria Rilke. Candidates will be examined on the poetry of
two of these authors and will be expected to have read the works
listed in any two of the sections below.

(a) Hofmannsthal: Gedichte und Lyrische Dramen, ed. Steiner
(Fischer Verlag, 1952), pp. 7--136, 467--529. 

(b) George: Hymnen, Pilgerfahrten, Algabal; Das  Jahr der Seele;
Der Teppich des Lebens und die Lieder von Traum und Tod mit einem
Vorspiel; the sections `Zeitgedichte', `Gestalten', `Gezeiten',
and `Maximin' from Der siebente Ring; Das neue Reich omitting the
section `Spruche'. 

(c) Rilke: Das Stunden-Buch; Neue Gedichte (both parts); Requiem
fur eine Freundin; Requiem fur Wolf Graf von Kalckreuth; Die
Sonette an Orpheus; Duineser Elegien.

312 `Expressionist' poetry. Candidates will be expected to have
a detailed knowledge of poetry included in Lyrik des
Expressionismus ed. Silvio Vietta (Deutsche Texte no. 37,
published by Niemeyer).

314 German Poetry since 1945. Candidates will be expected to have
a general knowledge of the field, and a detailed knowledge of
works written in or after 1945 by three of the following authors:
Bachmann, Benn, Biermann, Bobrowski, Volker Braun, Brecht, Celan
(the collections of poetry from Mohn und Geduchtnis to Atemwende
inclusive), Enzensberger, Grass, Huchel, Sarah Kirsch, Kunert,
Sachs.

Note: The paper will include a compulsory section containing
general questions and commentary passages taken from the authors
being offered; candidates will thus be required to attempt either
a general essay or a commentary. Brecht's poetry from 1945 to
1956 may be offered as one of the three authors selected for
detailed knowledge in this paper by candidates offering Brecht
as a prescribed author in paper X.

315 The German novel since 1945. Candidates will be expected to
have a general knowledge of the field, and to have read
German-language novels relating to the topics listed below. The
paper will consist of a number of general questions, and a number
of questions on each of the following topics (candidates will be
precluded from answering more than two questions on any one
topic): Narrative Voice; `Vergangenheitsbewaltigung'; Politics
and Society; Identity and Gender.

400 Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.

401 Dante's minor works.

402 `Questione della lingua.'  Candidates will be expected to
have read: Dante, De Vulgari Eloquentia; Bembo, Prose della
volgar lingua; Manzoni, Scritti sulla lingua.

403 Vico.

404 The aesthetics and literary criticism of Croce. Candidates
will be expected to be familiar with Part I of the Estetica,
Croce's principal theoretical additions to it, and a broad sample
of his criticism of Italian literature.

405 The Works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.

406 Sicilian literature 1950--90. 

407 Italian Women Writers 1950--90.

500 [4] The Civilisation of Muslim Spain.

502 Spanish Drama before Lope de Vega. Candidates will be
expected to be familiar with the works of: Juan del Encina, Lucas
Fernandez, Lope de Rueda, Juan de la Cueva, Bartolome de Torres
Naharro, Diego Sanchez de Badajoz, Juan de Timoneda, Miguel
Venegas, Miguel de Cervantes, and the Spanish works of Gil
Vicente. Candidates will be expected to have read the Portuguese
and bilingual texts of Gil Vicente, but passages for comment,
which will not be compulsory, will not be set from these.

503 The Spanish Erasmians. Candidates will be expected to have
read: Erasmus, El Enquiridion (ed. Damaso Alonso, Madrid, 1932);
Coloquios de Erasmo (Nueva Biblioteca de Autores Espanoles, vol.
xxi, pp. 149--202, 227--49); Alfonso de Valdes, Dialogo de las
cosas ocurridas en Roma (ed. Jose F. Montesinos, Clasicos
castellanos); Juan de Valdes, Dialogo de doctrina christiana y
el psalterio (ed. Domingo Ricart, Mexico, 1964, pp. 1--130); Juan
Luis Vives, Concordia y discordia en el linaje humano [De
concordia et discordia in humano genere], Bk. IV (Obras
completas, trans. L. Riber, Aguilar, Madrid, 1947--8, ii, 195--
253); Cristabal de Villalan (attr.), Viaje de Turquaa (Part I);
F. de la Torre, Institucian de un rey christiano (ed. R. W.
Truman, Exeter Hispanic Texts, 1979)(passages for commentary will
not be set from this text).

504 The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico and the Antilles.
Candidates will be expected to have read: Cristobal Colon, Los
cuatro viajes del almirante y su testamento (ed. Austral); Hernan
Cortes, Cartas de relacion de la conquista de Majico (ed. M.
Alcala, Porrua, Mexico) and A. R. Pagden, Hernan Cortes: Letters
from Mexico (Oxford University Press, London, 1972), Letters two
and three; Bernal Diaz del Castillo, Historia de la Conquista de
la Nueva Espana (Porrua, Mexico, 1960), vol. i, pp. 174--501 and
vol. ii, pp. 1--60; Bartolome de las Casas, Breviisima relacion
de la destruccion de las Indias (EUDEBA, Buenos Aires, 1966);
Toribio de Motolinia, Historia de los Indios de la Nueva Espana
(Porrua, Mexico, 1969), pp. 77--109; Bernardino de Sahagun,
Historia general de la Nueva Espana (Porrua, Mexico, 1956),
Libros 3, 7, and 8. Candidates will also be expected to have read
Pedro Martir de Angleria, Decadas del Nuevo Mundo (ed. J. Torres
Asensio), omitting Decadas 2, 3, and 6.

505 Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577--88. Candidates
will be expected to have read: Santa Teresa de Jesus, Moradas del
castillo interior; Fray Luis de Granada, Introduccion del simbolo
de la fe (ed. Jose Maria Balcells, Madrid, Catedra, 1989), pp.
125-- 231; Fray Luis de Leon, Rey de Dios, Esposo, and Jesus,
from De los nombres de Cristo; San Juan de la Cruz, Llama de amor
viva (candidates will also be expected to have read the poem),
Malon de Chaide, La conversion de la Magdalena (3 vols., ed.
Felix Garcia, Clasicos Castellanos, Madrid, 1958), III, 83--178,
190-- 219.

506 Federico Garcia Lorca. Candidates will be expected to have
read: Federico Garcia Lorca, Obras completas (Aguilar, Edicion
del cincuentenario), 3 vols. Passages for commentary will be set
from among the following: Canciones, Poeta en Nueva York, Llanto
por Ignacio Sanchez Mejias, Yerma, El publico.

507 Twentieth-century Catalan literature. Candidates will be
expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed
knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages for
comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from the
authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works
prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern
Languages Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning
of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the
examination.

508 Galician literature and culture after Francoism. Candidates
will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a
detailed knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages
for comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from
authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works
prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern
Languages Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning
of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the
examination.

530 The Work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of
literature and learning. Passages for commentary will be set from
Primera cronica general (ed. R. Menendez Pidal, Madrid, 1955),
caps. 814--967; Las siete partidas (ed. Real Academia de la
Historia, Madrid, 1807), I (Prologo and i--both versions), ii;
II (i, iii--v, ix--xi, xv, xviii, xxi--xxii, xxiv, xxxi); III
(xix--xx); Cantigas de Santa Maria (ed. Jesus Montoya, Letras
hispanicas, 293, Madrid, Catedra).

531 Spanish and Portuguese Prose Romances of the Fifteenth and
Sixteenth Centuries. Candidates will be expected to have a
knowledge of the field and to have made a special study of at
least one romance from each of the following groups, from which
passages for literary commentary will be set: (a) sentimental,
(b) chivalric, and (c) pastoral.

(a) Diego de San Pedro, Carcel de amor (ed. Whinnom); Juan de
Flores, Grimalte y Gradissa (ed. Waley); Bernardim Ribeiro,
Menina e moca;   

(b) Spanish Grail Fragments (ed. Pietsch); Amadis de Gaula, Part
I (ed. Place); Palmeirim de Inglaterra (ed. Rodrigues Lapa);
Tirant lo Blanch, Book I;   

(c) Jorge de Montemayor, Los siete libros de la Diana (ed. Lopez
Estrada); Gil Polo, Diana enamorada (ed. Ferreres); Samuel Usque,
Consolacao as tribulacoes de Israel vol. i.

532 Latin American Fiction from 1940. Candidates will be expected
to show a detailed knowledge of the novels/short stories of at
least two of the following authors: Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo
Carpentier, Julio Cortazar, Fernando del Paso, Carlos Fuentes,
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Joao Guimaroes Rosa, Osman Lins, Clarice
Lispector, Mario Vargas Llosa.

560 The Galician--Portuguese Cancioneiros.

561 The Chronicles of the Portuguese Expansion in Asia.
Candidates will be expected to have read: the texts in Portuguese
contained in T.F. Earle and John Villiers, Albuquerque, Caesar
of the East (Aris and Phillips, 1990); Joao de Barros, Decadas,
ed. Antonio Baino, vol. I (Sa da Costa, 1945) (candidates are
advised to consult also the electronic edition of the Decadas
published by the Centre for the Study of the Portuguese
Discoveries); Diogo do Couto, O soldado pratico, ed. Rodrigues
Lapa (Sa da Costa, 1954); Fernao Mendes Pinto, Peregrinacao,
chaps. 1, 36-- 104, 203--26.

562 Camoes. Candidates will be expected to have read Os Lusiadas
(ed. F. Pierce)(passages for translation will be set from Cantos
I, V, IX) and Liricas (ed. Rodrigues Lapa, 1970 or later).

563 The Brazilian Novel of the North-East 1880--1960.

600 [5] Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and
Russian.

601 Comparative Slavonic Philology, with special reference to
Russian and any one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech,
Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian,
Ukrainian, White Russian.

602 [6] The structure and history of one of the following
languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat,
Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.

603 Language and style in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century
Russian literature.

604 Russian thought from 1825 to 1905. Candidates will be
expected to have read the works of Belinsky, Herzen, the
Slavophiles, Chernyshevsky, Mikhaylovsky, Plekhanov, Lenin.

605 Russian narrative fiction from 1917. Questions will be set
predominantly on the following authors: Babel', Bulgakov,
Erenburg, Leonov, Olesha, Pasternak, Sholokhov, Solzhenitsyn,
Zamyatin.

606 Modern Russian poetry, with special reference to the works
of Akhmatova, Mandel'shtam, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva.

607 Russian religious philosophy in the late nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries, with special reference to the works of
Fedorov, Solov'ev, Berdyaev, Florensky and S. Bulgakov.

609  Russian womens writing. Questions will be set on the work
of Pavlova, Zinov'eva-Annibal, Teffi, Akhmatova, Tsvetaeva,
Petrushevskaya, and also on general topics (including
autobiography, pre-revolutionary realist prose, the poetry of the
First Wave emigration, Socialist Realism, post-1953 prose,
contemporary poetry).

701 The School of the Ionian Islands 1797--1912, with special
reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis,
Valaoritis, and Mavilis.

702 The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880--1912, with special
reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis,
Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.

703 The Greek novel 1918--40, with special reference to the works
of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis, Venezis,
K. Politis, and G. N. Abbot.

704 Greek Women Writers.

801 [7] Medieval Welsh tales and romances.

802 The poets of the Welsh princes.

803 [7] The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym.

804 The Ulster Cycle of tales.

805 The classical Irish bardic tradition.

806 The structure and history of the Welsh language.

807 The structure and history of the Irish language.

900 Hebrew poetry and prose of Medieval Spain and Provence. In
addition to the literary texts, candidates will be expected to
show knowledge of the historical background of Spain and Provence
from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries, in particular the
transition from an Islamic to a Christian environment and the
Jewish response to it. Candidates will be expected to have read
selected works by the following writers: Moses Ibn Ezra; Abraham
Ibn Ezra; Joseph Ibn Zabara; Judah al-Harizi; Meshullam da Piera;
Shem Tob Falaquera; Todros Abulafia; Isaac Hagorni. All texts
will be selected from J. Schirmann, Hashirah ha'ivrit besefarad
uveprovans.

901 Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature. Candidates will
be expected to show knowledge of the work of Central and East
European Hebrew writers (some of whom settled in Jewish Palestine
in the early decades of this century) and in particular of their
literary development in the environment of Austrian, Russian, and
Polish literature, and their influence in shaping contemporary
Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to have read
stories by Y. H. Brenner and by M. Berdyczewski; David Vogel's
novel, Hayei nisu'im; a selection of poetry by H. N. Bialik, Saul
Tschernichovsky, Leah Goldberg, Nathan Alterman, and Abraham
Shlonski. Texts will be selected from the following works: Y. H.
Brenner, Kovetz sippurim (Sifrei Mofet); Y. Lichtenbaum (ed.),
Sofreinu (Ahiasaf); T. Carmi (ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew
Verse.

902 The literature of the State of Israel. Candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of modern Israel's literary history
and the development of its literature in the light of
twentieth-century Western European influences. Candidates will
be expected to have read stories by S. Y. Agnon, Aharon Meged,
and Aharon Appelfeld; a selection of poetry by Nathan Zach,
Yehuda Amichai, Dan Pagis, and Meir Wieseltier; and two plays by
Yehoshua Sobol. Texts will be selected from the following works:
S. Y. Agnon, Sefer Ha-ma'asim (Schocken Books, 1948); Aharon
Appelfeld, Shanim vesha'ot (Hakibbutz Hameuchad, 1975); T. Carmi
(ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse; Yehoshua Sobol, Nefesh
yehudi and Ghetto.

903 Yiddish Linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show
knowledge of the methods and findings of Yiddish linguistic
research with respect to any three of the following five topics:
(i) origins and history of Yiddish; (ii)interrelationships with
German dialects and standard German; (iii) the Semitic component
in Yiddish; (iv) Yiddish dialectology; (v) Yiddish
sociolinguistics. Required readings for each of these topics will
be in Yiddish, English, and German.

904 Modern Yiddish Literature. Candidates will be expected to
have read:

Sholem Aleichem, Kasrilevker progres (in his Fun Kasrilevke, NY
1919, pp. 11--84);   Ber Borokhov, Di ufgabn fun der yidisher
filologye (in Shprakhforshung un literatur geshikhte, ed. N.
Mayzl, Tel Aviv 1966, pp. 53--75);   Sh. An-ski (Shloyme-Zanvl
Rapoport), Der dibek (in  Di yidishe drame fun tsvantsikstn
yorhundert, NY 1977, vol. ii, pp. 7--60);   Selections from the
poetry of R. Ayzland, A. M. Dilon, M. L. Halpern, Z. Landoy, M.
Leyb, H. Leyvik, Y. Y. Shvarts, A. N. Stencl, M. Vintshevski (in
Musterverk fun der yidisher literatur, ed. Rozhanski, vol. lxxvi,
pp. 40--53, 61--6, 91--100, 112--34; vol. lxxviii, pp. 211,
234--8);   Isaac Bashevis Singer, A togbukh fun a nisht
geboyrenem and Der yid fun bovl (in his Der sotn in goroy un
andere dertseeeylungen, Jerusalem 1972, pp. 251--70, 307--307-
19). 





Notes on mutual exclusions and other restrictions

[1]  No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern
Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Modern Literary
Theory' and the Special Topic `The History and Theory of
Criticism' from the Honour School of English Language and
Literature.

[2]  No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and
Modern Languages my offer both the Optional Subject `Jean-Jacques
Rousseau' and the Further Subject `Political and Social Thought'
from the Honour School of Modern History.

[3]  No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and
Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Marcel
Proust' and the Further Subject `Literature, Politics, and
Society in France 1870-1914' from the Honour School of Modern
History. 



[4]  Candidates will be given an opportunity to show knowledge
of Arabic, but will not be required to show such knowledge.
Candidates offering this paper must have the approval of the
Joint Committee on Arabic and Spanish. Applications should be
sent to the Faculty Secretary, Oriental Institute, not later than
the Monday of second week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year
in which the candidate proposes to take the examination. 



[5]  No candidate in the Honour School of Modern Languages or in
a joint Honour School involving Modern Languages may offer both
the Optional Subject `Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common
Slavonic and Russian' and option (1) (`The Old Church Slavonic
Language') in the Linguistic Studies Paper II in Russian (Russian
Paper V from the Honour School of Modern Languages). 



[6]  Candidates offering Czech (with Slovak) will not be
permitted to offer either of those languages in the Optional
Subject on the structure and history of one of certain specified
languages. 



[7]  No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern
Languages may offer the Special Topic `Medieval Welsh' from the
Honour School of English Language and Literature with any of the
Optional Subjects `Medieval Welsh tales and romances', `The poets
of the Welsh princes', and `The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'. 



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 29 May.

1 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Physical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part B examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 498, delete ll. 2–6 and substitute:

`1. The examination consists of Part A and Part B. Each part will consist of two subject areas, Physics and Philosophy. In Part A candidates will take three papers in Physics and will be examined on three subjects in Philosophy, one of these subjects being open to choice. In Part B, candidates will offer four subjects as specified in the Schedule below.'

2 Ibid, delete ll. 11–14, and substitute:

`3. Candidates for Part A must give to the Registrar notice of their choice of the optional Philosophy subject not later than Friday in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding that part of the examination. Candidates for Part B must give to the Registrar notice of their choice of written papers not later than Friday in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding that part of the examination.'

3 Ibid, delete ll. 19–45, and substitute:

`Schedule

Part A

Physics

Candidates are required to

(i) take a three-hour written paper in theoretical physics,

(ii) take two written papers on the fundamental principles of physics.

The syllabuses for the three papers under (i) and (ii) above will be specified as part of the published requirements and arrangements for Part A of the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics: four-year course). The choice of papers under (ii) above shall be approved by the Sub-Faculty of Physics and published in the Gazette by the Joint Committee for Physics and Philosophy not later than the end of the Trinity Term for examination five terms thence. Philosophy

Candidates are required to take three subjects as specified in the provisions for Physics and Philosophy in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.

Part B

Candidates are required to offer Advanced Philosophy of Physics as well as three subjects in Physics and/or Philosophy. These subjects will consist of written papers except under the conditions below.

(i) The list of subjects and syllabuses from which the Physics papers may be selected shall be approved by the Sub-Faculty of Physics and published in the Gazette by the Joint Committee for Physics and Philosophy not later than the end of the Trinity Term for examination five terms thence. Those candidates offering at least two papers in Physics may offer an essay or project in place of one of these papers. The proposed nature of the essay or project and its duration shall be submitted for approval to the Chairman of the Sub-Faculty of Physics or deputy with, in the case of a project, the agreement of the Chairman of Physics or deputy.

(ii) The syllabus of the Advanced Philosophy of Physics subject, and the list of subjects and syllabuses for those candidates offering one or more further subjects in Philosophy, are as specified in the provisions for Physics and Philosophy in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part A examination in 2001)

In Part A of the above Schedule insert under Physics:

`(iii) submit to the examiners such evidence as they may require of the successful completion of practical work normally pursued during the four terms preceding that in which the candidate is admitted to Part A of the Second Public Examination.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part B examination in 2002)

Under (i) in Part B of the above Schedule delete `Those candidates offering . . . in place of one of these papers.' and sub stitute `Those candidates offering at least two subjects in Physics must submit, as one of them, an essay or practical project normally undertaken in the term in which the candidate is admitted to Part B of the Second Public Examination.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(b) Philosophy in some Honour Schools

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 463, l. 13, after `except' insert `121 and'.

2 Ibid., p. 466, l. 50, after `Physics*' insert `(two-hour paper)'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part B examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 471, delete ll. 11–13 and substitute:

`Part B: candidates are required to take subject 121. Those candidates offering one or more further Philosophy subjects must choose them from the subjects 101–4, 107–99 above.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part B examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 471, ll. 17–18, delete `A candidate offering an essay or project in Physics may not take subject 199 in Philosophy.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


2 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

(a) Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 49, delete ll. 11–27 and substitute:

`Section 5. Procedural Programming and Digital Design

Practical weight: one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Procedural Programming: Imperative programming constructs, with informal treatment of invariants. Procedures and modules; their use in the design of large programs. Data structures, including arrays, records, and pointers. Basic tools for program development. Case studies in design of medium-sized programs.

Digital Design: Simple design of combinational and sequential circuits; standard design elements. Computer arithmetic for integers and floating-point numbers; basic error analysis. Register transfer level design of a simple microprocessor with microcode. Simple programming in assembly language. Functions of assemblers, compilers, and linkers'.

(b) Preliminary Examination in Mathematics and Computation

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation (see (a) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


3 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 576, after l. 8, insert:

`[Until 30 September 1999: candidates admitted in Michaelmas Term 1997 may take the examination according to the 1997 regulations.]'.

2 Ibid., after l. 10, insert:

`1. Every candidate must follow for at least six terms a course of instruction in Economic and Social History and must upon entering for the examination produce from his or her society a certificate to that effect.'

3 Ibid., l. 11, delete `1.' and substitute `2.'

4 Ibid., ll. 17 and 19, after `science' insert `, medicine'.

5 Ibid., l. 49, delete `All candidates will' and insert `Candidates may'.

6 Ibid., p. 577, ll. 14, 16, 18, 19, and 25, renumber cll. `2'– `6' as `3'–`7' respectively.

7 Ibid., l. 26, before `attempt' insert `initial'.

8 Ibid., delete l. 32, and, on ll. 33–9, renumber papers `1.2'–`1.8' as `1.1'–`1.7' respectively.

9 Ibid., after l. 39 insert:

`1.8 Environment and development in twentieth-century southern and central Africa

1.9 Spatial and historical perspectives on contemporary Russian economic issues

1.10 The economic history of Russia and the Soviet Union, 1900–1991'.

10 Ibid., p. 578, delete 1.2. 11 Ibid., after l. 9, insert `5.5 History, society, and the modern body'.

12 Ibid., delete ll. 10–17.

13 Ibid., ll. 18, 26, 38, and 48, and p. 579, ll. 7, 17, and 26, renumber papers `1.2'–`1.8' as `1.1'–`1.7' respectively.

14 Ibid., p. 579, l. 7, delete `1870' and substitute `1850'.

15 Ibid., after l. 34, insert:

`1.8 Environment and development in twentieth-century southern and central Africa: a historical approach

This eight seminar option on southern and central Africa explores the possibilities of an environmental approach to history. The focus is largely on the twentieth century. Settler colonialism, imperial rule, the commercialisation of agriculture and the growth of industry have had profound effects both on the societies and the natural world of the region. Conservationist strategies were also intensely debated from the late nineteenth century onwards. The option will examine these issues in the context of economic and social change, and with an eye on explaining contemporary African problems. It will also introdeuce students to discussions of such ideas as preservation and conservation, degradation and transformation, sustainability and development.

The readings for each meeting will be organised on a thematic basis. Major themes include: hunting and game conservation; disease, ecology and the state; the impact of settler and peasant agriculture; political conflicts over state regulation of natural resources and their role in rural and nationalist movements; drought, famine, and poverty; deforestation and fuel resources; property regimes and the environment; urbanisation, industry, and their environmental impact.

1.9 Spatial and historical perspectives on contemporary Russian economic issues

This course is concerned with spatial and evolutionary dimensions of Russian economic institutions over the past two centuries. A central theme is the bearing of the historical features of institutions on the role and policies of government, particularly in the present. Emphasis will be placed on path dependent processes, and the understandings from development literature and geography that help to explain them, on the shaping of property rights and corporate law, agrarian institutions, the development of science, and fiscal and financial structures. The framework for the analysis of the institutions and policies by which Russia's economy has been organised and governed will be blocks of years inclusive of reforms and their implementation. Historical materials will be drawn selectively from the 1860s through the 1880s, the 1890s to 1913, the revolution and the NEP, collectivisation and the First Five Year Plan, and the 1950s through mid-1960s.

1.10 The economic history of Russia and the Soviet Union, 1900–1991

This paper covers the history of the economies in Tsarist Russia during 1900–17 and in the Soviet Union during 1917–91. The Tsarist economy section, which accounts for about one-quarter of the paper, examines issues such as the emancipation of the serfs, industrialisation, fiscal and monetary policy, foreign economic relations, and the war economy during 1914–17. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the evolution of the command economy in the USSR (War Communism, New Economic Policy, Stalinist central planning, regionalisation during the Khrushchev period, the mature command economy under Brezhnev). But emphasis is placed on knowledge of the features and policies of the Soviet command system (e.g., central planning, performance of state enterprises, fiscal and monetary policies, foreign trade), rather than of the details of economic history. The final section of the paper examines the economic reforms during the perestroika, economic collapse and the break-up of the Soviet Un ion.'.

16 Ibid., p. 582, delete ll. 22–31.

17 Ibid., delete p. 583, l. 41 to p. 584, l. 2.

18 Ibid., ll. 3 and 16, renumber papers `5.4' and `5.5' as `5.3' and `5.4' respectively.

19 Ibid. after l. 29, insert:

`5.5 History, society, and the modern body

The human body has emerged as a subject of historical inquiry in recent studies, especially in the history of medicine and its allied sciences. Assuming that the body is not given directly to perception, but is understood differently in different historical settings, we can begin to examine how the body has been constructed through medical practices and social routines. This course examines some of the diverse literature on human embodiment, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and disease, taking a broad approach, and drawing on history and the social sciences, with a special focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include the politics of anatomy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the normal and the deviant body; sexualities; reproduction and childbirth; race, gender, and disease; women's work in medicine and health.'

20 Ibid., p . 584, delete ll. 32–41.

21 Ibid., ll. 42, 50, and p. 585, ll. 8, 11, renumber cll. 2–5 as 1–4 respectively.

22 Ibid., p. 584, ll. 43 and 50, delete `(b)' and substitute `(a)'.

23 Ibid., p. 585, ll. 12–13, delete `in paragraphs 1–3 above (see notes (a) and (c))' and substitute `in paragraphs 1 to 2 above (see note (b)).'

24 Ibid., delete ll. 15–23, and substitute:

`(a) Candidates wishing to take a paper under 1, 2, or 4 will need to satisfy the appropriate Graduate Studies Committee of the relevant faculty board or inter-faculty committee that they have an adequate background in that subject.

(b) The chosen subject must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies of the Modern History Faculty not later than Monday of the fourth week of the first Michaelmas Term of the course. Candidates will not be allowed to offer a paper from a Final Honour School examination under 4 in a subject they have already studied for a previous degree.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(b) M.Sc. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 749, l. 49, and p. 750, l. 2, after `science', insert `, medicine'.

2 Ibid., after l. 11 insert:

`Candidates must take at least one of their papers as a three-hour written examination. For the remaining paper candidates must choose to be assessed either by written examination or by two 5,000 word essays. Essays may be only submitted in lieu of written papers for subjects in Schedule I of the M.Phil. in Economic and Social History or for other papers permitted in the schedule below where similar provision exists in the regulations for those examinations. The essays must be the work of the candidates alone and they must not consult any other person including their supervisors in any way concerning either the choice of themes or the method of handling the themes chosen. The themes chosen by the candidate must be submitted for approval by the chairman of examiners, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than the Monday of the fifth week of Hilary Term. Candidates will be informed within two weeks, by means of a letter directed to their colleges, whether the topics they have submitted have been approved. The finished essays must be delivered by the candidate to the Clerk of the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the third week of Trinity Full Term. The essays must be presented in proper scholarly form, and two typed copies of each must be submitted. Candidates may be examined viva voce on the subjects on which they submit essays. Candidates who have not delivered essays as prescribed by the due date on any of their subjects must sit the written examination in those subjects.'

3 Ibid., delete from p. 750, l. 39 to p. 751, l. 4.

4 Ibid., p. 751, ll. 5, 15, and 18, renumber cll. `3'–`5' as `1'– `3' respectively.

5 Ibid., l. 5, delete `(b)' and substitute `(a)'.

6 Ibid., ll. 19–20, delete `paragraphs 1 to 4 above (see notes (a) and (c)' and substitute `paragraphs 1 and 2 above (see note (b))'.

7 Ibid., delete ll. 22 to 30 and substitute:

(a) Candidates wishing to take an M.Phil. paper under 1 will need to satisfy the appropriate Graduate Studies Committee of the Social Studies Board that they have an adequate background in that subject.

(b) The chosen subject must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies of the Modern History Faculty not later than Monday of the fourth week of the first Michaelmas Term of the course. Candidates will not be allowed to offer a paper from a Final Honuor School examination under 3 in a subject they have already studied for a previous degree.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


4 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Moderations in Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies)

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 66, after l. 35 (as amended by the Decree establishing Moderations in Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies)) insert:

`Regulations

Candidates offering Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies are required to offer four three-hour papers: 1, 2

Either

Akkadian texts. (Lists are available from the Oriental Institute) and Akkadian grammar and unprepared translation.

Or

Egyptian texts: Middle Egyptian texts, ed. Baines and Smith. (Copies are available from the Oriental Institute) and Middle Egyptian grammar and unprepared translation.

3. Civilisations of the Ancient Near East.

4. History of the Ancient Near East to 30 bce.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(b) Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 94, ll. 12–13, delete

`Ancient Egyptian' and substitute `Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 34–40 and substitute:

`Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Each candidate shall offer the papers specified for Moderations save that candidates who have passed any paper or papers in Moderations need not offer those papers again.'

3 Ibid., in the footnote after l. 44, after `in Chinese' insert `or Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


(c) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies)

With effect from 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 435, before l. 1, delete `Egyptology' from the column listing main subjects and substitute `Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies'.

2 Ibid., delete from l. 29 on p. 443 to l. 13 on p. 444, and substitute:

`Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

The languages which may be offered shall be:

As first language: Akkadian or Egyptian

As second language (which must be different from the first language):

Akkadian
Egyptian
Arabic
Aramaic and Syriac
Classics
Coptic
Hebrew (Biblical and Mishnaic)
Hittite (may not be available every year)
Old Iranian
Sumerian

The following papers will be set:

1. Translation paper (first language).

2.Translation paper (second language).

3. 4. Literary and historical topics including prepared translation from first language.

5. 6. Literary and historical topics including prepared translation from second language.

For papers 4 and 6, in each case four passages from a list of prescribed texts will be set for examination by essay. For each paper, candidates must present a translation of and essay on one passage. Papers should be typed and provided with proper scholarly apparatus. The passages for paper 4 will be assigned in the Oriental Institute at 10 a.m. on Monday of First Week in Full Term in the term in which the final examination is to be offered, and must be handed in to the Clerk of the Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Monday of Second Week. A signed statement that the essay is the candidate's own work should be submitted separately in a sealed envelope bearing his or her candidate number, to the Chairman of examiners (forms are available from the Faculty Office, Oriental Institute). The passages for paper 6 will be assigned in the Oriental Institute at 10 a.m. on Monday of Third Week in Full Term in the term in which the final examination is to be offered, and must be handed in to the Clerk of the Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Monday of Fourth Week. Essays should not exceed 3,500 words. A signed statement that the essay is the candidate's own work should be submitted separately in a sealed envelope bearing his or her candidate number, to the Chairman of examiners (forms are available from the Faculty Office, Oriental Institute). Lists of prescribed texts for papers 3–6 are available from the Oriental Institute. In the case of candidates offering Classics, they must offer for papers 2, 5 and 6 three of subjects (i)–(xxiv) listed under Classics as an additional language in Oriental Studies.

7. A field of concentration to be chosen from a list of topics published at the beginning of Michaelmas Term each year by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board for examination in the following academic year. Candidates may propose their own field of concentration. The choice must be approved by the Board in each case.

8. Selected Egyptian and/or Ancient Near Eastern artefacts (one and a half hours, to be examined in the Ashmolean Museum and to have half the weight of the other papers).

9. General paper, including questions on Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies today.

10. A dissertation on a topic to be approved by the Faculty Board, of a different character from that chosen for paper 7.

11. An optional special subject to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, including topics such as have been approved under the present FHS syllabuses in Hebrew, and the additional language syllabus in Classics.'

3 Ibid., p. 453, l. 36, delete `Egyptology'.

4 Ibid., p. 454, l. 9, delete `(for candidates offering Egyptology as main subject)'.

5 Ibid., delete from l. 39 on p. 453 to l. 18 on p. 454, and substitute:

`1, 2, 3 = Papers 2, 5 and 6 as specified for Akkadian in the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies). (Instead of either paper 5 or paper 6, candidates may offer one of papers 7–10 as specified for the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies).'

6 Ibid., p. 458, delete ll. 19–23 and substitute:

`1, 2, 3 = Papers 2, 5 and 6 as specified for Egyptian in the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies). (Instead of either paper 5 or paper 6, candidates may offer one of papers 7–10 as specified for the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies).'

Return to List of Contents of this section


5 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 494, delete ll. 20–31 and substitute:

`(1) Christian Moral Concepts

The major moral concepts in Christian thought, such as: love, natural and revealed law, the supreme good, conscience, virtues, sin, justification, and grace; and their contribution to contemporary discussions. Candidates may treat questions on these subjects primarily with reference to their sources in the Bible, if they so wish.

(2) Government and its tasks

Theological interpretations of: justice, law, and authority; forms of government, local, national, and international; government, society and the church; the coercive use of force in punishment and war, responsibilities for education, employment, economy, and environment.'

2 Ibid, renumber existing cll. 4 and 5 and cll. 3 and 4.

(b) Honour School of Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 520, delete ll. 20–3 and substitute:

`(11) Candidates may offer either

A. Christian Life and Thought in Europe, 1789–1914 Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the life and thought of the Christian Church (with special reference to Britain) and the development of Christian theology in its historical context. Candidates will be given opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of the following texts:

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion
J.H. Newman, Lectures on the Prophetical office
A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation, vol. III
S. Kierkegaard, Philosophical Fragments
L. Feuerbach, The Essays of Christianity

or

B. Christology from Kant to Troeltsch 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the impact of modern philosophy and of cultural and historical criticism on Christology, as reflected in some of the following writers: Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Strauss, Baur, Kierkegaard, Thomasius, Ritschl, Kèhler, Neitzsche, Harnack, Wrede, Schweitzer, Kautskey, and Troeltsch. Candidates will be required to comment on a selection of the following texts:

I. Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Harper Torchbooks, 1960), pp. 85–138.

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark, 1956), pp. 374–475.

G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, ed. P.C. Hodgson (University of California Press, 1985), vol. III, pp. 310–47.

D.F. Strauss, The Life of Jesus Critically Examined, ed. P.C. Hodgson (Fortress, 1972), pp. 40–63 and 757–84; The Christ of Faith and the Jesus of History, ed. L.E. Keck (Fortress, 1977), pp. 19–37 and 159–69.

C. Thomasius, Christ's Person and Work, Part 2: The Person of the Mediator, in God and Incarnation in Mid Nineteenth Century German Theology, ed. C. Welch (Oxford University Press, 1965), pp. 31–88.

A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation (T. and T. Clark, 1900, reprint 1966), Vol. III, pp. 385–484.

M. Kèhler, The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historic Bible Christ, ed. C.E. Braaten (Fortress, 1964), pp. 46–97.

E. Troeltsch, `The Significance of the Historical Existence of Jesus for Faith' in Ernst Troeltsch: Writings on Theology and Religion, ed. R. Morgan and M. Pye (Duckworth, 1977), pp. 182–207.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committees give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Clinical Medicine

A.O. OGUNLESI, Balliol: `Human immunodeficiency virus genetic variation and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response'.
St Hugh's, Monday, 1 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.M. Esiri, H. Whittle.

Return to List of Contents of this section


English Language and Literature

D.R. GOWEN, St Catherine's: `Studies in the history and function of the British theatre playbill and programme, 1564–1914'.
English Faculty, Friday, 15 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: D.F. McKenzie, P.H. Davison.

J. MILLER, Magdalen: `Lazamon's Brut and English his- toriography'.
St Cross Building, Friday, 22 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.M. Hudson, F. Riddy.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Law

T. KREBS, Christ Church: `Failure of consideration: a comparative study'.
Worcester, Thursday, 2 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: G. Dannemann, K. Barker.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Literae Humaniores

A.I. WILSON, Magdalen: `Water management and usage in Roman North Africa'.
St John's, Monday, 25 May, 5 p.m.
Examiners: N. Purcell, R.J.A. Wilson.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Physical Sciences

N. BIRD, Mansfield: `The mechanical properties of gamma-TiA1 based single crystals'.
Department of Materials, Friday, 19 June, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: S.G. Roberts, I. Jones.

J. DYER, Linacre: `New approaches to functionalised pyrrolidines'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Thursday, 18 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: C.J. Schofield, D. Young.

A. MUXWORTHY, Worcester: `Stability of magnetic remanence in multidomain magnetite'.
Department of Earth Sciences, Saturday, 16 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: J.C. Briden, D.F. Heider.

R. THOMAS, Exeter: `Microstructure development in multi- component alloys'.
Department of Materials, Thursday, 21 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: P.S. Grant, H. Jones.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Social Studies

S. GREGG, St Antony's: `Challenging the modern world: Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II and the development of Catholic social teaching (with specific reference to in- dustrial relations, capitalism, and relations between developed and developing nations)'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 22 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.F. Charles, F. McHugh.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Committee for Archaeology

G.N. DAVIES, University: `Economic geography of the ancient Greek countryside: a re-examination of monumental rural sites on the island of Siphnos'.
Lady Margaret Hall, Thursday, 21 May, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: S.R.F. Price, S. Hodkinson.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Committee for Management Studies

M.S. VAN OSNABRUGGE, Hertford: `The financing of entrepreneurial firms in the UK: a comparison of business angel and venture capitalist investment procedures'.
Keble, Tuesday, 19 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: T.J. Jenkinson, W.E. Wetzel.

Return to List of Contents of this section


EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Biological Sciences

N. RAHMAN-HUQ, Hertford: `A study of microvascular brain basement membrane'.
Glycobiology Institute, Friday, 22 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R.A. Dwek, H.M. Charlton.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 1998: Colleges

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue

OBITUARIES

St Edmund Hall

PROFESSOR CECIL GRAYSON, MA, FBA, 29 April 1998; commoner 1938–40 and 1946–7, Honorary Fellow 1986–98. Aged 78.

Return to List of Contents of this section


St Hugh's College

DAME MARY LUCY CARTWRIGHT, DBE, MA, D.PHIL. (MA, D.SC. Cambridge), FRS, 3 April 1998; commoner 1919–22, Honorary Fellow to 1998. Aged 97.

CECILIA PHYLLIS GOODENOUGH, 4 April 1998; commoner 1924–7. Aged 93.

YAKOV MALKIEL, HON. D.LITT. (PH.D. Humbold, HON. LHD Chicago, HON. LL.D. Illinois), 24 April 1998; Honorary Fellow 1989–98. Aged 82.

EILEEN WINIFRED MILLER (née Tanner), 31 March 1998; commoner 1932–5. Aged 84.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Trinity College

MARY KATHERINE ABBOTT, 16 May 1998; exhibitioner 1985. Aged 31.

THOMAS DONALD MACKAY SHAW (LORD CRAIGMYLE, May 1998; commoner 1942. Aged 74.

DENIS ANTHONY BECK ROBINSON, April 1998; commoner 1952. Aged 66.

JOHN MARTIN HOBBS, 23 March 1998; scholar 1949. Aged 66.

ARTHUR JOHN MACKENZIE CHADWICK, March 1998; commoner 1934. Aged 82.

CHARLES AUBREY THOROLD, 2 March 1998; exhibitioner 1925.

JOHN VINCENT D'ALLESSIO ROWLEY, 30 November 1996; commoner 1926. Aged 91.

RICHARD ARNOLD THOMAS, January 1998; commoner 1928. Aged 89.

Return to List of Contents of this section


ELECTIONS

Brasenose College

To Open Exhibitions in Law:

ALASTAIR G. DOBBIE, formerly of St Paul's School, London

NIGEL W. ENTICKNAP, formerly of Henbury School, Bristol

ALEXANDRA J. FOGDEN, formerly of Lady Eleanor Holles School

BIRKE HÄCKER, formerly of Helfenstein Gymnasium Geilsingen, Germany

GILES S. PRATT, formerly of Brighton College

PAUL J. TOMS, formerly of Plymouth College

Return to List of Contents of this section


To an Open Exhibition in Literae Humaniores:

NICHOLAS C.T. STAMP, formerly of Radley College

Return to List of Contents of this section


Christ Church

To an Academical Clerkship:

RICHARD A. BAILEY

To Stahl Travel Exhibitions:

CANDICE V. BUXTON

KATHARINE S. HIGGS-STRANGE

To a Glass Williams Scholarship:

JAMES A. DONALDSON, formerly of Rossall School

Return to List of Contents of this section


To Shelton Exhibitions:

KATHERINE SHORT, formerly of the King's School, Canterbury

VENETIA L. TAYLOR (renewed)

JAMES LONGSTAFFE (renewed)

Return to List of Contents of this section


To an Open Scholarship:

KATE L. EDWARDS

Return to List of Contents of this section


Mansfield College

To a Scholarship:

TOMOYUKI HORI, formerly of Langside College, Glasgow

Return to List of Contents of this section


To Proctor Travel Scholarships for Study Abroad:

WILLIAM JAMES MICHAEL CADBURY, formerly of King Edward's School, Birmingham

MARK DAVID COX, formerly of the Hulme Grammar School for Boys, Oldham

NICHOLAS WESLEY GREENLAND, formerly of Warwick School

SARAH ANNE HALL, formerly of the University of London

Return to List of Contents of this section


To Nathan Whitley Travelling Scholarships:

CHRISTOPHER ALEXANDER BLACKBURN, formerly of Christ's Hospital, Horsham

KATHRYN JEAN HOMAN,formerly of Withington Girls' School, Manchester

STEPHANIE PHAIR, formerly of Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle, London

JEONG-MIN SEO, formerly of the American University in Cairo

CLARE ELIZABETH SMITH, formerly of Pennsylvania State University

CHRISTOPHER ERIC STOYELL, formerly of Bishop's Stortford College, Hertfordshire

Return to List of Contents of this section


Merton College

To Postmasterships:

MISS L.J. CATER, formerly of Clifton High School

N.D. CUNDY, formerly of King Edward VI School, Chelmsford

MISS A.D. HAMBLIN, formerly of Bournemouth School for Girls

MISS G.M. HIGGINS, formerly of The Perse School for Girls

L.B.T. HOUGHTON, formerly of King Edward's School, Birmingham

MISS N.A. MORLEY, formerly of Castell Alun High School, Hope

P. ROBERTS, formerly of Wellington College

D.B.J. SKINNER, formerly of Newcastle under Lyme School

Return to List of Contents of this section


To an Exhibition:

P.R. DENT, formerly of King Edward VI School, Retford

Return to List of Contents of this section


Oriel College

To a Scholarship (TT 1998):

THOMAS RICHARD HENRY FOX, formerly of Wellington College

To an Exhibition (TT 1998):

DAVID ANTONY JOHN HOPKINS, formerly of Aylesbury Grammar School

Return to List of Contents of this section


PRIZES

Christ Church

William Gurney Travel Prize:

HELEN MOLESWORTH

VERITY J. PLATT

NICHOLAS I. CADE

Return to List of Contents of this section


Stahl Prize:

HELEN A. AZER

Return to List of Contents of this section


Mansfield College

Collections Prizes:

SAM EDWARD GEOFFREY FULLER

JAMES WILLIAM HUCKLE

JAMES KENNETH PANTON

SUSAN ELIZABETH WHITWORTH

Return to List of Contents of this section


Oxford University Gazette, 14 May 1998: Advertisements

Advertisements

Contents of this section:


How to advertise in the Gazette

Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue


The Borromini Ensemble

`Pearls of the Baroque': Sarah Westwood (soprano), Alan Davis (recorder), Jean Gubbins (cello), and Richard Silk (harpsichord) will perform music by Bach, Handel, Telemann, Purcell, Couperin, and Vivaldi, on Fri., 22 May, 7.30 p.m., in the Holywell Music Room. Tickets £7 (concessions £5) from the Playhouse Ticket Shop at Blackwell's, tel.: Oxford 261384, and at the door.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Prints of the Night

A selling exhibition of artists' etchings and engravings. Night scenes 1508--1997. Works by Durer, Rembrandt, Pissarro, Munch, and many others. Organised by Elizabeth Harvey-Lee at Sanders of Oxford, 104 the High, Oxford. Open daily, 10 a.m.--6 p.m., 16--25 May.

Return to List of Contents of this section


The Ladies Looking Glass

Shinead Pratschke, Amanda Boyd, Louis Mott, Diana Moore, and Christopher Gould will perform songs from Purcell, Vaughan Williams, Elgar, Noel Coward, and others. Fri., 5 June, 7.30 p.m. at the Yolande Paterson Hall, Farringdon Road, Abingdon. Tickets £8.50 (adults), £6 (students/concessions). Contact 01235 532012.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Whitfield Institute

Is the Watchmaker Really Blind?---reflections on the origin of the cosmos and life in the light of the Bible. Dr John Lennox (Senior Fellow, Whitfield Institute; Research Fellow, Green College) will speak on Mon., 18 May, 7--9.30 p.m., in the Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, Woodstock Road. Tickets £5 (concessions £2.50).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Museums Week 16--24 May

Conservation events in Oxfordshire: for full programme of open conservation studios and tours, conservation exhibitions, and lectures, see Web site: http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/boris/conservation/oxuniv/musweek.h tm.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Tuition Offered

Summer Arts Course for 10 to 14 year-olds; range of media inc. photography, ceramics, painting, drawing, computer graphics. Suitable for all levels---beginner to advanced. Small groups and experienced tutors. d'Overbroek's College, 1 Park Town, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

Piano lessons: experienced teacher. Adults and children. All grades. Beginners welcome. Miss P. Read, BA (Hons.), LRAM. Jericho. Tel.: Oxford 510904.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Services Offered

Frederick and Sudabeh Hine import old and new Persian carpets from Iran and sell direct to the public. We usually also have a good selection of hand-knotted rugs and runners from Turkey, Afghanistan, and China. Our Beluch tribal camel/tent bags make splendid cushions. Come and browse without obligation. Low prices, special offers, home trial. First class repairs and cleaning. Usual business hours are 10 a.m.--6 p.m., Mon.--Sat. Ring first or just drop in. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 559396.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer expert advice and tuition for both hardware and software. On-site service at home or in the office. We provide upgrades for most computers or alternatively we will supply or source hardware or software to your requirements. For a quality service matched with competitive prices, contact Chris Lewis. Tel./fax: Oxford 461333.

Bespoke Garden and Landscape Design: `one off' consultancy visits, or sketch and scaled layouts, planting schemes, construction details, and site supervision, as desired. Nationwide service from Oxford/Gloucestershire base. Chelsea Gold Medal 1996 and 1997. Jacquie Gordon BA Dip LA (Glos) ALI. Tel./fax: 01531 822743.

Oxford University Newcomers' Club. The club exists to welcome to Oxford the partners and families of academic visitors and graduate students. Come along to the Club rooms at 13 Norham Gardens, and sample our programme of events and outings. We are open each Wednesday morning, 10.30--12 noon, from the week before term starts to the week after term, also throughout the summer vacation.

Long established Oxford builder (25 years). Property maintenance, renovations, extensions. Every aspect of the building trade covered. Free estimates. Academic references available. Richard Edwards, tel.: Oxford 343562.

Tax advice: ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant specialises in assisting academics and other professionals with their tax affairs, inc. self-assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. Tel.: Oxford 513381, fax: 558064, e-mail: 100430.145@compuserve.com.

Wise Owl Educational Software: the only UK children's shareware library, est. 1991. Specialising in educational programs and games (DOS, Windows 3.1 and 95) for all PCs (XTs to Pentiums). 800+ titles for ages 2--16+. 3.5" and 5.25" media. Free newsletter and advice. Tel.: 01235 529808 (Mon.--Fri., 9 a.m.--5 p.m.), e-mail wiseowlsw@aol.com (Web site http://members.aol.com/wiseowlsw/index.html).

Simple Kitchens and Furniture: kitchens, free-standing and fitted furniture made to suit you. Using traditional furniture-making techniques and the finest materials, our work is built to last. Our friendly, personal service is second to none. Contact Thomas Heidkamp, tel.: 01844 353338, for a no-obligation consultation.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Domestic Services

Au pair or nanny wanted to look after boy (6) and girl (5) in quiet, friendly household in central North Oxford. Starting mid-June; live in or out. Permanent position available, but would consider temporary help until end of Aug. Must have previous childcare experience, be 20+, and non-smoker. During school holidays: full time, during school terms: afternoons (plus 1 hour in morning before school if possible). Tel.: Oxford 552518 (after 8 p.m.).

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Situations Vacant

Excellent typist wanted for 4--5 mornings per week, 1--2 hours per morning. Suit someone working from home who has a sense of humour and can take shorthand or fast longhand. Interesting work! Please tel.: Oxford 511357.

Laboratory technician required for St Clare's, Oxford. This is a part-time post to start in late Aug. 1998. We are looking for a well-organised, practical person who would enjoy working with young people (aged 16--20) in an international community. Previous laboratory experience and appropriate qualifications are essential. The post is for approximately 28.5 hours per week during the academic year of 36 weeks. Further details from Maria Andrews, Office Manager, St Clare's Oxford, 139 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7AL. Tel.: Oxford 552031, fax: 310002. Closing date: 25 May.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Houses to Let

Comfortable, semi-detached house in Marston, available May. Newly refurbished. Fully furnished to a high standard. Three bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, fitted kitchen, gas c.h., bathroom with power shower, garden. Quiet position with views of central Oxford; close to JR Hospital and cycle track across Parks to city centre; good bus route. £750 p.c.m., plus bills and Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 874310, e-mail: markchapman@ripon-cuddesdon.ac.uk.

North Oxford : 3-bedroom detached house in secluded drive; washing machine, drier, garage, maintained garden backing onto playing fields. Convenient for shops and schools. Available Sept. 1998--Jan. 1999, shorter or longer period considered. Suit visiting academics. £925 p.c.m., inc. Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 722630.

West Oxford: terrace house in excellent condition; 3 bedrooms (inc. 1 study bedroom); 10 minutes' walk to central Oxford, 5 minutes' walk to station; in quiet cul-de-sac overlooking playing-field; fully furnished and equipped (gas c.h., fireplace, phone, TV and video, fitted kitchen, washer-drier, fridge, freezer, microwave). Small garden with sunny patio. Available 1 Aug. 1998--31 Aug. 1999 (dates flexible). £750 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 794232, e-mail: h.j.glock@reading.ac.uk.

Available beginning July for 6--12 months plus: 3/4 attractive Victorian terrace house, central North Oxford. Suit family. Three double bedrooms, 28-foot sitting-room, bathroom, kitchen/diner. £950 p.c.m. Well-equipped. Gas c.h., street parking permit available. Write to 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon. Tel.: Oxford 559911.

Grandpont, south Oxford: 4-bedroom house with kitchen, dining-room, small garden. Available from 1 Oct. for 1 year. £800 p.c.m., plus bills and Council Tax if applicable. Graduate students (non-smokers) or possibly a family. Tel.: Oxford 241845 to arrange viewing.

North Oxford . fully-furnished Edwardian family house in Frenchay Road with stripped wooden flooring throughout. Four bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large living-room with working fireplace, spacious kitchen/breakfast room with slate floor. Large garden. Available unfurnished from Aug. £1,800 p.c.m. Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE, tel.: Oxford 311011.

St Ebbe's, in new development near the river and 5 minutes from Carfax. Terrace house, fully furnished: 2 bedrooms, open plan ground floor, fitted kitchen, c.h., telephone, sunny garden with parking space. Available 1 Sept. (or possibly earlier) for long let. £600 p.c.m., plus bills and Council Tax. Suit visiting academic. Mr Braithwaite, tel.: Oxford 244637 (agent).

Short-term/holiday lets in Witney, 12 miles Oxford, on good bus service. Fully-furnished and well-equipped cottages. Tel.: 01993 703035, fax: 771014.

Summertown, North Oxford, 1.5 miles from city centre, on quiet side street. Furnished house with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, 2 studies, large living-room, large eat-in kitchen, walled garden, gas c.h., and all key appliances. Available mid-Aug.--late Dec. 1998. Tel./fax: Oxford 552217, e-mail: paul.klemperer@nuffield.ox.ac.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Luxury, unusual, spacious modern house in quiet road in North Oxford within ring road, close to bus route. Stunning views to open countryside. Open plan design with separate double bedroom and 2 bathrooms. Small patio garden; off-street parking. Suit visiting academic or professional couple; regret no children, pets, or smokers. £895 p.m., inc. Council Tax. Available June 1998. Tel.: Oxford 515085.

House available for rent next academic year. Large sitting-room, dining-room, modern kitchen, 2 double bedrooms, 2 studies, 1.5 bathrooms, walled garden, c.h., washer-drier, dishwasher, fridge, china, linen, etc. Bottom of Headington Hill, 15--20 minutes' walk from Bodleian. Available late Aug. 1998--late May 1999. £900 p.m. Contact Prof. Grundy, 11 Cherwell St, Oxford OX4 1BG. Tel.: Oxford 242966, e-mail isobel.grundy@ualberta.ca.

Oxford Waterside, Jericho: brand new house on prestigious development. Two bedrooms, 1 en suiteshower room, family bathroom, living/dining-room, beautifully-fitted kitchen with ceramic tiled floor, downstairs cloakroom. Furnished to high standard. Small garden; views over Port Meadow. Allocated off-street parking. Ten minutes' walk to Radcliffe Infirmary and many University departments, also shops, theatres, etc. Available for weekly lets or longer as required, sometimes at short notice. Tel.: Oxford 311124, fax: 311125, e-mail: anae0002@nda.ox.ac.uk.

Central Oxford, Rewley Park, near rail station (London--Paddington 52 minutes), bus station (Heathrow 70 minutes), and city centre. Brand new 5-bedroom town house, built to high specification; 3 bathrooms (2 en-suite), 2 reception rooms, modern kitchen, downstairs w.c., conservatory, small garden, parking, river/canal view. Available from June. £2,000 p.c.m. Tel.: 01844 208315, fax: 201511, e-mail: 100574.451@compuserve.com.

Furnished central North Oxford house to let for one year or less from 15 Sept. Walk to colleges, rail and bus station; near Port Meadow; c.h.; recently redecorated; desks, filing cabinets, several large closets; secluded garden; 2 ½ bathrooms, washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. 2 bedrooms, £950 p.m.; 3 bedrooms, £1,250 p.m. (inc. bedsit with separate entrance). Contact: J. Mackrell, Oxford 775567 (27 May--1 June: 553679); or A. Gaston, Canada: tel. 613 745 1368, fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail: Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Flats to Let

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk from city centre, available mid-May for short/long let: exceptionally well-furnished second-floor flat in quiet, civilised Victorian family house with large, light, airy rooms. Double bedroom, drawing room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Regret no children or pets. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

North and central North Oxford: 1- and 2-bedroom apartments, fully furnished to high standard; good security, off-street parking, a variety of sizes and available dates. From £575--£720 p.c.m. Best suited to professionals or visiting academics. Tel.: Oxford 516144.

Upper Wolvercote: spacious 2-bedroom flat with lovely rural views in quiet location yet on regular bus route to city centre. Fully furnished, with well-equipped kitchen, c.h., garage, etc. Non-smokers preferred. Available 1 June for long-term let. £650 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 559802.

Central North Oxford: spacious 1-bedroom flat in quiet road. Shared garden. Suit postdoc. couple or similar. Available now. Tel.: 0171-794 8965.

North Oxford : available 1 Sept. 1998--31 May 1999, £550 p.m., fully-equipped ground-floor flat suitable for 2 adults; dining-room/study; living-room/study, double bedroom, shower-room, kitchen; dish-washer, washing/drying machine, electric stove; c.h., car-port, small garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA. Tel.: 609 921 2717.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Summer Lets

Holiday accommodation: attractive and comfortable, 10 minutes to city centre, in quiet road, central North Oxford, near water meadows. Well-equipped, sleeps 6/7. Available Jul., Aug., and Sept. Write to 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon. Tel.: Oxford 559911.

Four-storey Victorian town house to let in Oxford, 1--29 Aug. Sleeps 4/5. All mod. cons. Small sunny garden to Oxford canal. Close to city centre and river Thames. Bikes, rowing boat. Feed 2 cats and water plants. Tel.: Oxford 557133, e-mail: sledwith@brookes.ac.uk.

Wolvercote: comfortable 2-bedroom Edwardian house available for the month of Aug. Next to Port Meadow, less than 15 minutes on frequent bus service to centre of Oxford and University departments. Suitable for children. £750 for Aug. Tel.: Oxford 510315 or 553297.

Peaceful and comfortable fully-furnished apartment, close to Oxford station. Bedroom with double bed, bathroom, kitchen with washing machine, bright living-room/study with small balcony overlooking meadows and river; posible use of undercover parking and cycle. Suit visiting academic/s. 1 Aug.--30 Sept. £450 p.c.m. (negotiable), plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 246239, e-mail: clsaf@csv.warwick.ac.uk.

Sunny Victorian terrace house, Iffley Fields: 2 reception (period fireplaces), modern kitchen, bathroom, second w.c., large double bedroom, bedroom/study (double sofa-bed), utilities cellar, antiques, stripped bannisters, sanded floors, nice garden. Mid-June--Oct., £725 p.m. inc. council tax. Tel.: Oxford 798069 or 01873 810982; e-mail: ayers@wadham.ox.ac.uk.

City centre house with view of Thames available for 4 months, June--Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas c.h., garden, garage. £975 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

Very attractive semi-detached house in north Summertown; 3 bedrooms, 2 studies, 2 living-rooms plus kitchen and large conservatory; generous garden with play equipment. Easily sleeps 5. Ideal for children. Easy access to Summertown shops and central Oxford. Use of 2 adult and 2 child bicycles. All modern conveniences. Available 18 Aug.--2 Sept.; some flexibility over dates. £325 p.w. inc. utilities. Tel.: Oxford 556655.

Summer let in Oxford, live in comfort near the Thames; c.h.; 4 bedrooms; large split-level living-room, south-facing garden, dining-room, fully-equipped kitchen; bathroom with bidet and w.c.; shower-room with w.c. Available 6 weeks, 22 July--2 Sept. Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within easy walking distance of the city centre and all main university buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9--9 corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating. Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Peaceful, beautiful, large country house to share in outstandingly beautiful village, 17 miles from Oxford. Suit mature graduate with own transport. 17 minutes to Oxford by train from country station 10 minutes away. Accommodation flexible; 1, 2, or 3 rooms available, as preferred, for private use. Beautiful private bathroom guaranteed. Available 4 Apr. Rent depends on number of rooms taken, includes all bills. Tel.: 01285 740569 (day), 01451 821550 (eve.).

Very spacious west-facing room with balcony, Woodstock Road. Ideal for city centre, Radcliffe Infirmary, and University. Non-smoker. Available now until 30 June 1998. £80 p.w. Tel./fax: Oxford 513688.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Sought

Needed for academic couple from Jerusalem: quiet cottage or house with large garden, from end June--18 July. Must be very quiet at night. Possibility of exchange in Jerusalem. Mrs Anat Toney, 6 Oakthorpe Road, Oxford.

Summer accommodation wanted. Australian academic and spouse seek self-contained, furnished accommodation with at least 2 bedrooms; mid-July--end Sept., in or near Oxford. Contact Celia Glyn, tel.: Oxford 557828, e-mail: celia.glyn@phonetics.ox.ac.uk, or nralph@ocsl.ocs.mq.edu.au.

House rental sought, 3/4 bedrooms. From 1 July for a year (or possibly 1 summer and 1 academic year rental). Anywhere in city considered. Contact Stella Tillyard, tel.: 0039 55 4685594 (day) or 0039 55 5002335 (eve.), e-mail: brewer@datacomm.iue.it.

Canadian professor, wife, and highly responsible teenage son require quiet accommodation from Sept. 1998, for up to 11 months. Local references available. Piano an asset. Maximum £750 p.c.m. Might consider non-furnished for significantly lower rent. Fax (Canada): 403 492 9234, e-mail: Reuben.Kaufman@ualberta.ca.

Visiting academic from New Zealand requires furnished accommodation for self, wife, and daughter (age 7); late Nov. 1998--July 1999. Especially Headington, but anywhere considered. Reply to Dr R. Phillips, History, Auckland University, Private Bag 92019, Auckland. E-mail: rt.phillips@auckland.ac.nz.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Three-bedroom furnished flat or house sought by academic couple with 2 children (11 and 9), visiting Wolfson College; early Aug.--mid Jan. 1999. Preferably North Oxford. Reply to Prof. David Wood, Law Faculty, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia. Tel.: +61 3 9344 6192, fax: 9347 2392, e-mail: d.wood@law.unimelb.edu.au.

Visiting academic seeks 2-bedroom furnished flat to rent, 22 June--5 Aug., preferably close to Pembroke/St Peter's. Wife and child (3 years) visiting part time. Non-smokers, local references available. James Basker, Columbia University, tel.: 212 531 3732, fax: 663 9169, e-mail: oxbadmin@interport.com.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in Oxford letting and managing properties---try us first! Many of our landlords have remained with us since we opened and are delighted with our service---why not pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

American visiting fellow, spouse, and boys 12 and 14 seek fully-furnished 3- or 4-bedroom house in Oxford or environs, from 19 June through 20 Aug. 1998. Children will be present for 3 weeks only. Please contact in USA: D. Matthews, 6514 Kalama Road, Kapaa, Hawaii 96746, tel.: 808 821 0479, fax: 808 821 1193, e-mail: dbm@aloha.net.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Exchange

Vancouver family (Univ. of British Columbia professor, wife, and 5-year-old daughter) seeks to trade houses with another (non-smoking) family for approx. 3-month period, Apr.--Aug. 1999. We have a lovely, spacious California-style house, 5 minutes from UBC, 15 minutes from the downtown, 20 minutes from Vancouver International Airport, and a short block to a beautiful sandy beach (Spanish Banks) and other recreational amenities. We would need a house or large flat, in Oxford or close by, with reasonably good access to public transport. Dr T.A. Hutton, 4554 Belmont Avenue, Vancouver, V6R 1C4, British Columbia, Canada. Tel.: 604 228 9592, fax: 604 822 6164.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

Professional academic couple seeks house or flat with minimum 2 bedrooms in central Oxford, for 1 year sabbatical from Sept. 1998. No children, no pets, non-smokers; mature and responsible adults. Would also consider house/car exchange with persons coming to the Chapel Hill/Durham area of North Carolina for similar period of time. Contact Dr Valerie King, 1624 Hadley Mill Pittsboro, NC 27312, USA. Tel.: 919 542 2328, fax: 966 3811, e-mail: vking@med.unc.edu.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Holiday Lets

Italy: old Tuscan farmhouse in peaceful countryside with distant view of ancient Etruscan town of Volterra; 20 minutes from San Gimignano, 1 hour from Florence, Siena, and airport at Pisa. Three bedrooms (sleeps 7), fully-equipped kitchen. £300 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 727394.

South Shropshire, near Ludlow: 3-bedroom terrace holiday cottage with fabulous views over south Shropshire hills. Full of antiques and interesting objects. Perfect for exploring Welsh Marches. Dishwasher and microwave; garden. £220 p.w. during term time, £250 p.w. during vacation. 3 keys commended by tourist board. Contact William Longrigg, tel.: 0171 203 5090 (day) or 350 1435 (eve.).

Beautiful 1-bedroom cottage available for summer holiday lets. Can sleep 4. Small `sun trap' garden. Beautifully furnished. Outstanding North Cotswolds countryside. Five miles from Stow-on-the-Wold, in the lovely village of Ford. Tel.: 01285 740569 (day), 01451 810698 (eve.).

Andalucia, house (or part) to let in magical Medieval village with stunning landscape. Our house is at the front of the village, with unobstructed views past Gibralter and the Mediterranean to the Rif mountains of Morocco. Excellent walking and bird-watching. Visit Granada, Cordoba, Ronda, Seville, Cadiz, and Morocco. Reduction for long let. Dr Campbell, tel.: Oxford 513935, e-mail: l.lustgarten@soton.ac.uk for brochure.

South-west France (Tarn et Garonne): traditionally-restored farmhouse and outbuildings in peaceful hilltop hamlet with fine views over unspoilt countryside, close to medieval market town on river Aveyron. Sleeps 8+. Small pool; large south-facing garden with some shade. Available Aug. Tel.: 0118 987 3095.

Enjoy a holiday in a charming villa or cottage on the islands of Skopelos, Skiathos, and Alonissos. Many with enclosed yards and close to the sea. Weekly prices start from £76 per person in May. For brochure, tel.: 0030 424 22947, fax: 424 23057, e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr.

Burgundy (Morvan National Park): 19th-c. stone cottage in quiet hamlet. Sleeps 5+. Enclosed front and rear gardens backing onto own large meadow with streams. Spacious sitting-room, 2 double bedrooms, study, bathroom, fully-equipped kitchen, washing machine, c.h., telephone, log fires. Ideal for peace and quiet, walking, swimming in nearby lakes, wine-tasting and sight-seeing in Burgundy (half hour from Vezelay and Avallon). Available 9 Aug.--3 Sept. £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 556626.

Fisherman's cottage on the seawall at Newport, Pembrokeshire. A family holiday home, child- and dog-friendly; the front door opens onto the coastal path and beach with wonderful views across the estuary. Good for sailing, walking, and golf. Electric heaters and open fires. Sleeps 6. Good local shops and restuarants. Rates (inc. electricity) from £115--£290 p.w. or £25 per night off-season. Tel.: Oxford 714943.

Umbria, Italy: luxury flat in tranquil rural setting. Sleeps 2--4. Large terrace, private garden, stunning views. Perugia 15 minutes, Assisi 30 minutes, Florence and Siena 2 hours. Tel.: 01252 877155 (eve.).

Provencal fortified farmhouse in tiny rural village surrounded by lavender fields offers B&B or half-board. There is also a 3-bedroom apartment with kitchenette and sitting-room---ideal for writer/artist or academic on sabatical leave; short or long stays possible. Contact Karolyn Kauntze, Montsalier, 04150 Banon, France. Tel./fax: 00 33 4 92 73 23 61.

Verona outskirts: in exceptionally beautiful 15th-c. villa, self-contained ground-floor flat; large double bed-sitting, kitchen/dining and bath rooms; garden area; parking; frequent buses from door to city centre. £300 p.w., inc. services and weekly cleaning. Available from 1 May, except Aug. Tel.: 00 39 452 6499, or (Moore) 01844 238247.

Fethiye, Turkey: new apartments 5 minutes to beach sleeping max. 4; pool, bar/restaurant, entertainments; English/Turkish owners. From only £140 p.w. per apartment. Tel./fax: 01202 737202.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Houses for Sale

Luxury 2-bedroom apartment at the top of a Victorian house in Summertown, affording splendid views of Wytham woods. First-quality workmanship and original features, inc. spacious sitting-room, dining-room, kitchen, bathroom, and cloakroom. Offers above £180,000. Tel.: Oxford 510362.

Three-bedroom Victorian terrace house in East Oxford, close to city centre and near bus route. Sitting-room, kitchen-diner, large cellar and roof space. Gas c.h. with new boiler. Good decorative condition. £110,000. Tel.: 01404 841591 (eve.).

Cottage for sale in France: Montsoreau, near Saumur. Superb view over the Loire in an attractive small village near shops. Downstairs: large living-room/kitchen, bedroom, washroom/toilet, shower, workroom/storage space. Upstairs: large bedroom with study area, en suitebathroom/shower/toilet. Attic (could be developed); double cellar cut into hillside. Vacant possession. £30,000 o.n.o. Contact Prof. and Mrs B. P. Reardon, 6 Impasse des Jonquilles, 14780 Lion-sur-Mer. Tel./fax: +33 2 31 36 08 56, e-mail: bryan.reardon@wanadoo.fr.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Properties for sale at Oxford Waterside

Central North Oxford/Jericho. Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties available include: 2-bedroom apartments from £118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from £169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open daily, 10 a.m.--5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or 726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas Merrifield).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 15 May - 1 June

Diary

Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Development Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development ProgrammeWeb site.

Return to Contents Page of this issue


Friday 15 May

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Dealing with the media—advanced (television and crisis management)', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Still life painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET (with Dominique Wong-Min, piano) perform works by Haydn and Dvorák, Holywell Music Room, 1 p.m. (tickets £5/£2.50 from Blackwell's Music Shop or at the door).

RABBI DR NORMAN SOLOMON: `The dialectic of universal and particular in modern Judaism' (seminar series: `Transnational communities, diasporas, and globalisation'), Lecture Room, Christ Church, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR K. ROBINS: `Spaces of global media' (ESRC Research Programme in Transnational Communities: `Conceiving transnational activity'), Upper Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

C. JOUHAUD and D. BLOCKER: `History and literature: prospects' (third of three meetings: `Histoire et littérature: France—Ancien Régime'), Wadham, 5 p.m.

S. MENDES and S. RUSSELL-BEALE: `Thersites, Richard III, Ariel, Iago---creating a Shakespearian character on stage' (introduced by the Cameron Mackintosh Professor, Thelma Holt, CBE), Bernard Sunley Lecture, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.-C. COLLIARD: `Les quarante ans de la Cinquième République—La Cohabitation: trois expériences' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Saturday 16 May

FRANCO-BRITISH colloquium (various speakers): `Révolution: arts, sciences, politique', Maison Française, 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m. (continues tomorrow).

LORD NOLAN: `Government, ethics, and the law' (Blackstone Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30 a.m.

JULIET ALLEN performs piano works by Beethoven, Tippett, and Brahms, Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 8 p.m. (free tickets available on application to College Secretary).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Sunday 17 May

THE REVD DR SUSAN DURBER preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Monday 18 May

P. HUDIS: `The philosophy of Marxist-humanism' (Ruskin College Politics Forum---public lectures), Raphael Samuel Hall, Ruskin College, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. FRYKENBERG: `Munshis, Pandits, and Vakils: cultural contributions to India's consolidation' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `India's Raj: indigenous components and the imperial construction of India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Tuesday 19 May

THE MEETING OF CONGREGATION, due to take place today, is cancelled.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Aspects of conservation', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

J.W. COOK: `What is sacred about sacred art?' (Hussey Annual Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR VERA C. RUBIN: `What Halley didn't know about the universe' (Halley Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University Museum, 5 p.m.

DR H. KAMMINGA: `Medical models of causation: the case of the discovery of vitamin deficiency diseases' (lecture series in the history and philosophy of biology), Sherrington Room, Department of Physiology, 5 p.m.

I. BRADLEY: `God is Green—or is He? Thoughts on Christianity, the churches, and the environment' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars: last of three seminars on Ecology and Theology), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER: `The imagery of government in the Italian Renaissance' (Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture), Mordan Hall, St Hugh's, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Policing a poem in Paris, 1749' (Seminar in Social and Cultural History, 1500--1800), Hovenden Room, All Souls, 8.30 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Wednesday 20 May

SYMPOSIUM: `Feed the fury—art meets science', with speakers Dr Sian Ede, Peter Chatwin, Pamela Martin, Professor Richard Dawkins, Christopher O'Toole, and A.S. Byatt, University Museum of Natural History, 2–5.30 p.m. (admission free).

PROFESSOR R. FRYKENBERG: `Mandalas, Mamul, and Namak: ideological contributions to India's consensus' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `India's Raj: indigenous components and the imperial construction of India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR M. JASCHOK: `A mosque of one's own—Chinese women, Islam, and sexual equality (nan-nu pingdeng)' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women: Barbara E. Ward Commemorative Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. SKLAR: `Theoretically fundamental idealisations' (John Locke Lectures: `Philosophy within science'), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR D. JOLY: `Temporary protection: the cornerstone of a new asylum regime' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. BRIANT: `Greek epigraphy and Achaemenid history: from Sardis to Xanthos' (David Lewis Lecture), Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's, 5 p.m.

N. WOOD: `Inculturating Christianity in post-modern Britain' (Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. PETERSON: `King Serfoji's Cabinet of Experimental Science: The German Kunstkammer in eighteenth-century India' (seminar series: `Collection and comparison in the sciences'), Museum of the History of Science, 5 p.m.

DR SIN YE CHEUNG: `The subject-choice of women in education and its occupational consequences' (interdisciplinary seminars: `Gender and the public/private divide'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. STEVENSON: `Recent researches in Portuguese and Brazilian music history' (public lecture), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR V. DUBOWITZ: `The floppy infant: from the cradle to the genes' (Alan Emery Lecture), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

DR SCHUYLER JONES: `Beatrice Blackwood: curator, fieldworker, teacher, friend' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum: Beatrice Blackwood Lecture), Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road, 7 p.m. (open to the public).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Thursday 21 May

MAISON FRANÇAISE exhibition opens: `Images d'Ostabat, un village basque sur la route des pèlerins de St Jacques de Compostelle' (paintings by Josette Dacosta-Bray; until 31 May).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM: half-hour tours of the conservation laboratories and conserved objects in the galleries, 10.30 a.m., 11.30 a.m., 1.30 p.m., and 2.30 p.m. (Free admission. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30 p.m.)

DR R. CHOWDREY: `The Indian women's movement and gender discourse: emerging tensions and responses' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars), Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. FENTON (Professor of Poetry): `Robert Lowell' (lecture series: `Three Poets: D.H. Lawrence, Robert Lowell, Ted Hughes'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 2 p.m.

THE REVD DR ALAN TORRANCE: `The Church and the mediation of the open society' (Hensley Henson Lectures in Theology: `The Christ of history and the open society'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR N. WILLIAMS: `Gaeilge, Gàidhlig, Gaelg—the origins of Manx' (O'Donnell Lectures), the Hall, the Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

DR C. SOURVINO-INWOOD: `Euripidean tragedies and Athenian religion' (Gaisford Lecture), Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's, 5 p.m.

CLARE SHORT, MP: `The White Paper on the Government's new approach to international development', Keble, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. SPEIRS: ` "Vom armen bb" / "Of poor bb" and others' (The Brecht Centenary in Oxford—Streit und Gelächter: a seminar on Brecht's poetry), Lecture Room 6, New College, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.Z. SMITH: `Close encounters of diverse kinds' (annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture), the Hall, Wolfson, 6 p.m. (open to the public).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Friday 22 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Chinese bronzes', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

DR N. WILLIAMS: `Nebbaz Gerriau dro tho Carnoack' (O'Donnell Lectures), the Hall, the Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. CLARKE: `Japanese Millenarian movements in global perspective' (seminar series: `Transnational communities, diasporas, and globalisation'), Lecture Room, Christ Church, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. SKLAIR: `Transnational practices and the analysis of the global system' (ESRC Research Programme in Transnational Communities: `Conceiving transnational activity'), Upper Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.D. NORTH: `The Ambassadors' Secret: a new study of Holbein's painting' (Delta Lecture), Museum of the History of Science, 6 p.m. (admission by free tickets, obtainable in advance from the Museum).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Sunday 24 May

THE REVD DR JUDITH MALTBY preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Monday 25 May

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (today only).

SHELDONIAN THEATRE closed (today only).

UNIVERSITY MESSENGER SERVICE suspended (today only).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Tuesday 26 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Egypt: craftsmen of the Amarna period', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR W. KUENNE: `Simple truth and alethic realism' (Gareth Evans Memorial Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. DURANT: `Public participation in science policy making: the case of the new genetics' (lecture series in the history and philosophy of biology), Sherrington Room, Department of Physiology, 5 p.m.

DR G. HUDSON: `The body and the state in early modern England' (Seminar in Social and Cultural History, 1500--1800), Hovenden Room, All Souls, 8.30 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Wednesday 27 May

PROFESSOR G. SIFAKIS: `Folk songs of the Cretan mountains: a semiotic reading' (in English) (Taylor Institution Sesquicentennial Lectures: `Languages and literatures of Europe'), the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. SKLAR: `Transience and belief' (John Locke Lectures: `Philosophy within science'), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

D. FRIESEN: `Artisans, citizens, philosophers: singing God's song in a foreign land as a model for a theology of culture' (Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.H. KAUFMAN: `The museum collection of the Edinburgh Phrenological Society' (seminar series: `Collection and comparison in the sciences'), Museum of the History of Science, 5 p.m.

DR P. WEIL: `Why was it necessary to reform French policy on immigration, asylum, and citizenship?' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

H. CRAWLEY-LYONS: `Gender, persecution, and the public/private dichotomy: refugee women and asylum in the UK' (interdisciplinary seminars: `Gender and the public/private divide'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET perform works by Haydn, Borodin, and Beethoven, Holywell Music Room, 7.45 p.m. (tickets £8/£6/£4, from Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the door).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Thursday 28 May

DR A. MAMA: to be announced (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars), Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. FENTON (Professor of Poetry): `Ted Hughes' (lecture series: `Three Poets: D.H. Lawrence, Robert Lowell, Ted Hughes'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Policing poetry in Paris, 1749' (inaugural Besterman Lecture), the Hall, the Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

M. ELLIS: `Unholy alliance: religion and atrocity in our time' (Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Friday 29 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Baroque art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR A. PORTES: `Globalisation from below: the rise of transnational communities' (ESRC Research Programme in Transnational Communities: `Conceiving transnational activity'), Upper Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Saturday 30 May

MAISON FRANÇAISE/MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE study-day: `Pratiques et approches: l'histoire des sciences en action', Maison Française, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS (with Mary Nelson, soprano) perform cantatas by Vivaldi, 8.15 p.m., New College Ante- Chapel (tickets £7/£5 from Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the door).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Sunday 31 May

HUGH RICE preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Monday 1 June

DR J. WALKER: `The rotary mechanism of ATP synthesis' (first Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture), University/Pitt Rivers Museum, 4 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section