13 January 2000 - No 4534



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 130, No. 4534: 13 January 2000<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

13 January 2000



The following supplement was published
with this Gazette:

Library Integration


University Health and
Safety
information


Return to Gazette
Home Page






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 13 January 2000: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or
recurrent entry.]

  • BOARDS OF FACULTIES

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


    1 Decree

    Council has made the following decree, to come into effect on 28
    January.


    Decree (1): Establishment of E.P. Abraham
    Professorship of Cell
    Biology

    Explanatory note to Decree (1)

    No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor will
    declare carried, without holding the meeting of Congregation on 18
    January, Statute (3) establishing an E.P. Abraham Professorship of
    Cell Biology, which was promulgated on 14 December (see `University
    Agenda' below). Council has accordingly made the following decree,
    which gives effect to consequential changes.

    Text of Decree (1)

    [For text of decree see decree annexed to Statute (3) from
    Gazette No. 4530, 25 November 1999.]

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    2 Status of Master of Arts

    Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
    the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, p. 367) has
    been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for
    membership of Congregation:

    CAROLE ANNE CULL, Radcliffe Infirmary

    SARAH FAITH NEWBURY, Department of Biochemistry

    PAUL JAMES NORTHROP, Department of Statistics

    VERONICA NOEMI ORTENBERG, D.PHIL., St Hugh's College

    ROBERT DAVID ROGERS, Jesus College

    DAVID SHLUGMAN, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    3 Register of Congregation

    Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
    to the Register of Congregation:

    Chattoe, E., MA, Lady Margaret Hall

    Cull, C.A., MA status, Radcliffe Infirmary

    Hooker, S.M., MA, D.Phil., Jesus

    Newbury, S.F., MA status, Department of Biochemistry

    Northrop, P.J., MA status, Department of Statistics

    Ortenberg, V.N., MA status, D.Phil., St Hugh's

    Rogers, R.D., MA status, Jesus

    Shlugman, D., MA status, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics

    Traill, Z.C., MA, Keble

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BOARDS OF FACULTIES

    For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
    28 January, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 13 January 2000: University Agenda<br />

    University Agenda


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CONGREGATION 17 January


    Degree by Special Resolution

    The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
    noon on 17 January, unless by that time the Registrar has received
    notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
    provisions of Tit. II, Sect. VI, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997,
    p. 15) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
    Congregation.

    Text of Special Resolution

    That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

    ALEXANDER GUEMBEL, Lincoln College

    BRONWEN MARGOT MORGAN, MA status, St Hilda's College

    MICHELANGELO ZACCARELLO, Pembroke College

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CONGREGATION 18 January


    Notice

    The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises
    questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of
    which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-
    Chancellor will accordingly declare the statutes approved, the
    preamble adopted, and the special resolution carried without a
    meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11
    (Statutes, 1997, p. 8).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CONGREGATION 8 February 2 p.m.

    ¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of
    any intention to vote against the preambles of the statutes below,
    signed by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the
    Registrar by noon on Monday, 31 January (see the Guide to Procedures
    in Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University Agenda').


    Promulgation of Statutes

    Statute (1): Integration of the University's libraries

    Explanatory note

    The following statute, promoted on the recommendation of the
    Libraries Committee and with the concurrence of the General Board,
    establishes a new body, to be known as the Curators of the University
    Libraries, as the central statutory element in a series of measures
    designed to achieve the greater integration and co-ordination of the
    University's libraries to which Congregation in principle committed
    itself in approving the General Resolution of 6 February 1996
    (Gazette, Vol. 126, p. 728). The new body will replace
    the existing Libraries Committee of Council and the General Board,
    together with the old Libraries Board and the Curators of the
    Bodleian Library, which have been suspended since 1 January 1997
    under the provisions of Decree (5) of 14 November 1996
    (Gazette, Vol. 127, p. 321; Statutes, 1997,
    p. 64). The full range of measures proposed, which have been welcomed
    by Council and the General Board, are set out in the report from the
    Libraries Committee which is published separately as Supplement (1)
    to Gazette No. 4533. Approval of the statute will
    necessitate a substantial amount of consequential legislation, which
    will be brought forward in due course as appropriate.

    (1) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish a body known as
    the Curators of the University Libraries, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS
    FOLLOWS.

    1 In Tit. VIII (Statutes, 1997, p.
    58) delete Sect. III and substitute:

    `Section III. Of the Curators of the University Libraries

    1. There shall be a body called the Curators of the University
    Libraries consisting of:

    (1) the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic Services), who shall be
    chairman;

    (2) one of the Proctors or the Assessor as may be agreed between
    them;

    (3)--(6) four persons elected by Council, of whom one shall be a
    member both of Council and of its Planning and Resource Allocation
    Committee, and of whom two shall be persons not being resident
    holders of teaching, research, or administrative posts in the
    University or in any college or other society

    [There would be an understanding (a) that one of the
    external
    members should be someone with experience of managing a major
    research
    library, and (b) that Council should also appoint a person
    with experience in
    the application of IT to libraries
    ];

    (7)--(11) one member from each of the five Divisional Boards,
    elected by their respective boards;

    (12)--(15) four persons elected by Congregation from amongst its
    members;

    (16) a person elected by the Conference of Colleges;

    (17) a Junior Member elected by the Executive of the Oxford
    University Student Union;

    (18) a Junior Member elected by the Graduate Committee of the
    Oxford University Student Union.

    The curators shall have power to co-opt not more than two additional
    members for such periods as the curators may determine from time to
    time.

    The curators under (3)--(16) shall hold office for four years and
    shall be re-eligible, and the curators under (17) and (18) shall hold
    office for one year and shall be re-eligible; provided always that
    the tenure of office of elected curators shall be subject to their
    retaining the qualifications in virtue of which they were elected;
    and provided also that a curator elected to fill a vacancy caused
    otherwise than by lapse of time shall hold office for the unexpired
    residue only of the period of office of the curator whom he or she
    succeeds.

    The Director of University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian
    shall be secretary to the Curators.

    No Junior Member shall be present for the discussion of, or receive
    the papers or minutes relating to, reserved business as defined in
    Ch. II, Sect. III, cl. 7.

    2. The curators shall be responsible to Council for:

    (a) ensuring that provision is made for the University's
    library and information requirements for teaching and research;

    (b) making financial provision, from funds made available
    to them by Council or from other sources, for such libraries as
    Council shall from time to time determine;

    [Note: the libraries which Council has already
    agreed should be funded
    through the Curators of the University Libraries are the Bodleian
    Library and
    its dependent libraries, the Sackler Library, the Taylor Institution
    Library,
    the Cairns Library, the Institute of Health Sciences Library, the
    English,
    History, Modern Languages, Music, and Theology Faculty Libraries, and
    the
    Social Studies Libraries
    ]

    (c) ensuring that the University's major research
    libraries, including the Bodleian, Sackler, and Taylorian Libraries,
    are maintained as a national and international scholarly resource;

    (d) advising as necessary on the University's trusteeship
    of the collections held in its libraries, including, where
    appropriate, advising on the need for specialist legal or financial
    advice;

    (e) advising on any proposals involving the use of
    resources in the University for library and information provision for
    teaching and research;

    (f) such other responsibilities as may be determined by
    Council from time to time.

    3. The curators shall have authority under Council to make such
    arrangements as are necessary to fulfil their responsibilities and
    shall have such other powers as may be laid down by statute, decree,
    or regulation.

    4. The Director of University Library Services and Bodley's
    Librarian shall be appointed by an electoral board which shall be
    chaired by the Vice-Chancellor or his or her nominee, and the other
    members of which shall be appointed by the curators. The electors in
    making their choice shall have regard to the direction given by Sir
    Thomas Bodley, that Bodley's Librarian should be `one that is noted
    and known for a diligent student, and in all his conversation to be
    trusty, active, and discreet: a graduate also, and a linguist'.

    5. The Director of University Library Services and Bodley's
    Librarian shall act for the curators and shall be responsible to them
    in the exercise of their powers.

    6. The curators shall approve arrangements for the delegation of
    appointments within the University Library Services, provided that
    the appointment of senior library staff at grade 6 shall be subject
    to the approval of the curators on the recommendation of the Director
    of University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian.'

    2 Ibid., delete Sect. IV (p. 60) and renumber
    existing Sectt. V--VI (pp. 62--3) as Sectt. IV--V.

    3 This statute shall have immediate effect,
    provided that until such time as the membership of the curators is
    constituted their powers shall be vested in the Libraries Committee;
    and provided also that the initial periods of appointment of the
    first elected curators shall be so varied as to procure a regular
    rotation of subsequent appointments.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Statute (2): Conversion of the Wilde Readership in Mental
    Philosophy to a Professorship of Mental Philosophy

    Explanatory note

    The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the
    statute is approved, which are promoted on the recommendation of the
    Literae Humaniores Board and with the concurrence of the General
    Board, convert the Wilde Readership in Mental Philosophy to the Wilde
    Professorship of Mental Philosophy.

    (2) WHEREAS it is expedient to convert the Wilde
    Readership in Mental Philosophy to the Wilde Professorship of Mental
    Philosophy, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

    1 In Tit. XV, Sect. II, cl. 1, concerning
    professorships (Statutes, 1997, p. 110, as renumbered by
    Statute (2) approved by Congregation on 29 June 1999,
    Gazette, Vol. 129, pp. 1433, 1482), after `Professorship
    of Comparative Philology' insert:

    `Wilde Professorship of Mental Philosophy'.

    2 In Tit. XVI, Sect. XIV, cl. 6, concerning the
    John Locke Prize (p. 133, as renumbered by the same statute), delete
    `Wilde Reader in Mental Philosophy' and substitute `Wilde Professor
    of Mental Philosophy'.

    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

    1 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, SCHEDULE, concerning official
    members of faculty boards (Statutes, 1997, p. 244),
    under Literae Humaniores, delete `Philosophy, Mental, Wilde Reader
    in' and after `Philology, Comparative' insert:

    `Philosophy, Mental, Wilde'.

    2 Ibid. (p. 246), under Social Studies, delete
    `Philosophy, Mental, Wilde Reader in' and after `Logic, Wykeham'
    insert:

    `Philosophy, Mental, Wilde'.

    3 Ibid., Sect. XII, concerning membership of
    the Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies (p. 257, as
    renumbered by Decree (1) of 28 May 1998, Gazette, Vol.
    128, p. 1284), delete `The Wilde Reader in Mental Philosophy' and
    substitute:

    `The Wilde Professor of Mental Philosophy'.

    4 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, SCHEDULE A,
    concerning professorships (p. 393), after `Dr Lee's Professor of
    Experimental Philosophy' insert:

    `Wilde Professor of Mental Philosophy'.

    5 Ibid., Sect. III, concerning particular
    professorships (p. 492), delete § 253 and substitute:

    `§ 253. Wilde Professor of Mental Philosophy

    1. The Wilde Professor shall lecture and give instruction in
    Mental Philosophy, and shall from time to time lecture on the more
    theoretical aspects of Psychology.

    2. The professor shall be elected by a board of electors
    consisting of:

    (1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the President of Corpus Christi
    College is Vice-Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

    (2) the President of Corpus Christi College, or, if the President
    is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the Governing
    Body of Corpus Christi College;

    (3) a person appointed by the Governing Body of Corpus Christi
    College;

    (4) a person appointed by Council;

    (5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

    (7), (8) two persons elected by the Board of the Faculty of
    Literae Humaniores;

    (9) a person elected by the Board of the Faculty of Psychological
    Studies.

    3. For the purposes of this professorship the term "Mental
    Philosophy" shall be taken to mean the theoretical and
    conceptual study of the human mind.

    4. The interest on the capital sum provided for the endowment of
    the post shall be used towards defraying the stipend of the
    professor.

    5. This decree may be altered from time to time; provided always
    that

    (i) the title of the professorship shall be retained;

    (ii) the main object of the professorship shall be kept in
    view, namely, the promotion of the study of Mental Philosophy among
    the Junior Members of the University of Oxford.

    6. The professor shall be subject to the General Provisions of the
    decree concerning the duties of professors and to those Particular
    Provisions of the same decree which are applicable to this chair.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 13 January 2000: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or
    recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    UNIVERSITY PREACHERS


    Hilary Term 2000

    Thursday, 13 January, at 8 a.m. THE REVD HUGH WHITE, Fellow of
    St Catherine's College, Celebrant, Holy Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 16 January, at 10 a.m. DR MARK EDWARDS, Tutor in
    Theology, Christ Church. (Latin Litany and Sermon.) At St
    Mary's.

    Sunday, 23 January, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR ROBERT GORDON, Regius
    Professor of Hebrew, Fellow of St Catharine's College, Cambridge.
    (Macbride Sermon on the Application of Messianic Prophecy.)
    At Hertford College.

    Sunday, 30 January, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY, Dean
    of Christ Church, Honorary Fellow of Exeter College. At the
    Cathedral
    .

    *Sunday, 6 February, at 10 a.m. THE REVD DR FRASER WATTS,
    Starbridge Lecturer in Theology and Natural Science, University of Cambridge.
    (Sermon on Religion and Science.) At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 13 February, at 10 a.m. THE REVD CANON PROFESSOR
    KEITH WARD, Professor of Divinity, Canon of Christ Church. (Sermon on
    Religion and Science
    .) At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 20 February, at 10 a.m. DR PAULINE RUDD, University
    Research Lecturer, Faculty of Biological Sciences. (Sermon on Religion
    and Science
    .) At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 27 February, at 10 a.m. THE REVD DR JOHN
    POLKINGHORNE, former President of Queens' College, Cambridge. (Sermon
    on Religion and Science
    .) At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 5 March, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD FR FERGUS KERR,
    Regent of Blackfriars. (Sermon on the Grace of Humility.) At St
    Mary's.

    *Sunday, 12 March, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR CANON DAVID
    BROWN, Van Mildert Professor of Divinity, University of Durham. (Sermon
    for the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary
    .) At Oriel
    College
    .

    *On these days Doctors will wear their robes.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CHICHELE PROFESSORSHIP OF ECONOMIC HISTORY

    AVNER OFFER, MA, D.PHIL. (BA Jerusalem), Fellow of Nuffield College and
    Reader in Recent Social and Economic History, has been appointed to the
    professorship with effect from 1 August 2000.

    Dr Offer will be a fellow of All Souls College.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    HAROLD VYVYAN HARMSWORTH VISITING
    PROFESSORSHIP OF AMERICAN HISTORY 2000–1

    TIMOTHY HALL BREEN (BA, MA, PH.D. Yale), William Smith Mason Professor of
    American History and Chair, Department of History, Northwestern University,
    has been elected to the professorship for the academic year 2000–1,
    replacing Professor R. Beeman.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    HAROLD VYVYAN HARMSWORTH VISITING
    PROFESSORSHIP OF AMERICAN HISTORY 2003–4

    RICHARD R. BEEMAN (AB California, MA William and Mary College, PH.D.
    Chicago), Professor of History, Dean of the College, and Deputy Dean, School
    of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, who had accepted election
    for the academic year 2000–1, has now been appointed for the academic
    year 2003–4.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DR LEE'S PROFESSORSHIP OF CHEMISTRY

    JACOB KLEIN (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Professor, Weizmann Institute of Science,
    Rehovot, Israel, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1
    October 2000.

    Professor Klein will be a fellow of Exeter College.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    RECOGNITION OF DISTINCTION: CHANGE OF TITLE

    The title awarded to B. Bujic, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Music and
    Fellow of Magdalen College, in the 1996–7 Recognition of Distinction
    exercise, has been changed to Reader in Musicology.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BRIAN JOHNSON PRIZE IN PATHOLOGY 1999

    The Prize has been awarded to SARAH ISABEL SHEIKH, Corpus Christi College.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    JOHN LOCKE PRIZE IN MENTAL PHILOSOPHY 1999

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to SCOTT SCHUCHART, Wolfson College, and
    HEATHER STEWART, Magdalen College.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    THE FUNDING OF RESEARCH: TRANSPARENCY
    REVIEW

    The 1998 Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR) White Paper, which listed
    £1.1 billion of additional funds for the Science Budget (including £0.4
    billion from the Wellcome Trust), stated: `... the Government will ... ensure that
    [the Higher Education] Funding Councils and the Research Councils work
    together to deliver better value, transparency and targeting in the use of
    science research funding.'

    There was already in existence a Joint Costing and Pricing Steering Group
    (JCPSG), administering a joint initiative by the Higher Education Funding
    Council for England (HEFCE) and the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and
    Principals (CVCP) to improve costing and pricing in the HE sector. Following
    the CSR, a Transparency Review Steering Group (TRSG) was set up under the
    chairmanship of the Director General of the Research Councils, Dr John Taylor
    (who had been asked to take the review forward). The steering group contains
    representatives of the Funding Councils and the Research Councils;
    universities are represented by Dr Ken Edwards, Vice-Chancellor of the
    University of Leicester (from the CVCP Research Policy Sector Group) and the
    Finance Directors of the Universities of Bristol and Surrey; and Professor
    David Westbury (Chairman of the JCPSG) and Dr Chris Henshall (Deputy
    Director of Research and Development, Department of Health) also attend.

    The TRSG delegated the review to the JCPSG, which carried out an extensive
    consultation exercise within the HE sector. The resulting recommendations were
    accepted by the TRSG in June 1999 and now have to be implemented.

    The main stated objective of the review, which is mandatory on the HE sector,
    is `for institutions to adopt a consistent approach to costing which will enable
    them to account in a comparable way for how they spend funds on their main
    activities of teaching and research'. Although it had been intended that
    outcomes would be available in time for the Government's next CSR, that
    review has been brought forward to 2000, and therefore only sample results
    will be available. Nevertheless, it is clear that the Government attaches great
    importance to the satisfactory implementation of the recommendations.

    Each institution is required, using a sector-wide consistent costing
    methodology based on statistically valid time-allocation data, to produce five
    annual `headline' figures for report to the Treasury. These must represent the
    actual full costs incurred in providing the following, and must equate to the
    institution's total costs in the year:

    (1) publicly funded teaching;

    (2) other, non-publicly funded, teaching;

    (3) publicly funded research;

    (4) other, non-publicly funded, research;

    (5) other activities.

    Implementation is being carried out in three phases: eight pilot institutions
    (not including Oxford) are required to report on 1998--9 data; the remaining
    twenty-three research-intensive institutions (including Oxford) are required
    to report on 1999--2000 costs in the summer of 2001; the rest of the sector
    has to report on robust 2000--1 data in the summer of 2002.

    In order to implement the review within Oxford, Mr Vice-Chancellor has set up
    a working group under the chairmanship of Professor S.D. Iversen, the
    Pro-Vice-Chancellor with special responsibility for research, the other members
    of which are the Chairman of the General Board (Dr R.C.S. Walker), the
    Chairman of the Conference of Colleges (Professor A.M. Cameron, the Warden
    of Keble), the Provost of Queen's (Sir Alan Budd), the Bursar of Corpus
    Christi (Mr B.C. Ruck Keene), the Head of Administration in the Nuffield
    Department of Clinical Medicine (Ms L. Sims), the Director of Finance and
    Secretary of the Chest (Mr J.R. Clements), the Head of Planning and Resource
    Allocation (Mr M.D. Sibly), and the Head of Management Accounting (Mr K.P.
    Davies). A key element in the successful completion of the exercise will be the
    collection of information on staff activity, and the working group has set up
    two sub-groups, chaired by the Warden of Keble and Ms Sims respectively, to
    look into the implications for colleges and departments.

    The working group has agreed the following terms of reference:

    (a) to develop full-cost accounting in accordance with the
    requirements of the Transparency Review;

    (b) to agree a costing strategy;

    (c) to agree the costing methodology to be used;

    (d) to agree a timetable for implementation of the scheme;

    (e) to submit a bid to HEFCE for non-recurrent funding to
    support the project;

    (f) to publicise the requirements of the Transparency Review and
    of the project, together with their benefits, within the wider University;

    (g) to help to deal with the concerns and fears of departments,
    colleges, and individual members of staff and to facilitate obtaining maximum
    co-operation with the project;

    ( h) to monitor the day-to-day operations of those assigned by
    the steering group to carry out the implementation of the costing work;

    (i) to review the reasonableness of results produced by the project;

    (j) to disseminate cost information so it may be used to inform
    decision-making;

    (k) to ensure that all external reporting requirements are met.

    The benefits to the University will be that the results will enable it to
    understand the full cost of all the activities which it carries out (this will
    inform and influence strategic decision-making) and will assist in
    understanding how costs and activities are shared between the central
    University and the colleges; the results will also inform the allocation of
    resources within the new organisational structure; and they will assist in
    negotiating appropriate levels of overheads from research contracts.

    Because of the long-term strategic significance of the results, the group will
    report regularly through its chairman to Council, as the University's senior
    executive body, on the project's progress.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LANGUAGE CENTRE

    The 1999–2000 programme of courses continues this term. Most courses
    are already full, with waiting lists. However, there are still a few spaces at
    the more advanced levels and in the EFL courses for spouses and in British
    Culture.

    The Language Library has a large and expanding selection of courses, audio
    and videotapes, CALL programs, and other language learning materials in 111
    languages, as well as live television in eleven languages and extensive links
    to language-learning Web sites through its own Web pages.

    The centre is open 9.30 a.m.–9 p.m., Monday–Thursday, and 9.30
    a.m.–6.30 p.m. on Fridays, from the beginning of noughth week until the
    end of ninth week (open until 6.30 p.m. on the Fridays of noughth week and
    ninth week); it is also open on Saturdays in full term, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
    New users should time their first visit to arrive ten minutes before 10 a.m. or
    2 p.m., when introductory talks take place.

    The Lambda Project caters for those who wish to follow a guided programme
    of self-study in French, German, or Spanish. Details of this and all other
    activities can be found on the Language Centre Web site, at
    http://units.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre. Other information may be
    obtained by telephoning Oxford (2)83360, by e-mailing to admin@lang.ox.ac.uk,
    or calling at the centre, at 12 Woodstock Road.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE
    UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

    From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to individual cases
    of financial hardship among widows of former members of the Federated
    Superannuation System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of Oxford
    Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate
    proven cases of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the
    Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.
    All cases are dealt with in the strictest confidence.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

    Exhibitions now open

    Japanese prints: a selection from the Ashmolean's collection (until 30
    January
    )

    In the red: an exhibition on the history of debt (until 30 April)

    Forthcoming exhibitions

    Gino Severini: from Futurism to Classicism—a national touring exhibition
    organised by the Hayward Gallery (18 January–5 March)

    Golden Pages: Qurans and prayer-books from the H.E. Shaik Ghasan I. Shaker
    Collection (3 February–2 April)

    Eighteenth-century Venetian drawings from the Ashmolean's collection (14
    March–4 June
    )

    Francis Ernest Jackson and his School: includes paintings, drawings, prints,
    and posters by Jackson and his students (21 March–4 June)

    Crucifixion 2000—paintings by the contemporary Palestinian artist Laila
    al-Shawa (4 April–14 May)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BODLEIAN LIBRARY


    Gordon Duff Prize 2000

    In accordance with the regulations for the administration of the Gordon Duff
    Prize (Statutes, 1997, p.603), a competition is announced for a
    prize of £150 for an unpublished essay on any of the following subjects:
    bibliography, palaeography, typography, book-binding, book illustration, the
    science of books and manuscripts, and the arts relating thereto.

    The competition is open to all members of the University. The essay shall be
    of not more than 12,000 words. No essay may be submitted unless the subject
    has first been approved. Candidates must submit their proposed subjects not
    later than 30 April, and essays must be received by 1 August.

    All communications should be addressed to the Director of University Library
    Services and Bodley's Librarian at the Bodleian Library.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    COMMITTEE FOR THE MUSEUMS AND SCIENTIFIC
    COLLECTIONS (CMSC)

    The CMSC considers matters of mutual interest to the museums and scientific
    collections, and reports to the General Board of the Faculties. The CMSC's
    newsletter, which is aimed at staff in the museums and collections, is now
    available on the Web at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/oxonly/cmsc.

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 13 January 2000: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    SPEAKER'S LECTURES IN BIBLICAL STUDIES
    1999–2001

    Future hope and present reality

    ANDREW CHESTER, University Lecturer, the Divinity School, University
    of Cambridge, will deliver his first series of Speaker's Lectures at
    5 p.m. on the following Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

    1 Feb.: `Future hope and the end of time.'

    8 Feb.: `Prophecy: true or false?'

    15 Feb.: `Land and nation.'

    22 Feb.: `Kingdom and Messiah.'

    29 Feb.: `Resurrection and transformation.'

    7 Mar.: `Paradise restored.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SLADE LECTURES 2000

    Ruskin today

    PROFESSOR ROBERT HEWISON, Professor in Literary and Cultural Studies,
    University of Lancaster, will deliver the Slade Lectures at 5 p.m. on
    the following days in the Lecture Hall, the University Museum of
    Natural History. The lectures will be given on Thursdays, with the
    exception of the inaugural lecture, to be given on Wednesday, 19
    January.

    These lectures are open to the public.

    19 Jan. (Inaugural Lecture): `Ruskin today.'

    27 Jan.: ` "All my eye and Betty Martin":
    the formation of Ruskin's taste and the Ruskin family art
    collection.'

    3 Feb.: ` "I think he must have read my
    book": Ruskin and the writing and rewriting of Turner.'

    10 Feb.: ` "Nobody might have taken the trouble
    to look": Ruskin and the stones of Venice.'

    17 Feb.: ` "A new and noble school in
    England": Ruskin and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.'

    24 Feb.: ` "The two paths": Ruskin after
    1860.'

    2 Mar.: ` "The triumph of the innocents":
    Ruskin, Holman Hunt, and spiritualism.'

    9 Mar.: `Ruskin tomorrow.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CAMERON MACKINTOSH LECTURES

    PROFESSOR NICHOLAS HYTNER will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 4
    February, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's
    College.

    There will be an open meeting for students connected with drama the
    following day, Saturday, 5 February (time and venue to be announced).

    Subject: `An anti-hauteur view of
    directing.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    NEWS INTERNATIONAL VISITING PROFESSOR OF
    BROADCAST MEDIA

    PROFESSOR ROGER GRAEF will lecture at 6 p.m. on the following days.
    The lectures on 17 and 24 January will be given in the Saskatchewan
    Room, Exeter College; the final two lectures will be given in Green
    College.

    Mon. 17 Jan.: `Brave New World: public service broadcasting in
    the twenty-first century.'

    Mon. 24 Jan.: `Now you see it, now you don't: visions of reality
    in the twenty-first century.'

    Tue. 1 Feb.: `Secrets of the cutting-room.' (Master-
    class/workshop
    )

    Tue. 8 Feb.: `Moveable feast: ethics in the media.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    J.W. JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR PETER HOLLAND, Division of Zoology, the University of
    Reading, will deliver a Jenkinson Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 29
    February, in Lecture Theatre B, the Zoology/Psychology Building.
    Refreshments will be served after the lecture.

    Tickets are not required for admission.

    Subject: `Hox genes in evolution and development:
    the exception or the rule?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

    Macroecology and global change

    The following seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

    Conveners: R.J. Whittaker, MA, and K.J. Willis (Ph.D.
    Cambridge), University Lecturers in Human Ecology.

    DR J. NEWMAN

    21 Jan.: `A bottom-up analysis of component
    community response to elevated carbon dioxide.'

    PROFESSOR K. GASTON, Sheffield

    28 Jan.: To be announced.

    PROFESSOR K. BENNETT, Uppsala

    4 Feb.: ` "Holocene" environmental change
    in southern Chile: new evidence from post-glacial lake
    sediments.'

    DR T. BLACKBURN, Imperial College

    11 Feb.: `Extinction, endemism, and the avifauna of
    New Zealand.'

    DR A. CHEPSTOW-LUSTY, Cambridge

    18 Feb.: `Inca agroforestry: lessons from the
    past.'

    PROFESSOR F.I. WOODWARD, Sheffield

    25 Feb.: `Climate, CO2, and vegetation:
    past, present, future.'

    DR J. KERR

    3 Mar.: `Scale, patterns, and the limits of data
    resolution: perspectives on North American biodiversity.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Oxford Seminars in Cartography

    IAN GREGORY and HUMPHREY SOUTHALL, University of Portsmouth, will
    give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 10 February, in the School of
    Geography.

    Subject: `A historical GIS for Great Britain.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

    Fertility and Reproduction Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Mondays in the
    basement Seminar Room, the Institute of Social and Cultural
    Anthropology.

    Convener: Dr Soraya Tremayne.

    DR S. CASTLE, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    17 Jan.: `Adolescent sexual behaviour in Mali.'

    DR A. ANKOMAN, Wales

    24 Jan.: `The use and misuse of anthropology in
    HIV/AIDS research and prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.'

    DR M. KONRAD, Goldsmiths' College, London

    31 Jan.: `Fertility and the substance of
    anonymity.'

    G. BARRETT, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    7 Feb.: `How can unintended pregnancy be measured?
    Implications of findings from qualitative interviews.'

    R. BARBER

    14 Feb.: `Looking after children: child public
    health.'

    DR TREMAYNE:

    21 Feb.: `Population policy in post-revolutionary Iran.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    The Genome Revolutions

    The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

    Conveners: J.A. Hodgkin (Ph.D. Cambridge), Professor of
    Genetics, and D.B. Roberts, MA, Reader in Genetics.

    DR J. SULSTON, Sanger Centre, Cambridge

    27 Jan.: `An overview of genome sequencing.'

    PROFESSOR S. OLIVER, Manchester

    10 Feb.: `The genome of the yeast S.
    cerevisiae
    .'

    DR J. PARKHILL, Sanger Centre, Cambridge

    24 Feb.: `Bacterial genomes.'

    PROFESSOR HODGKIN

    9 Mar.: `The genome of the nematode C.
    elegans
    .'

    PROFESSOR M. ASHBURNER, Cambridge

    11 May: `The Drosophila genome.'

    PROFESSOR M. BEVAN, John Innes Institute, Norwich

    18 May: `A flourishing weed: sequencing the
    Arabidopsis genome.'

    DR I. JACKSON, Edinburgh

    25 May: `The genome of the mouse.'

    DR D. BENTLEY, Sanger Centre, Cambridge

    15 June: `The human genome.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Large
    Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

    DR D. STOCK, Cambridge

    21 Jan.: `Structure of the transmembrane rotary
    motor in ATP synthase.'

    DR R. WILLIAMS, Cambridge

    28 Jan.: `A structural view of phospholid
    signalling.'

    DR C.A. OUZOUNIS, Cambridge

    18 Feb.: `Mining text and sequences for protein
    interactions.'

    PROFESSOR S. IWATA, Uppsala

    25 Feb.: `Crystallisation and crystallographic
    studies of the respiratory membrane proteins.'

    DR J. LADBURY, University College, London

    3 Mar.: `Specificity in tyrosine kinase-mediated
    signalling.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Department of Psychiatry

    The following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Seminar Room, the Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford Hospital.

    Convener: G.M. Goodwin, BM, MA, D.Phil., W.A. Handley
    Professor of Psychiatry.

    DR R. PEVELER, Southampton

    1 Feb.: `Depressive illness in primary care.'

    PROFESSOR L. E. DELISI, State University of New York

    15 Feb.: `Schizophrenia as a life-time disorder of
    brain plasticity.'

    DR D. HEALY, Bangor

    22 Feb.: `Antidepressants: current controversies.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE, PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

    The following research seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of
    Pathology.

    Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Pathology.

    DR N. SAUNDERS

    13 Jan.: `Insights into the biology of serogroup B
    Neisseria mengitidis from the complete genome sequence.'

    PROFESSOR M. FERGUSON, Dundee

    3 Feb.: `The structure and biosynthesis of parasite
    and mammalian GPI anchors.'

    PROFESSOR B. SYKES

    10 Feb.: `The genetics of history.'

    DR M. ROBINSON, Cambridge

    17 Feb.: `Coated vesicle adaptors: friends and
    family.'

    DR A. BLOCKER, Institut Pasteur, Paris

    24 Feb.: `Functional and structural analysis of the
    type III secretion of Shigella Flexneri.'

    P. KRAMER, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg

    16 Mar.: `CD95 (APO-1/Fas) mediated apoptosis:
    signalling and disease.' (Norman Heatley Lecture)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

    Text and book: new studies in literature and history

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays (unless
    indicated otherwise) in Room 11, the St Cross Building.

    Convener: P.D. McDonald, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer
    (CUF) in English Language and Literature.

    DR S. DIXON

    28 Jan.: `The dynamics of the manuscript verse
    miscellany.'

    PROFESSOR R. GROSS

    Mon. 14 Feb., 5 p.m.: `Print and the public sphere
    in the new American republic.'

    DR R. MIGHALL

    25 Feb.: `How do you edit a classic?'

    DR H. SMALL

    10 Mar.: `Liberal editing: literature and science
    in the New Fortnightly Review and the nineteenth
    century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    Lecture

    DR FIONA MACINTOSH, Senior Research Fellow, the Archive of
    Performances of Greek and Roman Drama, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 2 February, in the Classics and Modern Languages Common
    Room, 67 St Giles'.

    Conveners: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Classical Languages and Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages.

    Subject: `Oedipus in France.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Philosophy of Physics seminars

    The following seminars will take place at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: G. Bacciagaluppi, D.Phil., Junior Lecturer in
    the Philosophy of Physics, J.N. Butterfield, MA, Senior Research
    Fellow, All Souls College, and S. Saunders, MA, University Lecturer
    in the Philosophy of Physics.

    DR N. LINDEN, Bristol

    20 Jan.: `Quantum entanglement.'

    SANG WOOK YI, LSE

    27 Jan.: `Renormalisation group methods in
    condensed matter physics.'

    DR J. HALLIWELL, Imperial College

    3 Feb.: `Decoherence and records.'

    PROFESSOR M. REDHEAD, LSE

    10 Feb.: `The intelligibility of the universe.'

    PROFESSOR L. SMOLIN, Imperial College

    17 Feb.: `A holographic view of relational space
    and time.'

    O. POOLEY

    24 Feb.: `Relationism or substantivalism? The
    debate's recent transformations.'

    DR A. VALENTINI, Augustus College

    2 Mar.: `Signal-locality in hidden variable
    theories.'

    DR C. DEWDNEY, Portsmouth

    9 Mar.: `Reality, nonlocality, and Lorentz-
    invariance in quantum mechanics.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES AND COMMITTEE FOR
    ARCHAEOLOGY

    Joint seminar in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History: the
    City of Rome

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Old
    Library, All Souls College. Further details may be obtained from
    Professor E.M. Steinby, All Souls College (telephone: Oxford
    (2)78248, fax: (2)78256).

    T.P. WISEMAN, University of Exeter

    17 Jan.: `Topography and legend.'

    P. CASTRÉN, Helsinki

    24 Jan.: `Vici and
    regiones: addresses in late antique Rome.'

    F.G.B. MILLAR

    31 Jan.: `The Lexicon Topographicum Urbis
    Romae
    and history.'

    T. CORNELL, Manchester

    7 Feb.: `Reconstructing early Rome.'

    P. ZANKER, Rome

    14 Feb.: `The ruins of Rome and their public, past
    and present.'

    A. CLARIDGE

    21 Feb.: `The Province Reliefs and the
    Hadrianeum.'

    E.M. STEINBY

    28 Feb.: `Monumenta: who built what in
    ancient Rome.'

    S. PANCIERA, Rome

    6 Mar.: `Villae e domus:
    sull'identificazione dei proprietari.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    Lecture

    PROFESSOR R.M. BEATON, King's College, London, will lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Thursday, 20 January, in the ground-floor lecture room, 47
    Wellington Square.

    Convener: P.A. Mackridge, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Modern Greek.

    Subject: `Seferis and the novel.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Graduate Seminar in Spanish Studies

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Taylor Institution.

    Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII
    Professor of Spanish Studies, and C.H. Griffin, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer in Latin American Literature.

    DR COLIN THOMPSON

    18 Jan.: `Eutrapelia and exemplarity in the
    Novelas ejemplares.'

    PROFESSOR JEREMY LAWRANCE, Manchester

    25 Jan.: `The Turks in the Spanish imagination,
    1400–1550.'

    DR JUAN CARLOS BAYO JULVE

    8 Feb.: `La organización del discurso
    poético en el Cantar de Mio Cid.'

    RAFAEL ARRAÍZ LUCCA, IDEA, Caracas

    15 Feb.: `José Antonio Ramos Sucre
    (1890–1930): vida y obra.'

    DR ANDREW GINGER, Edinburgh

    22 Feb.: `Writing about oneself in nineteenth-
    century Spain: the strange case of Ros de Olano's Jornadas
    de retorno
    .'

    DR ROBERT PRING-MILL

    29 Feb.: `The use of symbolic numbers in Llull's
    Arbre de Sciència.'

    CARLOS LECHNER, Columbia

    7 Mar.: `Marriage manuals in early modern Spain.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MODERN HISTORY

    Seminar in Medieval History

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor
    of Medieval History, and C.P. Wormald, MA, University Lecturer (CUF)
    in Modern History.

    PROFESSOR D. ROLLASTON, Durham

    17 Jan.: `Symeon of Durham and the shaping of the
    past.'

    H. DOHERTY

    24 Jan.: `The Angevins in north-west England.'

    DR R. STUDD, Keele

    31 Jan.: `Reclaiming the Angevin Empire.'

    N. KARN

    7 Feb.: `Writers and collectors of letters in later
    twelfth-century monasteries.'

    DR A. GRANSDEN, Cambridge

    14 Feb.: `The price of votes in abbatial elections:
    Bury St Edmunds.'

    M. WHITTOW

    21 Feb.: `Latins in the Byzantine Empire in the
    eleventh and twelfth centuries.'

    DR L. USILTON, North Carolina

    28 Feb.: `The king's indigent army: Royal Corrodies
    in medieval England.'

    S. BAXTER

    6 Mar.: `The earls of Mercia and their commended
    men.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Seminar on knowledge and its institutions in early modern Europe

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: J.A. Bennett, MA, Keeper, the Museum of the
    History of Science, and I.W.F. Maclean, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Renaissance Studies.

    PROFESSOR R. EVANS

    19 Jan.: `Knowledge and its institutions in central
    and eastern Europe.'

    PROFESSOR N. MOUT, Leiden

    26 Jan.: `The Lipsius Circle.'

    DR N. DAVIDSON

    2 Feb.: `The Incogniti in Venice and the
    development of the academy in early modern Italy.'

    DR R.G. LEWIS

    9 Feb.: `The Geneva Academy in a changing world,
    c.1560–c.1700: the rival claims
    of constancy and concord.'

    R. BRIGGS

    16 Feb.: `The Académie Royale des
    Sciences.'

    DR R. SERJEANTSON, Cambridge

    23 Feb.: `The arts course and seventeenth-century
    British universities: functions and challenges.'

    PROFESSOR B. MORAN, Nevada

    1 Mar.: `Distinguishing sites and redefining
    knowledge: chemistry between city, court, and academy in early
    modern Germany.'

    PROFESSOR M. FEINGOLD, Virginia Polytechnic Institute

    8 Mar.: `Mathematicians and naturalists: Isaac
    Newton and the nature of the early Royal Society.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Commonwealth History Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Modern History Faculty. Postgraduate research student presentions
    will be made at the final two meetings, on 3 March and 10 March.

    PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE

    21 Jan.: `The local state and the informal economy:
    India's real structural adjustment over the last two
    decades.'

    PROFESSOR L. CAPLAN, Professor Emeritus, SOAS, London

    28 Jan.: `Children of colonialism: history and
    anthropology of the Anglo-Indian community in contemporary
    India.'

    DR E. BOEHMER, Leeds

    4 Feb.: `How colonial is it? Literatures of empire
    reconsidered.'

    DR R. ROGAN

    11 Feb.: `Rewriting the Palestine War of 1948.'

    PROFESSOR J.D.Y. PEEL, SOAS, London

    18 Feb.: `From history to anthropology and back:
    studying religious change in West Africa between the 1960s and
    the 1990s.'

    DR M. DOBSON and DR M. MALOWANY, Wellcome Unit for the History of
    Medicine

    25 Feb.: `Bounce back malaria: the fears and
    challenges of malaria control in twentieth-century East Africa.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MODERN HISTORY, MEDIEVAL AND MODERN
    LANGUAGES

    Seminar on the history of the book, 1450–1800

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R.G. Lewis, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer
    (CUF) in Modern History, and I.W.F. Maclean, MA, D.Phil., Professor
    of Renaissance Studies.

    DR A.R.A. HOBSON

    21 Jan.: `Plaquette bindings in the fifteenth and
    sixteenth centuries.'

    DR L. HELINGA

    28 Jan.: `The Historia Fiorentina
    (1476): problems of textual transmission.'

    DR K. JENSEN, British Library

    4 Feb.: `Cataloguing incunabula: bibliographers
    versus readers.'

    DR T. CLAYTON

    11 Feb.: `The print trade in Europe in the
    eighteenth century.'

    I. GADD, Cambridge

    18 Feb.: `Ecclesiastical law and the English book
    trade prior to 1641: some preliminary findings.'

    PROFESSOR J. FLOOD, Institute of Germanic Studies, University of
    London

    25 Feb.: `Medicine and bibliography: the English
    sweating sickness on the Continent in 1529.'

    DR C. FERDINAND

    3 Mar.: `The economics of the provincial book trade
    in the eighteenth century: the case of Ward and Chandler of
    York.'

    DR M. BANNISTER, Oxford Brookes

    10 Mar.: `The publishing trade and the presentation
    of news in seventeenth-century France.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

    Seminar in Economic and Social History: family formation and
    dissolution

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Chester Room, Nuffield College.

    Conveners: P.A. David, MA, Professor of Economics and
    Economic History, K.J. Humphries, MA, Reader in Economic History, and
    A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic
    History.

    A. JANSSENS, Nijmegen

    18 Jan.: `The breadwinner family.'

    N. HIGGINS, Cambridge

    25 Jan.: `Family formation in the Midlands,
    c.1930–60.'

    K. FISHER, Cambridge

    1 Feb.: `Changes in married sexuality in the
    twentieth century.'

    L. MARKS, Imperial College

    8 Feb.: `Consequences of the birth-control pill for
    behaviour.'

    R. ADAIR, Cambridge

    15 Feb.: `Early modern illegitimacy.'

    J. LEWIS

    22 Feb.: `Long-term family trends in Britain.'

    J. ERMISCH, Essex

    29 Feb.: `Post-war trends and determinants of
    family formation and dissolution.'

    R. ROWTHORN, Cambridge

    7 Mar.: `Trends in divorce.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MUSIC

    Graduate Students' Colloquia

    The following colloquia will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty.

    P. KILDEA, the Britten–Pears Library

    18 Jan.: ` "And light falls equally on black
    and white": Britten's and Auden's longest journey.'

    C. HUMPHRIES, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

    25 Jan.: `Meaningful realism in analysis,
    interpretation, and performance.'

    R. STROHM

    1 Feb.: `Murder in Armenia and voices in
    opera seria.'

    M. BENT, J. Craig-McFeely, and A. Wathey (Royal Holloway)

    8 Feb.: `The Digital Image Archive of Medieval
    Music (DIAMM).'

    K. RUSSMAN, Cambridge

    15 Feb.: `The United States's policy of
    incorporating music performance in its psychological warfare
    strategy during the Cold War and its consequences.'

    H. MACDONALD, Washington University at St Louis

    22 Feb.: `Beethoven's game of cat and mouse.'

    C. CLARK, Toronto

    29 Feb.: `Fabricating music at Esterhaza: costuming
    Haydn's Armida.'

    J. RICE, Rochester, Minnesota

    7 Mar.: `Problems of genre and gender in Mozart's
    scena "Misero, o sogno" (K.431).'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Seminar on Jewish history and literature in the Graeco-Roman
    period

    The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    Wolfson College.

    Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish
    Studies.

    PROFESSOR GOODMAN

    18 Jan.: `State and society in Roman Galilee
    revisited.'

    DR E. HABAS, Beer Sheva

    25 Jan.: `The end of the Alexandran ethnarchs and
    the death of the Genarch.'

    PROFESSOR P.R. DAVIES, Sheffield

    1 Feb.: `Messianism at Qumran.'

    DR D. GREEN, Waikato and OCHJS

    8 Feb.: `The Palaeohebraic Divine Titles in
    4QIsaiahc and the Divine Titles according to rabbinic
    literature.'

    DR C.T.R. HAYWARD, Durham

    15 Feb.: `Philo on Jacob's change of name to
    Israel.'

    DR T. ILAN, Hebrew University

    22 Feb.: `The Schools of R. Ishmael and R. Akiba on
    women.'

    PROFESSOR A. BAUMGARTEN, Bar Ilan

    29 Feb.: `From sectarianism to tolerance: rabbinic
    Judaism in the aftermath of the destruction of the Temple.'

    PROFESSOR Z. SAFRAI, Bar Ilan

    7 Mar.: `Halakhic observance in the Judaean desert
    documents.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Topics in ancient Near Eastern Studies and Egyptology

    The following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture
    Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

    Conveners: J.R. Baines, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Egyptology, and S. Dalley, MA, Senior Research Fellow, Somerville
    College

    DR A. COHEN, Harvard

    25 Jan.: `Some political aspects of Early Dynastic
    III period southern Mesopotamian death rituals.'

    C.B.F. WALKER, British Museum

    1 Feb.: `Identifying archives in ancient
    Mesopotamia.'

    N. SCHREIBER

    15 Feb.: `Black-on-red pottery: a new look at
    Gjerstad's Iron Age chronology.'

    DR H. WHITEHOUSE, Ashmolean Museum

    22 Feb.: `The prisoners of Hierakonpolis: the
    function of images in Early Dynastic Egypt.'

    DR J. TAYLOR, British Museum

    29 Feb.: `A good burial in the West: the adoption
    of Egyptian burial practices by Libyans and Kushites,
    1100–650 BC.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Oxford Physics Colloquia

    The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    Conveners: P.G.H. Sandars, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Experimental Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor
    of Astronomy.

    PROFESSOR R. BROWN, Institute of Physics

    21 Jan.: `Electronic publishing.' (Special
    talk and demonstration
    )

    PROFESSOR H. REEVES, CEN Saclay, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris

    28 Jan.: `Origin of the light elements.'

    DR A.R. WEIDBERG

    4 Feb.: `Physics prospects at the LHC.'

    PROFESSOR K. KOHSE-HOINGHAUS, Bielefeld, Germany

    18 Feb.: `Diamonds, fire, and lasers.'

    DR W. HAYES

    25 Feb.: `In condensed matter, relaxing muons tell
    a tale.'

    DR A.M. STEANE

    3 Mar.: `Can quantum computing work?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    The following colloquia will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Main
    Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic
    Chemistry.

    DR P. SLATER, Surrey

    17 Jan.: `Solide oxide fuel cells; bringing power
    to the people.'

    DR M. RAYMAN, Surrey

    24 Jan.: `Selenium: from chemistry to cancer.'

    PROFESSOR B.F.G. JOHNSON, Cambridge

    31 Jan.: `Metal clusters and nanoparticles in
    devices and catalysis.'

    DR C. JONES, Cardiff

    7 Feb.: `The stabilisation and reactivity of indium
    hydride complexes.'

    PROFESSOR M.G. DAVIDSON, Bath

    14 Feb.: `Supramolecular chemistry of Ylidic
    species—carbon as a hydrogen bond acceptor.'

    DR P.H. WALTON, York

    21 Feb.: `Synthetic models of carbonic anhydrase:
    the importance of secondary interactions.'

    PROFESSOR D. O'HARE

    28 Feb.: `Studying reactions using time-resolved
    diffraction.'

    Inorganic Study Day

    6 Mar.: presentations by some of the younger
    research associates in the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    DR P.A. WRIGHT, St Andrews

    13 Mar.: `Making space for molecules—design in
    hydrothermal synthesis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Department of Materials

    The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Lecture Theatre, the Hume-Rothery Building.

    Conveners: J.D. Hunt, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Materials
    Science, and G.A.D. Briggs, MA, Reader in Materials.

    DR K. MACKENZIE, New Zealand Institute for Industrial Research and
    Development

    20 Jan.: `Solid state NMR—what it is, and what
    can it tell us about materials.'

    PROFESSOR DR E. MEYER, Basel, Switzerland

    27 Jan.
    : `From contact to non-contact: force microscopy
    experiments.'

    PROFESSOR W. STUART, Marconi

    3 Feb.: `Taming the photon—materials for
    getting the most out of light.' (Interdepartmental
    Condensed Matter Seminar
    )

    PROFESSOR V. RANDLE, Swansea

    10 Feb.: `Control of grain boundary crystallography
    in low stacking fault energy metals.'

    DR D. VESELY

    17 Feb.: `Diffusion in polymers.'
    (Interdepartmental Polymer Seminar)

    DR J. WEAVER, Glasgow

    24 Feb.: `Lithographically functionalised
    microscope probes.' (Interdepartmental Condensed Matter
    Seminar
    )

    DR A. PETFORD-LONG

    2 Mar.: `The development of advanced information
    storage materials—how can microscopy help?'

    DR A. HOWE, Corus/British Steel

    9 Mar.: `Models: who needs 'em—current
    examples and views for the potential for metallurgical models in
    the steel industry.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PHYSIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the
    lecture theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics.

    PROFESSOR I. HOPE, Leeds

    21 Jan.: To be announced. (Jenkinson
    Seminar
    )

    DR J. DAVIES, Edinburgh

    28 Jan.: `The ramifications of kidney development.'
    (Jenkinson Seminar)

    DR G. BANTING, Bristol

    4 Feb.: `Membrane proteins within and beyond the
    Golgi: molecular interactions and movies.'

    PROFESSOR V. VAN HEYNINGEN, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

    11 Feb.: `PAX-6—a post-genome era paradigm.'
    (Jenkinson Seminar)

    PROFESSOR A. NORTH, Sheffield

    18 Feb.: `Nucleotide-gated ion channels.'

    DR S. WILSON, University College, London

    25 Feb.: `Genetic analysis of forebrain development
    in the zebrafish.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    PROFESSOR S. BROWN, MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell

    3 Mar.: `Mutagenesis in the mouse—towards
    systematic studies of mammalian gene function.'

    DR S. MOSS, University College, London

    10 Mar.: `Assembly and functional modulation of
    GABAA receptors.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Cognitive Science Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in Room
    C113, the Department of Experimental Psychology.

    DR M. RUSHWORTH

    20 Jan.: `Comparing the role of attention in the
    sensory and motor systems.'

    DR D. MOORE

    27 Jan.: `Hearing loss and auditory learning.'

    DR D. GAFFAN

    3 Feb.: `Memory, amnesia, and cortical
    plasticity.'

    PROFESSOR J. STEIN

    10 Feb.: `Sensory basis of reading skills.'

    DR J. UTTMAN

    17 Feb.: `From sound to meaning: acoustic
    distortion, semantic context, and lexical access.'

    DR F. WICHMANN

    24 Feb.: `Modelling early spatial vision.'

    DR J. COLEMAN

    2 Mar.: `Probable and nonsense words.'

    DR J. CAMPBELL

    9 Mar.: `Consciousness and the binding problem.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SOCIAL STUDIES

    Senior Research Seminar in American politics

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Chester Room, Nuffield College.

    Conveners: B.E. Shafer, MA, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of
    American Government, and J.W. Ceaser, MA, John M. Olin Visiting
    Professor of American Government.

    PROFESSOR CEASER

    26 Jan.: `The public philosophy as an organising
    concept in the study of American politics.'

    PROFESSOR D.S. KING

    9 Feb.: `Americanisation and the American idea at
    home and abroad: contradictions or convergence?'

    PROFESSOR A.J. WARE

    23 Feb.: `The "System of 1896"
    revisited.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Economic management of the EU

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College.

    Conveners: C.J. Bliss, MA, Nuffield Professor of
    International Economics, and D.A. Vines, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
    Economics.

    PROFESSOR P. SINCLAIR, Birmingham

    19 Jan.: `Pensions and EMU.'

    DR VINES

    26 Jan.: `Fiscal policy co-ordination.'

    C. RADAELLI, Bradford

    2 Feb.: `Corporate tax co-ordination: is the EU
    tackling the real issues?'

    H. GRABBE, Birmingham

    9 Feb.: `EU enlargement.'

    J. FORDER

    16 Feb.: `EU external trade relations.'

    PROFESSOR W. BUITER, Monetary Policy Committee, Bank of England

    23 Feb.: `EU central banking.'

    PROFESSOR BLISS

    1 Mar.: `Competition and single market issues.'

    A. JENUEMAITRE, Maison Française

    8 Mar.: `European airline regulation.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Department of Economics seminar series: the political economy of
    transition

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Seminar
    Room C, the Department of Economics Building, Manor Road. Details of
    the 9 March seminar will be announced later.

    Further information may be obtained from Dr C. Lin (telephone:
    (2)84701, e-mail: cyril.lin@economics.ox.ac.uk).

    Conveners: A. Chawluk, MA Faculty Lecturer in Soviet-type
    Economies and their Transformation, C.M. Davis, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer in Russian and East European Political Economy,
    C.S. Leonard, MA, University Lecturer in Regional Studies in Post-
    Communist States, and C.Z. Lin, MA, D.Phil., Shaw Lecturer in the
    Economy of China.

    DR J.O. MARTINS, OECD

    20 Jan.: `Transition in the Baltic Republics.'

    PROFESSOR P. HANSON, Birmingham

    27 Jan.: `The Russian transition record.'

    P.M. OPPENHEIMER

    3 Feb.: `Corporate governance in Russia.'

    DR M. SPAGAT, Royal Holloway College, London

    10 Feb.: `The politics of co-optation.'

    PROFESSOR S. ESTRIN, London Business School

    17 Feb.: `Corporate governance in Ukraine.'

    DR K. SULTAN, Harvard Institute for International Development

    24 Feb.: `Weaknesses of the banking system in
    Ukraine.'

    DR S. MALLE, OECD

    2 Mar.: `A decade of transition in Russia: why
    Russia failed and what needs to be done.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SOCIAL STUDIES, ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

    Post-Communist regions in transition

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

    Conveners: C.S. Leonard, MA, University Lecturer in
    Regional Studies in Post-Communist States, and J. Pallot, MA,
    University Lecturer in the Geography of the USSR.

    DR D. DYKER, Sussex

    19 Jan.: `Research and development in the former
    Communist countries: asset or liability?'

    PROFESSOR P. HANSON, Birmingham

    26 Jan.: `Regional change in post-Soviet
    Russia.'

    PROFESSOR K. STONER-WEISS, Princeton

    2 Feb: `The reach of Russia's party system: how
    far, how deep, and what consequences?'

    DR S. O'HARA, Nottingham

    9 Feb.
    : `Agricultural restructuring and the environment in
    Central Asia.'

    DR A. STENNING, Birmingham

    16 Feb.: `Local responses to economic
    transition—the case of Nowa Huta.'

    DR L. JACKSON, Wolverhampton

    23 Feb.: `Ethnic minorities and the politics of
    inclusion in Ukraine.'

    PROFESSOR T. UNWIN, Royal Holloway and Westfield College, London

    1 Mar.: `Banknotes and national identity in Eastern
    and Central Europe: imagery and political process.'

    DR S. DAVYDOVA, Wye College

    8 Mar.: `Transformation of Central and Eastern
    European countries: agriculture and integration with the
    European Union.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    THEOLOGY

    Ian Ramsey Centre

    The science and theology relation—ways forward

    The following seminars will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

    Conveners: Professor J.H. Brooke, Andreas Idreos
    Professor of Science and Religion, and Dr M. Yee, Associate Director,
    the Ian Ramsey Centre.

    DR M. PARSONS, Executive Director, the Ian Ramsey Centre

    27 Jan.: `Contingency and rationality in science
    and religion.'

    DR C. SOUTHGATE, University of Exeter

    10 Feb.: `The difficult case of evolution.'

    DR K. WARE

    24 Feb.: ` "A raid on the inarticulate":
    why does theology (talk about God) differ from scientific
    discourse?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    INTERFACULTY SEMINAR

    Restoration to Reform, 1660–1832: British political,
    literary, intellectual, and social history

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Wordsworth Room, St Hugh's College. The series will continue in
    Trinity Term.

    Conveners: Dr Ros Ballaster (Mansfield), Professor
    Marilyn Butler (Exeter), Dr Faramerz Dabhoiwala (Exeter), Dr
    Christine Gerrard (Lady Margaret Hall), Dr Thomas Keymer (St Anne's),
    Professor Roger Lonsdale (Balliol), Dr James Raven (Mansfield), and
    Dr Isabel Rivers (St Hugh's).

    DR T. FULFORD, Nottingham Trent

    24 Jan.: `Mungo Park, Joseph Banks, and the
    expansion of empire.'

    DR M. HALLETT, York

    7 Feb.: `Manly satire: William Hogarth's A
    Rake's Progress
    .'

    DR T. PARNELL, Goldsmiths' College

    21 Feb.: `The contemporaneity of Tristram
    Shandy
    .'

    PROFESSOR S. MANNING, Edinburgh

    6 Mar.: `Hume and the fiction of the Scottish
    Enlightenment.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    GRADUATE INTERDISCIPLINARY LECTURES

    Seeing things in a new light—laser applications in science
    and technology

    The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    Note: two lectures will be given at the meeting on 29
    February.

    Conveners: C.E. Webb, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Laser
    Physics, and P. Ewart, MA, Professor of Physics.

    PROFESSOR H. HUTCHINSON, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    18 Jan.: `Lasers in science.'

    PROFESSOR G. HANCOCK

    25 Jan.: `Lasers in atmospheric chemistry.'

    DR D. TERRAR

    1 Feb.: `Lasers in the study of heart muscle
    contraction.'

    PROFESSOR P. FRENCH, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College

    8 Feb.: `Fluorescence lifetime imaging for
    biomedicine and microscopy.'

    PROFESSOR D. GREENHALGH, Cranfield University

    15 Feb.: `Optical diagnostics in gas flow and
    combustion.'

    PROFESSOR D. PAYNE, Optics Research Centre, Southampton

    22 Feb.: `The optical telecommunications
    revolution.'

    DR S. THORPE

    29 Feb.: `Doppler global velocimetry in aerodynamic
    studies.'

    DR E. YOUNG

    29 Feb.: `Laser ablation of samples for chemical
    analysis.'

    PROFESSOR WEBB

    7 Mar.: `Lasers in aeronomy, astronomy, and
    mechanical engineering.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH

    Conference: Student Health 2000

    This conference will be held on Monday, 7 February, 1.30–5.30
    p.m., in the Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Somerville College.

    The Committee on Student Health has oversight of the provision of
    arrangments for the health of students, based on the college doctor
    system. `Student Health 2000' will provide a forum for the exchange
    of ideas, perspectives, and information on student health and related
    issues, and will help inform the committee's future agenda.

    The conference is aimed at anyone within or linked to the University
    who is concerned with student health matters (whether medically
    qualified or otherwise), and should be of particular interest to
    college doctors, nurses, deans, chaplains, and tutors, JCR/MCR
    officers and student representatives, and also those from Oxford
    institutions who deal with student health matters.

    The conference programme has been devised following consultation with
    potential participants. There will be sessions on eating disorders,
    examination and other study-related stress, and student mental health
    care. Each session will be introduced by an expert speaker, followed
    by questions and a discussion.

    Attendance at the conference is free, and places will be allocated on
    a first-come, first-served basis. Programme details and booking forms
    have been sent to potential delegates. Any member of the University
    who has not received these, and would like to do so, should contact
    Ms S.R. Jones, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
    (telephone: Oxford (2)70563, e-mail: Samantha.Jones@admin.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DONALD BADEN-POWELL QUATERNARY RESEARCH
    CENTRE

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    common room, 60 Banbury Road.

    DR T. HOPKINSON, Cambridge

    19 Jan.: `Palaeolithic settlement: a scalar ecology
    of knowledge.'

    DR W. DAVIES, Cambridge

    26 Jan.: `The Aurignacian as a population dispersal
    indicator.'

    DR R. SCHULTING, Cardiff

    2 Feb.: `The monk(fish) of Caldey Island:
    subsistence and settlement on an inundated coastal landscape of
    the early-mid Holocene.'

    DR P. MITCHELL

    9 Feb.: `Hunter-gatherer archaeology of the Lesotho
    Highlands.'

    DR L. BARHAM, Bristol

    16 Feb.: `Making sense of the muddle in the middle:
    recent research on the Middle Stone Age in Zambia.'

    DR M. LAKE, London

    23 Feb.: `Mesolithic foragers on Islay: GIS
    simulations.'

    DR J. STEELE, Southampton

    1 Mar.: `Skilled hands and the archaeological
    record: the early evolution of human technology.'

    DR J. MCNABB, Liverpool

    8 Mar.: ` "Round the bend": recent work
    on the Acheulan of the Vaal river, Northern Cape, Southern
    Africa.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Unless otherwise stated, the following departmental seminars will be
    held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 347, the Computing
    Laboratory.

    For details of the Strachey Lecture (25 January), see below.

    M. SPIVEY

    18 Jan.: `The monad of breadth-first search.'

    J.P. SECHER, Diku

    1 Feb.: `On perfect supercompilation.'

    A. BAKEWELL, York

    8 Feb.: `Operational semantics for reasoning about
    the space use of Haskell evaluators.'

    O. DE MOOR

    15 Feb.: `Efficient image manipulation through run-
    time compilation.'

    A. HOARE, Microsoft

    22 Feb.: `Unifying theories of logic
    programming.'

    M. SAGE, Glasgow

    29 Feb.: `Fran TK, a declarative approach to
    building GUIs in Haskell.'

    L. AUGUSTSSON, Chalmers

    7 Mar.: `Cayenne—a functional language with
    dependent types.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Numerical Analysis Group

    Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on the days stated.
    Unless indicated otherwise, they will take place on Thursdays, in the
    Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

    The co-ordinators are L.N. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL). Further
    information may be obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford
    (2)73885).

    PROFESSOR B. CHRISTIANSON, Hertfordshire

    20 Jan.: `Cheap Newton steps for discrete time
    optimal control problems: automatic differentiation and
    Pantoja's algorithm.'

    PROFESSOR N. SANDHAM, Southampton

    27 Jan.: `Entropy splitting for high-order
    numerical simulation of compressible turbulence.'

    PROFESSOR N. VAN DER VORST, Utrecht

    3 Feb.: `Improvements for iterative methods?'

    PROFESSOR T. HUGHES, Stanford

    10 Feb.: `Large eddy simulation and variational
    multiscale methods.'

    DR K. LUST, Warwick

    17 Feb., RAL: `Continuation and bifurcation
    analysis of periodic solutions of partial differential
    equations.'

    DR J. PRYCE, RMCS Shrivenham, Cranfield University

    24 Feb.: `Exception-free arithmetic on the extended
    reals.'

    PROFESSOR B. LEIMKUHLER, Leicester

    2 Mar.: `Methods for the gravitational N-body
    problem.'

    DR B. MOHAMMADI, Montepellier

    9 Mar.: `Sensitivity analysis for design and
    control in an elastic CAD-free framework for multi-model
    configurations.'

    PROFESSOR. A BÖTTCHER, TU Chemnitz

    Wed. 15 Mar.: `C*-algebras and pseudospectra of
    large Toeplitz matrices.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Strachey Lecture

    PROFESSOR JOHN HUGHES, Chalmers University, will deliver the Strachey
    Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 25 January, in the Computing
    Laboratory.

    Subject: `The challenge of optimality in program
    specialisation.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

    The international relations of illegal drugs

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Seminar
    Room B, the Social Studies Faculty Centre.

    Convener: P.J. Robins, MA, University Lecturer in Middle
    East Politics.

    DR E. ESMEIJER, Phare Consultant

    18 Jan.: `The political economy of illegal
    narcotics.'

    DR F. GREGORY, Southampton

    25 Jan.: `Drugs and the new security agenda.'

    DR N. DORN, Institute for the study of drug dependence

    1 Feb.: `Europe: new challenges and third pillar
    responses.'

    M. MORGAN, BBC Monitoring Service

    8 Feb.: `Narcotics and corruption in central
    Asia.'

    PROFESSOR E. NADELMANN, Lindsmith Center, New York

    15 Feb.: `The global drugs prohibition regime:
    past, present, and future.'

    DR E. JOYCE, IRELA, Madrid

    22 Feb.: `The Andean countries.'

    P. ARLACCHI, Executive Director, UNDCP

    29 Feb.: `Practitioner perspectives: multilateral
    responses to illegal drugs.'

    M. RYDER, Special Representative for International Drugs Issues, FCO

    7 Mar.: `Practitioner perspectives: diplomatic
    responses to illegal drugs.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND OXFORD
    POLICY INSTITUTE

    Contemporary issues in the international relations of the
    developing world

    The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Mondays in Seminar
    Room A, the Social Studies Faculty Centre.

    Conveners: L.L. Fawcett, MA, and N.T. Woods, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturers (CUF) in Politics.

    DR S. JONES, Oxford Policy Management

    17 Jan.: `The politics of aid and the constraints
    of conditionality.'

    DR FAWCETT

    24 Jan.: `Progress and prospects for regionalism in
    the Middle East.'

    DR C. BIEBESHEIMER, Inter-American Development Bank

    31 Jan.: `The good governance agenda and developing
    countries.'

    PROFESSOR R. HIGGOTT, ESRC Centre for the Study of Globalisation and
    Regionalisation

    7 Feb.: `Globalisation and regionalism.'

    DR A. ACHARYA, York University, Ontario

    14 Feb.: `The Third World and world order in the
    twenty-first century: the impact of intrusive regionalism.'

    DR T. CAROTHERS, Carnegie Endowment, Washington, DC

    21 Feb.: `Democratisation and the developing
    world.'

    DR WOODS

    28 Feb.: `Developing countries and the reform of
    the international financial architecture.'

    PROFESSOR T. WEISS, City University of New York

    6 Mar.: `The politics of humanitarian
    intervention.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

    Aspects of Islamic Thought

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

    Conveners: F.A. Nizami, MA, D.Phil., J.Y. Michot (Ph.D.),
    and J. Piscatori (Ph.D.)

    PROFESSOR A. SCHIMMEL, Harvard

    19 Jan.: `Jalal al-Din Rumi.'

    PROFESSOR J. MORRIS, Exeter University

    26 Jan.: `Esoterism, Messianism, Millenarism.'

    PROFESSOR C. BAFFIONI, Istituto per l'Oriente `C.A. Nallino', Rome

    2 Feb.: `Science and its legitimation in the Ikhwan
    al-Safa.'

    PROFESSOR O. LEAMAN, John Moores University

    9 Feb.: `Miskawayh and Islamic humanism.'

    DR T. WINTER, Cambridge

    16 Feb.: `Ibn Kemal's criteria of Ottoman
    theological normalcy.'

    PROFESSOR MUHAMMAD KHALID MASUD, ISIM, Leiden

    23 Feb.: `Islamic law according to al-Shatibi.'

    DR J. JANSSENS, De Wulf-Mansion Centre, Louvain

    1 Mar.: `Al-Ghazali's Tahafut: a real destruction
    of philosophy? Of Avicennian philosophy.'

    PROFESSOR D. GUTAS, Yale

    8 Mar.: `The Golden Age of Arabic philosophy
    (1000–1400).'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LANGUAGE CENTRE

    Lunchtime seminars in applied linguistics

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in Room 301,
    the Language Centre (12 Woodstock Road). Refreshments will be
    available in the Language Centre reception area from 12.30 p.m.

    MRS M. CHARLES

    24 Jan.: `The role of introductory "It"
    patterns in the constructing of an appropriate academic
    persona.'

    DR A. FRANKENBERG-GARCIA, ISLA, Lisbon

    7 Feb.: `Using a translation corpus to sort out
    Portuguese–English cross-linguistic influence.'

    DR R. VANDERPLANK

    21 Feb.: `What makes a good "language
    keeper"? Success and failure in the Lambda Project.'

    DR E. MACARO

    6 Mar.: `An analysis of code switching in foreign
    language classroom discourse.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


    Economic Development Seminar: poverty,
    inequality, and other issues raised by the work of A.K. Sen

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays. The 3
    February seminar will take place in the Examination Schools; all
    other seminars will take place in the Library Wing Seminar Room, 21
    St Giles'.

    B. HARRISS-WHITE

    20 Jan.: `Gender, capital, and co-operative
    control.'

    A. ATKINSON

    27 Jan.: `Poverty from a world perspective.'

    A.K. SEN

    3 Feb.: `Six billion and all that.'

    M. DESAI, LSE

    10 Feb.: `A.K. Sen as a development economist.'

    L. CROLL, SOAS

    17 Feb.: `Amartya Sen's 100 million missing
    women.'

    J. COHEN

    24 Feb.: `Sen on capability, freedom, and
    entitlements.' (S. Alkire to comment)

    S. ANAND

    2 Mar.: `Measuring inequalities of health.'

    S. DEVEREUX, Sussex

    9 Mar.: `Sen's entitlement approach: critiques and
    counter-critiques.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

    Seminars: cross-border narratives—between North and West
    Africa

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Library Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Conveners: Dr Farida Abu-Haidar, Dr Cathie Lloyd, and Dr
    Sowon Park.

    S. SALIH

    20 Jan.: `Postcolonial theories.' (To be
    confirmed
    )

    J.-P. LLEDO, Algerian film-maker

    27 Jan.: `Chroniques algériennes'
    (film and discussion).

    E. TAKYI

    3 Feb.: `West African narratives in Ghanaian
    feminist novels.'

    L. IBNLFASSI, London Guildhall

    10 Feb.: `The virgin, the whore, the witch, and the
    saint: the Journey of Womanhood in the narrative of Ben
    Jelloun.'

    S. POOLE, Reading

    17 Feb.: `Women, borders, and boundaries in the
    Francophone literature of Algeria's war.'

    N. HITCHCOTT, Nottingham

    24 Feb.: `Migrating genders in Calixthe Beyala's
    fiction.'

    P. DUNWOODIE, Goldsmiths' College, London

    2 Mar.: `Confronting "la question
    indigène" in colonial Algeria.'

    P. MCDONALD

    9 Mar.: `The position of the postcolonial writer.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Refugee Studies Centre

    Seminars: perspectives on forced migration

    The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Further details may be obtained from Dominique Attala, Refugee
    Studies Centre, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA
    (telephone: Oxford (2)70722, fax: (2)70721, e-mail:
    rspedu@qeh.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsp/).

    For details on contacting the Refugee Studies Centre, see above.

    B. HOVY, Senior Statistician, UNHCR

    19 Jan.: `Measuring forced migration: what we know
    and what we don't.'

    PROFESSOR N. MACFARLANE

    26 Jan.: `States, power, and refugees:
    international relations and forced migration.'

    DR N. VAN HEAR

    2 Feb.: `Undisciplined: the virtues of rootlessness
    in refugee search.'

    DR M. GIBNEY

    9 Feb.: `Political perspectives on forced
    migration.'

    MS C. BRUN, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim

    16 Feb.: `Newcomers and hosts: internally displaced
    Muslims in Puttalam District, Sri Lanka.'

    DR N. AL ALI, Sussex

    23 Feb.: `Problematising "transnational
    communities": a case study of Bosnian refugees.'

    MS N. BIRKELAND, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,
    Trondheim

    1 Mar.: `War, environment, and forced migration in
    Angola.'

    DR M. DEEGAN

    8 Mar: `Literary perspectives on forced migration.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Weekend workshop: the rights of refugees under international law

    This workshop will be held on 20 and 21 May in Queen Elizabeth House,
    21 St Giles', Oxford. The course fee, which includes course
    materials, refreshments, and a light lunch, is £120. The
    instructor will be Professor James C. Hathaway, Director of the
    Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, University of Michigan Law School,
    and Senior Visiting Research Associate, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

    Interdepartmental Finance Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Said Business School, 59 George Street.

    Further information may be obtained from Elaine Durham, Said Business
    School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88650,
    e-mail: elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

    Conveners: Clara Raposo (Said Business School), Hyun Shin
    (Economics), and Sam Howison (Mathematics).

    N. INSTEFJORD, Birkbeck College, London

    21 Jan.: `Portfolio choice and ownership
    concentration.'

    I. TONKS, Bristol

    28 Jan.: `Performance of UK pension funds.'

    T. LYONS, Imperial College, London

    4 Feb.: to be announced.

    R. RAHI, LSE

    11 Feb.: `Efficiency properties of rational
    expectations equlibria with asymmetric information.'

    W. PERRAUDIN, Birkbeck College, London

    18 Feb.: `The consistency of ratings and on market
    yields.'

    K. NYBORG, London Business School

    25 Feb.: `R.&D. capital investments, and
    financing under repeated moral.'

    J. COCCO, London Business School

    3 Mar.: to be announced.

    V. SAPORTA, Bank of England

    10 Mar.: to be announced.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE
    AND DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL POLICY AND SOCIAL WORK

    Oral history seminars: understanding twentieth-century health
    care through oral history

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

    Convener: S. Harper, D.Phil., Research Associate, the
    Wellcome Unit.

    DR G. SMITH, Glasgow

    17 Jan.: `The experience of general practice.'

    DR R. FERGUSON, Glasgow University, Caledonian

    24 Jan.: `Exploring district nursing.'

    DR S. ANDERSON, LSHTM

    31 Jan.: `The chemist's story.'

    DR M. RHODES, Birmingham

    7 Feb.: `Births, bedpans, and bugs: professional
    education for midwives.'

    DR K. FISHER

    14 Feb. `The understanding and practice of birth
    control.'

    DR D. ATKINSON, Open University
    21 Feb.: `A history of learning disabilities.'

    PROFESSOR N. SMALL, Bradford

    28 Feb.: `The modern hospice movement.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    All SOULS COLLEGE

    Foreign Policy Studies Programme: the United States and the world

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old
    Library, All Souls College.

    Conveners: Sir Julian Bullard and Professor Robert
    O'Neill.

    STROBE TALBOTT, Deputy US Secretary of State

    21 Jan.: `Balance-sheet for the 1990s: how well has
    the US done?'

    SHASHI THAROOR, Director of Communications and Special Projects,
    Office of the UN Secretary General

    28 Jan.: `The US and the UN.'

    AMBASSADOR YUKIO SATOH, Permanent Representative of Japan to the
    United Nations

    4 Feb.: `The US and East Asia.'

    SIR JOHN KERR, Permanent Under-Secretary, Foreign and Commonwealth
    Office

    11 Feb.: `The US and the UK.'

    GEN. KLAUS NAUMANN, former Chairman, NATO Military Committee

    18 Feb.: `The US and NATO.'

    Speaker to be announced

    25 Feb.: `The US and Russia.'

    R.W.APPLE, The New York Times

    3 Mar.: `US domestic politics and foreign
    policy.'

    DR LYNN DAVIS, former Under Secretary of State and currently Deputy
    Director, the National Security Strategy Group

    10 Mar.: `Foreign policy challenges for the next
    administration.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE


    Bateson Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR D. KARLIN, Department of English, University College,
    London, will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 16 February, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The figure of the singer.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    GREEN COLLEGE


    Green College Lectures 2000

    Food for the next millennium: implications for the environment

    The Green College Lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on the following
    Mondays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    PROFESSOR M.J. GIBNEY, Institute of European Food Studies, Trinity
    College, Dublin

    17 Jan.: `Safe and nutritious food: global issues
    for the next millennium.'

    DR P.J. DALE, the John Innes Centre, Norwich

    24 Jan.: `Genetically modified organisms:
    environmental saviour or environmental disaster?'

    PROFESSOR W.P.T. JAMES, Director, Rowett Research Institute, Aberdeen

    31 Jan.: `Feast and famine: the paradox of under-
    and over-nutrition.'

    A. BENNETT, Chief Natural Resources Adviser, Department for
    International Development

    7 Feb.: `Food and forests: will they be compatible
    in the next millennium?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LINACRE LECTURES


    Linacre Lectures 2000

    Consciousness of connections: global environments in the new
    millennium

    The following lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in
    Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building.

    THE HON. MAURICE STRONG, Chairman, the Earth Council

    27 Jan.:: `Global sustainable development.'

    PROFESSOR M. LANGTON, University of Northern Territories, Australia

    3 Feb.: `Indigenous concepts of connectedness and
    the new environmentalism.'

    PROFESSOR H. GIRADET, Urban Futures, London

    10 Feb.: `Cities, people, planet.'

    DR C. JUMA, Harvard

    17 Feb.: `International trade and environment.'

    PROFESSOR S. YEARLEY, York

    24 Feb.: `Social movements as problematic agents of
    global environmental change.'

    PROFESSOR E.P. ODUM, Georgia

    2 Mar.: `The transformation of ecology.'

    P. MELCHETT, Executive Director, Greenpeace UK

    9 Mar.: `Global citizens—campaigning for
    environmental solutions.'

    PROFESSOR M. CASTELLS, Berkeley

    15 June: `Global networks and local societies:
    cities in the information age.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MANSFIELD COLLEGE


    Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics,
    and Society

    The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Council Room, Main Building (ground floor), Mansfield College.
    Further information may be obtained from the Administrator, OCEES,
    Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone and fax: Oxford
    (2)70886, e-mail: ocees@mansf.ox.ac.uk, Internet:
    http://users.ox.ac.uk/~ocees/.

    PROFESSOR K. SOPER, North London

    18 Jan.: `Realism, humanism, and the politics of
    nature.'

    P. DUBEN, Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution

    25 Jan.: `Risk, pollution, and regulation.'

    A. STIRLING, Sussex

    1 Feb.: `Science and precaution in the management
    of technological risk.'

    M. OKSANEN, Lancaster

    8 Feb.: `Authorship, communities, and intellectual
    property rights: insights for the protection of
    biodiversity?'

    J. MEADOWCROFT, Sheffield

    15 Feb.: `Implementing sustainability in high-
    consumption societies.'

    C. REDGWELL

    22 Feb.: `New mechanisms for ensuring state
    compliance with international environmental obligations.'

    N. ROBINS, Research Fellow, International Institute for Environment
    and Development

    29 Feb.: `Consumption, development, and
    environment.'

    N. WITOSZEK, European University Institute, Florence

    7 Mar.: `Moral communities and the environment: the
    Nordic enigma.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


    Jubilee Lecture Series

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the New
    Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

    PROFESSOR A. STEPAN, Columbia
    21 Jan.: `The world's religious systems and democracy.'

    MS PATRICIA HEWITT, MP, Minister of State at the Department of Trade
    and Industry

    28 Jan.: `Social justice in the knowledge
    economy.'

    LORD DAHRENDORF, Warden of St Antony's 1987–97

    4 Feb.: `Democracy beyond the nation-state.'

    BARONESS (HELENA) KENNEDY, QC, Chair, the British Council

    11 Feb.: `Reaching the parts beyond formal
    diplomacy.'

    MS BRIDGET KENDALL, BBC Diplomatic Correspondent

    18 Feb.: `Kosovo and after: the future of spin in
    the digital age.'

    PROFESSOR DAVID MARQUAND, Principal, Mansfield College

    25 Feb.: `Democracy in Britain.'

    SIR KEITH THOMAS, President, Corpus Christi College

    3 Mar.: `Heritage or history? Conflicting views of
    the past.'

    GUIDO DI TELLA, Argentinian Foreign Minister 1991–9, and
    Honorary Fellow of St Antony's

    10 Mar.: `Argentina, 1989–99: from the margins
    to the centre.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Russian and East European Centre

    Twentieth-century Russia: ideas, politics, and society

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Lecture Theatre, the New Building, St Antony's College.

    Conveners: D.R. Priestland, MA, University Lecturer (CUF)
    in Modern History, and R.J. Service, MA, University Lecturer in
    Modern Russian History.

    G. SMITH

    17 Jan.: `Russian and her Eurasianism.'

    C. ANDREYEV

    24 Jan.: `Russia and her fascism.

    E. ACTON, East Anglia

    31 Jan.: `Russia and her liberalism.'

    A. LUUKKANEN

    7 Feb.: `Russian and her Christianity.'

    D. LIEVEN, LSE

    14 Feb.: `Russia and her imperialism.'

    DR SERVICE

    21 Feb.: `Russia and her nationalism.'

    G. SWAIN, West of England

    28 Feb.: `Russia and her social-democracy.'

    MR PRIESTLAND

    6 Mar.: `Russia and her Communism.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    TRINITY COLLEGE


    Richard Hillary Lecture

    BERYL BAINBRIDGE will deliver the Richard Hillary Lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Wednesday, 2 February, in the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `What makes a writer?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WOLFSON COLLEGE


    Wolfson College Lectures

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Hall, Wolfson College. The lectures are open to the public.

    SIR MARTIN WOOD

    18 Jan.: `Superconductivity, eighty-nine years
    on—where's it going?'

    PROFESSOR M.E. FISHER, Maryland

    25 Jan.: `Pictures, models, approximations, and
    reality: phase transitions and the role of the theorist.'

    PROFESSOR STEPHEN MOORBATH

    1 Feb.: `Physics and geological time.'

    PROFESSOR SIR ROGER PENROSE

    8 Feb.: `Quantum mechanics: is there a limit to its
    validity?'

    PROFESSOR D.L.T. ANDERSON, European Centre for Medium-range Weather
    Forecasts

    15 Feb.: `Physics of climate.'

    PROFESSOR D.A. KING, Cambridge

    22 Feb.: `Atoms at the surfaces of solids:
    structure, bonding, magnetism, and reactivity at solid
    surfaces.'

    PROFESSOR J.P. BOUCHAUD, CEA, France

    29 Feb.: `Elements for a theory of financial risk:
    a physicist's perspective.'

    SIR PETER MANSFIELD, Nottingham

    7 Mar.: `Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI):
    principles and applications.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CAMPION HALL


    Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures

    Paul of Antioch and Ibn Taymiyya: the modern relevance of a
    medieval polemic

    DR THOMAS MICHEL will deliver the Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures at
    5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Examination Schools.

    27 Jan.: `Features of the Muslim–Christian polemical
    tradition.'


    3 Feb.: `The Christian prophet and the Prophet of
    Islam.'

    10 Feb.: `The divine word and scripture in Islam and
    Christianity.'

    17 Feb.: `God's unity and trinity: the
    Islamic–Christian debate.'

    24 Feb.: `Sin and redemption in Christianity and
    Islam.'

    2 Mar.: `Moving beyond the burdens of history.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY
    OF CHRISTIANITY AND CULTURE) AND CHRIST CHURCH

    Composing music for Christian worship in the new millennium

    The following lectures will be held at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in Regent's
    Park College. Each lecture will be followed by Evensong at Christ
    Church Cathedral at 6 p.m., at which music by the lecturer will be
    performed. The series is arranged by Stephen Darlington and Alan
    Kreider.

    Further information may be obtained from Alan Kreider, Regent's Park
    College, Oxford OX1 2LB (telephone: Oxford (2)88140, fax: (2)88121,
    e-mail: alan.kreider@regents.ox.ac.uk).

    HOWARD GOODALL, London

    18 Jan.: `Music and mystery.'

    ANDREW CARTER, York

    25 Jan.: `Requiem for Evensong.'

    ROBERT SAXTON

    1 Feb.: `Darkness to light; cycles and circles; the
    sacred in my music.'

    THE REVD JOHN BELL, Iona Community

    8 Feb.: `The lost tradition of lament.'

    THE REVD DR JANET H. WOOTTON, Union Chapel, Islington

    15 Feb.: `The future of the hymn.'

    GRAHAM KENDRICK, London

    22 Feb.: `Worship in spirit and truth.'

    ROXANNA PANUFNIK, London

    29 Feb.: `Beyond a Mass for Westminster.'

    PROFESSOR JOHN HARPER, Director General, Royal School of Church Music

    7 Mar.: `Renewing the past in the present: the
    living art of church music.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

    The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on the
    days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

    Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lectures at a cost of
    £2.50 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance
    with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian,
    Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234).

    MRS M. CLAPINSON, Keeper of Special Collections and Western
    Manuscripts

    Thur. 3 Feb.: `Bryon in the family papers.'

    J. PINFOLD, Librarian, Rhodes House

    Mon. 6 Mar.: `The Transvaal War: a contemporary
    lantern slide show and commentary.'

    Members attending the lecture on 6 March are invited to view the
    exhibition `From the Boer War to Uhuru: South Africa in the Twentieth
    Century' in the Schola Naturalis Philosophiae, Old Schools
    Quadrangle.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

    Lectures

    The following lectures will be given as indicated. Except where
    otherwise stated, admission is £1 for members, £2 for non-
    members.

    M. BRODY

    2 Feb., 8 p.m., Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58
    Banbury Road
    : `Renaissance maiolica at the Medici villa of
    Cafaggiuolo.'

    D. LEWIS

    15 Feb., 8 p.m., Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58
    Banbury Road
    : `Jessie White Mario, Garibaldi's unrecognised
    Florence Nightingale.'

    P. CLAIRE

    16 Feb., 5 p.m., Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean
    Museum
    : `Centrifugal centripetal: motifs in word pictures
    of Severini, Carra, and Apollinaire.' (Lecture-
    performance; programme £1
    )

    PROFESSOR P. RYLANDS, Director, Guggenheim Foundation

    22 Feb., 8 p.m., Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's
    College
    : `Peggy Guggenheim's museum in Venice.'
    (Students free)

    DR S. FRAQUELI, selector of the Severini Exhibition at the Ashmolean
    Museum

    1 Mar., 6 p.m., Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean
    Museum
    : `Gino Severini—from Futurism to Classicism.'
    (Admission free; nominal charge for wine)

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Other events

    The film Pummarò will be shown (with subtitles)
    in the Rewley House Lecture Theatre, 7.45 for 8 p.m., on 18 January.
    Admission is free.

    Conversazione in italiano: `L'Italia nel 2000', 7.45 for 8 p.m., 9
    February, in St Anne's College. Admission free.

    Dr Alan Milner will offer a wine-tasting in the context of an
    imagined dinner, at 7.45 for 8 p.m. on 9 March in Halifax House. This
    is a ticket-only event (admission £8 per person). Tickets may be
    reserved by telephoning Oxford 377479.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

    DR C. DE HAMEL will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Thursday, 20 January, in
    the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: `The Nazis and the Rothschilds' libraries.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 13 January 2000: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

    The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications
    from members of the University for grants towards the costs of
    research in economic history. Applications will be considered
    from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of the
    academic staff, and may relate to research into the economic
    history of any period or country.

    Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information
    about the general nature of their research to establish that it
    falls within the field of economic history; and (b)
    specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which
    a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one
    referee who might be consulted by the committee.

    It is intended by the committee that grants should normally
    be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion
    be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in
    exceptional circumstances.

    The committee will consider applications twice each year. The
    closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of
    Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week
    of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to the Secretary of
    the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University Offices,
    Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL BEQUEST

    The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at
    Oxford who are citizens of the Republic of India, and who,
    because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to
    complete the qualifications for which they are registered. Grants
    will not normally be awarded to those near to the beginning of
    their course of study. Application forms may be obtained from Mrs
    A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE.
    The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 2 June.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SASAKAWA FUND

    Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to
    be applied to `the advancement within the University of knowledge
    and understanding of Japan by way of academic contact and
    exchange between members of the University and citizens of
    Japan'. Further details may be obtained from Mrs A. Slater, the
    Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, to whom
    applications should be returned by the end of the fourth week in
    each term.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    HAYTER FUND

    Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established
    university posts for travel and research purposes connected with
    the languages and the economic, social, and political development
    of the following areas: the former Soviet Union and eastern
    Europe, the Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east Asia, and Latin
    America. Application forms and further details may be obtained
    from Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford
    OX1 2LE. The closing date for applications is the end of fifth
    week in each term.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES


    Research Fellowships (part-time)

    The Centre for Socio-Legal Studies invites expressions of
    interest from members of the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of
    Social Studies, or other related faculties, who would like to be
    associated with the centre as research fellows (part-time). Such
    research fellows would devote a part of their time to conducting
    research at the centre, either by joining in current projects or
    creating new ones. They would also be encouraged to participate
    in the other research and research-related activities of the
    centre. Research support facilities would be provided by the
    centre and, in suitable cases, office space would be available.

    In the case of tutorial fellows, the centre would propose to
    their colleges a form of buy-out of time of up to two days per
    week. In the case of other categories of fellows or employees
    where a buy-out would not be suitable, other financial
    arrangements would be considered.

    The fellowships will be for one year, with the possibility of
    renewal. The centre hopes to make two appointments in the first
    instance. Further details of the scheme may be obtained from the
    Director of the centre, Professor Denis Galligan (telephone:
    Oxford (2)84231, e-mail: djg@ermine.ox.ac.uk).

    Expressions of interest should be made to Professor Galligan by
    22 January.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ENTENTE CORDIALE SCHOLARSHIPS SCHEME

    A number of scholarships will be available in 2000–1 to
    British nationals who wish to proceed to further study,
    postgraduate research, or postdoctoral work, in any subject, at
    a French University or Grande École. Applicants must
    expect to graduate with a bachelor's or master's degree in 2000,
    or be working towards a doctorate at a UK university. They must
    have a good working knowledge of French.

    The scholarships are awarded for an academic year and cover
    registration fees and living expenses. Allowances are also given
    towards the purchase of books and arrival and departure costs.

    Further details and application forms are available from the
    International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
    Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: (2)70241). The closing date for
    applications is 28 February.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 13 January 2000: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    DIVISIONAL BOARDS


    Elections, 9 March

    Vacancies

    Note: in the following details, the figure given
    refers to a single vacancy for that number of years: e.g. `3'
    means `one vacancy, for three years'.

    For full details, see Gazette, 13 January.

    Life and Environmental Sciences Board

    SF Anthropology: 3, 2

    SF Geography: 4, 1

    Dept of Biochemistry: 4, 1

    Dept of Plant Sciences: 3, 2

    Dept of Zoology: 4, 1


    Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

    SF Chemistry: 4, 3, 1

    SF Engineering: 4, 2, 1

    SF Physics: 4, 3, 1

    Fac of Maths. Sci/Maths. Inst.: 4, 3, 2

    SF Earth Sciences: 2, 1

    SF Materials: 3, 2

    Computing Laboratory (Members of Fac. of Maths.
    Sci.)
    : 3, 2

    Dept of Statistics (Members of Fac. of Maths. Sci.): 4


    Medical Sciences Board

    Fac. of Clin. Med.: 4, 3, 2, 1

    Fac. of Physiol. Sci. and SF Psy. St. - see note 4 below:
    3, 2, 1


    Humanities Board

    Fac. of English: 3, 2, 1

    Fac. of Lit. Hum.: 4, 3, 1

    Fac. of MML: 4, 2, 1

    Fac. of Mod. Histy.: 4, 2, 1

    Fac. of Music: 3

    Fac. of Oriental St.: 4p

    Fac. of Theology: 3


    Social Sciences Board

    Fac. of Soc St.: 4, 3, 2, 1

    Fac. of Law: 4, 3, 1

    Fac. of Management: 4, 1

    Dept. of Educ St: 3, 2

    Queen Elizabeth House: 4

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    ¶ Nominations in writing for the elections on 9 March,
    by two members (other than the candidate) of the electorate for
    each vacancy, which is the same as the persons from among whom
    the vacancy will be filled (as specified above), will be received
    by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square,
    up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 14 February, and similar
    nominations by six members of the electorate other than the
    candidate, except in the case of the Medical Sciences
    Board, up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 29 February
    . Six-member
    nominations for the Medical Sciences Board will
    be received up to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 23
    February
    .

    Council has decided that nominations should show for each
    signatory the name and faculty, sub-faculty, or department
    (indicative of the relevant electorate) in block capitals. Any
    names which are not so shown may not be published. At
    least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made
    on an official nomination form
    . Copies of the form are
    obtainable from the Head Clerk (telephone: (2)70190; e-mail:
    Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).

    In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical
    note on each candidate will be published in the
    Gazette dated 2 March, and voters may wish to wait
    until they have read these notes before returning their ballot
    papers (which will be sent out to members of the electorate as
    soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and
    which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not
    later than 4 p.m. on 9 March).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Notes

    1. Each of the new Divisional Boards will have responsibility,
    under Council and subject to plans, policies, and guidelines set
    by Council and its committees, for one of the five new academic
    divisions (including its budget, space, syllabus, and staffing),
    embracing, among other matters, (a) the development and
    proposal, in collaboration with the colleges, divisional
    sub-units, and the academic services sector, of comprehensive and
    detailed strategic five-year plans and one-year operating
    statements, (b) the delivery of curricula (with an equal
    focus on graduate and undergraduate studies) and the maintenance
    of educational quality and standards in the broad subject area,
    (c) the division's relations with external funding
    agencies, and (d) the oversight of fund raising. Full
    details of the boards' responsibilities are set out in the
    Statute approved by Congregation on 29 June 1999
    (Gazette, Vol. 129, pp. 1323, 1482).

    2. The composition of the divisions and of the Divisional
    Boards, and the manner of holding elections, are laid down in
    Decree (1) of 4 November 1999 (Gazette, Vol. 130,
    p. 294). Each board will have the head of division in the chair,
    elected members as specified above, and a member appointed by the
    Conference of Colleges from within the division. (The Medical
    Sciences Board will also include the Regius Professor of Medicine
    and the Chairman of the Oxfordshire Health Authority. The Social
    Sciences Board will also include a representative of Area Studies
    elected by the chairmen of the relevant inter-faculty committees
    and the directors of the relevant centres.) Boards may co-opt one
    or more additional members (subject to the maximum number
    prescribed by the decree in each case). Two Junior Members,
    elected by the Oxford University Student Union, will have the
    right to attend each board for matters of unreserved business
    (with the right to speak but not to vote). Such officers of the
    University as Council may determine shall receive all board
    papers and may attend, or nominate a deputy to attend, any
    meeting (again, with the right to speak but not to vote).

    3. Where it is specified in the above list that the candidates
    must be from among certain persons `working in' a department or
    other institution, both the candidates and the electors must be
    persons so working at the time of the election.

    4. In the case of the five members of the Medical Sciences
    Board elected by and from among the members of the Faculty of
    Physiological Sciences and the Sub-faculty of Psychology, one
    must be from each of the Department of Human Anatomy and
    Genetics, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, the
    Department of Pharmacology, the Department of Physiology, and the
    Department of Experimental Psychology.

    5. The normal period of office for members of the Divisional
    Boards is four years, but the initial periods on each board are
    being varied to procure a regular rotation of subsequent
    appointments each year. Under the statutes, the length of the
    initial period of office of each person elected on 9 March will
    be determined by the number of votes cast for him or her (or, in
    the event of an equality of votes or an uncontested election, by
    academic standing).

    6. The heads of the five new divisions are currently being
    selected, and their identities being published, once Council has
    approved their appointment, in the Gazette.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

    TRINITY TERM 2000

    Honour Schools

    Classics and Modern Languages: K.M. KOHL, MA, Fellow
    of Jesus

    English and Modern Languages: E.A. FALLAIZE, MA,
    Fellow of St John's

    Modern History and English: J.S. KELLY, MA, D.PHIL.,
    Fellow of St John's

    Modern History and Modern Languages: D.G. PATTISON,
    MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen

    Modern Languages: R.C. OCKENDEN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
    of Wadham (address: c/o Mrs D. Clifton, 37 Wellington Square)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Master of Science

    Biology (Integrative Bioscience): A. KACELNIK, MA,
    D.PHIL., Fellow of Pembroke (address: Department of Zoology)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations
    made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 28 January.


    Boards of the Faculties of Psychological Studies
    and Physiological Sciences

    M.Sc. in Neuroscience

    With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 780, l. 26,
    delete `two' and substitute `three'.

    2 Ibid., p. 781, l. 10, delete `Four' and substitute `Five'.

    3 Ibid., delete ll. 18–20 and substitute:

    `Module II: Neuroanatomy

    Module III: Neuronal Cell and Molecular Biology

    Module IV: Synapses and transduction

    Module V: Systems overview'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LETTERS

    The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages has granted leave
    to H. BROWN to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Letters.

    A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available at the
    University Offices.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committees give
    notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Biological Sciences

    A.R. BEATON, St Cross: `Towards understanding the release of BTW: functional
    analysis of the non-structural protein NS3'.

    Microbiology Unit, Monday, 17 January, 1.30 p.m.


    Examiners: K.G.H. Dyke, R. Elliott.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Clinical Medicine

    P. MUSIALEK, Wolfson: `Nitric oxide and cardiac pacemaking'.

    University Department of Pharmacology, Friday, 4 February, 3 p.m.


    Examiners: A.F. Brading, P. Vallance.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Law

    C. EVANS, Exeter: `Freedom of religion or belief under the European
    Convention on Human Rights'.

    All Souls, Tuesday, 18 January, 12 noon.


    Examiners: A.V. Lowe, K. Boyle.

    A. LAYARD, Mansfield: `Environmental victims: an argument for
    compensation'.

    Examination Schools, Tuesday, 25 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M.H. Matthews, K.M. Stanton.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Literae Humaniores

    K.L.G. LUDDECKE, Lady Margaret Hall: `The beginning of narrative closure in
    Homeric epic'.

    Christ Church, Friday, 28 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: R.B. Rutherford, A.F. Garvie.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Mathematical Sciences

    R. FORSTER, Trinity: `Non-interference properties for nondeterministic
    processes'.

    Computing Laboratory, Friday, 14 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: G.M. Reed, G. Lowe.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Medieval and Modern Languages

    E.L. MILBURN, St John's: `Lyric poetry in sixteenth-century Naples: Luigi
    Tansillo (1510–68)'.

    Balliol, Friday, 14 January, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: D. Zancani, J.E. Everson.

    A.C. RICHARDS, Balliol: `Passivity or protest?: women, illness, and wasting in
    German novels by women, 1770– 1914'.

    Examination Schools, Thursday, 27 January, 9.30 a.m.


    Examiners: K.J. Leeder, P.M. Howe.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Modern History

    S. HODSON, Wolfson: `Sovereigns and subjects: the Princes of Sedan and Dukes
    of Bouillon in early modern France, c.1450–1652'.

    Examination Schools, Wednesday, 26 January, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: J.C. Robertson, H.M. Scott.

    B. NOVICK, Merton: `Ireland's revolutionary war? Nationalist propaganda, the
    Great War, and the construction of Irish identity'.

    Merton, Thursday, 3 February, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: P.J. Waller, C. Townshend.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Oriental Studies

    AHO SHEMUNKASHO, Wolfson: `Healing in the theology of Mor Ephrem'.

    Oriental Institute, Monday, 17 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D.G.K. Taylor, R.P.R. Murray.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Physical Sciences

    K. DALTON, St Catherine's: `Pulsed field studies of magnetotransport in
    semiconductor heterostructures'.

    Clarendon Laboratory, Friday, 28 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J. Singleton, R.A. Stradling.

    F. HUTCHINSON, Linacre: `Structure and energetics of trivalent metal
    halides'.

    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Thursday, 20 January, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: R.G. Denning, M. Silbert.

    K.C. SPENCER, Wolfson: `Parallel synthesis of C-nucleoside'.

    Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Monday, 17 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A.J. Fairbanks, M. Wood.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Social Studies

    D. FELSEN, Lady Margaret Hall: `The politics of the Italian budgetary
    process'.

    Lincoln, Monday, 17 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: D.B. Goldey, M. Donovan.

    L. WHITE, Nuffield: `Uncertainty and strategic behaviour'.

    Department of Economics, Wednesday, 19 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J.M. Malcomson, I. Jewitt.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Committee for Archaeology

    T.J. BROWN, Queen's: `Emperors and imperial cities AD 284–423'.

    Examination Schools, Thursday, 27 January, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: F.G.B. Millar, J.H.W.G. Liebeschuetz.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Committee for Educational Studies

    C. HUDSON, New College: `Young people's experience of family and schooling:
    how important is family structure?'.

    Examination Schools, Tuesday, 25 January, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: R.A. Pring, P. Woods.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
    LETTERS

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral
    examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Oriental Studies

    J.C. HARDY, Magdalen: `A study of conceptual content in Targum Jeremiah:
    selected motifs relating to exile and restoration'.

    Examination Schools, Monday, 24 January, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A.G. Salvesen, R.P. Gordon.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Social Studies

    KA-WIN MAY, St Antony's: `Civic duties and virtues in modern
    liberal-democratic societies: liberalism and republicanism'.

    Balliol, Monday, 24 January, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: A.R.G. Swift, M.E. Canovan.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 13 January 2000: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    OBITUARIES


    All Souls College

    DENNIS WILLIAM SIAHOU SCIAMA, MA (PH.D.), FRS, 19 December 1999; Fellow
    1970–85, Emeritus Fellow since 1990.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    St Edmund Hall

    JOHN EDWARD BAYLISS, MA, 20 April 1999; commoner 1955–8. Aged 64.

    MALCOLM BRODIE FORBES, 20 June 1998; commoner 1954–7. Aged 64.

    NITYANAND, 31 July 1998; commoner 1962–3 and 1968–70. Aged 69.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Trinity College

    JOHN DAVID CLARK, 2 November 1997; commoner 1977. Aged 39.

    WILFRID MYLES EADON, 3 November 1999; commoner 1933. Aged 84.

    DENIS EVE, 28 October 1999; commoner 1942. Aged 75.

    GREGOR HUGH GRANT, July 1999; commoner 1929. Aged 89.

    PETER WILDEBLOOD, 13 November 1999; scholar 1942. Aged 76.

    DAVID WOODROW, 22 November 1999; commoner 1938. Aged 79.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ELECTIONS


    All Souls College

    Visiting Fellowships

    The following will be in residence for Hilary Term 2000 as Visiting Fellows at
    All Souls College:

    PROFESSOR BRIAN J. BOND, King's College, London

    DR IAN C. HARRIS, University of Leicester

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL POWER, London School of Economics and Political
    Science

    PROFESSOR ALAN SOKAL, New York University

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Brasenose College

    To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Geography:

    GREGORY E.
    TUCKER (BA Brown, PH.D. Pennsylvania State)

    To a Supernumerary Fellowship in Chemistry:

    GUY H. GRANT (B.SC.
    Glasgow, PH.D. Liverpool)

    To a BT Junior Research Fellowship in Science:

    EDMUND J. CRAMPIN
    (B.SC. London), Magdalen College

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Corpus Christi College

    To Visiting Fellowships:

    PROFESSOR ANNA BALAZS, William Kepler Whiteford Professor in the Chemical
    Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh (MT 2000 and HT
    2001
    )

    PROFESSOR KLAUS GÜNTHER, Professor of Law, Johan Wolfgang Goethe
    University, Frankfurt am Main (TT 2001)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Nuffield College

    To Professorial Fellowships:

    ANTHONY HEATH, MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Professor of Sociology

    ADRIAN PAGAN (B.EC. Queensland, PH.D. ANU), Australian National University

    To Visiting Fellowships:

    BILL CALLAGHAN, MA (MA Kent), Chairman, the Health and Safety Commission

    MOIRA WALLACE (MA Cambridge), Social Exclusion Unit, the Cabinet Office

    To an Emeritus Fellowship:

    PROFESSOR NOEL GALE, MA (B.SC. London,
    PH.D. Cambridge), formerly Faculty Fellow and Director of the Isotrace
    Laboratory

    To a Senior Research Fellowship:

    DR RICHARD SPADY, MA (BA
    Haverford, PH.D. MIT), formerly Official Fellow of the college

    To a non-stipendiary Research Fellowship:

    BENT NIELSEN, MA (PH.D.
    Copenhagen), University Lecturer in Econometrics

    To an Associate Membership:

    ALAIN JEUNEMAÎTRE (PH.D.,
    Doctorate, University of Paris), École Polytechnique/CNRS Researcher,
    Maison Française

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    NOTICES


    BALLIOL COLLEGE


    Six-hour Lecturership in Mathematics

    Applications are invited for a six-hour lecturership in Mathematics to be held
    at Balliol College for the academic year 2000–1. The lecturer will be asked
    to teach first and second year Pure Mathematics, and to contribute some
    section b classes to the intercollegiate class scheme.

    The lecturer will also be expected to assist with the administration of the
    subject, with pastoral care of
    students, and with entrance interviewing.

    The lecturer will be expected to teach an average of six hours a week over
    the year, with up to eight hours a week in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms, and
    proportionally less in Trinity Term. He or she will receive, in addition to the
    normal rates for tuition, a retainer of £5,279 per annum, an entertainment
    allowance, and certain common room rights.

    The closing date for applications is Friday, 4 February. Applicants should
    submit a letter of application supported by a curriculum vitae, and
    should state which parts of the Mathematics syllabus they would be willing to
    teach. They should give the names of two referees whom they should ask to
    write directly to the Senior Tutor by the closing date. Applications and
    references should be addressed to the Senior Tutor's secretary, Balliol College,
    Oxford OX1 3BJ.

    It is expected that interviews will be held during the week beginning 14
    February.

    Any prospective applicants wishing to discuss details
    of the post should contact Keith Hannabuss (e-mail: keith.
    hannabuss@balliol.ox.ac.uk) or Frances Kirwan (e-mail:
    frances.kirwan@balliol.ox.ac.uk).

    Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BRASENOSE COLLEGE


    Junior Research Fellowship

    Brasenose College invites applications from graduates of either sex for a
    Junior Research Fellowship in Theology, Law, Philosophy, Politics, Economics,
    or any other area of Social Studies, tenable for three years from 1 October
    2000. Candidates must not have spent more than seven years in full-time
    education or research since their first degree on 1 October 2000. The
    fellowship is non-stipendiary and is intended to be held in conjunction with
    a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship or equivalent salaried support
    for independent research, for which candidates should apply separately. A
    fellow is entitled to free luncheons and dinners, either accommodation in
    college or an allowance in lieu and a study room, and support for research
    expenses.

    Further particulars may be obtained from the Senior Tutor, Brasenose College,
    Oxford OX1 4AJ (telephone:
    Oxford (2)77823, e-mail: college.office@bnc.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications
    should be submitted by 29 February.

    Brasenose College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CHRIST CHURCH


    Fowler Hamilton Visiting Research Fellowships
    2001–2

    Christ Church proposes to elect Fowler Hamilton Visiting Fellows, in the
    Humanities or the Social Sciences, from overseas for up to eleven months in
    the period September 2001 to August 2002.

    The fellowships are intended to enable distinguished senior scholars to pursue
    their own study and research
    as members of the college community, and they will be
    expected to reside in Oxford during the period of tenure.

    The fellows will be entitled to free family accommodation, use of a study room
    in college, and free lunches
    and dinners. Return fares from the country of origin will be paid for each
    fellow and his/her family. Limited stipends may also be offered depending on
    individual
    circumstances.

    Further details may be obtained from the Dean's Secretary, Christ Church,
    Oxford OX1 1DP (fax: Oxford (2)76238), and applications must be received by
    14 February at latest. The further particulars can also be seen
    on the college Web site, http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/jobs.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    NEW COLLEGE


    Official Fellowship in Classics

    New College proposes to elect, if a suitable candidate applies, a Fellow and
    Tutor in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature with effect from 1 October
    2000. The fellowship is associated with a titular university lecturership, which
    the University may at a later date convert into a stipendiary post; meanwhile
    the college will pay the full stipend. The college and University encourage
    applications from those interested in any aspects of Classical Literature and
    Languages. (The faculty has some preference for candidates with expertise in
    the following: Latin Literature and Literary Theory and its applications to
    classical studies.)

    Application forms and further particulars are available from the Senior
    Tutor, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590,
    e-mail: tuition@
    new.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is 11 February.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Todd-Bird Junior Research Fellowship in
    Medicine/Biochemistry; Astor Junior Research Fellowship in Music; Weston
    Junior Research Fellowship in Chemistry

    Applications are invited for these three Junior Research Fellowships tenable
    for three years from 1 October 2000. The Todd-Bird Junior Research
    Fellowship is restricted to the fields of Medicine/Biochemistry. The Astor
    Junior
    Research Fellowship is restricted on this occasion to the field of Music. The
    Weston Junior Research Fellowship is restricted on this occasion to the field
    of Chemistry.

    For all these fellowships applicants must, at the time of taking up the post,
    have completed at least two years study for an advanced degree. Each
    fellowship carries a stipend of £12,372 per annum (subject to review). In
    addition the fellows will be entitled to free rooms and meals
    in college, and to entertainment, research, and book
    allowances.

    Application forms and further particulars are available from the Senior
    Tutor, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590,
    e-mail: tuition@
    new.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is 18 February.

    New College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ORIEL COLLEGE


    Stipendiary Lecturership in English Literature

    Oriel College invites applications for a Stipendiary Lecturership in English
    Literature, for two years from 1 October 2000.

    The lecturer will assist the Fellow in English in the teaching of English and
    in the English sides of the joint schools of English and Modern Languages,
    and Classics and English. He or she will be required to teach up to ten hours
    per week across the range of English Literature in the period 1500 to 1830.

    There is no age limit for applications. The stipend
    offered is on the scale £15,334—£18,915 per annum.

    Further details are available from the Senior Tutor, Oriel College, Oxford OX1
    4EW (telephone: Oxford (2)76520). The closing date for applications is Tuesday,
    15 February.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Hayward Junior Research Fellowship

    Oriel College invites applications for a Hayward Junior Research Fellowship in
    the general field of medical science, tenable for a period of three years from
    1 October 2000. It is intended that the fellowship will be held in conjunction
    with a junior appointment or a grant for research in one of the departments
    of this University. It is expected that the successful candidate will normally
    be under thirty years of age.

    The fellow will receive free rooms in college or a housing allowance, and
    meals at the common table. Further financial arrangements will depend on the
    circumstances of the successful candidate. The fellow may be invited to do a
    limited amount of teaching for the college, in which case payment will be made
    at capitation rates.

    Further details may be obtained from the College Secretary, Oriel College,
    Oxford OX1 4EW. The closing date for applications will be Friday, 11 February.
    Oriel College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PEMBROKE COLLEGE


    Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in
    Non-linear Mathematics

    Pembroke College proposes to elect a Stipendiary Junior Research Fellow in
    Non-linear Mathematics. The fellowship will commence on 14 February 2000, or
    as soon as possible thereafter, for a maximum period of ten months
    in the first instance, with a possible extension for an
    additional year.

    Further details can be obtained from the Academic
    Registrar, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1 1DW (telephone: Oxford (2)76410, fax:
    (2)76418, e-mail: jackie.lewis
    @pmb.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is
    Friday, 21 January.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST CATHERINE'S COLLEGE


    Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Modern
    History and University Lecturership (CUF) in the Faculty of Modern History

    St Catherine's College proposes to elect to a Fellowship and Tutorship in
    Modern History at St Catherines College, in the field of the History of Britain
    and/or Europe in the Nineteenth and/or Twentieth Centuries, with effect from
    October 2000. The college appointment is tenable in
    conjunction with a University Lecturership (CUF). The
    successful applicant will be required to take tutorial responsibility and teach
    for the college, lecture and supervise graduates in the Faculty of Modern
    History of the University, and undertake research.

    Further particulars are obtainable from the Master,
    St Catherine's College (telephone: Oxford (2)71762, e-mail:
    margaret.lavercombe@stcatz.ox.ac.uk). Applications should include the names of
    three referees, who should be asked to send their references directly to the
    Master, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ, by Friday, 25 February.
    St Catherine's College and the University are equal opportunities employers.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST CROSS COLLEGE


    Appointment of Assistant Bursar

    St Cross College intends to appoint an Assistant Bursar. The appointee will be
    responsible for the provision of administrative support and financial
    management of
    aspects of the college's affairs. This includes responsibility for arranging for
    the general repair and maintenance of the college buildings, implementation of
    regulations to meet Health and Safety legislative requirements, and the
    management of income-generating events in college.

    The appointment will be offered on the University's salary scale for
    academic-related grade 2 staff (currently £18,915–£24,479). The
    appointment will entitle the post-holder to a university pension and
    thirty-eight days of
    annual leave, inclusive of eight public holidays. Free lunches and car parking
    on site are provided.

    Interested applicants may write for further details to the Bursar, St Cross
    College, St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LZ (fax: Oxford (2)78484, e-mail:
    maureen.doherty@stx.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for completed applications is
    3 February.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST EDMUND HALL


    William R. Miller Junior Research Fellowship in
    Biological Sciences

    St Edmund Hall proposes to elect to a W.R. Miller Junior Research Fellowship
    in the field of the Molecular Aspects of Biology for three years from 1 October
    2000. The fellowship includes dining rights and will be stipendiary, but the
    stipend will be reduced by the amount of any other stipend received from
    another source. The college will not normally elect someone who has previously
    held a similar appointment.

    Further particulars may be obtained from the Principal, St Edmund Hall,
    Oxford OX1 4AR, and applications should reach him no later than Monday, 10
    January.

    St Edmund Hall is an equal opportunities employer and a charity which exists
    to promote excellence in education and research.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST HILDA'S COLLEGE


    V.H. Galbraith Fellowship in Medieval Studies

    St Hilda's College invites applications from women graduates of any country
    for this Research and Teaching Fellowship in Medieval Studies, tenable for two
    years from
    1 October 2000. Preference will be given to those studying
    Medieval Philosophy, Science, Music, or Theology. Further particulars should
    be obtained from the Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY
    (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail: college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The
    closing date for applications is 4 February.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Appointment of Filming Liaison Officer

    St Hilda's College seeks a Liaison Officer for days when Chameleon TV are
    filming in Oxford. Payment by the day (about forty days per annum) and
    meals while on duty. Suitable for a recent graduate already based in Oxford,
    and without commitments which would conflict with quick response at short
    notice, familiar with college ethos, and able to relate to college members at all
    levels. Further particulars may be obtained from the Principal's Secretary, St
    Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone:
    Oxford (2)76813, e-mail: caroline.hill@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WOLFSON COLLEGE


    Appointment of Day Nursery Manager

    A Day Nursery Manager is required as soon as possible, to take charge of the
    nursery, which has twenty-nine places for children aged from six weeks to
    five years.

    An NNEB or equivalent qualification is essential, as is a minimum of five years'
    relevant experience. Salary in the range £15,000–£18,500. Staff
    benefits include pension scheme, six weeks' annual holiday, subsidised meals,
    and parking.

    Further details and an application form can be obtained from the Domestic
    Bursar's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD (telephone: Oxford
    (2)74071). The closing date for applications is 21 January.

    Wolfson College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 13 January 2000: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to advertise in the
    Gazette


    Terms and conditions
    of acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    Nuffield Department of Surgery

    Seminars, Hilary Term 2000, Seminar Room, Level 6, NDS, John
    Radcliffe Hospital at 1.00 p.m. Immunology: Tues. 18 Jan., Dr Caetano Reis E
    Sousa, ICRF, Lincoln's Inn fields, `Regulation of antigen presenting cell
    function in vivo'. Thurs. 3 Feb., Dicken Koo, Nuffield Dept. of Surgery,
    `Ischaemia/Reperfusion injury in renal transplantation'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Defining Heresy in the late antique and early
    Medieval world

    Henry Chadwick will deliver the late Roman History seminar,
    `The Concept of Orthodoxy' on 20 Jan. at 5.00 p.m. in the Classics Faculty
    Centre, 67 St Giles.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Tuition Offered

    Year 2K, why not lose weight, improve fitness, feel better?
    Personal fitness training and lifestyle management, with Paul Hornsby, one of
    the U.K.'s most experienced fitness trainers. Having worked as a trainer for
    14 years Paul has got what it takes to make you make a difference to the way
    you look and feel. For more information tel.: Oxford 773021, 07715 5842982 or
    email: pjh_personaltraining@yahoo.com.

    Piano tuition, experienced teacher. Adults and children. All
    grades. Beginners welcome. Contact Miss P. Read B.A. (Hons.) LRAM. Jericho.
    Tel.: Oxford 510904.

    GCSE and A level Easter Revision courses. Highly successful
    courses which build confidence and exam skills and which can make a
    significant difference to students' grades. Tel.: d'Overbroeck's College, Oxford
    310000.

    Jazz/World Music course for musicians aged 10–14 of all
    levels of experience. Feb. half-term. Contact Sami Cohen at d'Overbroeck's
    College. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

    Pilates is the buzzword in fitness today—yet it has
    already been delivering results for well over 80 years, during which time its
    devotees have included leading figures from the worlds of film, dance and
    professional sport. Pilates is a very safe, effective form of exercise, which
    works by strengthening the core postural muscles of the body, re-balancing
    and bringing it back into correct alignment, resulting in a longer, leaner
    body. The exercises are performed in a slow, controlled way, bringing long-
    term results. It is also a great way of relieving unwanted stress and tension.
    There is a massive demand for Pilates throughout the country and, as a
    result, there is a shortage of qualified instructors. Valerie Downing is a
    member of the Body Control Pilates Association, Europe's largest Pilates
    professional body and is now teaching the method at various locations
    throughout the county. Class numbers are limited to an absolute maximum of
    twelve so that a high level of personal tuition and supervision can be given.
    Beginners classes are suitable for first time exercisers. Tel.: Oxford 730429 for
    further information.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Services Offered

    Psychotherapy: experienced, qualified, UKCP registered,
    Gestalt and Integrative Psychotherapist recently moved from Nottingham to
    Merton (between Bicester and Islip). I am available to see individuals and
    couples for short or long-term therapy. New ongoing daytime psychotherapy
    group starting early in the new year. Personal and/or professional
    development workshops available throughout the year. Individual and group
    supervision also available. For further information contact Ruth Nathan on
    Oxford 331899.

    Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in
    Oxford. Also 24- hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access,
    and mail forwarding worldwide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying,
    mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury
    Rd., Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
    summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

    Dramatic colour scheme borders in the style of Gertrude
    Jekyll, mixing foliage and flowers. Jeanne Bliss, Landscape Designer and
    Pruning Adviser, Oxford and California. Tel.: Oxford 515379 for leaflet.

    SigmaMetrics. Consultants in statistics for the design of
    scientific experiments and clinical projects, and grant applications. We
    guarantee improvement of drafts of MSS for submission to learned journals,
    theses for higher degrees, author's drafts of chapters and books, and advise
    on preparation in dealing with applied statistical problems in MSc and DPhil
    Vivas. Confidential assistance available in managing MS rejection by statistical
    referees for journals. Special projects or tuition in applied biological and
    medical statistics undertaken by our higher graduate statisticians who are also
    graduates in science or medicine. For further details visit our website at:
    www.sigmametrics.co.uk, email: n.t.james@sigmametrics.co.uk (Dr N.T. James, BCh
    BM MA MSc (Oxon), or Freephone 0800 0345 945.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Domestic Services

    Looking for a native French speaker to tutor my two French
    speaking children (6 and 4), minimum twice weekly after school, North Oxford.
    Please call Oxford 512066.

    Looking for a native Italian speaker to coach and play with
    my two children (6 and 4) who understand Italian, after school or on
    weekends, North Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 512066.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Situations Vacant

    Tureck Bach Research foundation seeks a part-time assistant.
    Hours and good rates of pay negotiable. Requirements: computer skills, daily
    correspondence, telephone. The Tureck Bach Research Foundation is a
    charitable organisation bringing together distinguished scientists in varied
    fields, musicologists and performing musicians. Please call Oxford 515760 or fax
    Oxford 512620 at any time.

    Programmer conversant in Director 6.5/7, ASP, database and
    web required by Oxford-based multimedia company.Initial contract could lead
    to on-going work. The ideal person will have access to own computer and
    workspace. Hourly or freelance basis. Likely start date Feb. 2000. Please
    contact Hira Verick, tel.: 07880 541193, email: hira@MediaAgency.com.

    Secretarial/Editorial Assistant. Part-time freelance
    opportunity for someone with existing University connection to assist with the
    receipt of papers and correspondence with authors for a monthly journal.
    Flexible working hours readily arranged. Available from 1 Feb. 2000 with
    payment to £500 p.m. Enquiries, expressions of interest to:
    richard.brook@materials.oxford.ac.uk or tel.: Oxford 273782, or Richard Brook,
    Department of Materials, University of Oxford, OIX1 3PH.

    New College, Oxford. The college invites applications for the
    post of Librarian. Candidates should be graduates and have appropriate
    professional experience. The salary will be on the University Library Scale
    (academic related) on Grades 1/2 (£16,286–£24,479). Applicants
    should write for further particulars to the Bursar, New College, Oxford OX1
    3BN, tel.: Oxford 279550. The closing date for applications is 28 Jan. 2000.

    Oxford Preservation Trust, Assistant Secretary. Oxford
    Preservation Trust is a charitable trust established in 1927 to promote
    preservation of Oxford's historical, architectural and natural environment. It
    owns land and a number of buildings throughout the City and the Green Belt.
    The present Assistant Secretary to the Trust is due to retire in Spring 2000.
    Applications are now invited for this full-time post. Working alongside the
    Secretary you will be responsible for the day to day administration of the
    Trust, organising committee meetings, looking after the membership, including
    arranging a programme of visits, and the annual Environmental Awards. This
    is an interesting and varied post. Applicants should be computer literate and
    have a commitment to conservation. A knowledge of Oxford and its countryside
    would be an advantage. The salary is related to the University Clerical and
    Library Staff Scales, Grade 6 £18,667–£21,646. Please write by
    28 January 2000 enclosing a C.V. to Mrs D. Dance, Secretary, Oxford
    Preservation Trust, 10 Turn Again Lane, Oxford OX1 1QL. Arrangements should
    be made for two references to be sent direct to the Trust.

    Part-time Archivist. Jesus College seeks to employ from 1
    April 2000 an appropriately qualified and experienced archivist for 2 days
    each month to undertake routine maintenance of the College archive, to answer
    queries, mount up to 2 exhibitions each year, and, if time permits, to escort
    visitors. Experience in working with PCs is essential and familiarity with
    Microsoft Word, databases and email desirable. The College is an Equal
    Opportunities employer and is prepared to consider any suitably qualified
    applicant. Remuneration includes an honorarium of £1,500 per year,
    statutory holiday entitlement and meals when on duty in College. As this is a
    new appointment the terms and conditions will be subject to continual review
    with the post holder. For details and an application form contact the Home
    Bursar's Secretary at Jesus College, Oxford, OX1 3DW, tel.: Oxford 279715, by
    4 Feb. 2000.

    Argentine studies programme. Administrative assistant
    required immediately for approx. 10 hrs. per week, to assist Programme
    Director with office systems, database and conference organisation. The
    successful candidate will be computer literate (Word, Excel, web and email) and
    have an excellent command of Spanish. The post is initially for a period of
    2–3 months, but may be extended. Payment of £7 per hour is offered.
    Apply in writing to Dr Celia Szusterman, Latin American Centre, St Antony's
    College, Oxford OX2 6JF.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Houses to Let

    North Oxford house available from 28 Mar. 2000 for one year
    or less. Walk to colleges, train station, and bus station, near Port Meadow,
    c.h., recently redecorated, desks, filing cabinets, several large closets,
    secluded garden, 2 1/2 bathrooms, washing machine, drier, telephone, linen,
    dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. Two bedrooms, £950
    p.m.; 3 bedrooms, £1250 p.m (inc. bedsit with separate entrance). Tel.: J.
    Mackrell (eves.), Oxford 775567, or Canada: A.Gaston, 613 745 1368, fax. 613 745
    0299. E-mail: Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA or Gaston@cyberus.ca.

    Jericho, available early Jan. for 6 months. Two bedrooms,
    g.c.h, washing machine etc. Excellent family home. Non-smokers only. £700
    p.c.m. Call Ru or Terry on Oxford 559581.

    Charming cottage, 12 miles north west of Oxford in a quiet
    corner of village. Beams, inglenook fireplace, woodburning stove, g.c.h.,
    country antiques, washer/drier, fridge/freezer, bash/shower, small walled
    garden, garage, double bedroom, spare bedroom/study. Available from mid-
    April. Tel.: Oxford 284225.

    Furnished house to let up until 15 Sept. 2000. Centrally
    located, near railway station. For more information please contact the Domestic
    Bursar, Pembroke College, Oxford on Oxford 276423. Price: £600 p.c.m.

    Well situated, furnished terrace house in South Oxford.
    Close to city centre, park and reservoir. Double bedroom, single bedroom,
    bathroom, sitting room, dining room, kitchen and south facing garden. Washing
    machine, c.h. Would suit couple or two tidy sharers. Non-smokers only please.
    Available end Jan. for 6 months or 1 year. £750 p.c.m. plus council tax.
    Deposit and references required. Tel.: Oxford 310806.

    Mid-March to mid-June, 3-bedroom 18th century house, 3
    miles Oxford city centre, frequent buses. Gas c.h., dishwasher, washing
    machine, secluded garden, car-port, non-smoking. £800 p.c.m. Tel. (in
    January) 001 212 463 0078; (in February) Oxford 778768.

    Edwardian Terrace. Three-bedroom family home tucked away
    in quiet mews, but within walking distance to the city centre and Jericho.
    Stripped wooden floors, secure garden and proximity to schools make this a
    very desirable family home. Available now at £1,200 p.c.m. Contact Gay at
    Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY, tel.: Oxford
    302305, email: oxford@finders.co.uk, or visit our website at:
    http//www.finders.co.uk.

    Country cottage. Two-bedroom country cottage located on
    Boars Hill. Recently refurbished and redecorated, this house provides
    comfortable accommodation for a professional couple or small family. The
    location is ideal for access to Abingdon and Oxford. Pretty garden and private
    courtyard. Off street parking available. £795 p.c.m. For more information
    please tel.: Oxford 302344.

    Moreton in Marsh. 27 miles Oxford, 35 minutes by train.
    Elegant Cotswolds stone town house. Sleeps 5. All mod. cons., garden. Available
    end Jan. £520 p.c.m. Please tel.: 01608 810549.

    Four bedroom house in quiet residential area to west of city,
    10–15 mins. to centre by cycle or bus. Separate lounge and dining room,
    master bedroom ensuite. To let unfurnished for up to 6 months at £700
    p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 279285 or 862591.

    End terrace, fully furnished, off Abingdon Road. Two double,
    1 single bedroom, g.c.h., d.g., shower, washing machine, big garage, courtyard
    garden. Children and pets welcome. Available mid-Feb. £780 p.m.
    £1,200 deposit and references, or £145,000 for sale. Tel.: 0171 286
    8444.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Flats to Let

    An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes.
    We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are
    seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we
    may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents,
    specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
    professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in
    Oxford. Visit our website at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all
    the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone,
    fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we
    can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, email:
    info@qbman.co.uk.

    Flat near Oxford to let in 18th century house, centrally
    located in Woodstock. Two bedrooms, large sitting room, dining room, kitchen
    and bathroom. Telephone, c.h., washer/drier etc. Available 16 April 2000.
    £600 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 811488.

    Butler Close, central Oxford. Two-bedroom, first floor flat.
    £675 p.m. Apply: Chancellors, 255 Banbury Road, Summertown. Tel.: Oxford
    516161.

    Light one bedroom first floor flat. Oxford ring road above
    Summertown. Convenient centre and hospitals. 24-hour bus route. Off-street
    parking. Fully furnished, washing machine, gas c.h. Available early 2000.
    £520 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel./fax: Oxford 554285.

    North Parade, charming, fully furnished 1-bedroom flat in
    the heart of North Oxford. Available early Jan. £600 p.m. Tel.: Oxford
    513816 weekdays.

    Murray Court, Banbury Rd, Oxford. Very spacious (200 sq
    ft.), quiet, first floor flat. Three double bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (1 ensuite).
    Fully furnished to high standard, gas c.h., garage, garden. Within short
    walking distance Science Area, University Parks and city centre. Non-smokers
    only. Available 1 Jan. 2000. £1,250 p.c.m. Tel.: Brooks Property
    Management, Oxford 728597, fax: 794606.

    Woodstock Road, 2 miles from city centre. Purpose built, self-
    contained, ground floor flat, fully furnished. Living room with view and access
    to large rear garden, double bedroom, bathroom and kitchen. Close to bus
    stops. Car parking. Available from 1 Feb. 12 months let preferred. £550
    p.c.m. plus services. Tel.: Oxford 557684 (eves.).

    Central North Oxford, fully furnished, 2-bedroom, luxury
    apartment with off-road parking. £795 p.c.m. Also: fully furnished 1-
    bedroom flat with off-road parking. £695 p.c.m. For further information
    and to view please tel.: Oxford 559559.

    Furnished, well equipped flat over community centre in
    Polstead Road. Would suit graduate or academic visitor with family. Sitting
    room, 3 bedrooms (could all be double), kitchen, bathroom, separate W.C.
    Available now. Rent £850 p.c.m., reduced to £750 p.c.m. in return for
    light duties. For further details and an application form contact Ben Simpson,
    tel.: Oxford 274073, e-mail: ben.simpson@wolfson.ox.ac.uk, or write to him at
    Wolfson College, Linton Road, Oxford OX2 6UD. Applications will be considered
    as soon as possible and applicants may be interviewed.

    Available January 2000 (long let only). Modern decor and
    furnishings, 1 double bedroom, living room, kitchen, bathroom, c.h. All
    facilities. Private parking. Quiet Banbury Road location, 1/2 mile city centre.
    Non-smoker. £575 p.m. plus council tax. Tel.: 01993 852196.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Offered

    Abbeyfield (Oxford) Society. Very sheltered housing for
    elderly people. Spacious house in lovely garden near central Oxford. All rooms
    ensuite. Meals provided. Supportive staff. Details from: The Administrator,
    Brian Lewis House, 80 St Clements, Oxford OX4 1 AW. Tel.: Oxford 790439.

    Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long
    stays in the warm, comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
    exclusive, quiet, central north Oxford. Within walking distance of all main
    university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops and restaurants.
    All rooms have colour TV, tea- and coffee-making facilities, microwave and
    refrigerator/refrigerator availability, c.h. and alternative heating. Breakfast
    included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax Oxford 557879.

    Need somewhere quiet to work? Bottom of the garden
    study/office/workshop/studio measuring 14 ft x 9 ft. Built-in desk 8 ft x 3 ft.
    Metered heating, well lit and with excellent natural light, optional phone point.
    Very near Folly Bridge. £100 p.m. Please tel.: Oxford 242313/396878 for
    further details.

    Delightful rooms, North Oxford. smallest room £30 p.w.,
    telephone, shower, c.h., all mod. cons. Available now, short stay up to 3
    months. Located near Woodstock Road roundabout. Tel.: Oxford 511657.

    Large ensuite room to rent in country cottage overlooking
    Cherwell valley. Pretty village, 15 miles north of Oxford. Bus and rail services
    to Oxford. Garage available. N/S professional or academic. £60 p.w. Tel.:
    01869 232137 (eves.).

    North Oxford . Short let or long. Independent male graduate
    to share quiet house. Shared facilities, spacious room. Rent £55 p.w. inc.
    fuel. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Sought

    Japanese businessman, travelling with his wife and son,
    wishes to rent a 2-bedroom house or flat between 25 Mar. and 20 April, when
    they will be visiting Oxford. In the first instance please contact Edward
    Greene, 45 Pembroke St., Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 248308.

    Academic couple visiting Oxford University seek apartment
    with 1 (or 2) bedrooms during Trinity Term, May–June. Preferably quiet
    neighbourhood. Renting or house-sitting. References available. Tel.: 00 32 14
    46 00 86 (home), 00 31 13 466 8210 (office), email: Luc.Renneboog@kub.nl.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB
    Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers.
    We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and
    their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants
    seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services,
    or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation,
    telephone us: Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or email us: info@qbman.co.uk.
    Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our website at:
    http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

    Three-bedroom house in Oxford area wanted for visiting
    academic and family, approx. mid-Feb. to mid-June 2000. Please contact:
    s.may@auckland.ac.nz, and/or c/o Mrs. F. Greenwood, 01788 815638 after 20 Jan.
    House swap to 4-bedroom house in Auckland, New Zealand possible.

    Librarian, working in London but living in central Oxford,
    seeks accommodation, 8 Apr.–21 May, while his own flat is temporarily
    unavailable. Furnished studio flat or 1-bedroom flat preferred, central/north
    Oxford or near railway station if possible. Tel.: Oxford 250917 (answerphone),
    email: peter_jackson@link.org.

    Norwegian Professor and family (wife, and 3 children aged
    5, 8, and 11), seeks a furnished 3-bedroom flat or house in Oxford from 15
    Feb.—20 April, 2000 (exact dates negotiable), when he will be visiting
    Nuffield College. Non-smokers. Recommendations available. Up to £1,000.
    Central and child-friendly location is preferred. Email:
    bertil.tungodden@nhh.no, tel.: 00 47 55 58 38 74, or 00 47 55 95 36 70, fax: 00
    47 55 58 39 01.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Exchange

    Australian scholar and member of St Hugh's College seeks to
    exchange spacious newly renovated 4-bedroom home in leafy suburb of
    Canberra, close to Australian National University, for house in Oxford in May
    2000 for approx. 4 weeks. Minimum 1 double bedroom, 1 twin. Tel.: 61 2 6248
    7625, email: Rosamund.Dalziell@anu.edu.au.

    Academic couple seek accommodation in or near Cambridge
    Massachusettes from October 2000 for 1 year, and offer in exchange a four
    hundred year old beamed cottage in rural village, 5 miles from Oxford city
    centre. Fully modernised, 2-bedroom with c.h. and open fireplace. Excellent
    location for Oxford University and John Radcliffe Hospital. Contact: Dr J.
    Knight +44 (0) 1865 287671, email: julian@well.ox.ac.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Holiday Lets

    The Caribbean, the place to unwind. Imagine spending 2
    weeks relaxing the body, refreshing the mind, or just enjoying the magic of
    Tobago. Yoga Holiday and Heritage Festival Event, 15–29 July. Contact
    Spiral Travel, Caribbean Yoga Holiday Specialists, 65 Hurst Street, Oxford OX4
    1HA. Tel.: Oxford 728576, email: spiralltd@aol.com.

    Self-catering accommodation 5 minutes walk to city centre.
    We have 4-bedroom self-contained flats to let from July to Sept., fully
    equipped kitchens for groups or families. Close to shops, restaurants and
    buses. A 24-hour lodge with CCTV. Pleasant gardens in tranquil surroundings.
    Use of the adjacent sports ground. Washing machines on site. Free off-road
    parking. For rates tel./fax Oxford 725364.

    Tuscan hills. In superb situation near Siena, our own
    restored farmhouse standing amidst its own olives and vineyard. Spectacular
    hill and forest views. Easy access to Florence and other main art centres.
    Very peaceful with full services (but no pool). Sleeps up to 8. Tel./fax: 01252
    660899.

    Accommodation available Sydney, Apr.–Dec. 2000. Three
    bedroom modern townhouse, furnished/equipped, secure complex. Two
    bathrooms, laundry, courtyard/pergola, gas barbecue. Walk local shops, 10
    minutes' bus CBD, close harbourside parks/beaches. A$550 p.w. Fax 61-2-9351-
    2434, email: Simon.Petch@english.usyd.edu.au.

    Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno,
    superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished
    surroundings. Elevated, vine-covered, sitting area with brick
    barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to
    long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and
    around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round.
    £280 p.w., £1000 p.m. All linen, electricty and cleaning inc. Tel./fax:
    Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, email: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

    Luxury accommodation in mid-Wales between Hay on Wye and
    Builth Wells. Barn conversion completed late 1999. Sleeps 8, full c.h., and fully
    equipped kitchen. Ideal location for hill walking, trout fishing, birdwatching,
    and pony trekking. For rates tel.: Oxford 864372, after 6.30 p.m.

    Country lovers retreat, children and dogs welcome. Beautiful
    barn conversion into 2 cottages with panoramic views over secluded valley.
    Small mixed organic farm with rare breed animals. Owls, herons, buzzards,
    otters, exclusive fishing on farm as well as salmon fishing on River Taw
    nearby. Painting and drawing holidays, Tarka trail, RHS Rosemoor, beautiful
    North Devon coastline not far. For brochure tel.: 01769 520263. Short breaks
    available.
    n

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 14 January<br /> - 30 January

    Diary


    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff
    Development Programme Seminars
    : places should be booked in advance
    through
    the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
    ProgrammeWeb site.

    Return to
    Contents Page of this issue



    Friday 14 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Faces in stone and paint', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Sunday 16 January

    HILARY FULL TERM begins.
    DR M. EDWARDS preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m. (Latin Litany and Sermon).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Monday 17 January

    DR S. CASTLE: `Adolescent sexual behaviour in Mali' (Fertility and
    Reproduction Seminars), basement Seminar Room, Institute of Social and
    Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

    ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Small group teaching',
    2 p.m. (see information above).

    PROFESSOR ROGER GRAEF: `Brave New World: public service broadcasting in
    the twenty-first century' (lecture), Saskatchewan Room, Exeter, 6 p.m.

    PROFESSOR M.J. GIBNEY: `Safe and nutritious food: global issues for the next
    millennium' (Green College Lectures: `Food for the next millennium: implications
    for the environment', Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Tuesday 18 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Gino Severini–from Futurism to
    Classicism' (until 5 March).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Grand Tour: eighteenth-century
    European painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
    a.m.--1 p.m.)

    PROFESSOR H. HUTCHINSON: `Lasers in science' (Graduate Interdisciplinary
    Lectures: `Seeing things in a new light—laser applications in science and
    technology', Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 4.15 p.m.

    A. MURRAY: `The later Middle Ages' (Lecture series to celebrate the start of
    a new millennium: `The history of Christianity—how we got to where we
    are now'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    SIR MARTIN WOOD: `Superconductivity, eighty-nine years on—where's it
    going?' (Wolfson College Lectures: `Physics at the boundaries'), the Hall,
    Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

    PROFESSOR K. SOPER: `Realism, humanism, and the politics of nature' (Oxford
    Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Main
    Building, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

    P. KILDEA: ` "And light falls equally on black and white": Britten's and
    Auden's longest journey' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Music Faculty, 5.15
    p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Wednesday 19 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk (Dr Arthur MacGregor): `The Tradescants',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    PROFESSOR R. HEWISON: `Ruskin today' (Slade Lectures: `Ruskin today'),
    Lecture Hall, University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m. (open to the
    public).

    B. HOVY: `Measuring forced migration: what we know and what we don't'
    (Refugee Studies Centre seminars: `Perspectives on forced migration'), Library
    Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Thursday 20 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Introduction to
    electronic information resources', 2 p.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    S. SALIH: `Postcolonial theories' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
    seminars: `Cross-border narratives—between North and West Africa'),
    Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    DR C. DE HAMEL: `The Nazis and the Rothschilds' libraries' (Oxford
    Bibliographical Society lecture), Taylor Institution, 5.15 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Friday 21 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Japanese fan paintings' (special exhibition),
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    SIR KEITH THOMAS: `Arms and the man' (Ford's Lectures in British History:
    `The ends of life: roads to human fulfilment in early modern England'),
    Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR A. STEPAN: `The world's religious systems and democracy' (St
    Antony's College Jubilee Lecture Series), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5
    p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Sunday 23 January

    PROFESSOR ROBERT GORDON preaches the Macbride Sermon on the Application
    of Messianic Prophecy, Hertford, 10 a.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Monday 24 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Managing and
    developing effective teams', 9 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    DR A. ANKOMAN: `The use and misuse of anthropology in HIV/AIDS research
    and prevention in sub-Saharan Africa' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars),
    basement Seminar Room, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11
    a.m.

    PROFESSOR ROGER GRAEF: `Now you see it, now you don't: visions of reality
    in the twenty-first century' (lecture), Saskatchewan Room, Exeter, 6 p.m.

    DR P.J. DALE: `Genetically modified organisms: environmental saviour or
    environmental disaster?' (Green College Lectures: `Food for the next
    millennium: implications for the environment', Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe
    Infirmary, 6 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Tuesday 25 January

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Teapots and teacups', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    PROFESSOR G. HANCOCK: `Lasers in atmospheric chemistry' (Graduate
    Interdisciplinary Lectures: `Seeing things in a new light—laser applications
    in science and technology', Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory,
    4.15 p.m.

    PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the poem: "The
    Literary Life" by Ted Hughes' (lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR D. MACCULLOCH: `The Reformation' (Lecture series to celebrate the
    start of a new millennium: `The history of Christianity—how we got to
    where we are now'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR M.E. FISHER: `Pictures, models, approximations, and reality: phase
    transitions and the role of the theorist' (Wolfson College Lectures: `Physics at
    the boundaries'), the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

    P. DUBEN: `Risk, pollution, and regulation' (Oxford Centre for the Environment,
    Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Main Building, Mansfield, 5
    p.m.

    C. HUMPHRIES: `Meaningful realism in analysis, interpretation, and performance'
    (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Wednesday 26 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINARS: `Personal organisation'
    and `Evaluation methodologies for technology-assisted teaching and learning',
    both at 2 p.m. (see information above).

    PROFESSOR N. MACFARLANE: `States, power, and refugees: international
    relations and forced migration' (Refugee Studies Centre seminars: `Perspectives
    on forced migration'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5
    p.m.

    C. NUPEN introduces film Remembering Jacqueline du Pré,
    Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's, 8 p.m. (tickets
    £8/£5 from Oxford Playhouse, tel. 798600; information from (2)76821).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Thursday 27 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Dealing with
    harassment' (day 1), 10 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    J.-P. LLEDO: `Chroniques algériennes' (Centre for Cross-Cultural
    Research on Women seminars: `Cross-border narratives—between North and
    West Africa'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR R. HEWISON: ` "All my eye and Betty Martin": the formation of
    Ruskin's taste and the Ruskin family art collection' (Slade Lectures: `Ruskin
    today'), Lecture Hall, University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m. (open to
    the public).

    DR THOMAS MICHEL: `Features of the Muslim–Christian polemical tradition'
    (Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures: `Paul of Antioch and Ibn Taymiyya: the
    modern relevance of a medieval polemic'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    THE HON. MAURICE STRONG: `Global sustainable development' (Linacre Lectures:
    `Consciousness of connections: global environments in the new millennium'),
    Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Friday 28 January

    ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Introduction to
    strategic planning and management', 9 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Local Oxfordshire finds', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    SIR KEITH THOMAS: `Work and vocation' (Ford's Lectures in British History:
    `The ends of life: roads to human fulfilment in early modern England'),
    Schools, 5 p.m.

    MS PATRICIA HEWITT, MP: `Social justice in the knowledge economy' (St
    Antony's College Jubilee Lecture Series), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5
    p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Saturday 29 January

    ST ANNE'S COLLEGE: `A Feast for the Millennium', with Master of Wine, Jancis
    Robinson, and wine historian Hanneke Wilson; reception, 7.30 p.m., dinner, 8
    p.m. (tickets £35 from college Development Office: tel./fax (2)74852).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Sunday 30 January

    THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

    COLIN CARR: master-class, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 10 a.m.
    (admission by free programme, available from the Porters' Lodge, St John's;
    reserved for college members until ten days before the event).

    Return to List of Contents of this section