14 January 1999 - No 4497



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4497: 14 January 1999<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

14 January 1999


The following supplement was published
with this Gazette:

Congregation debate on
Governance (1 December): verbatim report

The listing of Staff Development Seminars for Hilary and Trinity
Terms was also published as a supplement with this
Gazette.
Details may be found at the "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
Office site.


University Health and
Safety
information


Return to Gazette
Home Page





<br /><br /><br /><br /><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /><br /><meta name="GENERATOR" content="Mozilla/4.06 [en] (Win95; I) [Netscape]" /><br /><title>Oxford University Gazette, 14 January 1999: University<br /> Acts<br />


University Acts




Contents of this section:


[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published
or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CONGREGATION 21 December




Degree by Special Resolution


No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of
Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15), the following
resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 21 December.


Text of Special Resolution


That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

DAVID PETER MYATT, Nuffield College

Return to List of Contents of this section




HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL




1 Decree


Council has made the following decree, to come into effect on 29 January. 


Decree (1): Establishment of Norman Collisson Professorship of Musculo-
skeletal Science


Explanatory note


No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor will declare
carried, without holding the meeting of Congregation on 19 January, the
Statute establishing the Norman Collisson Professorship of Musculo-skeletal
Science, which was promulgated on 15 December (see `University Agenda'
below). Council has accordingly made the following decree, which gives
effect to consequential changes.


Text of Decree (1)


[For text of Decree see decree annexed to statute in
Gazette 26
November 1998
.]

Return to List of Contents of this section




2 Status of Master of Arts


Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the
provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, p. 367) has
been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership
of Congregation:

MARK JONATHAN BENNETT, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics

NICHOLAS JEREMY JOHNSON, Oxford Institute of Legal Practice

DOMINIC THOMAS OLIVER, St Peter's College

TIMOTHY BRETT POUND, D.PHIL., St Cross College

Return to List of Contents of this section




3 Register of Congregation


Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to
the Register of Congregation:

 Bennett, M.J., MA status, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics

Johnson, N.J., MA status, Oxford Institute of Legal Practice

Myatt, D.P., MA, Nuffield

Oliver, D.T., MA status, St Peter's

Pound, T.B., MA status, D.Phil., St Cross

Return to List of Contents of this section




HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL AND GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES




Delegates of the University Press


Council and the General Board have appointed the following as Delegates
of the University Press from 1 October 1999:


For five years


PROFESSOR R.W. AINSWORTH, St Catherine's, vice Professor J.M. Brady

 PROFESSOR S.D. IVERSEN, Magdalen

 PROFESSOR D.A. WARRELL, St Cross, vice Professor J.M. Newsom-Davis


For three years


PROFESSOR C.M. PERRINS, Wolfson

Return to List of Contents of this section




BOARDS OF FACULTIES


For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 29
January, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

Return to List of Contents of this section







<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 January 1999: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



CONGREGATION 18 January


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be
approved at noon on 18 January, unless by that time the
Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more
members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II,
Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15) that
they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

ROBERT JOHN SERVICE, St Antony's College

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONGREGATION 19 January


Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole
business comprises questions to which no opposition has
been notified and in respect of which no request for an
adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor
will accordingly declare the statute approved, the
preambles adopted, and the special resolution carried
without a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect.
iii, cl. 11 (Statutes, 1997, p. 8).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONGREGATION 18 February


Election

Buildings Committee

Vacancy: one (for a person not being a member of Council
or the General Board)

Retiring member: Professor W.W.M. Allison

Period from TT 1999: 4 years

¶ Nominations in writing by two members of
Congregation other than the candidate will be received by
the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington
Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 25 January, and similar
nominations by six members of Congregation other than the
candidate up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 1 February.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each
signatory the name and college or department in block
capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be
published. At least one nomination in respect of each
candidate must be made on an official nomination form.
Copies of the form are obtainable from the Head Clerk
(telephone: (2)70190; e-mail:
Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).

In the event of a contested election, a brief
biographical note on each candidate will be published in
the Gazette dated 11 February, and voters
may wish to wait until they have read these notes before
returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to
members of Congregation as soon as possible after the
closing date for nominations, and which, after
completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later
than 4 p.m. on 18 February).

Note on the body concerned

The Buildings Committee is responsible to Council and the
General Board, taking account of university policies and
priorities, for formulating the University's programme
for all building works, for the execution of all building
projects, for maintaining university buildings in a
satisfactory condition, and for allocating space within
them. These responsibilities include making
recommendations to Council and the Board: (a) on
the choice of architects and the design, planning, and
elevations of all major building projects; and
(b) on the acquisition and allocation of new
sites. The committee has control of a substantial budget.

Return to List of Contents of this
section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 January 1999: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • BODLEIAN LIBRARY

  • UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS


  • OXFORD UNION SOCIETY LIBRARY BOARD
    OF INQUIRY
  • MAISON FRANÇAISE

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    SUB-DEPARTMENT OF CONDENSED
    MATTER PHYSICS

    On the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board, the
    General Board has assigned the Sub-department of
    Condensed Matter Physics to PROFESSOR J.F. RYAN, Student
    of Christ Church and Professor of Physics, from 1 January
    1999 to 30 September 2004, and to PROFESSOR R.J.
    NICHOLAS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of University College and
    Professor of Physics, for a period of three years from 1
    October 2001 to 30 September 2004.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEPARTMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL
    PSYCHOLOGY

    On the recommendation of the Psychological Studies Board,
    the General Board has assigned the Department of
    Experimental Psychology to PROFESSOR S.D. IVERSEN, MA,
    D.PHIL., D.SC.Fellow of Magdalen College and Professor of
    Psychology, from 1 January 1999, and has assigned the
    deputy headship of the same department to PROFESSOR N.P.
    EMLER, MA, Fellow of Wolfson College and Professor of
    Social Psychology, also from 1 January 1999, the
    arrangement to be reviewed in Trinity Term 2000.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INSTITUTE OF ARCHAEOLOGY


    Appointment of deputy

    On the recommendation of the Committee for Archaeology,
    the General Board has appointed G.R. LOCK, MA, Fellow of
    Kellogg College and University Lecturer in Archaeology
    (Computing and Statistical Methods), as deputy to E.M.
    Steinby, MA, Fellow of All Souls College and Professor of
    the Archaeology of the Roman Empire, as Director of the
    Institute of Archaeology for Hilary Term 1999, during
    which Professor Steinby will be on sabbatical leave..

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    JOHN BETTS ORGAN SCHOLARSHIP
    1998

    The Scholarship has been awarded to MATTHEW HALLS, New
    College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    KOLKHORST EXHIBITIONS

    Kolkhorst Exhibitions in Spanish have been awarded to
    MARY ELLIOT, Magdalen College, and RACHEL SMALL, Keble
    College.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    GIBBS PRIZES IN LAW

    The examiners for the Gibbs Prizes in Law have awarded
    prizes as follows:

    Gibbs Prize: ADAM KRAMER, University College

    Proxime accessit: MS CAROLINE STRATTON,
    Worcester College

    Book Prizes: PAUL HOBSON and JOHN TILLMAN,
    both of Hertford College

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EDUCATIONAL RECORDING AGENCY


    Survey of off-air recording

    This notice is to inform members of the University
    about a survey of educational recordings in which the
    University is obliged to participate this year, and to
    request co-operation in collecting the necessary
    information.

    The University (including its constituent colleges)
    is covered by an Educational Recording Agency (ERA)
    Licence to record radio and television broadcasts and
    cable programmes for educational use, without infringing
    copyright. The University pays about £24,000 per
    annum for this licence.

    It is a condition of the licence that institutions
    may be required to maintain for a specified period of
    time details of radio and television recordings made
    under the licence and to return this information to the
    ERA. Oxford University has been selected to take part in
    ERA's survey during the period 1 September 1998
    to 31 August 1999
    and the University is
    therefore asking all staff for assistance in collating
    the information required.

    In each department and college, and some faculty
    offices, an individual has been nominated as the local
    co-ordinator for the survey. All staff are asked to give
    details to the most appropriate co-ordinator of all
    recordings of radio and television programmes which they
    make for educational purposes whether at home, in the
    University, or elsewhere. The information required is the
    title, date, and channel of the programme, and the
    location where the recording was made. As statistics have
    to be returned by the University at the end of every
    month, it is important that a co- ordinator is informed
    as soon as possible after a recording is made.

    The identity of the local co-ordinator should be
    publicised in each department, college, and (where
    appropriate) faculty office. If it is not clear, the
    departmental administrator, senior tutor, or faculty
    office administrator should be able to identify the co-
    ordinator. In cases of difficulty, details of recordings
    can be passed instead to the University's central
    co-ordinator, Miss Catherine Long, at the ETRC
    (telephone: (2)70529, e-mail:
    catherine.long@etrc.ox.ac.uk). It is, of course,
    necessary to pass information about recordings only to
    one co-ordinator; there is no need, for example, to
    inform both a college co-ordinator and a faculty
    co-ordinator but simply the one which is most convenient.

    Please note that ERA are likely to visit the
    University at some stage during the survey period and to
    monitor the information returned against recordings held
    by the University. It is therefore important that the
    required information is collected carefully and that
    recordings are available for inspection if necessary. It
    is also important to note the requirement (which is
    general and not just for the period of the survey) that
    each recording should be labelled with the date and time,
    and with the statement that `This recording is to be used
    only for educational purposes'.

    It is hoped that the survey will not cause too much
    inconvenience, and the full co-operation of members of
    the University would be appreciated.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BATE COLLECTION OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS


    Study days and weekends at the
    Bate Collection

    Cornucopia: a celebration of Oxford's musical
    collections


    23 January:

    Introduction to the natural and hand horns
    with Bradley Strauchen.


    21–1 February:

    Baroque and classical reed-making
    with David Rachnor and William Waterhouse.


    13--14 March:

    Bow Rehairing Lecture-Demonstration with
    Andrew Bellis.


    27--8 March:

    Gamelan Weekend with Pete Smith and Andy
    Channing.


    8 May:

    Harpsichord study day with
    Martin Souter.


    29 May:

    Introduction to the Viol with Cathie
    Miserandino.


    11--18 July:

    Bow Making Course with Andrew Bellis.

    For further information about any of the above courses,
    or to book contact Dr Joanna Archibald, the Bate
    Collection of Musical Instruments, Faculty of Music, St
    Aldate's, Oxford OX1 1DB (telephone: Oxford (2)76139,
    e-mail: bate.collection@music.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ST ANNE'S COLLEGE


    `An evening with Bridget Jones'

    This evening of words and music will be held at 6.45 p.m.
    on Saturday, 30 January, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture
    Theatre, St Anne's College. Tickets, including dinner,
    cost £30, and are available from the Development
    Office, St Anne's College (telephone/fax: Oxford
    (2)74852).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ST JOHN'S COLLEGE AND COLIN
    CARR

    Recital

    COLIN CARR will perform the following at 8.30 p.m. on
    Saturday, 23 January, in the college hall: J.S. Bach,
    Suite No. 1 in G major; George Crumb, Sonata for solo
    cello; Alfredo Piatti, Three Caprices; J.S.
    Bach, Suite No. 6 in D major.

    Master-class

    COLIN CARR will hold a master-class at 11 a.m. on Sunday,
    24 January, in the Auditorium, St John's College. Chamber
    groups or performing soloists wishing to receive this
    public coaching should apply to the College Secretary, St
    John's College.

    Admission to both events is free, but subject to
    availability of space.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BODLEIAN LIBRARY


    Gordon Duff Prize 1999

    In accordance with the regulations for the administration
    of the Gordon Duff Prize (Statutes, 1997, p.
    603), a competition is announced for a prize of £150
    for an unpublished essay on any of the following
    subjects: bibliography, palaeography, typography,
    book-binding, book illustration, the science of books and
    manuscripts, and the arts relating thereto.

    The competition is open to all members of the
    University. The essay shall be of not more than 12,000
    words. No essay may be submitted unless the subject has
    first been approved. Candidates must submit their
    proposed subjects not later than 30 April, and essays
    must be received by 1 August. All communications should
    be addressed to the Director of the University Library
    Services and Bodley's Librarian at the Bodleian Library.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS


    Ashmolean Museum and Worcester
    College

    Sackler Research Fellowship

    Applications are invited for the Sackler Research
    Fellowship at Worcester College. The fellowship, which is
    tenable for two years from 1 October 1999, is to be held
    in the Eastern Art Department in the Ashmolean Museum.
    The Sackler Fellow will be expected to undertake
    one of the following projects:
    either to write and prepare for publication
    catalogues of the Yuan and early Ming ceramics held in
    the department (the candidate will be expected to have a
    reading knowledge of Chinese and established competence
    in the field of Chinese ceramics); or to
    write and prepare for publication a catalogue of the
    Japanese paintings held in the department (the candidate
    will be expected to have a reading knowledge of Japanese,
    and established competence in the field of Japanese
    art).

    The stipend of the fellowship is £13,200, plus
    lunching and dining rights in college.

    Application forms and further particulars are obtainable
    from the Director's Secretary, the Ashmolean Museum,
    Oxford OX1 2PH. The closing date is 29 January.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    New Dictionary of
    National Biography

    Appointment of Bibliographic Researchers

    Applications are invited for one or two Bibliographic
    Researchers to work for the New Dictionary of
    National Biography
    , a research project of the
    University of Oxford, funded by the British Academy and
    Oxford University Press. The bibliographer(s) will work
    with the Bibliographical Editor, Dr Rohini Jayatilaka,
    and will be responsible to her for the quality,
    integrity, and consistency of the citations listed in the
    bibliographical section of each article.

    If part-time, the bibliographer(s) would be expected to
    work about twenty hours per week, but candidates offering
    more hours are also encouraged to apply. Applications are
    welcome from candidates with humanities, fine arts, or
    science backgrounds. Candidates will have at least a
    first degree or equivalent
    library/bibliographical/archival qualifications,
    bibliographical experience, and a good knowledge of
    relevant printed and electronic sources, including some
    archival and manuscript resources. The successful
    candidate(s) will have the capacity to work
    independently, to meet deadlines, and to work effectively
    as part of a team. They should also have a good general
    knowledge of the British past, clear handwriting,
    accurate grammar and spelling, familiarity with a
    word-processing or database package, and competent
    keyboard skills.

    The bibliographic work will be based in the New DNB
    offices at 37A St Giles', Oxford. The bibliographer(s)
    will be expected to make substantial use of the project's
    database and possibly of the libraries in Oxford and
    further afield. The bibliographer(s) will be employed by
    the University of Oxford on a six-month fixed-term
    contract and the appointment will be on the RS1B scale
    for academic-related staff
    (£15,735–£20,107 per annum), pro rata
    where appropriate.

    Application forms and further particulars may be obtained
    from Dr Rohini Jayatilaka, New DNB, Oxford
    University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP
    (fax: Oxford 267035, e-mail: rjayatilaka@oup.co.uk).

    The closing date for applications is 31 January.
    Successful candidates should expect to start as soon as
    possible thereafter.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Appointment of Deputy Project Secretary

    A Deputy Project Secretary is required for this exciting
    project of national importance. He or she will take
    specific responsibilities and deputise for the Project
    Secretary in supporting a busy in-house team, and in
    assisting in processing material in its path towards
    publication. Organising ability, fast, accurate typing,
    and some previous office experience are essential, and
    some database knowledge is desirable. The post will suit
    someone with flexibility and initiative. Salary on the
    university clerical scale, grade C3
    (£11,294–£13,074).

    Applications in writing, with a curriculum
    vitae
    , daytime telephone number, and the names of
    two referees, should be forwarded to Katherine Manville,
    New DNB, Oxford University Press, Great
    Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP (from whom further
    particulars may be obtained by post). The closing date is
    Friday, 5 February.

    The University is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD UNION SOCIETY LIBRARY
    BOARD OF INQUIRY

    In Michaelmas Term 1998 the Oxford Union Society
    inaugurated a special Board of Inquiry to examine the
    future of its library.

    The library has its origins in the 1820s, and, although
    it includes some items printed prior to its foundation,
    is particularly relevant for its collections of
    nineteenth-century material. The Union also retains a
    `living library', with new publications regularly
    acquired.

    As in the case of many similar institutions, the library
    now faces problems on several fronts. The Board will
    consider the specific difficulties associated with a
    collection of this type, particularly in the areas of
    preservation and conservation, and the question of how
    the library can best contribute towards the facilities
    available in Oxford in the next century.

    The Union has requested the Board to submit a report in
    early summer 1999 and intends to prepare a preliminary
    development plan for the library by Michaelmas Term of
    this year.

    The Board of Inquiry includes both senior and junior
    members of the Society, as well as external experts. It
    is eager to consult as widely as possible, however, and
    would welcome ideas and submissions from all members of
    the Union, and from others with an interest in the field.
    Views and suggestions on all aspects of the Board's work
    are very welcome.

    All those who wish to contribute are invited to write in
    the first instance to the Librarian-in-Charge, Oxford
    Union Society, Frewin Court, Oxford OX1 3JB, from whom
    further information can also be obtained. Submissions
    should aim to reach the Library by Friday, 6 March
    (seventh week) in order that they might be fully
    considered by the Board.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MAISON FRANÇAISE


    Film-showings

    The following films will be shown at 6.30 p.m. on Mondays
    in the Phoenix cinema, Walton Street. The concessionary
    price for holders of a Maison Française leaflet is
    £3. Telephone for information and reservations:
    Oxford 512526.

    Details of this term's lectures and other meetings at the
    Maison appear in `Lectures' below.

    18 Jan.: Providence (Alan Resnais,
    1994)

    25 Jan.: Rendez-vous in
    Paris
    (Eric Rohmer, 1995)

    1 Feb.: Ponette (Jacques
    Doillon, 1996)

    8 Feb.: Les
    Misérables
    (Claude Lelouch, 1995)

    15 Feb.: Orphée
    (Jean Cocteau, 1950)

    22 Feb.: Lucie Aubrac
    (Claude Berri, 1997)

    1 Mar.: La Reine Margot
    (Patrick Chéreau, 1993)

    8 Mar.: La Grande Illusion
    (Jean Renoir, 1937)

    15 Mar.: City of Lost
    Children
    (Jean-Pierre Jeunet/Marc Caro,
    1995)

    22 Mar.: Marquise (Vera
    Belmont, 1997)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 January 1999: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Peter Moores Professor of Management
    Studies

    PROFESSOR COLIN MAYER will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
    p.m. on Thursday, 18 February, in the Examination Schools. The
    Vice-Chancellor will be present, and the lecture will be followed
    by a reception at the Schools (telephone for further information:
    (2)88654).

    Subject: `Firm control.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Cameron Mackintosh Visiting Professor
    of Contemporary Theatre

    PROFESSOR DIANA RIGG, DBE, will deliver her inaugural lecture at
    5 p.m. on Friday, 29 January, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture
    Theatre, St Catherine's College.

    Subject: `Theatre.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH HISTORY

    Use and delight: environmental history in Northern England
    since 1600

    PROFESSOR T.C. SMOUT, Historiographer Royal of Scotland and
    Director, the Institute for Environmental History, University of
    St Andrews, will deliver the Ford's Lectures in British History
    at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools.

    22 Jan.

    : `Use and delight: continuity and change in attitude
    to nature.'


    29 Jan.

    : `Woods of imagination and reality.'


    5 Feb.

    : `Making and using the soil.'


    12 Feb.

    : `Commanding the waters.'


    19 Feb.

    : `The fragile hill.'


    26 Feb.

    : `The quarrel over the countryside.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CARLYLE LECTURES

    Political thinking in the early Middle Ages

    JANET L. NELSON, King's College, London, will deliver the Carlyle
    Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Thursdays in the Examination
    Schools.


    21 Jan.
    : `Trends.'


    28 Jan.

    : `Peers.'


    4 Feb.

    : `Patriarchs.'


    11 Feb.

    : `Councils.'


    18 Feb.

    : `Rites.'


    25 Feb.

    : `End-times.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND
    COMPARATIVE RELIGION 1998–9

    Religion, restitution, and agency: lectures in medicine and
    religious thought

    PROFESSOR ROLAND LITTLEWOOD, Professor of Anthropology and
    Psychiatry, University College Centre for Anthropology, London,
    will deliver the Wilde Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Examination Schools.


    20 Jan.: `Extreme experiences and religious
    cognitions.'

    27 Jan.: ` "Moments of creation"---1: the
    bodily idioms of cosmology.'

    3 Feb.: ` "Moments of creation"---2: some
    generalities in the religious embodiment of women prophets
    and divine innovators.'

    10 Feb.: `In partial defence of Euhemerus.'

    17 Feb.: `Therapeutics of the divine: healing as a
    characteristic religious idiom.'

    24 Feb.: `Healing and restitution as mutual
    transformation.'

    3 Mar.: `Satan and the computer: the European
    revival of spirit possession.'

    10 Mar.: `Naturalistic and personalistic modes of
    thought.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SLADE LECTURES 1999

    Borromini and Baroque Rome

    PROFESSOR J. CONNORS, Slade Professor 1998–9, will deliver
    the Slade Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Wednesdays in the
    Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    20 Jan.: `Out of the Swiss lakes.'

    27 Jan.: `The newest profession.'

    3 Feb.: `Sacred theorems.'

    10 Feb.: `Façades that grow.'

    17 Feb.: `Architecture for the family.'

    24 Feb.: `Wisdom builds herself a house.'

    3 Mar.: `Piazza Navona and dynastic urbanism.'

    10 Mar.: `The last things and afterlife.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    HERBERT SPENCER LECTURES 1998–9

    Democracy in practice and in theory

    The Herbert Spencer Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
    in the Examination Schools. The lectures will be open to the
    public.

    Details of the final lecture in the series (2 March) will be
    announced later.

    DR A. RYAN

    26 Jan.: `No more than two cheers for
    democracy?'

    DR L. SIEDENTOP

    2 Feb.: to be announced.

    PROFESSOR L. MENAND, City University, New York

    9 Feb.: to be announced.

    PROFESSOR G. KATEB, Princeton

    16 Feb.: `Wildness and conscience: Thoreau and
    Emerson.'

    PROFESSOR R. SCRUTON, Birkbeck College, London

    23 Feb.: `Democracy is not enough.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    NEWS INTERNATIONAL VISITING PROFESSOR
    OF BROADCAST MEDIA

    The political structure of British broadcasting 1949–99

    PROFESSOR DAVID ELSTEIN will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following
    Tuesdays and Thursdays in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross
    Building.

    23 Feb.: `Beveridge.'

    25 Feb.: `Pilkington.'

    2 Mar.: `Annan.'

    4 Mar.: `Hunt.'

    9 Mar.: `Peacock.'

    11 Mar.: `The politics of digital.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY


    Institute of Social and Cultural
    Anthropology

    Youth, fertility, and reproductive health

    The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Mondays in the
    Seminar Room, the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

    Convener: Dr Soraya Tremayne.

    DR A. COLES

    18 Jan.: `Anthropologists' contribution to
    reproductive health programmes: donor perspectives.'

    DR K. HAMPSHIRE, Durham

    25 Jan.: `Population mobility and regulation of
    fertility among the Fulani of northern Burkina
    Faso.' (Provisional title)

    DR D. MARTIN

    1 Feb.: `Chinese birth practices in Hong Kong.'

    DR J. ENNEW, Cambridge

    8 Feb.: `Early marriage and early pregnancy in
    the context of children's rights: some Tanzanian data.'

    DR M. COLLUMBIEN, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    15 Feb.: `A study of male sexual health and
    behaviour in Orissa, India.'

    DR L. RIVAL, Kent

    22 Feb.: `Sexual identity, making love, and
    having babies in cross-cultural perspective: case studies
    from Amazonia, the Caribbean, and Euro-America.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Animated materiality: breathing life into things

    The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
    Fridays in the Lecture Theatre (ground floor), the Institute of
    Social and Cultural Anthropology.

    M. O'HANLON

    22 Jan.: ` "Mostly harmless"?:
    "man-catchers" and the colonial imagination in
    British New Guinea.'

    M. ROWLANDS, UCL

    29 Jan.: `Architectural bodies and motion in
    Grassfields material culture.'

    P. SPYER, Amsterdam

    5 Feb.: `The cassowary will (not) be
    photographed: "The Primitive", "the
    Japanese", and the elusive "Sacred" (Aru,
    eastern Indonesia')

    W. REA, Goldsmiths' College, London

    12 Feb.: ` "Dodging the deity": Ekiti
    Yoruba masquerades in view.'

    C. PINNEY, UCL

    19 Feb.: `Corpothetics in central India: the
    somatic solidarities of Hindu chronolithographs.'

    P. HARVEY, Manchester

    26 Feb.: `Why "smart objects" need
    narratives: the transformation of objects in new museum
    databases.'

    A. HORNBORG, Lund, Sweden

    5 Mar.: `Animism, fetishism, and machines.'

    S. COLEMAN, Durham

    12 Mar.: `Persons as objects and objects as
    agents among Protestant evangelicals.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in
    Lecture Theatre 1, the Department of Biochemistry.

    Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor
    of Molecular Biophysics.

    DR P. TIELMAN, Groningen

    22 Jan.: `Computer simulations of membrane
    proteins: molecular dynamics of lipid bilayers and OmpF
    porin.'

    PROFESSOR S.G. WITHERS

    29 Jan.: `Structural and mechanistic studies on
    glycosidase intermediates: tales from a Canadian
    "trapper".'

    DR C. VENIEN-BRYAN

    5 Feb.: `Cryo-electron microscopy in structural
    studies: transcription factor HupR; an example of a His-tag
    protein crystallised on a Ni-Lipid monolayer.'

    P.L. ADAMS

    19 Feb.: `Structure of an histamine binding
    protein.'

    DR A. WLODAWER, Macromolecular Structure Laboratory, NCI-FCRDC,
    Frederick, USA

    26 Feb.: `Structural basis of the entry of
    phage fd into E. coli cells.'

    DR D. DOYLE

    5 Mar.: `The structure of the K+ channel
    KCSA.'

    DR D. OWEN, Cambridge

    12 Mar.: `The story of "Mickey
    Mouse"—structure/function studies on proteins
    involved in endocytosis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Laboratory of Zoology

    The following departmental research seminars will be held on
    Mondays in Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology. Those
    attending are asked to note that the 15 February seminar will
    start at 3.30 p.m.; other seminars will start at 4.30 p.m.

    Convener: P. Harvey, MA, D.Sc., Professor of
    Zoology.

    PROFESSOR R. FORTEY, Natural History Museum

    18 Jan.: `The Cambrian "explosion"
    and the Ordovician faunal "revolution".'

    DR R. BEDDINGTON, National Institute for Medical Research

    25 Jan.: `Genes affecting anteroposterior
    pattern in the mouse embryo.'

    PROFESSOR B. GREENWOOD, London School of Hygiene and Tropical
    Medicine

    1 Feb.: `Pneumococcal disease in Africa.'

    PROFESSOR T. CLUTTON-BROCK, Cambridge

    8 Feb.: `Co-operative breeding and reproductive
    skew in animals.'

    J. PICKETT, Integrated Approach to Crop Research, Rothamsted

    15 Feb.: `Volatile signalling: from plants to
    animals.'

    PROFESSOR W. EARNSHAW, Edinburgh

    22 Feb.: `Biochemical mechanisms of apoptotic
    execution.'

    PROFESSOR B. GOODWIN, Schumacher College

    1 Mar.: `Self-organisation in ant
    societies.'

    DR A. POMIANKOWSKI, UCL

    8 Mar.: `Genomic imprinting is for sex not
    conflict.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Department of Plant Sciences

    The following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays
    in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant
    Sciences.

    DR C. BROWNLEE, Plymouth Marine Laboratory

    21 Jan.: `Developing in a fluctuating
    environment: integration of physiological and developmental
    signals in an algal embryo.'

    DR A. MILLAR, Warwick

    28 Jan.: `Molecular genetics of the biological
    clock.'

    DR S. TURNER, Manchester

    4 Feb.: `Genetic analysis of secondary cell
    wall formation and xylem development.'

    DR S. ZEEMAN, John Innes Centre

    11 Feb.: `Mutants of Arabidopsis
    lacking starch-metabolising enzymes.'

    DR J. BAILEY-SERRES, California Riverside

    18 Feb.: `Uncovering translational control of
    gene expression in flooded maize roots.'

    PROFESSOR D. TOMOS, Bangor

    25 Feb.: `High pressures and small volumes:
    quantitative maps of plant physiology at single cell
    resolution.'

    DR C. MARTIN, John Innes Centre

    4 Mar.: `Development of petals: specification
    of cellular form and function.'

    PROFESSOR H. ATKINSON, Leeds

    11 Mar.: `Crop resistance to nematodes: a
    benign application for genetically modified plants.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Genetics, past, present and future

    The following seminars will be given at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays
    in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

    DR P. PENNY, MRC, Harwell

    21 Jan.: `Plain genetics and fancy mice.'

    DR M. VAN HEUVEL

    4 Feb.: `Drosophila genetics: the
    making of an egg.'

    PROFESSOR R.L. GARDNER

    18 Feb.: `Transgenesis in the study of mouse
    development.'

    DR J.A. LANGDALE

    4 Mar.: `Plant developmental genetics: from
    transposons to proteomes.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Trinity Term

    PROFESSOR M.S. DAWKINS

    29 Apr.: `Genes and behaviour.'

    PROFESSOR C.J. LEAVER

    13 May: `Transgenic plants: the next green
    revolution?.'

    DR M. EDWARDS, Oxagen

    27 May: `Biotechnology in medicine.'

    PROFESSOR B.C. SYKES

    10 June: `Genetics and medicine—the golden
    age.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Department of Psychiatry

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Seminar Room, the Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford
    Hospital.

    Convener: G.M. Goodwin, BM, MA, D.Phil., Handley
    Professor of Psychiatry.

    PROFESSOR F. CREED, Manchester

    26 Jan.: `Psychological treatment for the
    irritable bowel syndrome.'

    PROFESSOR E.S. PAYKEL, Cambridge

    9 Feb.: `Cognitive therapy for residual
    depression.'

    PROFESSOR E. JOHNSTONE, Edinburgh

    2 Mar.: `Predictors of the development of
    schizophrenia: findings from the Edinburgh High Risk Study.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology: laboratory seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the
    laboratory.

    Convener: N.N. Osborne, MA, D.Sc., Professor of
    Ocular Neurobiology.

    PROFESSOR OSBORNE

    18 Jan.: `Where does the raised glutamate in
    the vitreous humour of glaucoma patients come from and what
    are the implications?'

    DR J. CARVER, Wollongong

    25 Jan.: `How do small heat shock proteins
    stabilise unfolding proteins?'

    PROFESSOR R. GREEN, ASTRA Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Leicester

    1 Feb.: `Neuroprection: use of GABAergic
    agents.'

    DR T. SHARP

    8 Feb.: `Novel pharmacological strategies for
    treatment of depression.'

    DR G. CHIDLOW

    15 Feb.: `Role of serotonin in the anterior
    uvea.'

    DR KAZUHIKO UNOKI, Institute of Ophthalmology, London

    22 Feb.: `Growth factors in injury of rat
    retina.'

    DR S. EASTWOOD

    1 Mar.: `Post-mortem studies of gene expression
    in schizophrenia.'

    DR MING CHAO

    8 Mar.: `Report on a twenty-four-month study to
    suggest that clonidine is a neuroprectant in retinal
    ischaemia.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Institute of Health Sciences: research seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays
    in the Institute of Health Sciences, Old Road, Headington. Unless
    otherwise indicated, they will be held in the Teaching Suite.

    Convener: Dr J. Emery.

    S. ZIEBLAND and DIPEX team, ICRF General Practice Research Group

    14 Jan.: `DIPEX (Database of Individual
    Patient's EXperiences).'

    DR K. VENABLES

    21 Jan.: `What can we learn from occupational
    asthma?'

    PROFESSOR G. GILLET, Dunedin School of Clinical Medicine, Otago,
    New Zealand

    28 Jan.: `The introduction of innovative
    treatments.' (IHS Guest Lecture)

    DR S. GRIFFIN, Cambridge

    4 Feb.: `Should we screen for diabetes? An
    evidence-led debate?'

    PROFESSOR R. COLLINS and S. LEWINGTON

    11 Feb.: `Blood pressure, stroke, and CHD.'

    DR P. ONG

    18 Feb., Board Room: `Complementary medicine
    utilisation.'

    PROFESSOR L. RASTAM, Malmö, Sweden

    25 Feb., Board Room: `Evidence-based public
    health.' (IHS Guest Lecture)

    DR M. DAWES

    4 Mar.: `Is white coat hypertension safe?'

    DR H. HIN, GP, Banbury

    11 Mar.: `Coeliac disease in primary care.'

    DR T. LANCASTER and L. STEAD

    18 Mar.: `The problem of attrition bias:
    dealing with drop-outs in clinical trials and meta-
    analysis.'

    J. DAWSON, Department of Public Health

    25 Mar.: `A retrospective study to compare
    medium term outcomes between hip implants.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Nuffield Department of Surgery

    The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays in the Seminar
    Room, Level 6, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, the John
    Radcliffe Hospital. The seminars on 26 January, 16 February, 2
    March, and 9 March will take place at 5 p.m.; other seminars will
    take place at 1 p.m.

    Convener: P.J. Morris, MA, Nuffield Professor of
    Surgery.

    R. LECHLER, Imperial College School of Medicine and Hammersmith
    Hospital

    19 Jan.: `Cognate and non-cognate aspects of
    peripheral T cell tolerance.'

    A. DARDIK

    26 Jan.: `How to build a better blood
    vessel.'

    D. TOUGH, Edward Jenner Institute for Vaccine Research

    2 Feb.: `Memory T cell turnover: regulation by
    cytokines.'

    P. LOWENSTEIN, Manchester

    9 Feb.: `Acute and chronic consequences of
    successful brain tumour gene therapy.'

    P. WHATLING

    16 Feb.: `Drug treatment for claudication.'

    A. AGER, National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill

    23 Feb.: `Regulation of lymphocyte and
    Langerhans cell migration.'

    M. BRADDOCK, Glaxo Wellcome

    2 Mar.: `Tissue shear stress and therapeutic
    applications for gene therapy in cardiovascular disease.'

    S. KNIGHT, St James's Hospital, Leeds

    9 Mar.: `Free tissue transfer to the ischaemic
    lower limb.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE, PHYSIOLOGICAL
    SCIENCES

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in
    the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

    Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Pathology.

    DR R. WOOD, ICRF Clare Hall Laboratories

    28 Jan.: `Nucleotide excision repair in human
    cells.'

    J. BABIK and K. HONEY

    11 Feb.:
    (JB) `Gene regulation of the IL12 p35
    subunit.'

    (KH) `CD40L blockade induces tolerance and linked
    suppression.'

    DR P. BORK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg

    18 Feb.: `Comparative sequence analysis.'

    PROFESSOR SIR ALEC JEFFREYS, Leicester

    25 Feb.: `DNA fingerprinting: from Antarctica
    to Chernobyl.'

    PROFESSOR R. IRVINE, Cambridge

    4 Mar.: `Inositide synthesis within and without
    the nucleus.'

    DR P. FAIRCHILD

    11 Mar.: `Directed differentiation of embryonic
    stem cells.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    Philosophy of Mathematics Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in
    the Lecture
    Room at the Sub-faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street.

    Convener: D.R. Isaacson, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Mathematics.

    DR IAN RUMFITT


    18 Jan.

    : `Frege's logicism.'

    PROFESSOR ROBERT THOMAS, Manitoba


    25 Jan.

    : `Why ontology really doesn't matter to the
    mathematician.'

    DR GIANNI RIGAMONTI, Palermo


    1 Feb.

    : `A proof of the Fan Theorem without Bar Induction.'

    DAVID BOSTOCK


    8 Feb.: `Can the intuitionist understand
    semantics for the logical constants based on the notion of
    proof?'

    DR GIANLUIGI OLIVERI


    15 Feb.

    : `Patterns and infinity.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES, ORIEL COLLEGE

    Audiences ancient and modern

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in
    Lecture Room 2, Staircase 18, Oriel College (Island Site). The
    seminar will continue in weeks 5–8 of term.

    Convener: C.S. Kraus, MA, University Lecturer (CUF)
    in Classics.

    PROFESSOR R. MAYER, King's College, London

    21 Jan.: `Audiences for oratory: Pliny,
    Tacitus, and fame.'

    DR T. WHITMARSH, Cambridge

    28 Jan.: `Sophistry in motion: the con-texts of
    Dio's Kingships.'

    A. BITEL

    4 Feb.: `Levels of adulterous encounter in
    Apuleius's Golden Ass, Book 9.'

    PROFESSOR O. TAPLIN

    11 Feb.: ` "No text can give us
    straightforward information about its production and
    reception" (Don Fowler). Discuss with special reference
    to Homer and/or Hesiod.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    Graduate Seminar in Spanish Studies

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Taylor Institution.

    Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII
    Professor of Spanish Studies, and C.H. Griffin, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer in Latin American Literature.

    C. PATTERSON

    19 Jan.: `Ramón Otero Pedrayo
    (1888–1976): Galician, Catholic, fidalgo,
    orator, geographer, bibliophile, essayist, teacher, poet,
    politician, playwright, novelist, and nationalist.'

    DR R. DAVIES, Sheffield

    26 Jan.: `The Pérez Galdós
    Editions Project: creating electronic packages of the
    Torquemada Novels.'

    P. GARCÍA-CARO

    9 Feb.: `Literary views on the close of the
    First Spanish Republic (1873–4).'

    D.P. GRAU

    16 Feb.: ` "Home" v.
    "dona". Palabras e ideas en la poesía de
    Joan Fuster: un análisa estadístico-
    estilítico.'

    JORDI DOCE CHAMBRELÁN

    23 Feb.: `Versions of absence: Hardy's
    "Afterwards", Machado's "A José
    María Palacio", and Jiménez's "El
    viaje definitivo".'

    PROFESSOR T. DADSON, Birmingham

    2 Mar.: `A poet and his sources in seventeenth-
    century Spain.'

    DR D. CREWS, Central Missouri State University, Warrensburg

    9 Mar.: `Ascanio Colonna, Juan de
    Valdés, and the Diet of Ratisbon, 1541.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Lecture

    JACQUELINE CERQUIGLINI-TOULET, Université de
    Paris–Sorbonne, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 25
    February, in the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: `L'écriture testamentaire à
    la fin du Moyen Age: identité, dispersion, trace.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Lecture

    PROFESSOR PAOLO ORVIETO, University of Florence, will lecture at
    5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 January, in Room 2, the Taylor
    Institution.

    Convener: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer in Italian.

    Subject: `Hermeneutical problems in the first canto
    of Dante's Inferno.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MODERN HISTORY

    Seminar on Southern Europe (with special relation to the
    question of national identity)

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    European Studies Centre (St Antony's College), 70 Woodstock
    Road.

    PROFESSOR I. POGGIOLINI, Pavia

    18 Jan.: ` "We have made Italy, now we
    must make Italians": Italian history and the search for
    a national identity.'

    R. CLOGG

    25 Jan.: `Identity and antiquity in Greece.'

    H. MARTINS

    1 Feb.: `Portugal and the Luso-Afro Brazilian
    world.'

    DR M. URQUITO, University of the Basque Country

    8 Feb.: `The unsuccessful construction of
    Spanish national identity and the birth of regional
    identities (1808–1998).'

    DR JAVIER DIAZ NOCI

    15 Feb.: `Reflections on Basque identity.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Lecture

    DR C. JANSEN, Konstanz, will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 25
    January, in the European Studies Centre (St Antony's College),
    70 Woodstock Road.

    Conveners: A.J. Nicholls, B.Phil., MA, Special
    Lecturer in Modern History, and H.J.O. Pogge von Strandmann, MA,
    D.Phil., Professor of Modern History.

    Subject: `The radical deputies of the Paulskirche and
    German politics after the defeat of the revolution,
    1849–67.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Seminar in Modern European Jewish History

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in
    the European Studies Centre (St Antony's College), 70 Woodstock
    Road.

    Convener: D. Rechter (Ph.D. Jerusalem), Research
    Fellow, St Antony's College.

    Z. GITELMAN, Michigan

    21 Jan.: `Internationalism, patriotism, and
    disillusion: Soviet Jewish veterans remember World War
    Two.'

    C. CLARK, Cambridge

    28 Jan.: `The German state and Jewish rights,
    1871–1918.'

    L. WEITZMAN, George Mason University

    4 Feb.: `Women in the Holocaust.'

    T. ENDELMAN, Michigan

    11 Feb.: `Jewish converts to Christianity in
    modern Europe—inside or outside the historiographical
    fold?'

    P. WEINDLING, Oxford Brookes

    18 Feb.: `Sickness, survival, and medical
    genocide during the Holocaust: the significance of
    survivors' testimonies.'

    A. POLONSKY, Brandeis

    15 Feb.: `Compiling an anthology of
    Polish–Jewish writing since 1945: the dilemma of the
    survivor.'

    L. KOCHAN

    4 Mar.: `Men of property and Jewish
    emancipation in Europe, 1780–1850.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    National Socialism and the sciences in the Third Reich

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    European Studies Centre (St Antony's College), 70 Woodstock Road.

    Conveners: M. Szöllösi-Janze, D.Phil.,
    Stifterverband Visiting Fellow, St Antony's College, and A.J.
    Nicholls, B.Phil., MA, Special Lecturer in Modern History.

    DR S. PALETSCHEK, Tübingen (preceded by an introduction by
    DR SZÖLLÖSI-JANZE)

    22 Jan.: `The invention of "Humboldt"
    and National Socialism. The idea of the German university
    and the impact of National Socialism, 1920–60.'

    DR M. RÖSSLER, UNESCO, Paris

    29 Jan.: `Geography and area planning during
    National Socialism.'

    PROFESSOR H. TRISCHLER, Deutsches Museum, Munich

    5 Feb.: `Small science or big science?
    Aeronautical research in Nazi Germany.'

    DR L. MARSCHALL, Munich

    12 Feb.: `Consequences of the politics of
    autarky: the case of biotechnology.'

    DR C.-R. PRÜLL, Freiburg

    19 Feb.: `Pathology and politics in the
    metropolis, 1900–45: London, Berlin, and the Third
    Reich.'

    DR U. DEICHMANN, Cologne

    26 Feb.: `The expulsion of Jewish chemists and
    biochemists from German academia, 1933–9, and their
    correspondence with German colleagues afte 1945: the
    impossibilty of "normalisation"?'

    DR S. KÜHL, Magdeburg

    5 Mar.: `Science and the killing of the
    mentally handicapped in Nazi Germany. The relationship
    between eugenics and the so-called "euthanasia
    action".'

    DR J. REINDL, Munich

    12 Mar.: `Oskar Vogt, Julius Hallervorden,
    Nicolai Timoféeff-Ressovsky: three biomedical
    scientists at the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute for Brain
    Research at Berlin–Buch during the Third Reich.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MODERN HISTORY, MEDIEVAL AND MODERN
    LANGUAGES

    European Humanities Research Centre

    Seminar on the History of the Book 1450–1800

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in
    the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R.G. Lewis, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, and I.W.F. Maclean, MA,
    D.Phil., Professor of Renaissance Studies.

    DR S. TYACKE, Public Records Office

    22 Jan.: `Maps from manuscript to print.'

    PROFESSOR C. FAHY, University College, London

    29 Jan.: `The publication of two Renaissance
    masterpieces: Castiglione's Il libro del
    cortegiano
    and Ariosto's Orlando
    furioso
    .'

    DR A. ARMSTRONG, Manchester

    5 Feb.: `Jean Lemaire de Belge's "Concorde
    des deux Langages": changing manifestations of literary
    self-consciousness in manuscript and print.'

    DR H. WATANABE-O'KELLY

    12 Feb.: `The library of the Electors of
    Saxony, 1570–1630.'

    DR V. GILLESPIE

    19 Feb.: `The Book and the Brotherhood:
    reflections on the lost library of Syon Abbey.'

    DR C. GRIFFIN

    26 Feb.: `Sixteenth-century printing workers in
    Spain: evidence from the Inquisitional archives of their
    professional and private lives.'

    DR A. HEGARTY

    5 Mar.: `Books and reading in early
    seventeenth-century Salamanca, with special reference to the
    diary of Girolamo da Sommaia (1603–7).'

    PROFESSOR D. MCKENZIE and DR J. RAVEN

    12 Mar.: `The economics of the London book
    trades in the later sixteenth and the seventeenth
    centuries.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

    Seminar in Economic and Social History

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Convener: C.H. Feinstein, MA, Chichele Professor of
    Economic History.

    S. ENGERMAN, Rochester

    20 Jan.: `Climate and institutions. North and
    South America since the colonial period.'

    A. WRIGLEY

    27 Jan.
    : `Attempting to understand the interaction of
    economic and demographic variables in early modern England:
    what has changed in the last thirty years.'

    P. JOHNSON, LSE

    3 Feb.: `Does corporate structure affect
    corporate performance? The case of financial services in
    Victorian England.'

    R. SMITH and J. OEPPEN, Cambridge

    10 Feb.: `Mortality levels among British
    élites and non-élites
    c.1550–1900: trends and explanations.'

    P. O'BRIEN, London

    17 Feb.: `Singularity and significance of the
    English fiscal state 1688–1815.'

    N. VON TUNZELMAN, Sussex

    24 Feb.: `Technology production, technology
    use, and the evolution of skills.'

    P. HUDSON

    3 Mar.: `Micro history meets macro history.'

    N. CRAFTS, LSE

    10 Mar.: `Productivity growth during the first
    Industrial Revolution: inferences from the pattern of
    British external trade.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MUSIC

    The composer speaks

    The following public lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in the Holywell Music Room.

    The series will continue with lectures to be given by JAMES
    MACMILLAN on 17 February, and MIKE ROBERTS on 10 March.

    ROBERT SAXTON

    20 Jan.: `Return? Journey? Circles of Light and
    beyond.'

    STEPHEN MONTAGUE

    10 Feb.: `Stephen Montague's String Quartet no.
    1, in memoriam Barry Anderson and Tomasz
    Sikorski, for string quartet and electronics: an illustrated
    analysis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Topics in Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Egyptology

    The following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room
    1, the Oriental Institute.

    Conveners: John Baines, Stephanie Dalley.

    R. MOOREY

    2 Feb.: `Popular imagery in Babylonia
    c.2150–1750 BC.'

    W. HOROWITZ, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    9 Feb.: `Cuneiform from the Land of Israel and
    Hazor.'

    C. RIGGS

    16 Feb.: `The Egyptian funerary tradition at
    Deir el-Bahri in the third century AD.'

    J. TAIT, University College, London

    23 Feb.: `Why did anyone bother to write
    Demotic literature?'

    L. SASSMANNSHAUSEN, Tübingen

    2 Mar.: `Kings and ditch-diggers: the Middle
    Babylonian letter archives from Nippur.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Seminar on Jewish history and literature in the Graeco-Roman
    period

    The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    Wolfson College.

    Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Jewish Studies.

    PROFESSOR S. FREYNE, Trinity College, Dublin

    19 Jan.: `Galileans and Phoenicians.'

    DR V. REBRIK, Tübingen

    26 Jan.: `Sources of the excursus about the
    Jews (Tacitus, Historiae V).'

    PROFESSOR Y. ELBAUM, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    2 Feb.: `The attitude to gentiles in Seder
    Eliahu.'

    PROFESSOR S. BENIN, Memphis

    9 Feb.: `Holy fools? Jewish and Christian
    approaches to martyrdom in late antiquity.'

    PROFESSOR J. SCHWARTZ, Bar Ilan University

    16 Feb.: `Material culture and Rabbinic
    literature.'

    DR G. BOHAK, Tel Aviv

    23 Feb.: `Was Homer Jewish? Ethnicity and
    culture in the Graeco-Roman world.'

    PROFESSOR F. MILLAR

    2 Mar.: `Christians, Jews, and others in late
    Roman Palestine.'

    DR S. WILSON, Carleton University

    9 Mar.: `Defectors and apostates in late
    antique Judaism.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Theoretical Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in
    the Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

    Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham Professor of
    Physics.

    DR N. WILKIN, Birmingham

    22 Jan.: `A quantum liquid of vortices?'

    PROFESSOR J. SILK

    5 Feb.: `Speculations about galaxy
    formation.'

    DR D. KHMELNITSKII, Cambridge

    19 Feb.: `From classical to quantum
    kinetics.'

    DR N. FERGUSON

    5 Mar.: `Mathematical biology from the
    perspective of a theoretical physicist: mad cows, disease
    evolution, and HIV.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: colloquia

    Unless otherwise indicated, the following colloquia will be held
    at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Main Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic
    Chemistry Laboratory.

    An Inorganic Discussion Day, with presentations by some of the
    younger research associates in the Inorganic Chemistry
    Laboratory, will be held on Monday, 8 March, 3–6 p.m.

    Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic
    Chemistry.

    DR P. DAY, Manchester

    18 Jan.: `Application of accelerator mass
    spectrometry to biological and environmental chemistry.'

    PROFESSOR G.J. PIELAK, North Carolina

    25 Jan.: `Ferricytochrome c. The
    effects of sugar on its stability, structure, and
    dynamics.'

    DR N. KALTSOYANNIS, University College, London

    1 Feb.: `Computational adventures in
    d and f element chemistry.'

    DR P. BETON, Nottingham

    8 Feb.: `Adsorption and manipulation of
    fullerenes on silicon surfaces.'

    PROFESSOR P. DAY

    15 Feb.: `The molecular chemistry of magnets
    and superconductors.' (Royal Society Bakerian
    Lecture
    )

    PROFESSOR H. SCHUMANN, Berlin

    Wed. 17 Feb., 12 noon: to be announced.

    DR J. ERRINGTON, Newcastle upon Tyne

    22 Feb.: `Synthetic challenges in
    polyoxometalate and metal alkoxide chemistry.'

    PROFESSOR C. REED, California, Riverside

    1 Mar.: `Super anions and superacids.'

    PROFESSOR T. MARDER, Durham

    15 Mar.: `Well-defined conjugated rigid-rods as
    multifunctional materials.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory

    The following departmental lectures will be given at 2.15 p.m.
    on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical
    Chemistry Laboratory.

    DR C. BAIN
    25 Jan.: `The dynamics of wet interfaces.'

    PROFESSOR C. PARMENTER, Indiana

    8 Feb.: `Collisional and collision-free energy
    flow in molecules with internal rotation.'

    PROFESSOR D. FRENKEL, FOM Amsterdam

    1 Mar.: `Condensation and
    crystallisation—computer simulation of rare events.'
    (RSC Bourke Lecture)

    PROFESSOR T. MASON, Coventry

    8 Mar.: `Sonochemistry: a review with
    demonstrations.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Hinshelwood Lectures

    Exploring nature by nuclear magnetic resonance

    PROFESSOR DR RICHARD R. ERNST, Nobel Laureate, of ETH
    Zürich, will deliver the Hinshelwood Lectures at 11.15 a.m.
    on the following Tuesdays and Thursdays in the Physical and
    Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: J.P. Simons, MA, Dr Lee's Professor of
    Chemistry.

    9 Feb.: `The fascinating applications of NMR in
    chemistry, biology, and medicine, and its historical
    development.'

    11 Feb.: `The NMR approach to molecular structure
    and dynamics.'

    16 Feb.: `Biomolecular dynamics explored by
    NMR.'

    18 Feb.: `The NMR approach for investigating the
    structure of solids.'

    23 Feb.: `Exploration and disorder in solid
    polymers.'

    25 Feb.: `Hydrogen dynamics investigated by NMR.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    The following research seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on
    Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy
    and Genetics.

    Convener: Professor K.E. Davies.

    PROFESSOR G. LONG, Edinburgh

    22 Jan.: `Computer modelling of GnRH and
    magnocellular neurones.'

    DR J. TINSLEY

    29 Jan.: `Utrophin: the Full Monty.'

    PROFESSOR S. HILLIER, Edinburgh

    5 Feb.: `Paracrine regulation of follicular
    development and ovulation.' (Jenkinson
    Seminar
    )

    DR W. JAMES

    12 Feb.: `Aptamers: the in vitro
    evolution of new ligands for research and therapy.'

    DR Y. BOYD, MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell

    19 Feb.: `Mouse models for x-linked disorders:
    new findings from old mutants.'

    DR P. MATTHEWS

    26 Feb.: `What is the meaning of functional
    neuroanatomy mapped by FMRI?'

    DR S. SHIRAZI-BEECHEY, Liverpool

    5 Mar.: `Functional and genetic control of
    transporter expression in epithelia.'

    DR R. HILL, Edinburgh

    12 Mar.: `The role of hedgehog and bagpipe in
    skeletogenesis.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Cognitive Science Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in
    Room D135, the Department of Experimental Psychology.

    PROFESSOR S. IVERSEN

    21 Jan.: `Frontal lobe function.'

    DR K. NOBRE

    28 Jan.: `Directing our attention in four
    dimensions.'

    PROFESSOR A. COWEY

    4 Feb.: `Do monkeys have blind insight?'

    PROFESSOR E. ROLLS

    11 Feb.: `How vision might work.'

    PROFESSOR L. WEISKRANTZ

    18 Feb.: `Pupil employment and di-vision of
    labour. Beta late than never.'

    PROFESSOR R. PASSINGHAM

    25 Feb.: `Imaging and motor learning in the
    human spirit.'

    PROFESSOR N. RAWLINS

    4 Mar.: `How animal experiments help understand
    the neural basis of pain in humans.'

    DR P. AZZOPARDI

    11 Mar.: `Blind sight and visual awareness.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SOCIAL SCIENCES

    Senior Research Seminar in American Politics

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Chester Room, Nuffield College.

    Conveners: C.O. Jones, MA, Olin Professor of American
    Government, and B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American
    Government.

    P.J. MARTIN

    26 Jan.: `Strategy and outcome in judicial
    decision-making: three cases from the Burger Court.'

    DR A.D. SHEINGATE

    9 Feb.: `The politics of place in
    American political development.'

    PROFESSOR W.J.M. CLAGGETT, Florida State

    23 Feb.: `Recruitment and political
    participation: the causal nexus.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    THEOLOGY

    Interdisciplinary seminars in the study of religions

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Blue Boar Seminar Room, Christ Church.

    Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor
    of Divinity, and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions,
    Mansfield College and Westminster College.

    PROFESSOR T. HOPKINS, Oxford Centre for Vaishnava Studies and
    Franklin and Marshall College, USA

    9 Feb.: `Negotiating religious identity: some
    Indian examples.'

    DR S. HAMILTON, King's College, London

    23 Feb.: `To be or not to be? That is
    not the question: the issue and nature of
    identity in early Buddhism.'

    DR S. GILLIAT-RAY, University of Exeter

    9 Mar.: `Religious identity and young Muslims.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Ian Ramsey Centre

    Seminars in science and theology

    The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in
    the Hood Room, St Cross College.

    PROFESSOR A. LYNE, University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank

    28 Jan.: `Cosmology and life in the
    universe.'

    PROFESSOR R. STANNARD, Open University

    11 Feb.: `Cosmology and theology.'

    PROFESSOR J. WEBSTER

    25 Feb.: `Theology and cosmology: some
    reflections.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    STANDING COMMITTEE FOR THE M.ST. IN
    WOMEN'S STUDIES


    Annual Visiting Lecture in Women's
    Studies

    PROFESSOR ANN PELLEGRINI, Harvard, will deliver the Annual
    Visiting Lecture in Women's Studies at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 19
    January, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Passionate attachments out of order:
    meditations on Judy Garland's body.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INTER-FACULTY SEMINAR

    Restoration to Reform, 1660–1832: British political,
    literary, intellectual, and social history

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Upper Common Room, St Anne's College. Details of the 22 February
    meeting will be announced later.

    Conveners: Dr R. Ballaster, Professor M. Butler, Dr
    F. Dabhoiwala, Dr C. Gerrard, Dr T. Keymer, Professor R.
    Lonsdale, Dr J. Raven, and Dr I. Rivers.

    DR J. MULLAN, University College, London

    25 Jan.: `Writing the history of eighteenth-
    century literature.'

    DR N. GROOM, University of Exeter

    8 Feb.: `Forgery and authenticity: the romantic
    posterity of Thomas Chatterton.'

    PROFESSOR I. GRUNDY, Alberta

    8 Mar.: ` "Destined for something
    higher"? Potential and achievement in Lady Mary Wortley
    Montagu.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DONALD BADEN-POWELL QUATERNARY RESEARCH
    CENTRE

    The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    common room of the centre (60 Banbury Road).

    N. GALANIDOU, Cambridge

    21 Jan.: `How space was used in the
    Palaeolithic and Mesolithic: in search of a new
    approach.'

    M. REED, Reading

    28 Jan.: `Computer modelling of mammoth
    extinction in North America.'

    M. LENEY

    4 Feb.: to be announced.

    F. WENBAN-SMITH, Southampton

    11 Feb.: `Recent palaeolithic research at the
    Community School site, Swanscombe.'

    M. WHITE, Cambridge

    18 Feb.: `Island Britain: an archaeological
    perspective from the Middle Pleistocene.'

    I. WATTS, London

    25 Feb.: `Skin changing: ritual performance in
    the Middle Stone Age.'

    J. MCNABB, Liverpool

    4 Mar.: `Recent work on the Early Stone Age in
    South Africa.'

    D. DE LOECKER, London

    11 Mar.: ` "A veil of stones": on the
    interpretation of early Middle Palaeolithic scatters and
    patches at Maastricht–Belvédère
    (Netherlands).'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BODLEIAN LIBRARY

    Oxford Seminars in Cartography

    The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in
    the School of Geography.

    D. DORLING, Bristol

    18 Feb.: `Mapping with feeling: the human
    cartography of people's lives.'

    R. MITCHELL, Public Record Office

    6 May: `Contention the mother of invention:
    early maps of England in the Public Records Office.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    COMPUTING LABORATORY


    Strachey Lecture

    MARTYN THOMAS will deliver a Strachey Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 19 January, in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing
    Laboratory.

    Subject: `The praxis of software engineering.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

    Oxford Architectural History Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Mondays in
    Rewley House.

    Conveners: M.R. Airs, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
    Conservation and the Historic Environment, and G. Tyack, MA,
    M.Litt., Fellow, Kellogg College, and Director, Stanford
    University in Oxford.

    J. AYRES

    1 Feb.: `Building the Georgian city.'

    J. RHODES

    8 Mar.: `Shaw House, Newbury.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Old Library, All Souls College.

    Convener: R.G. Hood, MA, Professor of Criminology and
    Director of the Centre.

    S. SHUTE, Birmingham

    27 Jan.: `Unduly lenient sentences: who passes
    them?'

    DR P. YOUNG, Edinburgh

    10 Feb.: `Auto punishments: the fine and the
    prison.'

    PROFESSOR A. BOTTOMS, Cambridge

    24 Feb.: `Criminology and the problem of
    order.'

    PROFESSOR R. ERICSON, British Columbia

    10 Mar.: `The policing of risk.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

    The following research seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
    in Lecture Room 1, the Department of Educational Studies. Details
    of the 22 February seminar will be announced later.

    PROFESSOR G. GRACE, Institute of Education, University of London

    18 Jan.: `Realising the mission: Catholic
    approaches to school effectiveness.'

    PROFESSOR D. HALPIN, Goldsmiths' College, London

    25 Jan.: `Developing a Third Way? Tackling
    disadvantage through Labour's Education Action Zones.'

    PROFESSOR S. TOMLINSON, Goldsmiths' College, London

    1 Feb.: `Race and special education.'

    DR G. BROOKS, NFER

    15 Feb.: `The NFER evaluations of the Basic
    Skills Agency's Family Literacy Demonstration
    Programmes.'

    DR F. FLETCHER-CAMPBELL, NFER

    1 Mar.: `Whole school target setting:
    application to pupils with special educational needs.'

    DR S. BRITSCH, Purdue

    8 Mar.: `Writing science: the development of
    teacher knowledge in the integrated curriculum.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEPARTMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Summer School on Connectionist Modelling

    This two-week residential Summer School will be held between 18
    and 30 July. The course is aimed primarily at researchers who
    wish to exploit neural network models in their teaching and/or
    research, and it will provide a general introduction to
    connectionist modelling, biologically plausible neural networks,
    and brain function, through lectures and exercises on personal
    computers (Macintoshes and PCs). The course is interdisciplinary
    in content, though many of the illustrative examples are taken
    from cognitive and developmental psychology, and cognitive
    neuroscience. The instructors with primary responsibility for
    teaching the course are Kim Plunkett and Edmund Rolls.

    The cost of participation, excluding travel and meal costs,is
    £950. Some partial bursaries are available for graduate
    students. Further details may be found on the Internet at
    http://www-cogsci.psych.ox.ac.uk/summer-school/.

    Those interested in attending the Summer School are asked to send
    a one-page summary of their background, and reasons for wishing
    to attend, by 31 January, to Mrs Sue King, Department of
    Experimental Psychology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD
    (telephone: Oxford (2)71353, e-mail:
    susan.king@psy.oxford.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH
    STUDIES

    Public Lectures

    The following public lectures will be given at 8.30 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in Yarnton Manor.

    A shuttle service will be provided by the OCHJS minibus, leaving
    the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, at 7.45 p.m., and departing from
    Yarnton Manor at 10 p.m.

    PROFESSOR D. CESARANI, Director, Wiener Library

    20 Jan.: `Arthur Koestler.' (David
    Patterson Lecture Series
    )

    PROFESSOR T. ENDELMAN, Michigan

    27 Jan.: `Gender and radical assimilation in
    modern Jewish history.' (David Patterson Lecture
    Series
    )

    PROFESSOR M. IDEL, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    3 Feb.: `Golem: some comparative proposals.'
    (Louis Jacobs Lectures: `Golem—new
    perspectives'
    )

    10 Feb.: `Golem: some early nineteenth-century
    treatments.' (Louis Jacobs Lectures: `Golem—new
    perspectives'
    )

    DR N. FERGUSON

    17 Feb.: `The myth of the Rothschilds.'
    (David Patterson Lecture Series)

    DR B. WASSERSTEIN

    24 Feb.: `Britain and the Jews of Europe
    1939–45: intelligence aspects.' (To mark the
    publication of a new edition of
    cBritain and Jews of
    Europe 1939–45\) (David Patterson Lecture
    Series
    )

    DR D. STONE

    3 Mar.: `Anthony Mario Ludovici and the
    extremes of Englishness.' (David Patterson Lecture
    Series
    )

    DR J. GOLDSTEIN, West Georgia College and Harvard University

    10 Mar.: `The Republic of China and Israel,
    1911–99.' (David Patterson Lecture Series)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RESEARCH
    CENTRE

    Intellectual property in the new millennium

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Latner Room, St Peter's College.

    Conveners: D. Vaver, MA, Reuters Professor of
    Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law and Director
    of the Centre, and C.A. Greenhalgh, MA, Reader in Economics and
    Research Director of the Centre.

    PROFESSOR VAVER

    19 Jan.: `Intellectual property: where's the
    world going?'

    DR M. SPENCE

    2 Feb.: `European intellectual property
    harmonisation: the recent deluge.'

    PROFESSOR D. BOSWORTH, UMIST, and DELI YANG, UMIST

    9 Feb.: `Intellectual property law in China:
    how much is there and how does it affect innovation?'

    PROFESSOR J.W. HARRIS

    16 Feb.: `Patenting cell lines—analysing
    John Moore's spleen.'

    DR R. PITKETHLY

    23 Feb.: `The European patent system and
    innovation: help, hindrance, or irrelevance?'

    G. DUTFIELD

    2 Mar.: `The public and private domains:
    intellectual property rights in traditional ecological
    knowledge.'

    DR GREENHALGH

    9 Mar.: `Protecting intellectual property:
    Anglo/American trade mark and patenting practices of
    selected British companies.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES, AND
    TRANSNATIONAL COMMUNITIES PROJECT, THE ESRC

    History, culture, and politics of the Islamic world: the
    historical roots of Islamic transnationalism

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

    Conveners: Dr F.A. Nizami and Dr J. Piscatori.

    DR D. MORGAN, SOAS, London

    20 Jan.: `Cross-cultural contacts under the
    Mongol Empire.'

    PROFESSOR B. FRAGNER, Bamberg

    27 Jan.: `The Persian language area as a
    cultural region in history.'

    PROFESSOR D. KING, Frankfurt

    3 Feb.: `Astronomical instruments and ideas
    across all boundaries.'

    PROFESSOR I. LAPIDUS, Berkeley

    10 Feb.: `Between universalism and
    particularism: the historical bases of Muslim
    transnationalism.'

    DR C. HILLENBRAND, Edinburgh

    17 Feb.: `Travels in divers places with divers
    persons: some medieval wayfarers.'

    PROFESSOR W. HALLAQ, McGill

    24 Feb.: `Taqlid and the dynamics of law:
    historical, doctrinal, and regional themes.'

    DR D. ABULAFIA, Cambridge

    3 Mar.: `The "servitude" of Muslims
    and Jews in medieval Europe.'

    DR M. KUNT, Cambridge

    10 Mar.: `Turks and Muslims in Ottoman polity
    and society.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MAISON FRANÇAISE

    The following meetings will be held this term at the Maison
    Française. For details of this term's film-showings at the
    Maison Française see `Notices' above.

    Special seminar

    A. GUNNY, Liverpool, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday,
    19 January, in the Middle East Centre, St Antony's College.

    Subject: `European travellers to the Middle East in
    the nineteenth century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Seminar in modern French history and politics

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Maison Française.

    O. WHITE

    21 Jan.: `Going native in Timbuctoo.'

    R. GILDEA

    28 Jan.: `Terror and talks in occupied France:
    the fifty hostages of Nantes–Chateaubriant, 1941.'

    S. HAZAREESINGH

    4 Feb.: `A republican in Geneva: Jules Barni
    and the transformation of French republicanism.'

    C. LABORDE, King's College, London

    11 Feb.: `The culture(s) of the Republic:
    French debates on Anglo-American multiculturalism.'

    N. MCMASTER, East Anglia

    18 Feb.: `Maurice Papon and the Paris massacre
    of 17 October 1961.'

    K. NABULSI

    25 Feb.: `The ley-lines of late eighteenth-
    century republican war: Pasquale Paoli and Thaddeus
    Kosciuszko in France.'

    A. GOSCHA, Universié de Paris VII

    4 Mar.: `Ruptures et continuités
    idéologiques en Indochine, 1900–40.'

    S. AUDOIN-ROUZEAU, Université de Picardie Jules-Verne

    11 Mar.: `Les Allemands en France 1870–1
    et leur représentation chez les Français.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    French literature from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Okinaga Room, Wadham College. The series will continue in Trinity
    Term.

    V. WORTH, King's College, London

    21 Jan.: ` "La parole est moitié
    à celui qui écoute": listening to the
    Racinian confident(e).'

    W. WILLIAMS

    4 Feb.: `Racine's monsters.'

    G. FORESTIER, Paris IV

    18 Feb.: `Editer Racine: présentation de
    la nouvelle édition Pléiade.'

    C. BIET, Paris X

    4 Mar.: `Jouer Racine.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Science and the new century: Britain, France, and
    Germany c. 1900

    The following seminars in the research programme `Histoire des
    connaissances: sciences, techniques, enseignements' will be held
    at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History of Science Seminar Room,
    the Modern History Faculty.

    N. JAS, European University Institute, Florence

    28 Jan.: `The new historiography of science and
    technology and the new century: which perspectives?'

    11 Feb.: `Virtues of science as virtues of state:
    the 1888 French law on fertiliser fraud suppression and its
    influence throughout Europe.'

    H. DENHAM

    25 Feb.: `Advent of a "subersive
    science"? Ecology as a concept, practice, and proto-
    discipline, 1890–1914.'

    J. SEGAL, Université de Lyon II, Centre Pierre Léon

    11 Mar.: `Marjan von Smoluchowski
    (1872–1917) and the origins of information theory in
    physics—the tribulations of a Polish physicist in
    Europe.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    European Movement lecture

    H.E. M. DANIEL BERNARD, French Ambassador, will lecture at 8 p.m.
    on Tuesday, 23 March, in the Maison Française.

    Subject: `The French vision of Europe.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Other meetings

    The following meetings will be held as shown. Unless otherwise
    indicated, the meetings will be held in the Maison
    Française, from which further information may be obtained
    (telephone: Oxford (2)74220).


    Fri. 15 Jan.–Sun. 17 Jan.: Franco-British
    Study Day, `Tribu, parentèle et État en pays
    d'Islam.'

    Sat. 13 Feb., 9 a.m.–8 p.m.: Franco-British
    Study Day: `Koyré et au-delà'.

    Sat. 13 Mar., Sun. 14 Mar., 10 a.m.–6 p.m.:
    Research Programme `Histoire et théorie des arts':
    colloquium, `Visual images: verbal images: other images.'

    Sat. 13 Mar., 10 a.m. –5 p.m., St Hugh's
    College
    : Translation Research in Oxford meeting, `Don
    Quichotte et ses traducteurs' (telephone for further
    information: Edith McMorran, (2)74996, or Sue Robinson,
    (2)74222).

    Mon. 15 Mar., 10 a.m.–4 p.m.: colloquium,
    `Victor Hugo.'

    Fri. 19 Mar., 10 a.m.–4 p.m.: Association for
    the Study of Modern and Contemporary France meeting,
    `Cuisine et politique en France'.

    Sat. 20 Mar., 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m.: Franco-British
    Study Day, `Changing French political systems.'

    Thur. 25 Mar., 7.30 p.m.: Oxford–Grenoble
    Association open meeting.

    Sat. 27 Mar., 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m.: Study Day,
    `Virginia Woolf and the body.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

    DR KOICHI NAKANO

    22 Jan.: `The spoils of bureaucratic
    regulation: amakudari in Japan's
    "liberalised" telecom sector.'

    DR SATOSHI KURIBAYASHI, Bunkyo University, Kanagawa

    29 Jan.: `The limits of "efficiency"
    in Japan and Asia.'

    MR OMI HATASHIN, Lancaster

    5 Feb.: `Japanese foreign policy towards
    international peace making efforts in Cambodia.'

    DR B. POWELL

    12 Feb.: `Writing history for the Japanese
    stage—do equestrians do it best?' (Illustrated by
    video excerpts from Kinoshita Junji's
    Requiem on the Great
    Meridian)

    DR J. GILSON, Birmingham

    19 Feb.: `Japan's pragmatic role in ASEM.'

    PROFESSOR MIWAO MATSUMOTO, Tokyo

    26 Feb.: `Ships and chips: pitfalls of self-
    reliant development in Japanese war technologies.'

    PROFESSOR TAKAO MATSUMURA, Keio University, Tokyo

    5 Mar.: `Unit 731 and Japanese germ warfare in
    China, 1937–45.'

    DR A. ROY, Leeds

    12 Mar.: `Turbulence and change: the Japanese
    financial sector in the UK.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Contemporary South Asia Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in
    Queen Elizabeth House. The 4 February seminar will be held in the
    Library Wing Seminar Room; all other seminars will be held in the
    Blackhall Seminar Room.

    Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu, Dr Judith Heyer, and
    Professor Barbara Harriss-White.

    YUNAS SAMAD, University of Bradford

    21 Jan.: `Nuclear Pakistan and the emergence of
    a peace movement.'

    DINESH PRATAP, DAV College, Dehradun and Commonwealth Visiting
    Fellow, QEH

    28 Jan.: `Sustainable management of common
    property resources: a case of forests in the Himalayas.'

    U. VINDHYA, Andhra University and Visiting Fellow, QEH

    4 Feb.: `Comrades and lovers: questions of
    revolutionary identity and sexuality in the contemporary
    radical left movement in Andhra Pradesh (Co-convened
    with the Centre for Cross Cultural Research on Women
    ).'

    K. RAVI RAMAN, Kerala Agricultural University and Visiting
    Fellow, QEH

    11 Feb.: `Caste and gender: plantation
    work-world in south-west Asia, c. 1850--
    1950.'

    M.S.S. PANDIAN, Madras Institute of Development Studies and
    Visiting Fellow, QEH

    18 Feb.: `Resisting modernity: two stories.'

    MARTIN GREELEY, Institute of Development Studies, Sussex
    University

    25 Feb.: `Villages revisited: poverty reduction
    and growth over 20 years.'

    BELA BHATIA, Cambridge

    4 Mar.: `Researching a revolutionary movement:
    the Naxalite movement in Central Bihar.'

    GAUTAM MODY, Vice-President, Kamani Employees Union, Mumbai

    11 Mar.: `Questions of governance in Indian
    manufacturing firms.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Economic Development Seminar

    The following seminars will take place on Thursdays in the
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. The 28 January
    seminar will begin at 4.30 p.m.; other seminars will begin at 5
    p.m.

    Details of the 11 February seminar will be announced later.

    T. BESLEY, LSE

    21 Jan.: `Land reform, poverty reduction, and
    growth: evidence from India.'

    J. GUNNING

    28 Jan.: `IMF, structural adjustment, and
    poverty—an evaluation.'

    S. BHALOTRA

    4 Feb.: `Why children work in rural
    Pakistan.'

    J. KNIGHT

    18 Feb.: `Old and new poverty in China.'

    H. WHITE, Sussex

    25 Feb.: `A cause without a rebel: the World
    Bank's poverty agenda.'

    A. SAITH, LSE

    4 Mar.: to be announced.

    M. LIPTON, Sussex

    11 Mar.: `The effect of fertility on poverty.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on
    Women

    Researching gender, conflict, and violence

    Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held
    at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
    Elizabeth House.

    Conveners: Dr Cathie Lloyd and Dr Kate Fisher.

    PROFESSOR F. STEWART

    21 Jan.: `Social and economic consequences of
    conflict: a gender perspective on the results of the QEH
    study.'

    DR C. HOYLE

    28 Jan.: `Negotiating domestic violence.'

    DR U. VINDHYA, Andhra University

    4 Feb.: `Comrades and lovers: questions of
    revolution and sexuality in the contemporary radical left
    movement in Andhra Pradesh.' (Joint meeting with the
    Contemporary South Asia Seminar
    )

    DR C. HUMPHREYS, Warwick

    11 Feb.: `Possibilities and problems:
    Australian perspectives on the use of third party
    applications for protection orders in cases of domestic
    violence.'

    DR K. FISHER, Cambridge

    18 Feb.: ` "The men liked to keep you
    down": conflict and contraception in Britain
    1900–50.'

    DR J. EADE, Roehampton Institute, and DR T. ALLEN, LSE

    25 Feb.: `Ethnicity in nature or the nature of
    ethnicity.'

    A. FOSTER

    4 Mar.: `Perceptions of domestic violence in
    Tunisia: responses from health service providers, women's
    organisations, and students.'

    DR L. RADFORD, Roehampton Institute

    11 Mar.: `Mothering in the context of domestic
    violence.'

    DR S. CONDON, INED (National Institute for Demographic Studies),
    and D. FOUGEYROULLAS, Université Paris–Dauphine

    Date and venue to be announced: `Research on
    violence against women in France.' (In collaboration
    with the Maison Française
    )

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

    Interdepartmental Finance Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in
    the Seminar Room, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Conveners: A. Ljungqvist (Said Business School), Hyun
    Shin (Economics), and P. Willmott (Mathematics).

    Enquiries should be directed to Elaine Durham, Said Business
    School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford
    (2)88650, e-mail: elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

    S. RADY, Stanford

    22 Jan.: `Strategic trading and learning about
    liquidity.'

    J. MAHRT-SMITH, London Business School

    29 Jan.: `R. & D. in stand-alone firms and
    conglomerate divisions.'

    H. SERVAES, London Business School

    5 Feb.: `Is corporate diversification
    beneficial in emerging markets?'

    F. EDWARDS, Columbia Business School

    12 Feb.
    : `Hedge funds: implications of the LTCM
    collapse.'

    L. GERMAIN, London Business School

    19 Feb.: `The speed of learning in financial
    markets.'

    R.D. HUANG, Vanderbilt

    26 Feb.: `Tick size, bid–ask spread, and
    market structure.'

    A. FAURE-GRIMAUD, LSE

    5 Mar.: to be announced.

    J. DEWYNNE

    12 Mar.: `Volatility, implied volatility, and
    volatility surfaces.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES


    Programme in Comparative Media Law and
    Policy

    Reactions to the global, media shifts and policy responses

    The following seminars, arranged in conjunction with the Reuter
    Foundation Programme, will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

    PROFESSOR J. GRAY, LSE

    22 Jan.: `How global are global media?'

    S. KARLE, Dow Jones, New York

    29 Jan.: `Global reach to the business
    community, legal and competitive issues.'

    PROFESSOR K. TOMASELLI, Natal

    5 Feb.: `Global media versus national
    culture—the South African case.'

    N. SAKR, Centre for Media Freedom—Middle East and North
    Africa

    12 Feb.: `Middle East and North African policy
    responses to global media shifts.'

    R. BRUCE, Debevoise and Plimpton, London

    19 Feb.: `Global media regulation.'

    M. BOOTH, BSkyB

    26 Feb.: `Global competition in TV news: CNN,
    BBC, and Sky.'

    I. RITCHIE, Executive Director, MBC, London

    5 Mar.: `Global television: MBC, an Arabic
    language global TV satellite service.'

    R. STEWART, WorldSpace UK, London

    12 Mar.: `Global radio: the case of
    WorldSpace.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Seminar

    PROFESSOR MIKHAIL ALEXSANDROVICH FEDOTOV, Secretary, Union of
    Journalists of Russia, and UNESCO Chair on Copyright, Moscow,
    will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 January, in the Seminar
    Room, the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

    Subject: `Russian media law: approaches within an
    international setting.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF
    MEDICINE

    Medicine and culture before 1750

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in
    the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

    Convener: M.H. Pelling, MA status, M.Litt.,
    University Research Lecturer.

    M. SATCHELL

    18 Jan.: `Foundation and emergence: the genesis
    of the English leperhouses, c.1077--1200.'

    A. WEAR, Wellcome Unit, London

    25 Jan.: `The failure of the English Helmontian
    revolution in therapeutics.'

    L. KASSELL, Cambridge

    1 Feb.: ` "Some Red Powder and an Old
    Manuscript": alchemy and medicine from St Dunstan to
    Newton.'

    A. GOLDBLOOM, Wellcome Unit, London

    8 Feb.: `Samuel Hartlib, the Ephemerides, and
    lay medical knowledge, 1634--60.'

    C. CHAPMAN

    15 Feb.: `Murder as death; or the art of dying
    badly in late seventeenth-century England.'

    P. WALLIS

    22 Feb.: `Plague, practice, and polemic in
    later seventeenth-century London.'

    M. UNKOVSKAYA,

    1 Mar.: `Seventeenth-century Russian
    élite women and foreign doctors: the myth of the
    unseen body.'

    J. PHILIPS, London

    8 Mar.: `Allegories of the body: Bunyan,
    disease, and popular medicine.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ALL SOULS COLLEGE

    From the closed world to an infinite universe: Alexandre
    Koyré revisited

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

    PROFESSOR I. MACLEAN

    20 Jan.: `Renaissance concepts of infinity.'

    DR S. JOHNSTON

    27 Jan.: `Digges.'

    PROFESSOR N. JARDINE, Cambridge

    3 Feb.: `Kepler.'

    DR J. BENNETT

    10 Feb.: `Gilbert.'

    PROFESSOR S. GAUKROGER, Sydney

    17 Feb.: `Descartes.'

    DR S. HUTTON, Hertfordshire

    24 Feb.: `More.'

    S. MANDELBROTE, Cambridge

    3 Mar.: `Newton.'

    DR M.-R. ANTOGNAZZA, Aberdeen

    10 Mar.: `Leibniz.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Foreign Policy Studies Programme

    Masses on the move: migration and international politics

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Old Library, All Souls College.

    Conveners: Sir Julian Bullard and Professor Robert
    O'Neill, in collaboration with Dr M. Gibney, Refugee Studies
    Programme, Queen Elizabeth House.

    The pressures causing movement

    PROFESSOR R. COHEN, Warwick

    22 Jan.: `New forms, new sensitivities?'

    PROFESSOR G. GOODWIN-GILL

    29 Jan.: `Human rights: individuals and
    justice.'

    PROFESSOR J. WILLIAMSON, IMF

    5 Feb.: `Failing states and economic
    inequalities.'

    Responses

    I. KHAN, Head, Centre for Documentation and Research, UNHCR

    12 Feb.: `The United Nations: the work of the
    UN High Commissioner for Refugees.'

    PROFESSOR C. CLAPHAM, Lancaster

    19 Feb.: `The international politics of
    migration in Africa.'

    US embassy speaker (to be announced)

    26 Feb.: `The USA: a multi-role player.'

    H.E. THE HON ROY MACLAREN, High Commissioner for Canada

    5 Mar.: `Sparsely populated countries: Canada
    and immigration.'

    M. ELAND, the Home Office

    12 Mar.: `EU policy: dilemmas for Britain?'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BRASENOSE COLLEGE


    Brasenose Seminar in Hellenic Studies

    Literary aspects of Byzantine ecclesiastical texts

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Stockton Room, Brasenose College.

    PROFESSOR ALEXANDER ALEXAKIS, Columbia University


    27 Jan.

    : `Iconophile literature of the eighth century AD'.

    PROFESSOR MICHEL CACOUROS, École Pratique des Hautes
    Études, Sciences historiques et Philologiques, Sorbonne
    IV

    3 Feb.: `Scholarios, the last churchman of
    Byzantium, and philosophy.'

    PROFESSOR ATHANASIOS MARKOPOULOS, University of Crete


    10 Feb.

    : `Leo the Deacon, churchman and historian.'

    PROFESSOR LENNART RYDEN, University of Uppsala


    17 Feb.

    : `Literary qualities in Byzantine hagiography.'

    PROFESSOR ELIZABETH JEFFREYS

    24 Feb.: `Manganeios Prodromos' ecclesiastical
    writings.'

    PROFESSOR EVANGELOS CHRYSOS, University of Cyprus

    3 Mar.: `Acts of Ecumenical Councils as
    literary products.'

    PROFESSOR ALEXANDER ALEXAKIS, Columbia University

    10 Mar.: `The Versions of the Life of Leo of
    Catania.'

    PROFESSOR ROGER BAGNALL, Columbia University

    17 Mar.: `Monks and property; rhetoric, law,
    and patronage in the Apophthegmata Patrum and
    papyri.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE


    Corpus Christi Classical Seminar:
    Constructing Time

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College.

    DENIS FEENEY

    20 Jan.: `Synchronising Greece and Rome.'

    CHRISTOPHER BURNAND

    27 Jan.: `Playing with time: Cicero on Roman
    oratory.'

    RICHARD FOWLER

    3 Feb.: `Calibrating the Hellenistic.'

    LIN FOXHALL

    10 Feb.: `The running sands of time:
    archaeology and short-term time.'

    GILLIAN CLARK

    17 Feb.: `We live in Christian times.'

    ADRIAN GRATWICK

    24 Feb.: `Pliny, the obelisk, and Novius
    Facundus.'

    KATHERINE CLARKE

    3 Mar.: `Space, time, and place: Strabo's
    eternal triangle.'

    TESSA RAJAK

    10 Mar.: `Reckoning the end of days in post-
    Bibical Judaism.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture 1999

    PROFESSOR CLAUDE RAWSON, Department of English, Yale University,
    will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 10 February, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Killing the poor: an Anglo-Irish theme.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Lowe Lectures in Palaeography

    Manuscripts and method: the transmission of Vegetius

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL REEVE, Kennedy Professor of Latin, Cambridge,
    will deliver the Lowe Lectures in Palaeography at 5 p.m. on
    Mondays in the Examination Schools.

    25 Jan.: `A proposal about Modestus.'

    1 Feb.: `A man on a horse.'

    8 Feb.: `R.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    GREEN COLLEGE


    Green College Lectures 1999

    Genes

    The Green College Lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on the
    following Mondays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe
    Infirmary.

    DR JAMES WATSON, Nobel Prize winner, and President, Cold Spring
    Harbour Laboratory, New York

    18 Jan.: `From the double helix to the Human
    Genome Project.'

    PROFESSOR BRYAN SYKES

    25 Jan.: `The genetic origins of man.'

    PROFESSOR ADRIAN HILL

    1 Feb.: `Genetics and infection: why are some
    of us susceptible?'

    PROFESSOR PETER HARPER, Professor of Medical Genetics, University
    of Wales College of Medicine

    8 Feb.: `Genetic testing: prospects and
    problems.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    LINACRE COLLEGE


    Linacre Lectures 1999

    The peopling of Britain: the shaping of a human landscape

    The ninth series of the Linacre Lectures will be given at 5.15
    p.m. on the following Thursdays in Lecture Theatre A, the
    Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road (the St Cross Road
    entrance is to be used).

    PROFESSOR C. GAMBLE, Southampton

    21 Jan.: `Early beginnings.' (Discussant:
    Dr C. Stringer, British Museum
    )

    ROFESSOR P. MELLARS, Cambridge

    28 Jan.: `Homo sapiens.' (Discussant: Dr
    A. Sherratt
    )

    PROFESSOR A. WHITTLE, Wales

    4 Feb.: `Advent of agriculture.'
    (Discussant: Lord Renfrew, Cambridge)

    PROFESSOR B. CUNLIFFE

    11 Feb.: `Tribes and empires.'
    (Discussant: Professor M. Millett, Durham)

    DR H. HÄRKE, Reading

    18 Feb.: `Saxon kings and Norse warriors.'
    (Discussant: Sir Walter Bodmer)

    DR R. SMITH, Cambridge

    25 Feb.: `Plagues and populations.'
    (Discussant: Dr P. Slack)

    SIR TONY WRIGLEY, Cambridge

    4 Mar.: `Country and town: farmers, labourers,
    craftsmen, manufacturers, merchants.' (Discussant: Dr
    J. Langton
    )

    PROFESSOR C. PEACH

    11 Mar.: `Empire, the economy, and industry.'
    (Discussant: Sir Robert May, Office of Science and
    Technology
    )

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MANSFIELD COLLEGE

    Hildegard von Bingen and issues in contemporary Christianity

    DR A. CLENDENEN, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, St
    Xavier University, Chicago, will deliver the following lectures
    at the times shown in the Council Room, Mansfield College. For
    further information, telephone Catherine Middleton (telephone:
    (2)70988), or Andrew Linzey (telephone: (2)70983).

    In addition to the lectures, Dr Clendenen will preach a sermon
    on `Hildegard: "Trumpet of God" and "Living
    Light" ' at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 27 January, in the chapel,
    Mansfield College.

    Wed. 27 Jan., 4.30 p.m.: `The re-emergence of
    Hildegard von Bingen.'

    Thur. 28 Jan., 5 p.m.: `Ecological themes in
    Hildegard von Bingen's Scivias.'

    Fri. 29 Jan., 5 p.m.: `The relevance of Hildegard
    von Bingen to the question of gender and the priesthood.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Reformed and Independent Arts

    The following meetings will be held at 8 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    chapel, Mansfield College.

    `Reformed and Independent Arts' is a series of lectures,
    demonstrations, and discussions on backgrounds and contemporary
    trends in music, architecture, crafts, and literature in some of
    the Reformed and Independent churches and cultures derived from
    their influence. The sessions are designed for churches and
    universities. No previous background or experience in these
    subjects is needed.

    A performance of a J.S. Bach cantata in the context of a Lutheran
    Vespers Service in Mansfield College chapel will be given by the
    Carillon Singers at 8 p.m. on Sunday, 14 March.

    C. THOMPSON and C. BROCK

    21 Jan.: `Isaac Watts's use of the Bible.'

    J. WYATT

    28 Jan.: `Bunyan's Pilgrim's
    Progress
    .'

    K. REYMAIER

    4 Feb.: `Music reflecting theology.'

    D. FOX

    11 Feb.: `Welsh valleys hymns.'

    J. CREASER

    18 Feb.: `Milton's Paradise
    Lost
    .'

    M. HEBBLETHWAITE

    25 Feb.: To be announced. (Yvonne Workman
    Lecture
    )

    C. BINFIELD

    4 Mar.: `English nonconformist
    architecture.'

    E. STEVENSON

    11 Mar.: `Hungarian reformed arts and crafts.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society

    The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    the Council Room on the ground floor of the Main Building,
    Mansfield College.

    For further information contact the Administrator, OCEES,
    Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone and fax: Oxford
    (2)70886, e-mail: ocees@mansf.ox.ac.uk, Web site
    http://users.ox.ac.uk/~ocees/).

    S. PARNELL, Cape Town

    19 Jan.: `Issues in integrating environment
    into development planning: reflections from Cape Town.'

    R. ORAM, Director, Commuter Check Services Corporation, New
    Jersey

    26 Jan.: `Creating a shift to more
    environmentally friendly transport: the case for tax-free
    travel vouchers.'

    W. BECKERMAN

    2 Feb.: `Intergenerational justice and the
    environment.'

    L. MICHAELIS, OECD

    9 Feb.: `Environmental policy for social
    innovation.'

    G. DUTFIELD

    16 Feb.: `Biodiversity, conservation, and
    intellectual property rights.'

    J. MARQUAND, Project Leader, Management Development for Tomsk
    Ecological Committee

    23 Feb.: `Developing competence in Russian
    environmental management.'

    D. LEWIS, Secretary, Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution

    2 Mar.: `Setting environmental standards.'

    R. WELFORD, Huddersfield

    9 Mar.: `Business and ethics.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    After two decades of reform: China in Asia and beyond

    This two-day workshop will be held as shown below in St Antony's
    College.

    Convener: Z. Zhang, D.Phil., Wai Seng Research Fellow
    in Asia Pacific Studies.

    Friday, 26 February

    DR S. TSANG

    9.40 a.m.: opening.

    DR C.Z. LIN

    9.45 a.m.: `China's economic reform: a special
    survey.'

    P. NOLAN, Cambridge

    11 a.m.: `New developments in China's economic
    reform.'

    P. FERDINAND, Warwick

    12 noon: `China's reform in comparative
    perspectives.'

    U. DADUSH, World Bank

    2 p.m.: `The Asian financial crisis: the roles
    of China and Japan.'

    DR Z. ZHANG

    3.15 p.m.: `China's foreign exchange reform:
    lessons for Asia.'

    Z. CHEN, IMF

    4.15 p.m.: `Financial issues in China.'

    DR W. ZHANG

    5.15 p.m.: `Foreign direct investment in China:
    Asian contribution.'

    Saturday, 27 February

    E. CROLL, SOAS, London

    9.30 a.m.: `The changing fate of women in China
    during the reform.'

    A. HUSSAIN, LSE

    10.45 a.m.: `Social security in China in
    retrospect and prospect.'

    G. MATTSON

    11.45 a.m.: `Intellectual property rights: a
    comparative study of China and some other Asian
    countries.'

    M. YAHUDA, LSE

    2 p.m.: `The international politics of China in
    the reform years.'

    J. FEWSMITH, Boston

    3.15 p.m.: `Evolution of Chinese domestic
    politics and China's integration in the world community.'

    M. GAO, Tamsania

    4.15 p.m.: `Village politics in China: a
    comparison with other Asian countries.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    South Asian History Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    the Small Dining Room (first floor), Queen Elizabeth House.

    DR M. WASEEM, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad

    19 Jan.: `Pakistan and India: pasts and
    futures.'

    S. HAZAREESINGH, Warwick

    26 Jan.: `Ideas of urban citizenship: the
    agitation for civic rights and colonial resistance in Bombay
    City, 1905–25.'

    S. SULTAN, Cambridge

    2 Feb.: `Poverty, gender, and resistance:
    political action among women in a squatter settlement in
    Dhaka.'

    S. SHANI-GOLDWASSER, Cambridge

    9 Feb.: `The resurgence of ethno-Hinduism in
    India: a case study of Ahmedabad in the 1980s.'

    A. PATHAK, Edinburgh

    16 Feb.: `Forests, law, and state in colonial
    India.'

    K. BHAUMIK

    23 Feb.: `From silents to talkies: capital,
    class, and nation in the Indian cinema.'

    PRS presentations, 2 March: (1) C. MONTGOMERY, (2) B. DE

    (1) `British Indian military history in the early nineteenth
    century.'

    (2) `Bengal in the Second World War.'

    PRS presentations, 9 March: (1) S. SHEIKH, (2) S. JAYAWARDENE-
    PILLAI

    (1) `Social and political history of Gujarat in the fifteenth
    century.'

    (2) `History of British–Indian architecture in the
    nineteenth century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ST HILDA'S COLLEGE


    Women in Whitehall

    The following lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on the days
    shown in the Jacqueline du Pré Building, St Hilda's
    College. With the exception of the lecture to be given on Friday,
    5 March, they will take place on Wednesdays.

    MS M. NEVILLE-ROLFE, Regional Director, Government Office for the
    North-West

    27 Jan.: `Labour's regional policies: sea
    change or just moving the deck chairs?'

    DAME STELLA RIMINGTON, DCB, former Director General, the Security
    Service

    10 Feb.: `Managing secrecy.'

    MS P. DENHAM, former Regional Director, Government Office for the
    North-East

    17 Feb.: `From industrial policy to the
    regeneration of north-east England.'

    BARONESS PARK OF MONMOUTH

    5 Mar.: `Difficult places.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WOLFSON COLLEGE


    Wolfson College Lectures 1999

    Globalisation and insecurity

    The following lectures will take place at 5 p.m. on the days
    shown in the Hall, Wolfson College. Unless otherwise indicated,
    they will take place on Tuesdays. The lectures are open to the
    public (telephone for enquiries: Oxford (2)74103).

    DR V. FITZGERALD

    19 Jan.: `The security of international
    finance.'

    PROFESSOR J. KAY

    26 Jan.: `Global business, global
    economics?'

    DR S. WILLETT

    2 Feb.: `Physical insecurity: the globalisation
    of the means of war.'

    PROFESSOR I. BROWNLIE

    9 Feb.: `The peaceful settlement of disputes
    between states and the problem of globalisation.'

    PROFESSOR R. COHEN

    Thur. 18 Feb.: `Labour in an age of global
    insecurity.'

    PROFESSOR S. AMIN

    23 Feb.: `Economic globalism and political
    universalism—converging or diverging?'

    DR W. SACHS

    2 Mar.: `The environmental impact of
    globalisation.'

    PROFESSOR D. HELD

    9 Mar.: `The transformation of the political
    community.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WESTMINSTER COLLEGE


    Wesley and Methodist Studies Centre

    Graduate seminars 1998–9

    The following seminars will be held at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesdays
    in the Church and International House, Westminster College. The
    series will continue in Trinity Term.

    K. NEWPORT

    27 Jan.: `Charles Wesley's sermons.'

    J. ENGLISH

    24 Feb.: `John Wesley and politics.'

    K. TILLER

    24 Mar.: `Church and chapel in Oxfordshire.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ACTION GROUP AT OXFORD ON TEACHING AND
    LEARNING ENHANCED BY NEW TECHNOLOGY (OxTALENT)

    Design and development of multimedia and the Web for teaching
    and learning

    PROFESSOR DIANA LAURILLARD will lecture at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, 9
    March, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

    Subject: ` "Academics like to fiddle":
    design tools for academics to create teaching through
    multimedia.'

    `Show and Tell' morning

    A `Show and Tell' morning will be held on Thursday, 18 March,
    9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m., in Lecture Room A, the Computing
    Services. Those involved in using the Web to enhance teaching and
    learning are invited to submit entries for demonstration on the
    day.

    The message must be sent to:

    oxtalent@oucs.ox.ac.uk

    , with
    subject `OxT S&T'99 entry', and must contain: the URL of the
    Web site(s); a paragraph describing each entry; the name(s) of
    the person(s) who created the site; and the name(s) of the
    presenter(s) at the `Show and Tell' event. Thee submission
    deadline is noon on Friday, 26 February.

    Information on OxTalent's events can be found at

    http://info.ox.ac.uk/oxtalent/
    .

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

    The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on
    the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.
    All are invited.

    Sandwiches and wine will be served after the lectures at a cost
    of £2.50 per person, for which bookings should be made in
    advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, the Friends
    of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone:
    Oxford (2)77234).

    DR A. FRANKLIN

    Thur. 4 Feb.: `The Bodleian Library's
    collection of printed ballads, seventeenth to nineteenth
    centuries.'

    DR C. BROWN

    Wed. 17 Feb.: `Van Dyck's portrait of
    Franciscus Junius in the Bodleian Library.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

    Lectures

    Lectures will be given at 8 p.m. on the following days, as
    indicated below.

    Admission to the 10 February meeting will be by ticket only, at
    a cost of £8: enquiries should be made to Oxford 377479.
    Admission to other lectures costs for £1 for members of the
    association, £2 for non-members.

    Further information about the association may be obtained by
    sending a stamped self-addressed envelope to Professor J.R.
    Woodhouse, 47 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF.

    DR E. SENICI

    Wed. 3 Feb., St Anne's College: `Verdi's
    Requiem, an introduction.'
    (Note: the Requiem will be
    performed in the Sheldonian Theatre on 20 March by the
    Oxford Harmonic Society
    )

    DR A. MILNER

    Wed. 10 Feb., Halifax House, South Parks Road:
    `Immigrant grapes—the cultivation of foreign varieties
    in Italy.' (Tutored wine-tasting)

    DR M. KATRIZKY

    Tue. 16 Feb., Pauling Institute for Human Sciences,
    58 Banbury Road
    : `Italian mountebanks in the time of
    Ben Jonson.'

    DR J. STRUPP, St Anne's College

    Wed. 3 Mar.: `Il giardino dei Tarocchi: fantasy
    gardening at Obertello.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Other meetings


    Tue. 19 Jan., 8 p.m., Rewley House theatre:
    showing of film Stanno tutti bene (dir. G.
    Tornatore, with Marcello Mastroianni).

    Wed. 27 Jan., 8 p.m., St Anne's College: `The mass
    media in Italy after Berlusconi.'
    (Conversazione)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INTERNATIONAL LAW ASSOCIATION (BRITISH
    BRANCH)

    Oxford Speakers Series

    The following meetings will be held in the Habakkuk Room, Jesus
    College. Unless otherwise indicated, they will be held on
    Wednesdays, at 8.30 p.m. All are welcome to attend.

    Persons travelling from outside Oxford are asked to confirm one
    or two days in advance, with Ms Carolyn Evans, Exeter College,
    Oxford OX1 3DP (telephone: Oxford (2)79617, e-mail:
    carolyn.evans@exeter.ox.ac.uk), or Dr Michael Byers, Jesus
    College, Oxford OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford (2)79680, e-mail:
    michael.byers@jesus.ox.ac.uk).

    PROFESSOR C. WARBRICK, Durham

    20 Jan.: `The enforcement of international
    criminal law.'

    DR V. LOWE, Cambridge

    3 Feb.: `The International Law Commission and
    state responsibility: wrongfulness or liability?'

    PROFESSOR J. MERRILLS, Sheffield

    17 Feb.: `International boundary disputes in
    theory and practice.'

    JUDGE R. MAY, International Criminal Tribunal for the Former
    Yugoslavia

    Fri. 19 Feb., 5 p.m.: `The International
    Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: recent
    developments.'

    F. WEBBER, barrister specialising in immigration and refugee law

    3 Mar.: `Refugee law in UK courts: recent
    developments.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR MISSION STUDIES

    Leeds–Oxford Seminars on Africa: religion and innovation

    The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesdays in
    the OCMS, St Philip and St James' Church, Woodstock Road
    (telephone: Oxford 556071). The series will continue in Trinity
    Term.

    D.H. JOHNSON, James Currey Publishers

    20 Jan.: `Religion and communal conflict in the
    Sudan: the war against paganism.'

    PROFESSOR D. BELSHAW, Emeritus Professor, UEA

    17 Feb.: `The strategic challenge for the
    churches and Christian non-governmental organisations:
    poverty reduction in sub-Saharan Africa.'

    DR S. VON SICARD, Centre for the Study of Islam and
    Christian–Muslim Relations, Selly Oak Colleges, Birmingham

    17 Mar.: `Mission and political power: UMCA
    missionaries and their relations to Muslims in Zanzibar
    1864–85.'

    DR D. GAITSKELL, SOAS

    21 Apr.: `Beyond "devout
    domesticity": five female mission strategies in
    Southern Africa 1998–9.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 January 1999: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    HOPE STUDENTSHIP

    A Hope Studentship will be awarded, provided there is a candidate
    of sufficient merit, to a person who is, or who has been accepted
    for admission as, a member of the University and who intends to
    undertake graduate study under the Board of the Faculty of
    Biological Sciences in association with the Hope Entomological
    Collection in any area of Entomological Research. The studentship
    will be available from October 1999 and will provide for fees at
    the home/EU rate and a maintenance grant. Application forms are
    available from the Department of Zoology. Completed forms must
    be returned to the department by 31 March.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL BEQUEST

    The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at
    Oxford who are citizens of the Republic of India, and who,
    because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to
    complete the qualifications for which they are registered. Grants
    will not normally be awarded to those near to the beginning of
    their course of study. Application forms may be obtained from Mrs
    A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE.
    the closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 4 June.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SASAKAWA FUND

    Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to
    be applied to `the advancement within the University of knowledge
    and understanding of Japan by way of academic contact and
    exchange between members of the University and citizens of
    Japan'. Further details may be obtained from Mrs A. Slater, the
    Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, to whom
    applications should be returned by the end of the fourth week in
    each term.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    HAYTER FUND

    Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established
    university posts for travel and research purposes connected with
    the languages and the economic, social, and political development
    of the following areas: the former Soviet Union and eastern
    Europe, the Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east Asia, and Latin
    America. Application forms and further details may be obtained
    from Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford
    OX1 2LE. The closing date for applications is the end of fifth
    week in each term.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    VARLEY-GRADWELL TRAVELLING FELLOWSHIP
    IN INSECT ECOLOGY

    Applications are invited for the Varley-Gradwell Travelling
    Fellowship in Insect Ecology. A travelling fellowship, which may
    be of up to £2,000 in value, will be made for the support
    of fieldwork, travel, and other activity of direct benefit to the
    field of insect ecology. The fellowship will be tenable for one
    year commencing on a date to be agreed. It will not be
    renewable.

    Applications, including a curriculum vitae and a
    research proposal, should be sent to Mrs Judith Brown, Board of
    Management for the Varley-Gradwell Travelling Fellowship in
    Insect Ecology, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1
    2JD, by 28 February. Enquiries may be made by telephone to Oxford
    (2)70213 or by e-mail to Judith.Brown@admin.ox.ac.uk. The
    research proposal should include a budget and should not exceed
    two sides of A4 in length. Applicants should arrange for two
    referees to write in confidence to Mrs Brown by the closing date.
    In the case of graduate students, one of the referees should be
    the supervisor.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 14 January 1999: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
    SCIENCES


    Papers for Section o

    The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved
    the following papers for examination in Section o of the Honour
    School of Mathematical Sciences 2000 (see Examination
    Decrees
    , 1998, p. 275, regulation 3(f).)

    o3 Functional Programming and Algorithm Design

    o4 Imperative Programming

    o6 History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant (as specified for
    subject 101 in Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools
    including Philosophy)

    o7 Metaphysics and Theory of Knowledge (as specified for subject
    102 in Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including
    Philosophy)

    o8 Philosophy of Mathematics

    o9 Astronomy

    o10 Mathematics and Finance

    Part I: Mathematical Models of Financial Derivatives

    Part II: Decision Mathematics

    o11 Mathematics and its Applications

    o12 Mathematics Education

    Note: no paper o5 will be available for examination
    in 2000.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
    SCIENCES AND COMMITTEE ON CONTINUING EDUCATION


    M.Sc. in Software Engineering

    In accordance with the regulations for these courses, notice is
    hereby given that the list of Schedule B modules available in the
    period January to July 1999 will be:

    Advanced Concurrency Tools

    Software Engineering Mathematics

    Critical Systems Engineering

    Requirements Engineering

    Specification Methods

    Specification and Design

    Scalable Parallel Programming

    Practical Software Engineering

    Software Testing

    Machine Assisted Software Engineering

    Concurrency and Distributed Systems

    Advanced Software Development

    Software Engineering Mathematics

    Functional Programming

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

    HILARY TERM 1999

    Preliminary Examinations

    Oriental Studies: DR G. ABRAMSON, MA, Fellow of St
    Cross (address: Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies)

    Theology: DR J. DAY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady
    Margaret Hall

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Bachelor of Fine Art

    Final Examination: MR B.D. CATLING, MA, Fellow of
    Linacre (address: Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Bachelor of Medicine

    First Examination, Part II: DR D.J.T. VAUX, BM, MA,
    D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre (address: Sir William Dunn School of
    Pathology)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    TRINITY TERM 1999

    Honour Moderations

    English Language and Literature: DR H. BARR, MA,
    M.PHIL., D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

    Mathematics: DR M.J. COLLINS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
    of University

    Mathematics and Computation: DR GERAINT JONES, MA,
    D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Computing Laboratory)

    Mathematics and Philosophy: DR M.J. COLLINS, MA,
    D.PHIL., Fellow of University

    Modern History: PROFESSOR R. FOX, MA, D.PHIL.,
    Fellow of Linacre (address: Modern History Faculty)

    Music: DR E. HIGGINBOTTOM, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
    New College

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Honour Schools

    Materials, Economics, and Management Part I:
    PROFESSOR G.D.W. SMITH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Trinity (address:
    Department of Materials)

    Modern History and English: DR J. RAVEN, MA, Fellow
    of Mansfield

    Natural Science

    Chemistry Part I: PROFESSOR P.W. ATKINS, MA,
    Fellow of Lincoln

    Metallurgy and Science of Materials Part I:
    PROFESSOR G.D.W.SMITH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Trinity
    (address: Department of Materials)

    Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Part II:
    PROFESSOR L.N. JOHNSON, MA, Fellow of Corpus Christi
    (address: Department of Biochemistry)

    Oriental Studies: DR J.W. BENSON, MA, Fellow of
    Wolfson (address: Oriental Institute)

    Philosophy and Theology: THE REVD CANON J.B.
    WEBSTER, MA, D.PHIL., Canon of Christ Church

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Bachelor of Medicine

    First Examination Parts I and II: DR D.J.T. VAUX,
    BM, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre (address: Sir William Dunn
    School of Pathology)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Bachelor of Philosophy

    Philosophy: DR P.M.S. HACKER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
    of St John's

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Master of Philosophy

    Politics: PROFESSOR G.A. COHEN, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow
    of All Souls

    Sociology: PROFESSOR G. MARSHALL, MA, D.PHIL.,
    Fellow of Nuffield

    Qualifying examination in Politics: PROFESSOR G.A.
    COHEN, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow of All Souls

    Qualifying examination in Sociology: PROFESSOR G.
    MARSHALL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Nuffield

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Master of Science

    Politics Research: PROFESSOR G.A. COHEN, B.PHIL.,
    MA, Fellow of All Souls

    Sociology: PROFESSOR G. MARSHALL, MA, D.PHIL.,
    Fellow of Nuffield

    Theoretical Chemistry: PROFESSOR M.S. CHILD, MA,
    Fellow of University (address: Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
    Laboratory)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Master of Studies

    Philosophy: DR P.M.S. HACKER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
    of St John's

    Study of Religion: THE REVD PROFESSOR J.S.K. WARD,
    B.LITT., MA, Canon of Christ Church

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
    regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee for
    Educational Studies will come into
    effect on 29 January.


    1 Board of the Faculty of English
    Language and Literature

    Honour School of English Language and Literature

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
    2001)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
    202, l. 9, delete `and those for B.10', and substitute `that for
    B.10 by noon on Friday of the ninth week and those for'.

    2 Ibid., p. 204, l. 23, delete `in the
    medieval period, and'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    2 Boards of the Faculties of English
    Language and Literature and Literae Humaniores

    Honour School of Classics and English

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    As for the Honour School of English Language and Literature (see
    1 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    3 Boards of the Faculties of English
    Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

    Honour School of English and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    As for the Honour School of English Language and Literature (see
    1 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    4 Boards of the Faculties of English
    Language and Literature and Modern History

    Honour School of Modern History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    As for the Honour School of English Language and Literature (see
    1 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    5 Boards of the Faculties of
    Mathematical Sciences and Physical Sciences

    Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first Part II
    examination in 2000)

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 172, delete ll.
    49–52 and substitute `Candidates may be examined viva voce
    at the examiners' discretion'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    6 Board of the Faculty of Modern
    History

    Honour School of Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
    302, after l. 26 insert:

    `22. A Comparative History of the First World War,
    1914–20'.

    2 Ibid., l. 27, delete `22' and substitute
    `23'.

    3 Ibid., p. 320, l. 20, delete `S. J. Walker
    ɠ1970)' and substitute `J. C. Bondanella and P. Bondanella
    (Oxford, 1997)'.

    4 Ibid., p. 323, after l. 42, insert

    `22. A COMPARATIVE HISTORY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR,
    1914–20

    The set texts are as follows.

    H. Barbusse, Under Fire (Dent, 1917) pp. 5–106

    R.G. Binding, A Fatalist at War (Allen & Unwin, 1929) pp.
    176–180, 181–7, 193–5, 201–2, 204–21,
    227–37

    E. Blucher, An English Wife in Berlin (Constable, 1920) pp.
    50–1, 93–6, 133–4, 151–5, 157–9,
    161–4, 174–7, 182–5, 193–4, 196–8,
    207–12, 249–310

    V. Brittain, Chronicle of Youth (Golancz, 1981) pp.
    373–98

    A. Brusilov, A Soldier's Notebook (Macmillan, 1930) pp.
    140–54, 204–35, 289–314

    J. Charteris, At GHQ (Cassell, 1931) pp. 124–6, 131–3,
    141–3, 149–52, 161–9, 224–32, 259–79,
    281–312

    G. Clemenceau, The Grandeur and Misery of Victory (Harrap, 1930)
    pp 5–98 and Appendix

    H. Dugard, The Battle of V erdun (Hutchinson, 1916) pp.
    25–37, 107–226

    E. Von Falkenhayn, General Headquarters 1914–1916 and its
    Critical Decisions (Hutchinson, 1919) pp. 40–8, 145–9,
    193–218, 223–56, 284–9

    R. Graves, Goodbye to all that (Cassell, 1929, 1957) pp.
    80–146 Sir Douglas Haig's Despatches (Ed. J. Terraine)
    (Dent, 1979) pp. 19–59, 245–308, 311–49

    M. Hankey, The Supreme Command, Volume 2 (Allen & Unwin,
    1961) pp. 686–738, 748–830

    M. Hoffman, The War of Lost Opportunities (Kegan Paul, 1924) pp.
    129–56, 171–81, 233–46

    E. Junger, Storm of Steel (Chatto, 1929) pp. 92–110,
    205–37, 244–80

    D. Lloyd George, War Memoirs I (2 volumes) (Odhams, 1938) pp.
    327–93, 426–40, 585–600, 667–712,
    755–800

    E. Ludendorff, My war memories (Hutchinson, 1920) Volume 1 pp.
    328–55, Volume 2 pp. 421–26, 446–67, 479–97,
    580–8, 590–617, 645–54, 663–84, 721–35,
    751–64

    J. De Pierrefeu, French Headquarters 1915–1918 (Bles, 1924)
    pp. 28–48, 144–60, 164–83, 226–52

    R. Recouly, Foch: His Own Words on Many Subjects (Butterworth,
    1929) pp. 22–63, 92–103, 115–22, 154–55

    J. Reed, The War in Eastern Europe (Eveleigh Nash Co., 1916) pp.
    1–99

    E. Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front (Putnam,
    1929)

    Walther Rathenau, Industrialist, Banker, Intellectual and
    Politician: Notes and Diaries 1907–1922 (Ed. H. Pogge von
    Strandmann) (Oxford University Press, 1985) pp. 205–7,
    215–32 World War One Document Archive
    (http//www.lib.byu.edu/~rhd/wwi/), selected documents

    Note: in the event of difficulty contacting the Web
    page, please consult the Modern History Faculty Librarian.'

    5 Ibid., l. 43, delete `22' and substitute
    `23'.

    6 Ibid., p. 328, ll. 10–12 delete `1995
    ... and endowed himself)'
    and substitute `1995–), vol. ii, pp. 599–607 (annal for
    1066); vol. iii, pp. 5–47 (to `endowed with gifts')'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    7 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and English Language and Literature

    Honour School of Modern History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 6 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    8 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Literae Humaniores

    Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 6 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    9 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Modern Languages

    Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 6 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    10 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Social Studies

    (a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
    2000)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 6 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
    2002)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 6 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF CIVIL LAW AND
    DOCTOR OF CIVIL LAW BY ACCUMULATION

    The Board of the Faculty of Law has granted leave to
    R. HOOD, All Souls, to supplicate for the Degrees of Bachelor of
    Civil Law and Doctor of Civil Law by accumulation.

    A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available
    at the University Offices.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
    OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and
    committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Biological Sciences

    H.L. JENNER, St Hugh's: `The role of Nad-Malic enzyme in the
    metabolism of developing potato tubers'.

    Department of Plant Sciences, Friday, 15 January, 1.30 p.m.


    Examiners: A.M. Smith, N.J. Kruger.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Law

    J.D.R. CRAIG, Lincoln: `Legal principles for the protection of
    the right of privacy in the workplace: a comparative analysis of
    the law in the United States, France, and Canada'.

    Examination Schools, Friday, 22 January, 11.30 a.m.


    Examiners: P.L. Davies, S. Sciarra.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Mathematical Sciences

    H. BLANK, Hertford: `Numerical methods for compressible and
    incompressible flow'.

    St John's, Thursday, 21 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M.J. Baines, I.J. Sobey.

    P. FREARNHEAD, Merton: `Sequential Monte Carlo methods in filter
    theory'.

    Department of Statistics, Tuesday, 19 January, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: P.J. Green, C.N. Laws.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Medieval and Modern Languages

    A.W. MULLEN, St Anne's: `Historical and fictional narratives in
    Sciascia'.

    Christ Church, Tuesday, 16 March, 10.30 a.m.


    Examiners: V.R. Jones, M.L. McLaughlan.

    J. O'DONNELL, Pembroke: `Parody in the fictional and journalistic
    writing of Umberto Eco'.

    St Hugh's, Tuesday, 19 January, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: G.A. Stellardi, M. Caesar.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Modern History

    G.J. GARDNER, Lincoln: `The Scottish exile community in the
    United Provinces, 1660–90'.

    St Hilda's, Monday, 25 January, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: J. Wormald, T.C. Smout.

    I. KOPSIAFTI, Oriel: `Cassirer's philosophy of symbolic forms and
    the problem of pictorial art'.

    Trinity, Monday, 25 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M.J. Inwood, N. C} acùinovicù.

    A. WILTON, Lincoln: `Clergy and community: the archdeaconries of
    Buckingham and Gloucester, 1730–80'.

    Examination Schools, Friday, 19 March, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: J.D. Walsh, W.J. Gregory.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Music

    J. BELLINGHAM, Christ Church: `The developjment of musical
    thought in western Europe from late antiquity to the mid ninth
    century'.

    Christ Church, Friday, 15 January, 3.30 p.m.


    Examiners: H.M.R.E. Mayr-Harting, S. Rankin.

    J.M. ROSS, Christ Church: `Crisis and transformation: French
    opera, politics, and the press, 1897–1903'.

    St Catherine's, Friday, 15 January, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: P.R. Franklin, A. Fauser.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Physical Sciences

    A. LEONARD, Wolfson: `Simulating the Lyman-a forest'.

    Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Monday, 18 January, 2. p.m.


    Examiners: L. Miller, A. Meiksin.

    A. PRIEST, Worcester: `Magneto-optics of III–IV
    semiconductor heterostructures'.

    Sub-department of Theoretical Physics, Thursday, 28 January, 2
    p.m.


    Examiners: J.T. Chalker, A. Usher.

    J.M. REYNOLDS, Corpus Christi: `Neutron diffraction and
    reflection studies of superconductors'.

    Clarendon Laboratory, Friday, 15 January, 10.30 a.m.


    Examiners: D. Paul, S.J. Blundell.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Physiological Sciences

    D.C. BOYD, Brasenose: `Protein–DNA interactions on the
    promoters of human small nuclear RNA genes'.

    Examination Schools, Thursday, 21 January, 1.45 p.m.


    Examiners: S. Jackson, I.M. Jones.

    K.E. TAYLOR, St Hilda's: `Computational modelling of the
    contribution of posterior parietal cortext to saccadic eye
    movements'.

    University Laboratory of Physiology, Thursday, 21 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: R.M. Bracewell, R.C. Miall.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Social Studies

    T.A. MAU, St Antony's: `Whiter emotions? The evolution of the
    nationalist debates in Quebec and Scotland, 1450– 1995: the
    impact of a changing world economic order'.

    Worcester, Tuesday, 9 February, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A.J. Ware, J.A. Brand.

    Committee for Educational Studies

    J. BEKKER, St Anne's: `Change and continuity in the South
    African education system: towards educational transition'.

    Mansfield, Monday, 18 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D.F. Johnson, A. Lemon.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 January 1999: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Note: college vacancies will also be found in
    the
    Gazette's "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/as/">Appointments
    Supplement.

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    OBITUARIES


    Corpus Christi College

    RUSSELL ERNEST THOMPSON, B.PHIL., MA, 17 November 1998;
    scholar 1957–60. Aged 62.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Merton College

    CLAYTON LEE BURWELL, 12 May 1998; Rhodes Scholar
    1932–5. Aged 87.

    CHRISTOPHER JOHN SEPPINGS COLTHURST, 5 May 1998; commoner
    1956–60. Aged 62.

    ERIC DOUGLAS DEEBLE, November 1998; commoner 1930–4.
    Aged 86.

    CHARLES FRANCIS CALMADY DENT, 17 September 1997; commoner
    1923–5. Aged 93.

    PHIROZE EDULJI DUSTOOR; visitor 1935–6.

    JAMES FREDERICK GARNER, 20 March 1998; Rhodes Scholar
    1953–5. Aged 66.

    STEVEN JOHN GROAK, 3 June 1998; commoner 1963–6.
    Aged 54.

    OLIVER DEVERELL HOLT; commoner 1928–31.

    RONALD BERNARD JENNISON, 12 April 1998; commoner
    1944–5. Aged 70.

    SIR HAROLD KENT, GCB, QC, DCL, 4 December 1998;
    postmaster 1922–6. Aged 95.

    JOHN RAYMOND LAWRENCE, 23 October 1998; commoner 1942.
    Aged 76.

    DOUGLAS VALENTINE LE PAN, 27 November 1998; commoner
    1935–7. Aged 84.

    PETER DIXON LENNETT; commoner 1959–60.

    PATRICK MACDERMOTT, 5 June 1998; commoner 1948–50.
    Aged 72.

    GEOFFREY JOHN MAIN, November 1998; commoner 1947–9.
    Aged 76.

    NEIL ALAIN MCPHERSON, August 1998; commoner 1980–5.
    Aged 36.

    BARRY WILLIAM MICHAEL PALMER, 30 October 1998; postmaster
    1953–7. Aged 64.

    JOHN CHARLES GRAEME WATERHOUSE, 16 April 1998; commoner
    1957–63. Aged 59.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Anne's College

    MRS PATRICIA JEAVONS (née Randall);
    commoner 1953–6.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Edmund Hall

    ARTHUR ROGER DOUGLAS, MA, 12 December 1998; exhibitioner
    1949–53. Aged 70.

    RODERICK SAYERS PAUL, MA, 19 September 1998; commoner
    1956–9. Aged 63.

    PETER CHARLES SWANN, MA, 25 December 1997; commoner
    1940–1 and 1946–51. Aged 75.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Hilda's College

    DAMARIS IRWIN DYER-BALL (née Cavers), BA,
    30 November 1997; commoner 1937–40. Aged 79.

    BARBARA THEODORA ROSS GRAY (née Church),
    MA, 4 November 1998; scholar 1927–30. Aged 89.

    SYLVIA GREEN (née Crabb), MA, 3 January
    1999; commoner 1941–4. Aged 75.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Hugh's College

    AUDRIE BETTY BIRKETT (née Disney-
    Roebuck), 16 November 1998; commoner 1929–32. Aged
    87.

    BARBARA MAUD BROWN (née Goss), 26
    November 1998; commoner 1926–9. Aged 90.

    IRENE JESSIE REID FLEMING (née
    Bromley), 1 January 1998; commoner 1928–31. Aged 79.

    STELLA CHRISTINE HUTCHESON (née
    Smyth), 30 November 1998; commoner 1973–6. Aged 43.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Wolfson College

    WAYNE BRYNMORE WATKINS, B.SC., M.SC., PH.D., D.SC., 26
    March 1998; Junior Research Fellow 1968–9. Aged 55.

    LINDA WEBB, M.SC., September 1998; graduate student
    1982–3.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ELECTIONS


    All Souls College

    Visiting Fellowships

    The following will be in residence for Hilary Term 1999
    as Visiting Fellows at All Souls College:

    SIR JOHN COLES

    PROFESSOR NIKOLAI DOBRONRAVIN, University of St
    Petersburg

    PROFESSOR ZHONGQIAO DUAN, Renmin University of China

    PROFESSOR RICHARD ERICSON, University of British
    Columbia

    DR PAUL JOHNSON, London School of Economics

    PROFESSOR GABRIEL JOSIPOVICI, University of Sussex

    DR DINAH MANISTY

    PROFESSOR PAMELA REYNOLDS, University of Cape Town

    PROFESSOR GAVIN WRIGHT, Stanford University

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Corpus Christi College

    To Scholarships:

    GAIL JOY BARTLETT, formerly of Aylesbury High School

    MICHAEL JELFS CUBISON, formerly of King Edward VII
    School, Sheffield

    MIGUEL FRAGA, formerly of London Oratory School

    SAROSH ROHINTAN IRANI, formerly of Latymer Upper School,
    London

    KEVIN MICHAEL KING, formerly of Coventry School (King
    Henry VIII)

    OLIVER JAMES KUNC, formerly of Bradford Grammar School

    ELEANORE MARY JESSICA GEORGINA LYONS, formerly of Loreto
    Grammar School

    CLAIRE MIDDLEHURST, formerly of Aquinas College,
    Stockport

    ASSAD IRFAN NEGYAL, formerly of Bootham School, York

    ARUN SHARMA, formerly of Foyle/Londonderry College

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Green College

    To Graduate Awards:

    JEDEDIAH RICHARD DIXON, BA

    ANJUM HALAI (M.ED. Aga Khan)

    STEVEN JOHN LO (BA Cambridge)

    MARION KAY SHIPMAN (BA Open)

    BENJAMIN JAMES THORNLEY (B.SC. Swansea)

    KATHERINE HELEN ALEXANDRA TRIPPE, BA

    ANNA MARIE UPTON, BA

    JASON VERRALL (B.SC. London)

    To the Sir Richard Doll Computer Scholarship:

    MIGUEL-ANGEL GONZALEZ-BALLESTER

    To IBM Computer Scholarships:

    IOANNIS KARYDIS (BA Cambridge)

    JASON VERRALL (B.SC. London)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Kellogg College

    To an Honorary Fellowship:

    CHARLES ANTONY
    RICHARD HOARE, MA (HON. D.SC. California, Warwick, York,
    Bath), FRS, DFBCS, Professorial Fellow, Wolfson College

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Nuffield College

    To Professorial Fellowships:

    JEREMY JOHN RICHARDSON (BA Keele, MA, PH.D. Manchester),
    Professor of European Public Policy, University of Essex

    KEVIN WILLIAM ROBERTS, D.PHIL. (BA Essex), Professor of
    Economics, London School of Economics

    To a Faculty Fellowship:

    GEOFFREY EVANS (BA
    Sussex), Research Fellow of the college

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    To Visiting Fellowships:

    KERRY BROUGHER (BA University of California, Irvine, MA
    University of California, Los Angeles), Director, the
    Museum of Modern Art, Oxford

    DAVID WILLETTS, BA, Member of Parliament for Havant,
    Shadow Secretary of State for Education and Employment

    To a non-stipendiary Research Fellowship:

    TINA
    RYDBERG (M.SC., PH.D. Aarhus), University of Aarhus

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    NOTICES


    BALLIOL COLLEGE


    Jowett Senior Scholarships

    Balliol College proposes to elect two Jowett Senior Scholars. The
    scholarships, which will be awarded solely on the basis of
    academic merit, are open to graduates currently working in Oxford
    who are reading, or intend to read, for a D.Phil. It is expected
    that applicants will normally be
    in at least their first year and not later than their second year
    of graduate work. The scholarships are tenable in any subject for
    which the college admits students.

    The scholarships will be awarded for a maximum of two years.
    Scholars will take up their award on 1 October 1999.
    The value of the scholarships is £1,550 a year. In addition,
    scholars will receive free meals, and they will be
    entitled to dine twice a week at high table. The scholars will
    be entitled to accommodation (for which they will be charged)
    until they have completed their university residence
    requirements. This accommodation will be in the Graduate Centre
    at Holywell Manor.

    There will also be Jowett Exhibitions, up to the value of
    £1,000 each for candidates who are runners-up for the Jowett
    Senior Scholarships. These will be restricted to members of
    Balliol College. The exhibitions are tenable for one year only.
    Application forms may be obtained from the Senior Tutor's
    Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ; they should be
    returned by Friday, 22 January. There is no separate application
    form required for the exhibitions. The college hopes to interview
    short-listed applicants during the week commencing 22 February
    (sixth week).

    Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer and a charity
    which exists to promote excellence in education and research.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BRASENOSE COLLEGE AND ST ANNE'S
    COLLEGE


    Tutorial Fellowship in Ancient History

    Applications are invited for the above post, to commence on 1
    October 1999. The title of university lecturer (CUF) may be
    conferred on the holder of the fellowship. The combined college
    and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to
    £37,113 per annum. Additional
    college allowances are available.

    Further particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary,
    Brasenose College, Oxford O1 4AJ (telephone: Oxford (2)77823,
    fax: (2)77822, e-mail: college.office@bnc. ox.ac.uk).
    Applications should be sent to the Senior Tutor, Brasenose
    College, Oxford OX1 4AJ, with details of career and publications,
    and the names and addresses of three referees, not later than
    Friday, 5 February. Applicants should ask their referees to write
    to the Senior Tutor by the same date, without request from the
    college.

    Brasenose College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    GREEN COLLEGE


    Friends of 13 Norham Gardens: Osler
    Essay Prize 1999

    This prize, to the annual value of £200, is offered by the
    Friends of 13 Norham Gardens through the generosity of Dr Martin
    Entin of Montreal, Canada, for an essay to be submitted by a
    registered medical student of Oxford University (either clinical
    or preclinical).

    The subject chosen should in some way deal with medicine or
    medical science in the light of the life and work of Sir William
    Osler. Students who are interested in submitting an essay may
    visit Osler's former home and library at 13 Norham Gardens by
    appointment (telephone: Oxford 512492). Essays of not less than
    2,500 words and not more than 5,000 words should be sent to Lord
    Walton of Detchant at 13 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PS, by
    31 May.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    HERTFORD COLLEGE


    Junior Research Fellowship

    Hertford College invites applications for a Junior Research
    Fellowship in the Arts or Social Sciences, tenable for three
    years from 1 October 1999. The fellowship is open to graduates
    of any university aged under thirty at the time of the
    appointment, normally of postdoctoral or equivalent standing, who
    are already engaged in independent
    research. The stipend will be £12,169 rising annually by
    increments of £500 and indexed to academic salary rises,
    plus free meals and free accommodation or a housing
    allowance in lieu, together with computer and research
    allowances.

    Further details and an application form may be obtained from the
    Principal's Secretary, Hertford College, Oxford OX1 3BW
    (telephone: Oxford (2)79405, fax: (2)79437,
    e-mail: lihua.li@hertford.ox.ac.uk). Closing date for
    applications: Friday, 29 January.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    JESUS COLLEGE


    Tutorial Fellowship in Politics

    Applications are invited for a Tutorial Fellowship in Politics
    from 1 October 1999. The fellowship will be held in conjunction
    with a Titular University Lecturership (CUF), for which no
    separate application is required.

    The successful applicant will be expected to undertake research
    and to make a major contribution to teaching Politics to
    undergraduates at Jesus College within the context of the Honour
    Schools of Philosophy, Politics and
    Economics, and Modern History and Politics.

    The Social Studies Faculty Board has indicated a strong
    preference for an applicant in the field of Political Theory.
    The combined college and university salary will be according to
    age on a scale up to £37,113 per annum.

    Additional college allowances are available. Further particulars,
    containing details of the duties and full range of
    emoluments and allowances, may be obtained from the Principal,
    Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW.

    Letters of application, together with a curriculum
    vitae
    and the names of three referees, should reach the
    Principal, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW, not later than 5
    February. Referees should be asked to write directly to the
    Principal by the same date.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    LINACRE COLLEGE


    Junior Research Fellowships

    Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three
    Junior Research Fellowships, tenable for one year in the first
    instance from 1 October 1999 and renewable for a second year.
    Junior Research Fellows will receive a book allowance of
    £250 per annum and enjoy dining rights in college. The
    fellowships are open to men and women graduates of any
    university; there is no restriction of subject, but candidates
    should be intending to engage in research at postdoctoral level.
    Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a
    higher research degree before taking up a Junior Research
    Fellowship; and to be assured of adequate funding for the
    duration of a Junior Research Fellowship.

    See below for method of application.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research
    Fellowships

    Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three
    EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships, tenable for one
    year in the first instance from 1 October 1999 and renewable for
    a second year. Junior Research

    Fellows will receive a book allowance of £250 per annum and
    enjoy dining rights in college. The fellowships are open to men
    and women graduates of any university, but candidates should be
    intending to engage in research at postdoctoral level in the
    fields of the medical, biological, or chemical sciences.

    Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a
    higher research degree before taking up a Junior Research
    Fellowship; and to be assured of adequate funding for the
    duration of a Junior Research Fellowship.

    Application for any of the Junior Research Fellowships
    detailed above, on a form available from the College
    Secretary, should be made to the Principal, Linacre College,
    Oxford OX1 3JA, giving details of the applicant's academic record
    and proposed course of research. Two referees should be asked to
    write directly to the Principal by the closing date for
    applications, 31 January.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Heselton Legal Research Scholarship

    This scholarship, of a value of £1,000 per annum, is open
    to a suitably qualified student studying, or intending to study,
    for a research degree in an area of English Law or European
    Community Law. The scholar must be accepted by Oxford University
    to read for a higher degree, and must be, or become, a member of
    Linacre College.

    The scholarship, tenable from 1 October 1999, will be awarded for
    two years in the first instance, and may be
    extended for a third and final year.
    Application forms may be obtained from the College Secretary,
    Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA. Closing date for applications:
    1 March.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Domus Research Studentships

    Linacre College proposes to elect to not more than four Domus
    Studentships, tenable in the first instance for two years from
    1 October 1999, with the possibility of election for a third year
    subject to satisfactory work and progress. The value of these
    studentships will be £250 per year. They will not normally
    be tenable after the students' liability for university and
    college fees has ended.

    Holders of Domus Studentships will be given priority in the
    allocation of college accommodation.
    Candidates for these studentships will be either students who
    intend to begin reading for a higher degree or diploma at the
    University in October 1999, or current students of Linacre
    College in their first or second years. There is no restriction
    of subject.

    Candidates for these awards should submit an account of their
    previous academic work and a brief description of their proposed
    topic of research to the Principal, Linacre College, Oxford OX1
    3JA, before 31 January, and should ask two academic referees to
    write directly to the Principal about them by that date.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Graduate Scholarships

    Linacre College proposes to elect to two Graduate Scholarships,
    of a value of £2,000 per annum, tenable for one year from
    1 October 1999, with the possibility of renewal for a second
    year.

    The scholarships are open to suitably qualified students reading
    or intending to read for a research degree in the arts and
    humanities. At the time of taking up the scholarships, scholars
    must have been admitted as postgraduate students by a relevant
    faculty of the University, and must be, or become, members of
    Linacre College.

    Application forms may be obtained from the College Secretary,
    Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA. Closing date for applications:
    31 January.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ORIEL COLLEGE


    Hargreaves Senior Scholarship

    Oriel College proposes to elect a Hargreaves Senior Scholar for
    two years from 1 October 1999.

    The scholarship is open to men and women graduates of any
    university. During tenure of the scholarship, the successful
    applicant will be required to be reading for
    a higher degree in the humanities at the University of
    Oxford.

    The scholar will be a member of the senior common room and will
    be entitled to lunches and dinners at the common table and, if
    unmarried, to rooms in college, free of charge. The scholar may
    also receive a sum not exceeding £600 for each year of
    holding the scholarship.

    Applicants should write to the College Secretary, Oriel College,
    Oxford OX1 4EW, enclosing a curriculum vitae
    and a proposed outline of research (eight copies of each),
    together with the names of three referees.

    Candidates are asked to request their referees to send references
    direct to the College Secretary before Friday, 12 February.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ST PETER'S COLLEGE


    Bodossaki Graduate Scholarship in
    Science

    Applications are invited for a Graduate Scholarship established
    by the Bodossaki Foundation in any field of Sci-ence, including
    Mathematics, Engineering, and Medicine

    (especially Immunology and Oncology).

    The scholarship, which is open to Greek citizens who will be
    under the age of thirty on taking up the award, is tenable for
    a period of not more than three years from
    1 October 1999. The emoluments, totalling up to
    £10,500 per annum, cover university and college fees and a
    grant for maintenance. The successful applicant will be required
    to read for a higher degree of the University of Oxford.

    Applicants, who should have obtained a first-class degree of a
    British university or an equivalent Greek or other overseas
    qualification, should write to the Master, enclosing a
    curriculum vitae and outline of research proposed,
    together with the names of three referees. Referees should be
    asked to send references direct to the Master, St Peter's
    College, Oxford OX1 2DL. Applications and references should
    arrive by 1 February. Interviews are likely to be held in Oxford
    on 1 March.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SOMERVILLE COLLEGE


    Graduate Scholarships

    Somerville College proposes to award Graduate Scholarships to
    graduates of any university who intend to work, or are already
    working, for a higher degree at Oxford. The awards are tenable
    for two years from 1 October 1999, with a possibility of renewal
    for a third, and are unrestricted as to subject.

    The value of each scholarship will be £1,500 per annum. At
    least for the first year, scholars will be offered a room at the
    standard rate in the Margery Fry and Elizabeth Nuffield Graduate
    House, which is within the college curtilage, and will also be
    entitled to dine free of charge once a week at high table during
    Full Term.

    Application forms and further particulars for these scholarships
    are available from the College Secretary, Somerville College,
    Oxford OX2 6HD. The closing date for applications is 1 March, and
    candidates should ask two referees to write directly to the
    College Secretary by that date.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WORCESTER COLLEGE


    Wilkinson Junior Research Fellowship
    and Assistant Deanship

    Worcester College invites applications from graduates
    engaged in advanced study or research for the post of Wilkinson
    Junior Research Fellow and Assistant Dean. The post is tenable
    for two years (renewable for a third year), starting 1 September
    1999, and is open to men and women who by that date will not have
    had more than seven continuous years in academic work after their
    first degree. (This limit may be raised for candidates who have
    had interrupted academic careers). The salary will be £4,300
    per annum, with a small entertainment allowance. The successful
    candidate will be a member of the senior common room and will be
    entitled to free lunch and dinner at all times at which the
    college kitchen is open. He or she will be required to live in
    college, accommodation being provided free of charge, to assist
    the Dean and other college officers, and to deputise for the Dean
    in his absence.

    Further details and application forms may be obtained by writing
    to the Provost's Secretary, Worcester College, Oxford OX1 2HB
    (fax: Oxford 793106). The closing date for completed
    applications, including references, is 10 February. Interviews
    of short-listed candidates are expected to take place in the
    first week of March.

    Worcester College exists to promote excellence in education and
    research.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 14 January 1999:<br /> Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to
    advertise in the Gazette

    "../../../stdg/conds.htm">

    Terms and conditions of
    acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    Bodleian Shop

    Our great sale starts 7 Jan. (until 30
    Jan.). You will find many bargains, with even greater
    price reductions. Find us in the Old Schools Quadrangle:
    winter opening hours (until Apr.): Mon.–Fri. 9
    a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–12.30 p.m. Our
    shopping arcade on the Web is open 24 hours, 7 days a
    week, at: http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/arcade/.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Oxford University Newcomers'
    Club

    The Club's equipment store in the
    basement of 13 Norham Gardens is overstocked, and we will
    be open for selling to members of the University on Sun.
    morning, 17 Jan., 10.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m. For sale:
    baby equipment, car seats, prams, electric fires, toys,
    household goods, etc. Parking possible on Sundays. For
    further enquiries, tel.: 558352.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Concert

    Concert, 23 Jan., 8 p.m. The Cherwell
    Singers: religious music of seventeenth-century Spain.
    Juan Gutierrez de Padilla, and others. Exeter College
    Chapel, Oxford. Tickets £6 (£4 concessions)
    from Oxford Playhouse (tel.: Oxford 798600) or at the
    door. Proceeds to the Anthony Nolan Bone Marrow Trust.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuition Offered

    Private tuition given by recently-
    retired academic in chemistry, biology, statistics.
    Research projects/surveys also undertaken. Tel.: Oxford
    559061, e-mail: djcm@aol.com.

    English tuition given by Oxford-
    educated, female, native English speaker; experienced at
    teaching individually or in small groups. Also French to
    GCSE. Dr D. Martin, tel.: Oxford 559061, e-mail:
    djcm@aol.com.

    Piano lessons: experienced teacher;
    adults and children. All grades. Beginners welcome.
    Contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) LRAM. Tel.: Oxford
    (Jericho) 510904.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Services Offered

    Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New
    York to Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next week? All the
    best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect from
    college, home, factory, or elsewhere. Also 24-hour
    photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer workstation,
    high-grade colour photocopying, faxing, laminating,
    binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2
    7DL. Contact Justin Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax:
    514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

    Personal Computer Consultants: we offer
    expert advice and tuition for both hardware and software.
    On-site service at home or in the office. We provide
    upgrades for most computers, or alternatively we now
    supply our range of personally-built to your own
    specifications K Tec computers. We will also supply or
    source software to match your requirements. For a quality
    service matched with competitive prices, contact Chris
    Lewis, tel.: Oxford 461222, fax: 461333.

    Town and Country Trees: professional
    tree surgeons. All aspects of arboriculture undertaken
    including orchard and shrub pruning, planting, hedge
    trimming, stump grinding, etc. Quality work at
    competitive prices. We are fully insured. For a free
    quotation, call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01869 351540.

    North Oxford Therapy. Confidential
    consultation. Offering help with anxiety, depression,
    eating disorders, life goals, phobias, smoking, stress
    management, trauma, deep hypno-relaxation, sleep.
    Analytical therapist. Free initial consultation. Michael
    Minns DMS, DHP, MHPG. Tel.: Oxford 556368.

    Document editing services. Theses,
    research papers, conference papers, and all kinds of
    documents and projects edited by experienced freelance
    copy-editor. Tel.: Oxford 559061, e-mail:
    djcm@aol.com.

    Cross Counties Counselling Consultation
    Service. Treating all ages;
    individuals/families/groups/couples. Specialising: trauma
    (PTSD), depression, life crisis, relationships, anxiety,
    eating disorders, abuse, school-related problems,
    career/personal development issues. Locations: N. Oxford,
    Stratford-upon-Avon, Swindon. Barbera A. Martino, BA,
    MSW, CTS, CQSW. Prin. Cons. Psychotherapist (UK/USA).
    International tel./fax: 44 01386 438010. Free half hour
    consultation with treatment.

    Oxuniprint, Oxford University
    Press—the University Printers: specialising in
    booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing,
    and finishing. Output Bureau provides high-quality output
    from disc from all major DTP programs onto paper,
    bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film;
    high-quality specialist colour copier service. For
    service, quality, and competitive prices contact
    Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon
    Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Domestic Services

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
    Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
    competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
    carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
    cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
    For free estimates and friendly advice, call
    Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

    Czech Au Pair: Michaela seeks Au Pair
    position with friendly family or disabled person. She
    speaks fairly good English, plans to attend college, and
    seeks a 1-year placement. She has first aid training, and
    neither smokes nor drives. Available shortly. M.L. Au
    Pairs. I may be offering therapy, so please leave a
    message (tel.: Oxford 556368) or e-mail:
    michael.minns@talk21.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Situations Vacant

    Green College: part-time Bursary
    Secretary. Experienced secretary required, preferably
    with WordPerfect 6.1, to work in the College office for
    20–25 hours p.w. Salary will be on University
    Clerical and Library Grade 3
    (£11,294–£13,074 p.a.). Further details
    are available from the College Secretary, Green College,
    Radcliffe Observatory, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HG,
    tel.: Oxford (2)74781, to whom applications should be
    made by 25 Jan.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Houses to Let

    Fully-furnished house, central North
    Oxford. Three bedrooms, 2 bathrooms; furnished to very
    high standard; fully equipped. Walking distanace to city
    centre, rail station, most University departments,
    Radcliffe Infirmary. In very pleasant new development
    close to canal and open countryside. Rear garden. Suit
    visiting academic/professional family. This house is
    equipped to move into with minimum hassle (washer, drier,
    dishwasher, fax, answerphone, modem line). Rent
    £1,150 p.c.m. For details and photo, tel.: Oxford
    735710, fax: 327078, e-mail:
    andy.molyneux@radiology.ox.ac.uk.

    Headington: excellent family house in
    quiet cul-de-sac, fully furnished and in very good order.
    Good location for hospitals, Brookes, and city. Large
    reception, 3/4 bedrooms, 2 bath/shower, garage, well-kept
    garden. Available end Jan. for 6/12 months. £950
    p.c.m. Elwood and Co., tel.: Oxford 426410.

    Terrece house in East Oxford, available
    late Mar.–July; fully furnished and equipped. Two
    bedrooms, study, bathroom, living/dining-room, kitchen.
    £550 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford (2)77375, e-mail:
    charles.batty@sjc.ox.ac.uk.

    Two-bedroom, Victorian, terrace house;
    Iffley Fields. Artists' house; great character,
    interesting decor, c.h., mod. cons. Two reception rooms,
    large kitchen, bathroom, garden. Quiet, friendly
    neighbourhood. Available now, any period 2–6 months.
    £650 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 246146.

    Well-situated, furnished, terrace house
    in south Oxford. Close to city centre, park and
    reservoir. Double bedroom, single bedroom, bathroom,
    sitting-room, dining-room, kitchen, and south-facing
    garden. Washing machine, c.h. Suit couple or 2 sharers.
    Non-smokers only please. Available second week Feb. for 6
    months or 1 year. £675 p.c.m. including Council Tax
    but not bills. Deposit and references required. Tel.:
    Oxford 310806.

    Sunny Victorian terrace house, Iffley
    Fields. Two reception (period fireplaces), modern kitchen
    and bathroom, second w.c., large double bedroom,
    bedroom/study (double sofa-bed), utilities cellar,
    antiques, period pine features, nice garden. Suit couple,
    no children. Available late Mar. through Sept. 1999, rent
    £750 p.m. including Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 798069
    or 01873 810982, e-mail: ayers@wadham.oxford.ac.uk.

    Two-bedroom house in central North
    Oxford, very close to Green College. Beautifully
    furnished and very well equipped, with landscaped garden
    and off-street parking. This is a real jewel of a house!
    Non-smokers only, please. Available from 1 Feb. 1999
    initially until 1 Sept. 1999, but can then be available
    for another year.

    Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
    not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
    easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
    Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
    information on properties available and make use of our
    interactive database, priority reservation service
    (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
    service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
    go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
    Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY.
    Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail:
    oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
    http://www.finders.co.uk.

    An Englishman's home is his
    castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we
    have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
    quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding
    area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of
    Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in
    lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
    professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and
    most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at:
    http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
    properties that we have currently available to let.
    Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details
    of your requirements and we will do whatever we can
    without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-
    mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Flats to Let

    Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk
    from city centre, all main university buildings, and
    parks, and very close to the river. Available now for
    short/long let. Two exceptionally well-furnished,
    comfortable flats in extremely quiet, civilised, large
    Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential
    Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. (1)
    First-floor: double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen,
    bathroom. (2) Ground-floor: 1 double, 1 single bedroom,
    drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking;
    large secluded garden. Regret no children or pets.
    Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

    Elegant 1-bedroom ground-floor flat in
    St Margaret's Road, central North Oxford. Double bedroom,
    large sitting-room, kitchen and bathroom. Fully
    furnished; washing machine; gas c.h. Use of charming
    shared garden. Available from 1 Feb. 1999; let 6 months
    or longer preferred. £725 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.:
    Oxford 343384.

    Sunny 1-bedroom flatlet, ground floor,
    with large living-room/kitchen. Fully equipped, TV,
    telephone; share lovely garden. Close to Headington
    hospitals. £475 p.m. inclusive. Tel.: Oxford
    769328.

    Summertown: first-floor, modern,
    purpose-built flat; 2 double bedrooms plus single
    bedroom/study/dining-room. Fully furnished, all mod.
    cons., parking space. Available now for long or short
    lets. Tel.: Oxford 515301.

    Luxurious 2-bedroom flat in 18th-c.
    Woodstock; c.h., plone, washing machine, spin-drier, etc.
    Long or short lease. £650 p.c.m. Available now.
    Tel.: 01993 811488.

    Flat in Victorian house, Iffley Road, 1
    mile city centre. Large sitting-room/kitchen, bedroom,
    bath/shower. Rent to include Council Tax, hot water, some
    c.h. £460 p.c.m. (low because not self-contained in
    daytime). Tel.: 01869 350372.

    Woodstock Road, 2 miles city centre,
    near bus stops: fully-furnished, self-contained, ground-
    floor flat. Open plan living room and bedroom, separate
    kitchen and bathroom. Access to large rear garden. Car
    parking. Available now for 6–12 months. Rent
    £550 p.c.m. plus utilities. Tel.: Oxford 557684.

    Very pleasant flat, 1 mile Oxford city
    centre. Double bedroom with en suiteshower,
    single bedroom, living/dining-room, newly-refurbished
    kitchen and bathroom. Furnished or unfurnished. suit
    professional couple or 2 professional sharers. Rent
    £700 p.c.m. Tel./fax: Oxford 512149, e-mail:
    dorothymyers@gn.apc.org.

    Central London: London University
    professor seeks academic tenant to rent superb large 2-
    bedroom flat in sought-after area of Notting Hill.
    Available spring/summer 1999 to autumn 2000. Rent
    negotiable to right tenant. Tel.: 0171 727 9750.

    Unique character first-floor flat in St
    Clement's area of Oxford, high-quality modern conversion;
    bright, sunny, and spacious; very short walk to city
    centre, colleges, parks and river. Two bedrooms,
    bathroom, utility/store-room, fully-equipped kitchen,
    large sitting/dining-room with coal-effect fire place.
    Fully furnished including washing machine, refrigerator,
    microwave; gas c.h.; residents' parking; secure bike
    space; courtyard; quiet leafy outlook. Suit visiting
    academic/postgrad, or professional. Available now.
    £750 p.c.m. Tel.: 01600 860638.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Accommodation Offered

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
    comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
    exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within easy
    walking distance of the city centre and all main
    university buildings; a stone's throw from the river,
    parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9
    corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea-
    and coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent
    heating. Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms.
    Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Accommodation Sought

    Academic and partner (non-smokers) seek
    a 1/2-bedroom house/apartment in Oxford area, centre
    preferred, from 1 April 1999. contact Dr T. Andrews,
    tel.: Oxford (2)72506/(2)72471 (day), or 249889 (after 6
    p.m.).

    Finders Keepers specialises in managing
    your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
    Oxford letting and managing properties—try us first!
    Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
    opened and are delighted with our service—why not
    pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers,
    226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.:
    Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk,
    Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Mallams Residential Letting is well
    placed to help with your letting and management
    requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
    professional service tailored to your individual
    requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
    property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
    311977.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of
    letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
    foremost letting agents and property managers. We
    specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
    individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
    of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
    in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
    services, or if you simply need some informal help and
    advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
    fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
    Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
    at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
    marketing your property.
    n

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Holiday Lets

    Tuscany: family-owned farm, former
    Machiavelli property, producing high-quality wine and
    cheese, offers farmhouses (sleeping up to 14) and
    apartments, and pool. Half hour central Florence. Tel./fax:
    0039 055 824 9120, e-mail: pgklpoggio@FTBCC.it; Fattoria
    Corzano and Paterno.

    Dordogne Valley. Stone-built house in an
    acre of garden in Lostanges, a small hamlet in the
    eastern part of the Dordogne Valley, with a 270-degree
    view across a fabulous valley from a large elevated
    terrace. Swimming, lake club, tennis, and golf nearby.
    Great walking, cycling, and charming villages everywhere.
    Sleeps 8-10 people. Available from
    £200–£550 p.w. Peter Whitehead, tel.:
    01295 670320 for more details and brochure with
    photos.

    Crete: a traditional Cretan house in
    Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort
    in beautifully-furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine-
    covered sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for
    alfresco dining. In quiet area of Old Town, near long
    sandy beaches, tavernas, shops, and the many interesting
    sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1
    double, 1 twin). Available year-round. £250 p.w.,
    £900 p.m. Tel./fax: 0030 831 56525.

    Tuscan hills: restored farmhouse in
    superb situation near Siena standing amidst its own
    olives and vineyard. Spectacular hill and forest views.
    Art, music, food, wine, and walking in plenty. One hour
    florence, 45 minutes Siena. Very peaceful with full
    services (but no pool), sleeps up to 8 but suitable also
    for smaller parties. Tel./fax: 01252 660899.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 15 January<br /> - 31 January

    Diary


    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff
    Development Seminars
    : places should be booked in advance
    through
    the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
    ProgrammeWeb site.

    Return to
    Contents Page of this issue



    Friday 15 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Tutorial
    teaching—arts', 9.30 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The roots of
    Impressionism', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    FRANCO-BRITISH Study Day: `Tribu, parentèle et
    État en pays d'Islam' (continues Saturday and
    Sunday) (tel.: (2)74220).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Sunday 17 January

    HILARY FULL TERM begins.

    DR RICHARD CROSS preaches the Latin Litany and Sermon,
    St Mary's, 10 a.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Monday 18 January

    DR A. COLES: `Anthropologists' contribution to
    reproductive health programmes: donor perspectives'
    (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology Seminars:
    `Youth, fertility, and reproductive health'), Seminar
    Room, ISCA, 11 a.m.

    M. SATCHELL: `Foundation and emergence: the genesis of
    the English leperhouses, c.1077--1200'
    (lecture series: `Medicine and culture before 1750'),
    Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road, 2.15 p.m.

    DR J. WATSON: `From the double helix to the Human
    Genome Project' (Green College Lectures: `Genes'), Witts
    Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Small group
    teaching', 2 p.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuesday 19 January

    THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is
    cancelled.

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Examining and
    assessing undergraduates', 9.30 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Greeks and their
    gods', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
    (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    M. THOMAS: `The praxis of software engineering'
    (Strachey Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Computing
    Laboratory, 4.30 p.m.

    DR V. FITZGERALD: `The security of international
    finance' (Wolfson College Lectures: `Globalisation and
    insecurity'), the Hall,
    Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

    PROFESSOR A. PELLEGRINI: `Passionate attachments out
    of order: meditations on Judy Garland's body' (Annual
    Visiting Lecture in Women's Studies), Schools, 5 p.m.

    S. PARNELL: `Issues in integrating environment into
    development planning: reflections from Cape Town' (Oxford
    Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society
    seminars), Council Room, Main Building, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

    A. GUNNY: `European travellers to the Middle East in
    the nineteenth century' (Maison Française special
    seminar), Middle East Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Wednesday 20 January

    PROFESSOR R. LITTLEWOOD: `Extreme experiences and
    religious cognitions' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and
    Comparative Religion: `Religion, restitution, and agency:
    lectures in medicine and religious thought'), Schools, 5
    p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. CONNORS: `Out of the Swiss lakes' (Slade
    Lectures: `Borromini and Baroque Rome'), Lecture Hall,
    Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

    R. SAXTON: `Return? Journey? Circles of Light and
    beyond' (public lecture series: `The composer speaks'),
    Holywell Music Room, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR R. DAWKINS: `Universal Darwinism' (first
    lecture in Department for Continuing Education series
    `Darwin's astonishing legacy: evolutionary thinking in
    biology and beyond'), Department of Zoology, 8.15 p.m.
    (admission £5, series ticket £30; tel.
    (2)70360).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Thursday 21 January

    PROFESSOR F. STEWART: `Social and economic consequences
    of conflict: a gender perspective on the results of the
    QEH study' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
    seminars: `Researching gender, conflict, and violence'),
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    J.L. NELSON: `Political thinking in the early Middle
    Ages: trends' (Carlyle Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

    O. WHITE: `Going native in Timbuctoo' (seminar in
    modern French history and politics), Maison
    Française, 5 p.m.

    V. WORTH: ` "La parole est moitié à
    celui qui écoute": listening to the Racinian
    confident(e)' (Maison Française seminar:
    `French literature from the Renaissance to the
    Enlightenment'), Okinaga Room, Wadham, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR C. GAMBLE: `Early beginnings' (Linacre
    Lectures: `The peopling of Britain—the shaping of a
    human landscape'), Lecture Theatre A, the
    Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.15 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Friday 22 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Some small delights in
    eastern art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    M. O'HANLON: ` "Mostly harmless"?: "man-catchers" and
    the colonial imagination in British New Guinea'
    (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars),
    Lecture Theatre, ISCA, 4.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR T.C. SMOUT: `Use and delight: continuity and
    change in attitude to nature' (Ford's Lectures in British
    History: `Use and delight: environmental history in
    Northern England since 1600'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Saturday 23 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Asian silks' (tel. to book:
    (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.).

    COLIN CARR performs music for unaccompanied cello by
    Bach, Crumb, and Piatti, the hall, St John's, 8.30 p.m.
    (admission free, subject to availability of space).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Sunday 24 January

    THE REVD PROFESSOR WILLIAM JOHNSTONE preaches the
    Macbride Sermon on the Application of Messianic Prophecy,
    Hertford, 10 a.m.

    COLIN CARR: master-class (cello), the auditorium, St
    John's, 11 a.m. (admission free, subject to availability
    of space).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Monday 25 January

    DR K. HAMPSHIRE: `Population mobility and regulation of
    fertility among the Fulani of northern Burkina Faso'
    (provisional title) (Institute of Social and
    Cultural Anthropology Seminars: `Youth, fertility, and
    reproductive health'), Seminar Room, ISCA, 11 a.m.

    A. WEAR: `The failure of the English Helmontian
    revolution in therapeutics' (lecture series: `Medicine
    and culture before 1750'), Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury
    Road, 2.15 p.m.

    PROFESSOR M. REEVE: `A proposal about Modestus' (Lowe
    Lectures in Palaeography: `Manuscripts and method: the
    transmission of Vegetius'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR B. SYKES: `The genetic origins of man'
    (Green College Lectures: `Genes'), Witts Lecture Theatre,
    Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuesday 26 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Managing and
    developing effective teams', 9 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Nineteenth-century
    French drawings' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. KAY: `Global business, global economics?'
    (Wolfson College Lectures: `Globalisation and
    insecurity'), the Hall,
    Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

    R. ORAM: `Creating a shift to more environmentally
    friendly transport: the case for tax-free travel
    vouchers' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and
    Society seminars), Council Room, Main Building,
    Mansfield, 5 p.m.

    DR A. RYAN: `No more than two cheers for democracy?'
    (Herbert Spencer Lectures: `Democracy in practice and in
    theory'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Wednesday 27 January

    PROFESSOR R. LITTLEWOOD: ` "Moments of creation"---1: the
    bodily idioms of cosmology' (Wilde Lectures in Natural
    and Comparative Religion: `Religion, restitution, and
    agency: lectures in medicine and religious thought'),
    Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. CONNORS: `The newest profession' (Slade
    Lectures: `Borromini and Baroque Rome'), Lecture Hall,
    Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

    MS M. NEVILLE-ROLFE: `Labour's regional policies: sea
    change or just moving the deck chairs?' (lecture series:
    `Women in Whitehall'), Jacqueline du Pré Music
    Building, St Hilda's, 5.30 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Thursday 28 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Time management',
    9.30 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    DR C. HOYLE

    : `Negotiating domestic violence' (Centre for Cross-
    Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Researching gender,
    conflict, and violence'), Library Wing Seminar Room,
    Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    J.L. NELSON: `Political thinking in the early Middle
    Ages: peers' (Carlyle Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

    R. GILDEA: `Terror and talks in occupied France: the
    fifty hostages of Nantes–Chateaubriant, 1941'
    (seminar in modern French history and politics), Maison
    Française, 5 p.m.

    N. JAS: `The new historiography of science and
    technology and the new century: which perspectives?'
    (Modern History Faculty/Maison Française seminar
    series: `Science and the new century: Britain, France,
    and Germany . 1900'), History of Science
    Seminar Room, Modern History Faculty, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR P. MELLARS: `Homo sapiens' (Linacre
    Lectures: `The peopling of Britain—the shaping of a
    human landscape'), Lecture Theatre A, the
    Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.15 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Friday 29 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Dealing with
    harassment' (day 1), 10 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Limoges enamels', 1.15
    p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
    a.m.--1 p.m.)

    M. ROWLANDS: `Architectural bodies and motion in
    Grassfields material culture' (Institute of Social and
    Cultural Anthropology seminars), Lecture Theatre, ISCA,
    4.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR DIANA RIGG (Cameron Mackintosh Visiting
    Professor of Contemporary Theatre): `Theatre' (inaugural
    lecture), Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR T.C. SMOUT: `Woods of imagination and
    reality' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Use and
    delight: environmental history in Northern England since
    1600'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Saturday 30 January

    ST ANNE'S COLLEGE: `An evening with Bridget Jones' (an
    evening of words and music), Mary Ogilvie Lecture
    Theatre, St Anne's, 6.45 p.m. (tickets, inc. dinner,
    £30 from St Anne's Development Office: tel./fax
    (2)74852).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Sunday 31 January

    UNIVERSITY MUSEUM exhibition opens: British Gas Wildlife
    Photographer of the Year Competition 1998: the winning
    pictures (until 7 March).

    THE RT. REVD DR THOMAS BUTLER preaches the Ramsden
    Sermon, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section