12 October 1995



<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 9 October

  • HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 9 October


  • CONGREGATION 10 October

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CONGREGATION 9 October


    Degree by Special Resolution

    No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions
    of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1993, p. 13), the
    following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 9
    October.

    Text of Special Resolution

    That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

    ARND KERKHECKER, Worcester College

    ALEXANDER PETER LJUNGQVIST, M.PHIL., Merton College

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 9 October


    1 Decrees

    Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 27
    October.

    List of the decrees:

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Explanatory note to Decree (1)

    The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Law Board and
    with the concurrence of the General Board, amends the wording of the
    certificate to be issued to those awarded the Postgraduate Diploma in
    Legal Education so as to spell out more clearly the purpose for which
    the diploma is awarded.

    Decree (1)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1029, l. 23, after
    `Legal Practice' insert `in the subjects prescribed for the
    Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Practice'.



    Decree (2)

    The consent of the University is given to the amendments to Statutes
    II, III, V, and VI of Exeter College approved by the Governing Body
    on 24 July 1995, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7
    (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

    Note. The effect of the amendments is:

    1. to amend the regulations relating to the
    election of a new Rector;

    2. to remove an upper age limit for the
    appointment of Junior Research Fellows;

    3. to include a new scholarship;

    4. to allow the Governing Body to delegate
    certain powers to the Rector's and Tutors' Committee, and to
    establish a new Appeals Committee.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Decree (3)

    The consent of the University is given to the amendment to Statute VI
    of Hertford College approved by the Governing Body on 26 July 1995,
    in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the
    Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

    Note. The effect of the amendment is to appoint an
    Investment Manager and to prescribe the latter's powers, duties, and
    terms of appointment.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    2 Status of Master of Arts

    Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
    the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes,
    1993, p. 328) has been accorded to the following persons who are
    qualified for membership of Congregation:

    ADELAIDA MARTIN VALVERDE, Taylor Institution

    CHI-KEUNG NG, MA status, D.PHIL., St John's College

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    3 Register of Congregation

    Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
    to the Register of Congregation:

    Kennedy, D.M., MA, Queen's

    Ljungqvist, A.P., MA, M.Phil., MA, Merton

    Martin Valverde, A., MA status, Taylor Institution

    Ng, C.-K., MA status, D.Phil., St John's

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CONGREGATION 10 October


    1 Admission of Pro-Vice-Chancellor

    The following person, duly nominated by the Vice-Chancellor to be
    amongst his deputies for the year 1995–6, was admitted to
    office:

    PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD SOUTHWOOD, MA, D.SC., Fellow of Merton College

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    2 Promulgation of Statutes

    Forms of Statutes were promulgated. No notice of opposition
    having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preambles
    carried of the proposed Statutes (1) changing procedures in
    Congregation, (2) changing the composition of the Ashmolean Visitors,
    (3) establishing an electoral board for the Director of the Ashmolean
    Museum, (4) abolishing the Delegates of University Police and
    establishing the Committee for the Proctors' Office, (5) changing the
    title of the Gladstone Professorship, (6) renaming the
    Professorship of European Law, (7) establishing an American
    Standard Companies Professorship of Operations Management, (8)
    establishing a Professorship of Portuguese Studies, and (9)
    changing eligibility for the Craven Fellowships.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    3 Special Resolution approved nemine
    contradicente

    1 That the Curators of the University Chest be
    authorised to expend from the unearmarked section of the Higher
    Studies Fund such sums, initially estimated at £115K, as are
    necessary to cover the cost of the following commitments:

    (i) £20K to cover, for nine months until October 1996,
    the cost of an appointment of a research assistant to the
    Professor of Experimental Physics;

    (ii) up to £95K to cover the cost of the transfer and

    upgrading of equipment for the Professor of the Physics and
    Chemistry of Minerals.

    2 That the Curators of the University Chest be
    authorised to expend from that part of the Higher Studies Fund which
    is earmarked for Social Studies such sums, initially estimated at
    £238K, as are necessary to cover the cost of the following
    commitments:

    (i) a sum estimated at £163K to cover, for five years
    from the date of appointment, the cost of an appointment to a
    fixed-term post of University Lecturer in Biological Anthropology;

    (ii) £75K to meet the shortfall in funding for the
    provision of accommodation for the Centre for European and
    Comparative Law.

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: University Agenda<br />

    University Agenda


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CONGREGATION 21 October 2.30 p.m.


    Conferment of Honorary Degree

    The Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, approved by
    Special Resolution of Congregation on 21 March 1995, will be
    conferred upon ARTHUR MILLER (AB Michigan), Fellow of St Catherine's
    College and Cameron Mackintosh Visiting Professor of Contemporary
    Theatre.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CONGREGATION 31 October 2 p.m.

    1 Voting on Statutes promulgated on 10 October


    See Gazette 21 September.



    2 Voting on Amendment to Statute
    promulgated on 10 October

    Council proposes the following amendment to the proposed Statute
    establishing a Professorship of Portuguese Studies.

    That the proposed Statute (8) which was promulgated on 10 October
    (see p. 9) be amended by the insertion before `Professorship of
    Portuguese' of `King John II'.

    Note. It has now been agreed with the main benefactors
    that it would be appropriate for the new chair to be named after King
    John II of Portugal, who reigned between 1481 and 1495, who was of
    great importance to the history of the Discoveries, and who was an
    enthusiastic promoter of Humanism in Portugal. The above amendment
    provides accordingly. Subject to Congregation's approval,
    consequential amendments will be made in the draft decree annexed to
    the proposed statute (see p. 9).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    3 Promulgation of Statutes

    Explanatory note to Statute (1)

    The Committee for the School of Management Studies, with the
    concurrence of the General Board, has proposed that a Professorship
    of Management Studies be established and that the first incumbent
    also be appointed to the Peter Moores Directorship of the School of
    Management Studies. The first director of the school, Dr C.L.
    Brundin, has announced his intention to retire at the end of the
    1995–6 academic year. The committee for the school has argued
    that, in order to make an appointment of someone capable of providing
    strong academic leadership, it is necessary to establish a
    professorship to be associated with the directorship, which is
    already fully endowed at professorial level. The duties of the
    director as currently prescribed `shall include original work and
    teaching in Management Studies' and the committee considers that the
    title of professor is entirely consistent with these duties. The
    following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the
    statute is approved, accordingly establish a new Professorship of
    Management Studies, the first holder of which will also be appointed
    to the Peter Moores Directorship of the School of Management Studies
    for a period of five years in the first instance.

    (1) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish a Professorship of
    Management Studies, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

    In Tit. XIV, Sect. II, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1993, p. 107, as
    amended by Statute (3) approved by Congregation on 28 June 1994,
    Gazette, Vol. 124, pp. 1290, 1324), delete
    `Professorship of Management Studies' and substitute `Professorships
    (two) of Management Studies'.

    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

    1 In Ch. II, Sect. IV, § 1, SCHEDULE,
    concerning official members of faculty boards (Statutes,
    1993, p. 217, as amended by Decree (2) of 14 July 1994,
    Gazette, Vol. 124, p. 1352), under Social Studies, after
    `Management Studies' insert `(two)'.

    2 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, SCHEDULE A,
    concerning professorships (p. 359, as amended by the same decree),
    delete `Professor of Management Studies' and substitute `Professors
    (two) of Management Studies'.

    3 Ibid., Sect. III. § 147, title,
    concerning particular professorships (p. 428, as amended by the same
    decree and subsequently renumbered by Decree (2) of 2 February 1995,
    Gazette, Vol. 125, p. 700), delete `Professor' and
    substitute `Professors'.

    4 Ibid., cl. 1, delete `The Professor of
    Management Studies' and substitute `There shall be two Professors of
    Management Studies, each of whom'.

    5 Ibid., cl. 2, after `The' insert `first'.

    6 Ibid., insert cl. 3 as follows and renumber
    existing cl. 3 as cl. 4:

    `3. The second professor shall be elected by an electoral board
    consisting of:

    (1) the Vice-Chancellor or, if the head of the college
    specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-Chancellor, a person
    appointed by Council;

    (2) the head of the college to which the professorship shall
    be for the time being allocated by Council under any decree in that
    behalf, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person
    appointed by the governing body of the college;

    (3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college
    specified in (2) of this clause;

    (4) a person appointed by Council;

    (5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

    (7) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Social
    Studies;

    (8), (9) two persons appointed by the Committee for the School
    of Management Studies.'

    7 Ibid., cl. 4, as renumbered, delete `The' and
    substitute `Each'.

    8 Ibid., delete `this chair' and substitute
    `these chairs'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Explanatory note to Statute (2)

    Dr Charles Simonyi has offered the University a munificent
    benefaction for the endowment of a Professorship of the Public
    Understanding of Science. The following statute, and the decree to be
    made by Council if the statute is approved, formally accept the
    benefaction on the conditions agreed with Dr Simonyi, establish the
    Charles Simonyi Professorship of the Public Understanding of Science,
    and provide in the first instance for the immediate appointment of Dr
    C.R. Dawkins to a Charles Simonyi Readership in the Public
    Understanding of Science.

    (2) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish the Charles Simonyi
    Professorship of the Public Understanding of Science, THE UNIVERSITY
    ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

    In Tit. XIV, Sect. II, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1993, p. 107, as
    amended by Statute (4) approved by Congregation on 28 June 1994,
    Gazette, Vol. 124, pp. 1289, 1324), after `
    Professorship of Public Health' insert:

    `Charles Simonyi Professorship of the Public Understanding of
    Science'.

    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

    1 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, SCHEDULE A,
    concerning professorships (Statutes, 1993, p. 360),
    after `Watts Professor of Psychology.' insert:

    `Charles Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of
    Science.'

    2 Ibid., Sect. III, concerning particular
    professorships (p. 455), insert new § 204 as follows and
    renumber existing §§ 204–8 (pp. 455–60) as
    §§ 205–9:

    `§ 204. Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of
    Science

    1. The University accepts with deep gratitude
    the sum of £1.5m from Dr Charles Simonyi for the endowment of
    the Charles Simonyi Professorship of the Public Understanding of
    Science.

    2. The Charles Simonyi Professor of the Public
    Understanding of Science shall

    (a) notwithstanding the provisions of Sect. I,
    § 5. B. cl. 1 (b) of this chapter, engage in teaching
    related to the Public Understanding of Science and in other
    appropriate forms of provision as agreed between the professor, the
    head of the appropriate discipline-based department, and the Director
    of the Department for Continuing Education, such teaching and other
    forms of provision to occupy no fewer than twelve hours and no more
    than fifty hours in Oxford in any academic year;

    (b) promote the public understanding of science both
    within and outside Oxford.

    3. The professor shall be elected by a board of
    electors consisting of

    (1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the head of the college
    specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-Chancellor a person appointed
    by Council;

    (2) the head of the college to which the professorship shall
    be for the time being allocated by Council under any decree in that
    behalf, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person
    appointed by the governing body of the college;

    (3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college
    specified in (2) of this clause;

    (4), (5) two persons appointed by Council, one of whom shall
    be appointed after consultation with the benefactor;

    (6) a person appointed by the General Board;

    (7) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of
    Biological Sciences;

    (8) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of
    Physical Sciences;

    (9) a person appointed by the Committee on Continuing
    Education.

    4. Subject to the provisions of clause 2
    (a) above, the professor shall be subject to the General
    Provisions of the decree concerning the duties of professors and to
    those Particular Provisions of the same decree which are applicable
    to this chair.

    5. Such part of the income from the endowment as
    is not required to meet the salary and associated costs of the
    professorship shall be applied for the provision of support funds for
    the professor in such ways as the Committee on Continuing Education
    may determine. That committee may delegate its powers under this
    clause to a subcommittee consisting of the Chairman of the Committee
    on Continuing Education, the Director of the Department for
    Continuing Education, the professor, and the head of any discipline-
    based department or departments with which the professor is also
    associated, or their nominees, subject to annual report to the
    committee.'

    3 Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VII,
    Sect. III, § 204, cll. 1–4 as inserted by clause 2 above,
    the income from the endowment shall be applied in the first instance
    to fund a post in the Public Understanding of Science to be held by
    Dr C.R. Dawkins, Fellow of New College, on such terms and conditions
    as Council and the General Board may determine, and to provide
    support costs for such a post to be administered in accordance with
    ibid., cl. 5.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    4 Presentation of Vice-Chancellor's
    Oration

    The Oration delivered by Mr Vice-Chancellor on 3 October will be
    presented and may be discussed.

    ¶ The text of the Oration is published as Supplement (2) to
    Gazette No. 4375. As explained in the notice published
    in Supplement (1) to No. 4373 (p. 37), Council intends to put down a
    general resolution, for debate in Congregation on 28 November,
    concerning the report of Council's Working Party on Senior Library
    Posts. That resolution will constitute this year's annual general
    resolution `inviting approval of important new policies' under the
    provisions of Tit. II, Sect. V, cl. 2 (Statutes, 1993,
    p. 11; Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1073), and such an
    annual general resolution will therefore not, as in previous years,
    be on the agenda for the same meeting of Congregation as the
    presentation of the Oration. Accordingly, unless at least two members
    of Congregation have severally or jointly given notice in writing to
    the Registrar by noon on Monday, 23 October, that they wish to
    discuss or to ask a question about the Oration under the provisions
    of Tit. II, Sect. XI, cl. 4 (Statutes, 1993, p. 18, as
    amended by Statute (1) approved by Congregation on 28 June 1994,
    Gazette, Vol. 125, pp. 1289, 1324; Examination
    Decrees
    , 1995, p. 1079), or unless the meeting on 31 October
    is required to deal with other business, Mr Vice-Chancellor will
    cancel that meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. III, cl.
    11 (Statutes, 1993, p. 8; Examination
    Decrees
    , 1995, p. 1071).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CONGREGATION 9 November


    Election

    Visitatorial Board

    Vacancy: one

    Retiring member: Principal of St Edmund Hall

    Period from HT 1996: 4 years

    ¶Nominations in writing by six members of Congregation will
    be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington
    Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 23 October, and
    similar nominations by six members of Congregation up to 4
    p.m. on Monday, 30 October.

    Council has decided that nominations must show for each signatory
    the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which
    are not so shown may not be published.

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or
    recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



GIBBS PRIZES 1995

Gibbs Prize in Biochemistry

The Prize has been awarded to STEVEN L. DYSON, Magdalen College.

Proxime accessit: HILKE A. NENTWICH, St Anne's College.

Book Prizes: JAMES A. APPERLY, St Anne's College, LISA
H.
COLLEDGE, University College, and CHRISTOPHER B. PHELPS, Pembroke
College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Gibbs Prize in Chemistry

The Prize has been awarded to ARIEL BEN MIDDLETON, Keble College.

Proxime accessit: WAYNE M. LESLIE, Queen's College.

Book Prizes: HELEN DICKINSON,, Merton College, and
MALCOLM K.
WALTERS, St John's College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Gibbs Prize in Geography

The Prize has been awarded to DOMINIQUE L.I. MORAN, Christ Church.

Proxime accessit: HARPAL SINGH, Mansfield College.

Book Prizes: DAVID B.M. JACKSON, Brasenose College,
PHILIP M.
SCHLUTER, Jesus College, and JEREMY N. SMITH, St John's College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Gibbs Prize in Modern History

The Prize has been awarded to CLAIRE TRACEY, Balliol College.

Proxime accessit: TURLOUGH STONE, Merton College.

Book Prizes: ANNABELLE RITCHIE, Magdalen College,
KATHERINE
WILLIAMS, New College, TARIC AMAR, Balliol College, and MATTHEW
MOORE, St
Anne's College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Gibbs Prize in Politics

The Prize, for the best papers in Politics in the Final Honour School
of
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, has been awarded to YUNG-SUNG
KANG, Jesus
College.

Proxime accessit: LEANDER G. SCHNEIDER, Queen's College.

Book Prizes:: CHRISTOPHER R. BROOKE, Balliol College,
BENJAMIN J.
FENDER, Balliol College, and LEONIE C. HIRST, Somerville College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Gibbs Thesis Prize in Politics

The Prize, for the best thesis in Politics in the Final Honour School
of
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, has been awarded to PUZANT A.
MERDINIAN,
Merton College.

Proxime accessit: PAUL J. MARTIN, St John's College.

Book Prizes:: ELIZABETH BARRATT, Oriel College, TAMARA
H.P.
OPPENHEIMER, Merton College, and DOMINIC A. WILSON, Merton College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Gibbs Prize in Zoology

The Prize has been awarded to HOR Y. WONG, New College.

Proxime accessit: JOSEPH P. GARNER, New College.

Book Prizes:: SUZANNE J. BAKER, St John's College,
ANNETTE B.C.
KILLMER, Worcester College, and REBECCA A. LAWRENCE, Worcester
College.

Return to List of Contents of this section



WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE


Appointment of Acting Director

DR P.J. WEINDLING has been appointed as Acting Director of the
Wellcome Unit
for the period 1 October–31 December 1995. The Reader-elect in
the
History of Medicine, Professor Jane E. Lewis, will take up the
Directorship
with effect from 1 January 1996.

Return to List of Contents of this section



INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES


Chinese Language Training for Social
Scientists

The Institute for Chinese Studies is offering Chinese language
training
courses for social scientists. The course will serve all levels, from
beginners to advanced, and will take place during Full Term.

The courses are intended for social scientists at the University
who need
to learn the language for research purposes. Participants will be
given an
assessment test in advance of their attendance to ascertain the
appropriate
level of instruction.

The content of the course will be predominantly practical in
nature. The
students at beginners level will be involved in undergraduate classes
offering
intensive language instruction and substantial work in the language
laboratory. Those who are more advanced will be expected to focus on
selected
readings from Chinese newspapers and periodicals, and from othe
relevant
Chinese sources.
Further information may be obtained from Dr T.T. Liu (telephone:
(2)80390), or Ms Y. Song (telephone: (2)80395), at the Institute.

Return to List of Contents of this section



OLIS, THE UNIVERSITY'S LIBRARY SYSTEM

OLIS, the University's Library system, is an integrated library
system which
offers online cataloguing, circulation, acquisitions, and periodicals
registration. Sixty-seven Oxford libraries now catalogue onto OLIS.
Please see
below for a complete list of member libraries with information about
when they
began cataloguing and if they also use the Acquisitions Circulation
or
Periodical registration modules.

OLIS is a union catalogue which contains cataloguing
information (i.e. bibliographic records) from all of the member
libraries.
This enables a reader to search for any book held in any OLIS member
library
from any terminal or microcomputer connected to OLIS. Copy
information (i.e.
shelfmark) which is specific to a particular library has been
separated so
that when searching for a book, you will first be shown
the copy
information for the items held in the library where you are
conducting your
search. If there are copies in other libraries, for which there is
information in the OLIS catalogue, you will be given the chance to
see the
information about them. It will still be necessary to check other
catalogues
in the libraries concerned to find information about holdings
not yet
catalogued
on OLIS. In common with most other academic
libraries in
the UK, the catalogue can be searched from any terminal capable of
connection
to the JANET network.

Retrospective conversion of card and other catalogues into
machine-readable
form so that they can be interrogated online is seen to be a major
priority.
The OLIS catalogue currently has over 2 million copies attached to
1.5 million
titles. The Bodleian Library's Pre-1920 catalogue comprising 1.2
million
titles is now available on CD-ROM. This represents the culmination of
a
project commenced in 1966 by John Jolliffe, Bodley's Librarian from
1982 to
1985.

Funds have been allocated to enable conversion of records in the
Bodleian
Guard Book catalogues, and in the card catalogues of the
Bodleian-dependent
libraries. It is planned to complete this project within the next
three years.
During this period over 500,000 records will be added to the OLIS
database
each year. A programme for the conversion of periodical titles by a
team based
in the Radcliffe Science Library and other departmental science
libraries is
nearing completion. Other conversion initiatives have been undertaken
by
individual libraries with special emphasis on libraries wishing to
adopt the
OLIS circulation module.

Online circulation (issuing, reservations, and fines) has been
introduced into seventeen OLIS libraries. This allows readers
registered in
these libraries to find out what they have on loan and to place
reservations
from any terminal. Online acquisitions allows a reader to find out
when a book
has been ordered and received by one of the twenty-nine libraries now
using
the Acquisitions module. Seven libraries are now using the
periodicals
registration module. This allows readers to find out when a specific
issue of
a journal has been received or declared missing.

Searching the OPAC (Online Public Access Catalogue) allows you
to access
the items catalogued by any of these sixty-seven libraries. By
selecting
`Information about OLIS libraries' from the Introductory menu screen
on the
OPAC it is also possible to find out the address and opening hours of
any
member library, information about the holdings of that library, its
admission
procedures, and library news.

The online catalogue is designed so that it can be used easily,
but
guidance in how to use it is also provided. Help screens are now
available on
OLIS by pressing the F2 key, and explanatory leaflets about basic
searching
procedures and remote connection to OLIS are available in any library
or from
the Libraries Automation Service ((2)78170). A more complete
description of
OLIS and the special features available on the online catalogue can
be found
in a black booklet entitled `Making the most of OLIS' which is
located next
to every reader terminal. Library staff are able to show readers how
to use
the online catalogue and give advice on how to search the catalogue.
Assistance with problems is also provided by an Online Catalogue Help
Desk
((2)77163), staffed by members of the Bodleian Library Cataloguing
Division.
This is located in the Lower Reading Room of the Bodleian Library.

An advanced course demonstrating how to use OLIS more efficiently
by
chaining OLIS commands, how to save search files so that you can
combine (And,
Or, But Not) or limit (by date, by type of material, by holding
library) the
bibliographic records you have located on OLIS would be appropriate
for anyone
who is already familiar with basic searching on OLIS. The course,
which is
held in the Radcliffe Science Library Training room, is open to all
members of
the University. Please book a place on the course by telephoning
Zohra Fatima
(telephone: (2)78271, e-mail: zohra@vax).

A comprehensive evaluation of possible successors to the system
software
underlying OLIS was completed in Trinity Term 1995. A description of
the new
OLIS and the timetable for implementation will appear in a future
issue of the
Gazette.

Return to List of Contents of this section


OLIS Member Libraries


                                   (1)    (2)     (3)     (4)        

All Souls College                  2/90  
Ashmolean                          6/90           8/91
Balfour Library (Pitt Rivers)     11/93           8/95
Balliol College                    9/89           8/91  
Biochemistry Department            7/94
Bodleian                           9/88           8/92     
  Indian Institute                 9/88           8/92        
  Japanese Library                 1/88   10/94   8/93
  Law                              9/88           8/92
  Radcliffe Science                9/88           1/91    1/93
  Rhodes House                     9/88           8/92
Brasenose College                  8/93
Classics Lending                  10/92   4/94 
Computing Laboratory               6/90   10/94
Corpus Christi College             8/89   10/92   8/90    1/95
Criminological Research            2/95
Earth Sciences                     2/92           8/93    1/95
Educational Studies                3/91    8/95   8/95
Engineering Science                2/91
English Faculty                    1/89   4/90    8/91     
Experimental Psychology            1/90   10/92    
Geography                          1/90   1/95    8/91            
History Faculty                    5/91    
History of Art                     1/92           8/93    
Hooke                              1/89   10/89   10/92     
Institute of Economics and
   Statistics                      1/90   
Jesus College                      8/92    
Keble College                      1/93    
Kellogg College/
  Continuing Education             9/92
Lady Margaret Hall                 7/92           10/93  
Latin American Centre              1/91           11/91            
Lincoln College                    1/92    10/94
Magdalen College                   1/93    
Maison Française                   1/91   
Materials Department               1/93    10/95 
Mathematical Institute             5/90    
Middle East Centre                 1/91           11/91            
Modern Languages Faculty           1/89   4/90    9/92     
Music Faculty                      6/90     
New College                        9/89     
Nuffield College                   9/89   10/94   8/90    1/93       
Oriental Institute                 1/88           8/92       
   Eastern Art                     1/88           8/92
Philosophy                        11/90    4/95       9/92           

Physics (Astro, Nuclear, 
   Clarendon Lab)                  1/93   10/95
Physiology Departmental            6/90    
Plant Sciences                     1/90   10/93    
Queen Elizabeth House              1/90   10/92   8/91     1/95
Queen's College                    2/92       
St Anne's College                  1/91           9/92             
St Antony's College                1/91           12/91
St Cross College                  10/93
St Edmund Hall                     1/92
St Hugh's College                  7/95  
St John's College                  1/95
St Peter's College                10/93           9/94
Social and Cultural Anthropology   1/92   
Social Studies                     1/89   1/90    8/91      
Staff Library                      9/89           1/93  
Taylor Institution                 9/88   
Theology                           1/90   10/94     
Trinity College                    4/92   
University Museum                  1/91        
Wadham College                     4/92
Wellcome Institute                10/93   
Wolfson College                    7/90            8/92            
Zoology                            1/90   
      Alexander                    1/90   
      Elton                        1/90   

Key

(1) Cataloguing

(2) Circulation

(3) Acquisitions

(4) Periodicals registration

Return to List of Contents of this section



DATABASES AVAILABLE TO MEMBERS OF THE
UNIVERSITY


BIDS Databases

Members of the University have free access to the following
databases. Please
note that some require registration. For details, see below.

BIDS ISI

Science Citation Index (1981–94)

Social Science Citation Index (1981–94)

Arts and Humanities (1981–94)

Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings (1982–94)

These databases offer author, title, keyword, cited reference,
corporate
name, conference sponsor, etc., access to articles, reports, letters,
book
reviews, music reviews, conference proceedings, seminars, editorials,
etc.
from over 7,000 journals world-wide. Many of the articles in these
databases
also include abstracts.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Compendex Plus

This database offers a broad coverage of all engineering disciplines
(as well
as physics) and includes over 170,000 bibliographic citations with
abstracts
and 330,000 Table of Contents citations. It indexes 1,840 core
journals from
cover to cover and 535 conferences. It has a thesaurus composed of
9,400
preferred terms, 18,000 access terms and a system of cross-references
which
include related, narrower and broader terms. Contact Gill Cooper in
the
Radcliffe Science Library or Ann Greig of the Engineering Science
Library for
assistance.

EMBASE

EMBASE is bibliographic database of published scientific literature.
It offers
comprehensive coverage of human medicine, clinical medicine, drugs
and
toxicology, biological science, health affairs, psychiatry,
environmental
health, etc. Selective coverage (if drug related) of nursing,
dentistry,
veterinary medicine, alternative medicine and psychology is also
included. The
overlap with MEDLINE is claimed by Excerpta Medicus (the producers of
EMBASE)
at about 37 per cent. As with Compendex Plus, there is a thesaurus,
EMTREE
with terms in a hierarchical arrangement. Sub-headings which are
defined as
`medical links' and `drug links' are used to qualify terms. Drug and
medical
indexing terms are used. In 1993, MESH terms were included and are
treated as
synonyms with connections to one of the 35,000 preferred EMTREE
terms.

International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)

The data is taken from over 2,600 selected international social
science
journals and around 6,000 books per year. Subject coverage includes
economics,
political science, sociology and anthropology.

The journals indexed for the IBSS are from over sixty countries
so it is
more international in scope than the other BIDS databases. One of the
most
interesting feature of the IBSS is the network of correspondents from
all over
the world who index journals and publications which would not be
available
outside the region (e.g. Parliamentary papers of Hungary) for
inclusion in the
database.

Ecological Flora of the British Isles

This database, created by Fitter and Peat from the University of
York, is
searchable by the Latin name, vernacular name, distribution, habitat,
diseases, etc. Includes 1770 species of higher plants, 130 ecological
characteristics, etc. For example, using this database it is possible
to find
all herbal plants which live at 2,000 feet. Contact Linda Atkinson of
the
Geography Library for registration and assistance.

Registration for BIDS: to obtain a user-name,
password, and
pocket user guide to one or more of the BIDS services listed below,
please
register in one of these libraries or departments: Cairns Medical
Library,
Clarendon Laboratory, Computing Service, Engineering Department,
Institute for
Chinese Studies, Music Faculty, Physics Department, Radcliffe Science
Library,
St Peter's and Templeton Colleges.

Electronic update: a new mailing list has been set
up in
Oxford for those people interested in keeping up-to-date with BIDS
changes and
enhancements, the work of the user group, etc. Subscribe to the list
`bids-info' by sending an e-mail message (on Vax or Sable) to the
address
`majordomo@maillist.ox.ac.uk'. Type the message `subscribe bids-info'
and send
the message in the usual way.

Return to List of Contents of this section



OCLC FirstSearch

Members of the University can obtain a user-name and password, as
well as the
necessary log-on instructions, for accessing the OCLC FirstSearch
databases
from their college, departmental, or faculty librarian.

The searching procedure is very easy. There are clear prompts
and
excellent help screens. Below is a brief description of the many
databases
accessible free from office or library.

OCLC databases

Worldcat: over 30 million records of any type of
material
catalogued by OCLC member libraries world-wide, including (for some
libraries,
manuscripts holdings). Updated daily.

ArticleFirst: over 8,500 journals in science,
technology,
medicine, social science, business, the humanities, and popular
culture. 1990 to
the present. Updated daily.

ContentsFirst: complete table of contents page
and
holding information for more than 8,500 journals in many fields.
January 1990
to the present. Updated daily.

FASTDOC: this is a subset of the articles
indexed in
ArticleFirst. There are over 340,000 records with a high percentage
of citations
that can be ordered for online viewing or one-hour fax delivery.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Other databases

Applied Science and Technology Index (Wilson): more
than 350
international, English-language periodicals, covering engineering,
mathematics,
physics, and computer technology. Includes articles, interviews,
meetings,
conferences, exhibitions, new product reviews/announcements, and
more.
October 1983 to the present. Updated monthly.

Art Index (Wilson): more than 200 key
international,
English-language arts publications. Includes periodicals, yearbooks,
museum
bulletins, competition and award notices, exhibition listings,
interviews, film
reviews, and more. September 1984 to the present. Updated monthly.

Biography Index (Wilson): More than 2,700
English-
language periodicals. More than 1,800 books added each year. Very
wide range
of material covered including autobiographies, bibliographies,
critical studies,
book reviews, collections of letters. July 1984 to the present.
Updated monthly.

BioDigest (Plexus)\: more than 8,500 records covering the life
sciences for
undergraduates and high school students. September 1989 to the
present.
Updated monthly, September through May.

Biology Digest: more than 8,500 records covering
the life
sciences. September 1989 to the present. Updated monthly, September
to May.

Book Review Digest (Wilson): approximately 100
periodicals published in the US, Canada, and UK, covering over 7,000
adult
and children's books each year. Includes English-language fiction and
nonfiction. January 1983 to the present. Updated monthly.

Business Periodicals Index (Wilson): over 340
business
magazines in accounting, advertising, finance, personnel, business
etc. July
1982 to the present. Updated monthly.

Consumer Index (Pierian Press): more than 110
periodicals and services covering product evaluations, descriptions,
recalls,
alerts, and warnings. 1986 to the present. Updated quarterly.

Education Index (Wilson): more than 400
English-language
periodicals and yearbooks published in the US and elsewhere. Subjects
include
adminstration, teaching methods and curriculum, literacy etc. June
1983 to the
present. Updated monthly.

ERIC: over 800,000 references to thousands of
educational
topics. Includes journal articles, books, theses, curricula,
conference papers,
and standards and guidelines. 1966 to the present. Updated monthly.

FACTSEARCH (Pierian Press): facts and statistics
from
some 300 works, including newspapers, periodicals, the Congressional
Record,
and Congressional hearings. 1984 to the present. Updated quarterly.

General Sciences Index (Wilson): more than 100
journals
and magazines from the US and UK, covering subjects such as
anthropology,
astronomy, biology, computers, earth sciences, medicine and health
etc.
Includes articles, reviews, biographical sketches, letters to the
editor. May
1984 to the present. Updated monthly.

GPO Monthly Catalog: over 380,000 records on all
subjects of interest to the US government. July 1976 to the present.
Updated
monthly.

Library Literature (Wilson): More than 200
library and
information science periodicals published internationally, and more
than 600
books a year. December 1984 to the present. Updated monthly.

MEDLINE: more than 3,500 journals published
internationally, covering all areas of medicine. Updated monthly.


Microcomputer Abstracts
: more than 75 popular magazines and
professional journals on microcomputing in business, education,
industry and
the home. Includes articles, reviews and product announcements.
January 1989
to the present. Updated monthly.

Readers' Guide Abstracts (Wilson): popular
periodicals
published in the US and Canada on a very wide variety of subjects.
January
1983 to the present. Updated monthly.

Social Science Index (Wilson): more than 350
international, English-language, periodicals in sociology,
anthropology,
geography, economics, political science and law. February 1983 to the
present.
Updated monthly.

Queries and problems should be referred to Margaret Robb (78172)
or Vicky
Mills (71072).

Electronic update: a new mailing list has been set up in
Oxford for
those people interested in keeping up-to-date with BIDS changes and
enhancements, the work of the user group, etc. Subscribe to the list
`oclc-
info' by sending an e-mail message (on Vax or Sable) to the address
`majordomo@maillist.ox.ac.uk'. Type the message subscribe `oclc-info'
and send
the message in the usual way.

Return to List of Contents of this section



UNIVERSITY CLUB


Wine-tastings

Two wine-tastings will take place at the University Club (6/8 South
Parks
Road) this term, at 5.45 p.m. on the following Wednesdays.

Members and their guests are welcome, the fee being £2 per
person.

18 Oct.: Some recent additions to the wine-list.

6 Dec.: Wines for Christmas.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS 1995

PROFESSOR OLIVIER BLANCHARD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
will deliver the 1995 Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on
Wednesday, 8 November, Thursday, 9 November, and Friday, 10 November,
in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Economics of transition in eastern Europe.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES


French literature from the Renaissance to
the Enlightenment

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays, in
Trinity College. The 23 November seminar will be held in the Old
Bursary; earlier seminars will be held in the Danson Room.

Conveners: G.J. Mallinson, MA, University Lecturer (CUF)
in French, and S. Pierse.

N. CRONK

12 Oct.: `Illustrating the eighteenth-century
novel: the example of Cazotte's Le Diable
amoureux
.') (With slides)

S. JOHNSON

26 Oct.: `Jean-Pierre Camus as romancier
à clef
: the case of La Pieuse
Julie.
'

M. COOK, University of Exeter

9 Nov.: `Reading the Bernardin de Saint-Pierre
manuscripts.' (With slides)

J. CLARKE, Keele

23 Nov.: `The Guénégaud theatre and
the demise of the machine play (1673–80).'

Return to List of Contents of this section



Modern French Studies Research Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Mondays in the
Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: M.M. Bowie, MA, Marshal Foch Professor of
French Literature, and C.J. Davis, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer
(CUF) in French.

R. WHITE

16 Oct.: `Psychoanalysis in mourning.'

Round-table discussion, with Dr V. Worth (King's College, London), Dr
E. Fallaize, Dr J. Milligan, and Dr A. Finch; chaired by Mr C.F.
Robinson

30 Oct.: `Establishing a female canon.'

L. KORTHALS ALTES, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

13 Nov.: `Ethical criticism: old wine or new
spirit?'

PROFESSOR M. LE DOEUFF, Geneva

20 Nov.: `Comment l'intuition vint aux femmes.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



Oxford Russian Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in 47
Wellington Square.

Convener: G.S. Smith, MA, Professor of Russian.

PROFESSOR SMITH

19 Oct.: `1945–95: Boris Slutsky's war, in
prose and poetry.'

V. MAKANIN, Moscow

2 Nov.: A reading from his work.

DR V. OREL, Tel Aviv

9 Nov.: `The language and message of the Old Kievan
graffiti.'

A. RAJEWSKY

16 Nov.: `Studying the new Russian legal
language.'

PROFESSOR W. BRUMFIELD, Tulane

23 Nov.: `Lost Russia: architectural monuments.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



Lecture

DR E. BRÜGGEN, Cologne, will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 16
October, in Somerville College.

Conveners: A. Suerbaum, MA, and A. Volfing, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturers in German.

Subject: `Inszenierte Körperlichkeit. Höfisches
Zeremoniell im "Parzifal" Wolframs von Eschenbach.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



MODERN HISTORY


Special Faculty Lecture

PROFESSOR J. NELSON, King's College, London, will deliver
the annual Special Faculty Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 20 October,
in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Bad rulership in the earlier Middle Ages:
diagnoses and prescriptions.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



Early Modern Europe Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
Modern History Faculty.

Conveners: Sir John Elliott, MA, D.Phil., Regius
Professor of Modern History, R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
European History, and J.C. Robertson, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History.

J. ISRAEL, University College, London

13 Oct.: `Who began the European Enlightenment: the
English or the Dutch?'

R. MACKENNEY, Edinburgh

20 Oct.: ` "A plot discovered"?: myth,
legend, and the "Spanish" conspiracy against Venice in
1618.'

P. ROBERTS, Warwick

27 Oct.: `The most crucial battle of the Wars of
Religion? Conflict over sites of Reformed worship in sixteenth-
century France.'

J.-P. RUBIES, Reading

3 Nov.: `The practice and rhetoric of travel in the
formation of early modern élites: England and Spain
1500–1650.'

H. CIECHANOWSKA

10 Nov.: `Image-making for a restored monarchy: the
coronation of Carlo Borbone in Palermo in 1735.'

T. JOHNSON, University of the West of England

17 Nov. `Aspects of the Counter-Reformation in Bavaria.'

G. LUKOWSKI, Birmingham

24 Nov.: `Sarmatia and reform: political ideas in
eighteenth-century Poland.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



ORIENTAL STUDIES


Ancient Near Eastern Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Details of further seminars will be announced later.

Conveners: M.A. Collier, MA, Post-Doctoral Research
Fellow, All Souls College, S. Dalley, MA, Senior Research Fellow,
Somerville College, and E. Robson (B.Sc. Warwick), Junior Lecturer in
Akkadian.

DR S. QUIRKE, British Museum

17 Oct.: `The deployment of the hieroglyphic and
hieratic scripts in Middle Kingdom Egypt.'

Discussion

24 Oct.: `Wisdom literature in the Ancient Near
East.'

DR L. MORENZ, Queen's

31 Oct.: `Intertextuality and the Admonitions of
Ipuwer.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES


Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Physics,
and C.E. Webb, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Laser Physics.

DR C.J. FOOT

20 Oct.: `New developments in laser cooling: Bose
Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic gas.'

PROFESSOR L.J. CHALLIS, Nottingham

27 Oct.: `George Green: miller, mathematician, and
physicist.'

PROFESSOR A. BALOGH, Imperial College, London

10 Nov.: `Ulysses and the polar heliosphere.'

DR J.G. WALKER, Nottingham

17 Nov.: `Physics of the CD player.'

PROFESSOR N. KURTI

24 Nov.: `Birmingham, Oxford, and the Bomb.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



Department of Materials: materials
modelling laboratory seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1.15 p.m. on Fridays in
Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building.

Conveners: D.G. Pettifor, MA, Isaac Wolfson Professor of
Metallurgy, and A.P. Sutton, MA, M.Sc., University Lecturer in
Materials Science.

DR H. FUJITANI, Fujitsu Laboratories, Japan

13 Oct.: `Schottky barrier height and electronic
structure of silicide/silicon interfaces.'

DR A. SARKISSIAN

20 Oct.: `Computer modelling of eutectic
growth.'

PROFESSOR R. COHEN, Carnegie Institution of Washington

27 Oct.: `The computer cell: first principles high
pressure physics.'

PROFESSOR R.J. FAULKNER, Loughborough

3 Nov.: `Modelling of grain boundary
segregation.'

DR C. HIPPSLEY, AEA Industrial Technology, Harwell

10 Nov.: `Modelling the ductile to brittle
transition in steels.'

DR W. CLYNE, Cambridge

17 Nov.: `Modelling of residual stresses in
thermally sprayed coatings and their effect on interfacial
bonding.'

PROFESSOR N.C. HANDY, Cambridge

24 Nov.: `Density functional theory for
molecules.'

DR R. TEW, Nottingham

1 Dec.: `Complex ray theory and fluid–solid
diffraction phenomena.' (In association with OCIAM)

Return to List of Contents of this section



Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

Convener: Sir Roger Elliott, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Theoretical Physics.

PROFESSOR J.D. BJORKEN, Stanford; Eastman Visiting Professor

13 Oct.: `The gaugeless limit of the standard
model.'

DR S. SARKAR

27 Oct.: `Supersymmetry and cosmological
inflation.'

DR G. MANDELBAUM, Newton Institute

10 Nov.: `Chaotic gauge fields and their
quantisation.'

DR L. BREY, Madrid

24 Nov.: `Skyrme crystal in a two-dimensional
electron gas.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics
seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory.

Because on rare occasions the arrangements need to be changed,
anyone intending to come to Oxford specially to attend is advised to
check first by telephoning Oxford (2)72901.

PROFESSOR R. HIDE

12 Oct.: `Magnetohydrodynamic oscillations of the
earth's core.'

DR S. ELLIOTT, European Organisation for the Exploitation of
Meteorological Satellites, Darmstadt, Germany

19 Oct.: `Baroclinic instability in a cylindrical
geometry.'

PROFESSOR M. GHIL, California (Los Angeles), and École Normale
Supérieure, Paris

2 Nov.: `Some personal thoughts on ENSO, or, do we
we have a unified theory?'

ACADEMICIAN G.S. GOLITSYN, Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, Russian
Academy of Sciences

9 Nov.: `Non-linear spectra in geophysics and
astrophysics.'

DR P. READ

16 Nov.: `Modelling the climate on Mars—for
science and for future missions?'

DR L. SPARKS, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of
Technology

23 Nov.: `Large-scale retrieval of atmospheric
profiles.'

DR C.D. RODGERS

30 Nov.: `Optimisation of remote sensing.'

DR J. AUSTIN, Meteorological Office

7 Dec.: `Ten years of modelling the ozone hole and
some possible consequences for the Arctic.'

(Note: the date for this seminar is
uncertain
.)

Return to List of Contents of this section



Non-linear Dynamics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the
Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory.

Further information may be obtained from Dr T. Peacock
(telephone: (2)72342).

Convener: T. Mullin, MA, University Lecturer in
Physics.

DR C. BARENGHI, Newcastle

16 Oct.: `Helium couette flow: from the first
vortex to the vortex tangle.'

DR H. BYRNE, Bath

23 Oct.: `The role of cell–cell adhesion in
the development of carcinomas.'

DR D. BARKLEY, Warwick

30 Oct.: `Dynamics in the cylinder's wake.'

DR B. RUCKEIT, Hamburg

6 Nov.: `Low-frequency atmospheric variability.'

MR A. LOVEGROVE

13 Nov.: `Bifurcations in baroclinic flows.'

DR A. RUCKLIDGE, Cambridge

20 Nov.: `Shearing instabilities and global
bifurcations in 3D magnetoconvection.'

DR F. GIARGIUTII, EPSCI, Paris

27 Nov.: `Dynamics of flowing liquid films.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



SOCIAL STUDIES


Sociology Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in
Barnett House, Wellington Square.

Conveners: D. Gambetta, MA, Reader in Sociology, and M.
Hechter, MA, University Lecturer in Sociology.

Y. BARZEL, Washington

20 Oct.: `Economic rights, legal rights, and the
evolution of the state.'

W.G. RUNCIMAN, Cambridge

27 Oct.: `Why the future of sociology will go
"my" way.'

PROFESSOR S. RINGEN

3 Nov.: `Class inequality and political reform.'

DR A.H. HALSEY

10 Nov.: `A footnote to the history of sociology in
Britain.'

N.P. MOUZELIS, LSE

17 Nov.: `Sociology: state of the art and
prospects.'

LORD DAHRENDORF

24 Nov.: `Whither sociology?'

R. BOUDON, Maison des Sciences de l'homme, Paris

1 Dec.: `Reflections on sociology.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the
Library, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of
Art.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Archaeological Science.

S. BARNETT, Durham

2 Nov.: `Luminescence dating: recent work at Durham
University.'

N. BRODIE, Cambridge

16 Nov.: `Sense and nonsense in ceramic
characterisation studies.'

R. CROMPTON, Liverpool

30 Nov.: `Lucy's gait.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



BODLEIAN LIBRARY


Oxford Seminars in Cartography

LOUIS DE VORSEY, JR, Professor Emeritus, University of Georgia, will
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 17 October, in the Schola Astronomiae
et Rhetoricae, Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian Library.

Further details are obtainable from Nick Millea, Map Curator,
the Bodleian Library (telephone: Oxford (2)77013, fax: (2)77182, e-mail:
nmillea@vax.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Native American maps of the Columbian
Encounter.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

DR G. MCCRUM will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 16 October, in Lecture
Room 1, the Department of Educational Studies.

Subject: `Gender and social inequality at Oxbridge.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT

Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the
Main Lecture Theatre, the School of Geography.

Further information may be obtained from Anna Winton (telephone:
281180).

JONATHON PORRITT

16 Oct.: `New directions in the Green Movement.'

DR G. GANDY, Manches & Co., solicitors

23 Oct.: ``Transport and the environment: a
lawyer's perspective.'

DR K. THOMPSON, Sheffield

30 Oct.: `Predicting plant dispersal in response to
climate change.'

SIR JOHN HOUGHTON, Chairman, Royal Commission on Environmental
Pollution

6 Nov.: `Global warming: latest scientific status.'

PROFESSOR J. BEDDINGTON, Imperial College

13 Nov.: `Fishing limits and the limits to
fishing.'

N. DE N. WINSER, Deputy Director, Royal Geographical Society

20 Nov.: `Geographical observatories: a fifty-year
programme.'

PROFESSOR J. GARDINER, Chairman, Environmental Panel, Chartered
Institution of Water and Environmental Management

27 Nov.: `Sustainable development: integrated
catchment management and decision-making for the water
environment.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


Economic Development Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

J. WEEKS, SOAS

12 Oct.: `Economic growth and the size distribution
of establishments: an empirical survey.'

R. CASSEN

19 Oct.: `The productive effects for human
development.'

F. STEWART

26 Oct.: `The urban informal sector—a new
approach.'

J. KNIGHT

2 Nov.: `Towards a labour market in China.'

T. FISHER

9 Nov.: `The rural non-farm sector in India.'

R. SABOT, Williams College

16 Nov.: `Inequality, savings, and growth.'

G. KINGDON

23 Nov.: `The quality and efficiency of public and
private education in India.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Asian Studies Centre

AIDS in Asia—the challenge of the twenty-first century

The Asian Studies Centre at St Antony's College is to host a workshop
focusing on the causes and the social, economic, and political
consequences of the AIDS epidemic in the South Asian subcontinent and
in south-east Asia, particularly Thailand. Participants will be
primarily area specialists who have special expertise in the social
and medical fields related to AIDS.

The workshop will be held on Friday, 10 November, in the New
Room, the Hilda Besse Building (except where otherwise indicated), St
Antony's College.

Conveners: P.B.R. Carey, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer
(CUF) in Modern History, and R. Foot, MA, John Swire Fellow in the
International Relations of East Asia, St Antony's College.

Those wishing to attend should, by 16 October, contact either
the conveners or the Secretary of the Asian Studies Centre, Ms Chloe
Dobree (telephone/fax: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@st-
antonys.ox.ac.uk).

Workshop session I: 10–11.15 a.m.

JEEMON JACOB, journalist, Rashtra Deepika, New Delhi:
`The social alienation of AIDS patients in South Asia: the role of
the media.'

DR J. SHREEDHAR, Special Correspondent, Frontline,
Madras: `What fuels the HIV epidemic in India?'

Workshop session II: 11.30 a.m.–12.45 p.m.

PROFESSOR GERRY STIMSON, Directory, Centre for Research on Drugs and
Health Behaviour, London: `Drug injecting and HIV infection in south-
east Asia.'

DR H. HOMANS, Specialist in HIV/AIDS and reproductive health,
Overseas Development Administration: `The UK Government's response to
HIV/AIDS in the developing world: with special reference to south-
east Asia.'

Keynote address: 2.30–4 p.m., in the New Lecture Theatre, St
Antony's College

J. UNGPHAKORN, Director, Thai AIDS NGO—ACCESS: `AIDS in Asia:
the challenge of the twenty-first century.'

Round table discussion: 4.30–6 p.m., the New Room, St
Antony's College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Huang Hsing Foundation Lecture in Asian Studies

MR M. YAHUDA, LSE, will deliver the Huang Hsing Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 7 November, in the College Lecture Theatre (New Building),
St Antony's College.

Subject: `Hong Kong: a new beginning for China?'

Return to List of Contents of this section



Centre for Indian Studies

South Asian History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Seminar Room, the Nissan Institute.

Convener: D.A. Washbrook, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Modern
South Asian History.

PROFESSOR J. HURD, Norwich University, USA

17 Oct.: `Progress gone sour: the railways of India
1884–1938.'

DR P. ROBB, SOAS

24 Oct.: `Completing "our stock of
geography" or an object "still more sublime"?:
Colin Mackenzie's survey of Mysore, 1799–1810.'

DR M. WASEEM

31 Oct.: `The MQM: a case study of ethnic conflict
in Pakistan.'

DR U. SINGH, Saurashtra University

7 Nov.: `The resurgence of Hindutva—a case of
religious fundamentalism?'

DR D. KOPF, Minnesota

14 Nov.: `Scratches on Kali's mind: the historian
as novelist?'

MR S.W.A. SHAH

21 Nov.: `Agrarian unrest in the North-West
Frontier Province during the first Congress Ministry
(1937–9)—Ghalla Dher, a case study.'

DR M. MISRA

28 Nov.: `Business, politics, and nationalism in
inter-war India.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



TEMPLETON COLLEGE

SIR JOHN TEMPLETON will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 20 October, in
Templeton College.

The lecture is open to all members of the University. Those
wishing to attend are asked to contact Mrs Stephanie Parsons
(telephone: Oxford 735422).

Subject: `Accelerating progress.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



WADHAM COLLEGE AND THE MATHEMATICAL
INSTITUTE


Milne Lecture

DR J.C. MATHER, NASA Goddard Space Center, USA, will deliver the
nineteenth annual Milne Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 30 November,
in the Mathematical Institute. All are welcome.

Subject: `Observing the Big Bang.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



WOLFSON COLLEGE


Ronald Syme Lecture 1995

PROFESSOR T.D.C. BARNES, FRSC, Professor of Classics, University of
Toronto, will deliver the fifth Ronald Syme Lecture at 6 p.m. on
Thursday, 19 October, in the Hall, Wolfson College.

Subject: `Hagiography and Roman history.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



OXFORD IMMUNOLOGY GROUP

DR POLLY MATZINGER, National Institutes of Health, USA, will lecture
at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 18 October, in the Lecture Room, the Sir
William Dunn School of Pathology. The meeting will be chaired by
Professor Herman Waldmann.

Subject: `Tolerance and the four Ds: danger, distress,
destruction, and death, or: beyond self and non-self.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



OXFORD INNOVATION SOCIETY

PROFESSOR C. HIGGINS of the IMM will lecture to the society at 6 p.m.
on Thursday, 7 December, in the Department of Pharmacology. The
lecture will be preceded by tea at 5.30 p.m.

Admission is by ticket only, obtainable from Isis Innovation
(telephone: Oxford (2)72411).

Subject: `Gene therapy.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

The following illustrated lectures will be given at 8 p.m. on
the days shown (refreshements available from 7.45 p.m.). The
cost of entrance is £1 for members, £2 for non-members, but
there is no charge for students under thirty.

The 19 October and 10 November lectures will be given in the
Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College. The 31 October
lecture will be given in the Pauling Human Sciences Centre.

PROFESSOR P. ARMOUR

Thur. 19 Oct.: `Galileo: spheres v. satellites.'

DR G. MAGYAR

31 Oct.: `What is JET---the Joint European
Torus?'

PROFESSOR N. MANN

Fri. 10 Nov.: `Petrarch and Simone Martini.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Italian films

The following films will be shown at 8 p.m. on the days shown
in St Clare's Oxford, 139 Banbury Road. Entrance is free, but
small donations to the association are welcome.

Mon. 23 Oct.: La Ciociara (De Sica, 1960; without
subtitles)

Thur. 30 Nov.: Roma Città Aperta (Rosselini 1945;
English
subtitles)

Return to List of Contents of this section



OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

DR H. MAYR-HARTING will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 19 October,
in the Bostar Hall, University College. Wine will be served from 8.15
p.m. New members are welcome.

Subject: `Ottonian church and cosmos: the view from
Cologne.'

Return to List of Contents of this section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: Grants and Research<br /> Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: Examinations and<br /> Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
SCIENCES


Honour School of Mathematics 1996

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved
the
following list of lecture courses for papers C1 and C2 of the
Honour
School of Mathematics to be examined in Trinity Term 1996 (see
Examination Decrees, 1994, p. 242, regulation
7(1)(a)):

Algebraic Number Theory

Algebraic Topology

Analytic Topology

Approximation Theory

Axiomatic Set Theory

Communication Theory

Complex Algebraic Curves

Complexity and Cryptography

Decision Mathematics

Domain Theory

Elementary Number Theory

Finite Groups

Fourier Analysis

Functional Analysis

General Relativity

Generalised Linear Models in Statistics

The Gödel Incompleteness Theorems

Lattice Theory

Linear Models in Statistics

Markov Processes

Mathematical Ecology and Biology

Mathematical Models in Finance

Model Theory

Nonlinear Systems

Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations

Ordinary Differential Equations

Practical Statistics

Proof Theory

Quantum Theory

Representation Theory

Rings and Modules

Semantics of Programming Languages

Viscous Flow

Waves and Compressible Flow

The following courses from the above list will be required as
theoretical background for the practical classes in Statistics
(ibid., p. 243, regulation 7(3)(b)):

Statistics of Linear Models

Generalised Linear Models

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has also
approved
the following list of topics for the course of practical classes
in
Statistics for the academic year 1995–6:

Use of statistical software

Statistical summaries and graphs

Linear regression modelling

Uses of diagnostics for model checking and case screening

Selection of variables in multiple regression

Analysis of variance with data from designed experiments

Analysis of factorial effects

Approximate analyses for counts and proportions

Generalised linear modelling

Analysis of deviance

Regression models for binomial data

Log-linear models

Analysis of contingency tables

Gamma regression models

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Honour School of Mathematics 1997 and
Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1997

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved
the
following list of lecture courses for paper b(10) of the Honour
Schools of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences to be examined
in
Trinity Term 1997 (see Examination Decrees, 1994,
pp. 252 and 261,
regulation 3(c)).

Elementary Number Theory

Lattice Theory

Mathematical Ecology and Biology

Nonlinear Systems

Communication Theory

Applied Probability

Combinatorial Optimisation

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Honour School of Mathematical Sciences
1997

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved
the
following list of papers for examination in Section o of the
Honour
School of Mathematical Sciences 1997 (see Examination
Decrees
, 1994,
p. 252, regulation 3(e)).

Paper o1: Numerical Computation (as for Paper I.6 of the
Honour
School of Computation).

Paper o2: Extended Essay (as described in the regulations for
the
Honour School of Mathematical Sciences published in Examination
Decrees and Regulations).

Paper o3: Functional Programming and Algorithm Design (as for
Section

4 of the regulations for Honour Moderations
in Mathematics and
Computation. [This option is not available to candidates who have
taken Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation.]

Paper o4: Imperative Programming (as for Paper I.1 of the
Honour
School of Computation). Practical weight: one sixth. Paper of 2
hours
30 minutes.

Paper o5: Algorithms and Complexity (as for Paper I.5 of the
Honour
School of Computation).

Paper o6: History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant (Paper
101 of
the regulations for Philosophy in Some of the Honour Schools).
No
candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering Paper
b1.

Paper o7: Metaphysics and Theory of Knowledge (Paper 102 of
the
regulations for Philosophy in Some of the Honour Schools). No
candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering Paper
b1.

Paper o8: Philosophy of Mathematics (Paper 122 of the
regulations for
Philosophy in Some of the Honour Schools). No candidate will be
permitted
this option who is not offering Paper b1.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Honour School of Computation 1997

Subjects approved for the Honour School of Computation, Trinity
Term
1997:

Section II

1. Compilers and Operating Systems

2. Splines, Computer Graphics and
Computational Geometry

3. Parallel Scientific Computation and
Parallel Algorithms

4. Engineering and Computer Science (topics
from Engineering and
Computing Science paper IE2)

5. Mathematical Foundations of Programming
Languages (topics from a
list including Lambda Calculus and Types, Domain Theory,
Semantics of
Programming Languages)

6. Advanced Mathematical Logic and Complexity
(topics from a list
including Model Theory, Complexity, Proof Theory)

Options 1, 2 and 3 will have a 1/6 practical weight and a 2 1/2
hour
examination.

Options 4, 5 and 6 will have no practicals and a 3 hour
examination.

Section E

Paper a1, a2, a3, a4, a5, a6, b1, b8, and b9 from the Honour
School
of Mathematical Sciences together with paper b(10)(c):

Elementary Number Theory

Lattice Theory

Mathematical Ecology and Biology

Nonlinear Systems

Communication Theory

Applied Probability

There will be no practical element and each paper will be of
three
hours' duration.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Honour School of Mathematics and
Computation 1997

The subjects approved for Section II(MC) in the Honour School of
Mathematics and Computation, Trinity Term 1997, will be the same
as
those for Section II of the Honour School of Computation, Trinity
Term 1997.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Honour School of Mathematics and
Computation 1996

Subjects approved for papers C1(c) and C2(c)
for the Honour School of
Mathematics and Computation, Trinity Term 1996:

Paper C1(c)

Axiomatic Set Theory

Communication Theory

Complexity and Cryptography

Domain Theory

The Gödel Incompleteness Theorems

Lattice Theory

Neural Networks

Proof Theory

Semantics of Programming Languages

Paper C2(c)

Computer Graphics

Operating Systems

Parallel Algorithms

Programming Language Implementation

Theorem Proving

VLSI Design

Logic Programming and Learning

Four questions will be set on each of these subjects, with the
exception of Neural Networks for which only two questions will
be
set.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



JOINT COMMITTEE FOR MATHEMATICS AND
PHILOSOPHY


Honour School of Mathematics and
Philosophy 1996

The Joint Comittee for Mathematics and Philosophy has approved
the
following list of lecture courses in Advanced Logic to be
examined in
Trinity Term 1995 (see Examination Decrees, 1994,
p. 249):

Axiomatic Set Theory

The Gödel Incompleteness Theorems

Model Theory

Proof Theory

Return to List of Contents of this
section



BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND
MODERN LANGUAGES


Optional Subjects in the Honour School
of Modern Languages and the related Joint Honour Schools

The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages gives
notice, under the provisions of the regulations in Examination
Decrees, 1994, p. 375, ll. 40–2, that the following Optional
Subjects will be available in the examination in Trinity Term
1997.

Details of mutual exclusions are given in the footnotes.

101 The comparative descriptive linguistics of modern European
languages. Candidates will be expected to have a detailed
knowledge
of any two of the following languages and to have made a
comparative
study of their present-day phonetics, phonology, morphology,
syntax,
and vocabulary: English, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese,
Italian, Russian, Greek.

102 Semantics. Candidates will be expected to be familiar
with the
principal theories in this field since 1900.

103 General Linguistics.[1] Candidates should
be familiar with the
terminology, methodology, and main theoretical standpoints of
modern
linguistics. They should be able to discuss, with reference to
phonetics, phonology, grammar, and semantics, some of the
following
topics: linguistic units and relations; linguistic universals;
communicational functions of language; language acquisition;
linguistic variation and linguistic change; linguistic
relativism.
Opportunity will be provided for candidates to show proficiency
in
phonological, grammatical, and other types of analysis of given
samples of linguistic material.

104 Modern Literary Theory.[2] Candidates
will be
expected to be
familiar with major theories in this field since 1918.

105 European Cinema and Literary Movements from 1920 to the
present.
Candidates will be expected: (a) to show evidence of
having worked on
film study and analysis, using D. Bordwell and K. Thompson, Film
Art,
third edition (McGraw Hill, London, 1990); P. Cook, The Cinema
Book
(BFI, London, 1985); M. Liehm, Passion and Defiance (University
of
California Press, Berkeley–Los Angeles, 1984); (b)
to have studied
two of the following, up to four of which will be available in
the
examination: Expressionism and the Early Avant-garde; Realism,
Socialist-Realism, Neo-Realism; Auteurism; Filmic Adaptations of
Literary Texts/Literary Authors writing for the screen;
Totalitarianism in Literature and Film; Surrealism;
Representations
of Gender and Sexuality; The New Avant-garde and Post-modern
Film.

A list of the topics listed in (b) which will be
available in the
examination can be obtained from the Modern Languages Faculty
Secretarial Office in 37 Wellington Square at the beginning of
Michaelmas Full Term 1996.

200 Romance Philology and Linguistics. Candidates will be
expected to
show a detailed knowledge of the methods of Comparative Romance
Philology and to illustrate their answers with examples from more
than one Romance language. A section on 'Vulgar Latin' will be
set,
including passages for linguistic comment from one or more of the
following: Early Glosses, Appendix Probi, Aetheriae Peregrinatio
ad
Loca Sancta. The section will be compulsory for candidates
offering
Modern Languages Paper IV in any two Romance languages, and
optional
for all other candidates, with the exception of those offering
the
Classics and Modern Languages paper in Late Latin Philology, who
will
be precluded from answering it.

201 Anglo-Norman Language and Literature.

202 Old Provencal. Prescribed text: F.R. Hamlin, P.T.
Ricketts, J.
Hathaway, Introduction a l'etude de l'ancien provencal, Geneva
1967
and 1985, with particular reference to nos. 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 12,
14,
15, 17, 18, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28, 31, 33, 34, 36, 39, 40, 42, 44,
46,
48, 49, 53, 54, 56, 57, 59, 65, 67, 70, from which passages will
be
set for translation. In addition, candidates may answer questions
on
either literary or linguistic topics or both.

203 The twelfth- and thirteenth-century Grail Romances.

204 French historical writing up to 1515.

205 French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century.

206 Dramatic theory and practice in France from 1605 to 1660,
with
special reference to Corneille.

207 French grammarians and linguistic theory of the
seventeenth and
eighteenth centuries.

208 Jean-Jacques Rousseau.[3]

209 Honore de Balzac.

210 French Poetry 1870 to 1918.

211 French literature and the First World War.

212 Marcel Proust.[4]

213 Surrealism.

214 The `Nouveau Roman', with special reference to the work
of
Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute and Butor.

215 Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.

216 French women writers.

217 Advanced French Translation: Theory and Practice.

300 Old Norse. Candidates will be expected to have made a
special
study of F. Ranke and D. Hofmann, Altnordisches Elementarbuch
(Sammlung Goeschen No. 1115), pp. 80–135. Candidates will
also be
expected to have read the Voelsungasaga and related material from
the
Poetic Edda.

301 Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old
English.
Prescribed texts: Gothic, Gospel according to St Mark, chapters
1–9;
Old Saxon, Heliand, ll. 4025–5038; Old English, Beowulf, ll.

1049.

302 The German Minnesang. Candidates will be expected to have
made a
special study of Friedrich von Hausen, Lieder (ed. Schweikle)
(Reclam); Reinmar, Lieder (ed. Schweikle) (Reclam); Heinrich von
Morungen, Lieder (ed. Tervooren) (Reclam).

303 Wolfram von Eschenbach.

304 Martin Luther.

305 German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century.

306 Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to
Schiller.

307 Hoelderlin, Hyperion, Empedokles (ed. M. B. Benn,
Clarendon
German Series) and the poetry written after 1797.

308 The Bildungsroman from Wieland to Keller.

309 German political thought from 1780 to 1830. Candidates
will be
expected to have read: Kant, Idee zu einer allgemeinen
Geschichte in
weltbuergerlicher Absicht, 1784; Zum ewigen Frieden, 1795;
Humboldt,
Ideen zu einem Versuch, die Grenzen der Wirksamkeit des Staates
zu
bestimmen, 1792; Novalis, Die Christenheit oder Europa, 1799;
Fichte,
Reden an die deutsche Nation, 1808; Hegel, Vorlesungen ueber die
Philosophie der Geschichte, Einleitung (ed. Th. Litt, Reclam);
Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts, Vorrede, 1821.

310 Johann Nestroy and the Wiener Volkstheater.

311 The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and
Rainer
Maria Rilke. Candidates will be examined on the poetry of two of
these authors and will be expected to have read the works listed
in
any two of the sections below.

(a) Hofmannsthal: Gedichte und Lyrische Dramen, ed.
Steiner (Fischer
Verlag, 1952), pp. 7–136, 467–529.

(b) George: Hymnen, Pilgerfahrten, Algabal; Das
Jahr der Seele; Der
Teppich des Lebens und die Lieder von Traum und Tod mit einem
Vorspiel; the sections `Zeitgedichte', `Gestalten', `Gezeiten',
and
`Maximin' from Der siebente Ring; Das neue Reich omitting the
section
`Sprueche'.

(c) Rilke: Das Stunden-Buch; Neue Gedichte (both
parts); Requiem fuer
eine Freundin; Requiem fuer Wolf Graf von Kalckreuth; Die Sonette
an
Orpheus; Duineser Elegien.

312 `Expressionist' poetry. Candidates will be expected to
have a
detailed knowledge of poetry included in Lyrik des
Expressionismus
ed. Silvio Vietta (Deutsche Texte no. 37, published by Niemeyer).

313 The Writer and Politics in the Weimar Republic. Candidates
will
be expected to have read in particular: Willi Bredel,
Maschinenfabrik
N&K; Leonhard Frank, Der Mensch ist gut; Franz Jung, Die
rote Woche
and Die Eroberung der Maschinen; Anna Seghers, Grubetsch and
Aufstand
der Fischer von St. Barbara; Ernst Toller, Die Wandlung, Masse
Mensch, Die Maschinenstuermer, Der deutsche Hinkemann and Hoppla,
wir
leben; Friedrich Wolf, Der Unbedingte, Cyankali: §218 and
Die Jungen von Mons; and a selection of the post-1919 poetry of
Erich
Muehsam and Kurt Tucholsky.

314 German Poetry since 1945. Candidates will be expected to
have a
general knowledge of the field, and a detailed knowledge of works
written in or after 1945 by three of the following authors:
Bachmann,
Benn, Biermann, Bobrowski, Volker Braun, Brecht, Celan (the
collections of poetry from Mohn und Gedachtnis to Atemwende
inclusive), Enzensberger, Grass, Huchel, Sarah Kirsch, Kunert,
Sachs.

Note: The paper will include a compulsory section
containing general
questions and commentary passages taken from the authors being
offered; candidates will thus be required to attempt either a
general
essay or a commentary. Brecht's poetry from 1945 to 1956 may be
offered as one of the three authors selected for detailed
knowledge
in this paper by candidates offering Brecht as a prescribed
author in
paper X.

315 The German novel since 1945. Candidates will be expected
to have
a general knowledge of the field, and to have read German-
language
novels relating to the topics listed below. The paper will
consist of
a number of general questions, and a number of questions on each
of
the following topics (candidates will be precluded from answering
more than two questions on any one topic): Narrative Voice;
`Vergangenheitsbewaltigung'; Politics and Society; Identity and
Gender.

400 Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.

401 Dante's minor works.

402 `Questione della lingua.' Candidates will be expected to
have
read: Dante, De Vulgari Eloquentia; Bembo, Prose della volgar
lingua;
Manzoni, Scritti sulla lingua.

403 Vico.

404 The aesthetics and literary criticism of Croce. Candidates
will
be expected to be familiar with Part I of the Estetica, Croce's
principal theoretical additions to it, and a broad sample of his
criticism of Italian literature.

405 The Works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.

406 Sicilian literature 1950–1990.

407 Italian Women Writers 1950–1990

500 The Civilization of Muslim Spain.[5]

501 The Eastern Dialects of Spain, with Catalan.
502 Spanish Drama before Lope de Vega. Candidates will be
expected to
be familiar with the works of: Juan del Encina, Lucas Fernandez,
Lope
de Rueda, Juan de la Cueva, Bartolome de Torres Naharro, Diego
Sanchez de Badajoz, Juan de Timoneda, Miguel Venegas, Miguel de
Cervantes, and the Spanish works of Gil Vicente. Candidates will
be
expected to have read the Portuguese and bilingual texts of Gil
Vicente, but passages for comment, which will not be compulsory,
will
not be set from these.

503 The Spanish Erasmians. Candidates will be expected to have
read:
Erasmus, El Enquiridion (ed. Damaso Alonso, Madrid, 1932);
Coloquios
de Erasmo (Nueva Biblioteca de Autores Espanoles, vol. xxi, pp.
149–
202, 227–49); Alfonso de Valdes, Dialogo de las cosas
ocurridas en
Roma (ed. Jose F. Montesinos, Clasicos castellanos); Juan de
Valdes,
Dialogo de doctrina christiana y el psalterio (ed. Domingo
Ricart,
Mexico, 1964, pp. 1–130); Juan Luis Vives, Concordia y
discordia en
el linaje humano [De concordia et discordia in humano genere],
Bk. IV
(Obras completas, trans. L. Riber, Aguilar, Madrid, 1947–8,
ii,
195–253); Cristobal de Villalon (attr.), Viaje de Turquia
(Part I);
F. de la Torre, Institucion de un rey christiano (ed. R. W.
Truman,
Exeter Hispanic Texts, 1979)(passages for commentary will not be
set
from this text).

504 The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico and the Antilles.
Candidates
will be expected to have read: Cristobal Colon, Los cuatro viajes
del
almirante y su testamento (ed. Austral); Hernan Cortes, Cartas
de
relacion de la conquista de Mejico (ed. M. Alcala, Porrua,
Mexico)
and A. R. Pagden, Hernan Cortes: Letters from Mexico (Oxford
University Press, London, 1972), Letters two and three; Bernal
Diaz
del Castillo, Historia de la Conquista de la Nueva Espana
(Porrua,
Mexico, 1960), vol. i, pp. 174–501 and vol. ii, pp.
1–60; Bartolome
de las Casas, Brevisima relacion de la destruccion de las Indias
(EUDEBA, Buenos Aires, 1966); Toribio de Motolinia, Historia de
los
Indios de la Nueva Espana (Porrua, Mexico, 1969), pp.
77–109;
Bernardino de Sahagun, Historia general de la Nueva Espana
(Porrua,
Mexico, 1956), Libros 3, 7, and 8. Candidates will also be
expected
to have read Pedro Martir de Angleria, Decadas del Nuevo Mundo
(ed.
J. Torres Asensio), omitting Decadas 2, 3, and 6.

505 Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577–88.
Candidates will
be expected to have read: Santa Teresa de Jesus, Moradas del
castillo
interior; Fray Luis de Granada, Introduccion del simbolo de la
fe
(ed. Jose Maria Balcells, Madrid, Catedra, 1989), pp.
125–231; Fray
Luis de Leon, Rey de Dios, Esposo, and Jesus, from De los nombres
de
Cristo; San Juan de la Cruz, Llama de amor viva (candidates will
also
be expected to have read the poem), Malon de Chaide, La
conversion de
la Magdalena (3 vols., ed. Felix Garcia, Clasicos Castellanos,
Madrid, 1958), III, 83–178, 190–219.

506 Federico Garcia Lorca. Candidates will be expected to have
read:
Federico Garcia Lorca, Obras completas (Aguilar, Edicion del
cincuentenario), three vols. Passages for commentary will be set
from
among the following: Canciones, Poeta en Nueva York, Llanto por
Ignacio Sanchez Mejias, Yerma, El publico.

507 Twentieth-century Catalan literature. Candidates will be
expected
to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed knowledge
of
works by at least three authors. Passages for comment, which will
not
be compulsory, will be set from the authors currently prescribed.
Details of the authors and works prescribed for detailed
knowledge
will be available in the Modern Languages Administration and
Faculty
Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas
Full
Term of the academic year of the examination.

508 Galician literature and culture after Francoism.
Candidates will
be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a
detailed
knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages for
comment,
which will not be compulsory, will be set from authors currently
prescribed. Details of the authors and works prescribed for
detailed
knowledge will be available in the Modern Languages Faculty
Office,
37 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full
Term of
the academic year of the examination.

530 The Work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of
literature
and learning. Passages for commentary will be set from Primera
cronica general (ed. R. Menendez Pidal, Madrid, 1955), caps.
814–
967; Las siete partidas (ed. Real Academia de la Historia,
Madrid,
1807), I (Prologo and i—both versions), ii; II (i,
iii–v, ix–xi,
xv, xviii, xxi–xxii, xxiv, xxxi); III (xix–xx);
Cantigas de Santa
Maria (ed. Jesus Montoya, Letras hispanicas, 293, Madrid,
Catedra).

531 Spanish and Portuguese Prose Romances of the Fifteenth and
Sixteenth Centuries. Candidates will be expected to have a
knowledge
of the field and to have made a special study of at least one
romance
from each of the following groups, from which passages for
literary
commentary will be set: (a) sentimental, (b)
chivalric, and (c)
pastoral.

(a) Diego de San Pedro, Carcel de amor (ed. Whinnom);
Juan de Flores,
Grimalte y Gradissa (ed. Waley); Bernardim Ribeiro, Menina e
moca;
(b) Spanish Grail Fragments (ed. Pietsch); Amadis de
Gaula, Part I
(ed. Place); Palmeirim de Inglaterra (ed. Rodrigues Lapa); Tirant
lo
Blanch, Book I;
(c) Jorge de Montemayor, Los siete libros de la Diana
(ed. Lopez
Estrada); Gil Polo, Diana enamorada (ed. Ferreres); Samuel Usque,
Consolacþo as tribulacþes de Israel vol. i.

532 Latin American Fiction from 1940. Candidates will be
expected to
show a detailed knowledge of the novels/short stories of at least
two
of the following authors: Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier,
Julio
Cortazar, Fernando del Paso, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel Garcia
Marquez,
Joþo Guimarþes Rosa, Osman Lins, Clarice Lispector, Mario Vargas
Llosa.

560 The Galician-Portuguese Cancioneiros.

561 The Chronicles of the Portuguese Expansion in Asia.
Candidates
will be expected to have read: the texts in Portuguese contained
in
T.F. Earle and John Villiers, Albuquerque, Caesar of the East
(Aris
and Phillips, 1990); Joþo de Barros, Decadas, ed. Antonio Baiþo,
vol.
I (Sa da Costa, 1945) (candidates are advised to consult also the
electronic edition of the Decadas published by the Centre for the
Study of the Portuguese Discoveries); Diogo do Couto, O soldado
pratico, ed. Rodrigues Lapa (Sa da Costa, 1954); Fernþo Mendes
Pinto,
Peregrinacþo, chaps. 1, 36–104, 203–26.

562 Camþes. Candidates will be expected to have read Os
Lusiadas (ed.
F. Pierce)(passages for translation will be set from Cantos I,
V, IX)
and Liricas (ed. Rodrigues Lapa, 1970 or later).

563 The Brazilian Novel of the North-East 1880–1960.

600 Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and
Russian.[6]

601 Comparative Slavonic Philology, with special reference to
Russian
and any one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech,
Macedonian,
Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White
Russian.

602 The structure and history of one of the following
languages:
Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak,
Slovene,
Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.[7]

603 Language and style in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century
Russian
literature.

604 Russian thought from 1825 to 1905. Candidates will be
expected to
have read the works of Belinsky, Herzen, the Slavophiles,
Chernyshevsky, Mikhaylovsky, Plekhanov, Lenin.

605 Russian narrative fiction from 1917. Questions will be set
predominantly on the following authors: Babel', Bulgakov,
Erenburg,
Leonov, Olesha, Pasternak, Sholokhov, Solzhenitsyn, Zamyatin.

606 Modern Russian poetry, with special reference to the works
of
Akhmatova, Mandel'shtam, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva.

607 Russian religious philosophy in the late nineteenth and
early
twentieth centuries, with special reference to the works of
Fedorov,
Solov'ev, Berdyaev, Florensky, and S. Bulgakov.

608 Czech and Slovak fiction since 1945, with reference to the
works
of Hrabal, Paral, Kundera, Bednar, Johanides, and others.

700 The Greek Enlightenment.

701 The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with
special
reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis,
Valaoritis, and Mavilis.

702 The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with
special
reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis,
Krystallis,
Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.

703 The Greek novel 1918–40, with special reference to
the works of
K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis, Venezis, K.
Politis, and G. N. Abbot.

800 The records of Continental Celtic.

801 Medieval Welsh tales and romances.[8]

802 The poets of the Welsh princes.[8]

803 The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym.[8]

804 The Ulster Cycle of tales.

805 The classical Irish bardic tradition.

806 The structure and history of the Welsh language.

807 The structure and history of the Irish language.

900 Hebrew poetry and prose of Medieval Spain and Provence.
In
addition to the literary texts, candidates will be expected to
show
knowledge of the historical background of Spain and Provence from
the
eleventh to the fourteenth centuries, in particular the
transition
from an Islamic to a Christian environment and the Jewish
response to
it. Candidates will be expected to have read selected works by
the
following writers: Moses Ibn Ezra; Abraham Ibn Ezra; Joseph Ibn
Zabara; Judah al-Harizi; Meshullam da Piera; Shem Tob Falaquera;
Todros Abulafia; Isaac Hagorni. All texts will be selected from
J.
Schirmann, Hashirah ha'ivrit besefarad uveprovans.

901 Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature. Candidates will
be
expected to show knowledge of the work of Central and East
European
Hebrew writers (some of whom settled in Jewish Palestine in the
early
decades of this century) and in particular of their literary
development in the environment of Austrian, Russian, and Polish
literature, and their influence in shaping contemporary Hebrew
literature. Candidates will be expected to have read stories by
Y. H.
Brenner and by M. Berdyczewski; David Vogel's novel, Hayei
nisu'im; a
selection of poetry by H. N. Bialik, Saul Tschernichovsky, Leah
Goldberg, Nathan Alterman, and Abraham Shlonski. Texts will be
selected from the following works: Y. H. Brenner, Kovetz sippurim
(Sifrei Mofet); Y. Lichtenbaum (ed.), Sofreinu (Ahiasaf); T.
Carmi
(ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse.

902 The literature of the State of Israel. Candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of modern Israel's literary history
and
the development of its literature in the light of twentieth-
century
Western European influences. Candidates will be expected to have
read
stories by S. Y. Agnon, Aharon Meged, and Aharon Appelfeld; a
selection of poetry by Nathan Zach, Yehuda Amichai, Dan Pagis,
and
Meir Wieseltier; and two plays by Yehoshua Sobol. Texts will be
selected from the following works: S. Y. Agnon, Sefer Ha-ma'asim
(Schocken Books, 1948); Aharon Appelfeld, Shanim vesha'ot
(Hakibbutz
Hameuchad, 1975); T. Carmi (ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew
Verse;
Yehoshua Sobol, Nefesh yehudi and Ghetto.

903 Yiddish Linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show
knowledge of the methods and findings of Yiddish linguistic
research
with respect to any three of the following five topics: (i)
origins
and history of Yiddish; (ii)interrelationships with German
dialects
and standard German; (iii) the Semitic component in Yiddish; (iv)
Yiddish dialectology; (v) Yiddish sociolinguistics. Required
readings
for each of these topics will be in Yiddish, English, and German.

904 Modern Yiddish Literature. Candidates will be expected to
have
read:

Sholem Aleichem, Kasrilevker progres (in his Fun Kasrilevke,
NY 1919,
pp. 11–84); Ber Borokhov, Di ufgabn fun der yidisher
filologye (in
Shprakhforshung un literatur geshikhte, ed. N. Mayzl, Tel Aviv
1966,
pp. 53–75); Sh. An-ski (Shloyme-Zanvl Rapoport), Der dibek
(in Di
yidishe drame fun tsvantsikstn yorhundert, NY 1977, vol. ii, pp.

60); selections from the poetry of R. Ayzland, A. M. Dilon, M.
L.
Halpern, Z. Landoy, M. Leyb, H. Leyvik, Y. Y. Shvarts, A. N.
Stencl,
M. Vintshevski (in Musterverk fun der yidisher literatur, ed.
Rozhanski, vol. lxxvi, pp. 40–53, 61–6, 91–100,
112–34; vol.
lxxviii, pp. 211, 234–8); Isaac Bashevis Singer, A togbukh
fun a
nisht geboyrenem and Der yid fun bovl (in his Der sotn in goray
un
andere dertseylungen, Jerusalem 1972, pp. 251–70,
307–19).

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Footnotes

[1] Candidates offering the Optional Subject
`General Linguistics'
may not offer paper XIII from the Honour School of Modern
Languages.

No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern
Languages
may offer both the Optional Subject `General Linguistics' and the
paper `Linguistic Theory' from the Honour School of English
Language
and Literature.

[2] No candidate in the Honour School of
English and Modern Languages
may offer both the Optional Subject `Modern Literary Theory' and
the
paper `The History and Theory of Criticism' from the Honour
School of
English Language and Literature.

[3] No candidate in the Honour School of
Modern History and Modern
Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Jean-Jacques
Rousseau'
and the Modern History Political and Social Thought paper.

[4] No candidate in the Honour School of
Modern History and Modern
Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Marcel Proust' and
Further Subject in General History, `Literature, Politics, and
Society in France 1870–1914'.

[5] Candidates will be given an opportunity
to show knowledge of
Arabic, but will not be required to show such knowledge.
Candidates
offering this paper must have the approval of the Joint Committee
on
Arabic and Spanish. Applications should be sent to the Faculty
Secretary, Oriental Institute, not later than the Monday of
second
week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which the
candidate
proposes to take the examination.

[6] No candidate in the Honour School of
Modern Languages or in a
joint Honour School involving Modern Languages may offer both the
Optional Subject `Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common
Slavonic
and Russian' and option (1) (`The Old Church Slavonic language')
in
the Linguistic Studies paper II in Russian (Russian paper V from
the
Honour School of Modern Languages).

[7] Candidates offering Czech (with Slovak)
will not be permitted to
offer either of those languages in the Optional Subject on the
structure and history of one of certain specified languages.

[8] No candidate in the Honour School of
English and Modern Languages
may offer the paper `Medieval Welsh' from the Honour School of
English Language and Literature with any of the Optional Subjects
`Medieval Welsh tales and romances', `The poets of the Welsh
princes', and `The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1996

Honour Schools

English: I. RIVERS, MA, Fellow of St Hugh's

Modern History: J. STEVENSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
of Worcester

Modern History and Economics: C.C.C. ANDREYEV, MA,
D.PHIL., Student of Christ Church

Natural Science—Chemistry Part I: M.J.T.
ROBINSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen (address: Dyson Perrins
Laboratory)

Physics and Philosophy: I.J.R. AITCHISON, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester (address: Department of Physics)

Master of Philosophy

English Studies Courses (i) and (ii): E.H. COOPER,
MA, Fellow of University

Bachelor of Philosophy

Philosophy: M.K. DAVIES, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Corpus Christi

Law Moderations

D.J. IBBETSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen

Return to List of Contents of this
section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: Colleges, Halls, and<br /> Societies<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OBITUARIES


Merton College

KENNETH JAMES HESLOP, May 1995; commoner 1932–6. Aged 82.

ALBERT HULL, 8 August 1995; exhibitioner 1933–6. Aged 81.

RAYMOND GEORGE VAUGHAN RIGBY, 27 April 1995; commoner 1923–6.
Aged 90.

Return to List of Contents of this section



ELECTIONS


All Souls College

Visiting Fellowships

The following will be in residence for Michaelmas Term 1995 as
Visiting Fellows at All Souls College:

PROFESSOR GEOFFREY BOLTON, Edith Cowen University

PROFESSOR JAMES ESTES, University of Toronto

PROFESSOR ANDREI LEBEDEV, Moscow State University

PROFESSOR JOSEPH MACGILLIVRAY, Columbia University

PROFESSOR JOHN ROBERTS, Stanford University

PROFESSOR ELIZABETH SEARS, University of Michigan

PROFESSOR SUSAN TREGGIARI, Stanford University

Return to List of Contents of this section



Merton College

To a Visiting Research Fellowship (MT):

DR ELENA
BAGRYANSKAYA, Laboratory of Magnetic and Spin Phenomena, Novosibirsk

To an Emeritus Fellowship:

DR MICHAEL S. DUNNILL

To an Honorary Fellowship:

PROFESSOR ANDREW WILES

Return to List of Contents of this section



Wadham College

To a Fellowship by Special Election:

DR BRUCE GORDON
CUMMING, Paul Hamlyn Junior Research Fellow in Neuroscience

To a Junior Research Fellowship in Physical Sciences:

KING KUOK HII (PH.D. Leeds)

Return to List of Contents of this section



Worcester College

To an Official Tutorial Fellowship in Geography (with effect
from 1 January 1996):

HEATHER ANN VILES, MA, D.PHIL.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Manchester College

To Scholarships:

NIGEL CLIFF

SIMON HUMPHRIES

Return to List of Contents of this section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 12 October 1995: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms and
conditions of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Bodleian Shop

The Bodleian Shop will remain open until 6 p.m.
every weekday evening until Christmas. New: Cats in Oxford desk
calendar, silver Radcliffe Camera earrings and cufflinks, and lots of
other gifts and cards. Entrance in Old Schools Quadrangle. Open
9–6 weekdays, 9–12.30 Sats.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Oxford Bach Choir, 1896–1996

Centenary Season—advance information. Choral
Workshop, Sat., 4 Nov.: tutors, Simon Halsey and David Lowe. Recital,
Thur., 9 Nov.: Mark Wildman (bass), and Christopher Robinson (piano).
Brahms' Requiem, Sat., 2 Dec.: Bournemouth SO with
Meredith Davies (cond.). Centenary Dinner, Fri. 15 Mar. 1996, St
Catherine's College: guest speaker, Jeremy Irons. Centenary Concert,
Sat., 1 June 1996, with CBSO and Christopher Robinson, CVO,
conductor: programme to inc. première of a new Cantata
specially commissioned from Nicholas Maw; also Bruckner, Te
Deum
, and Mendelssohn, Violin Concerto. Further details of
celebratory events to be announced in a special brochure obtainable
after 1 Sept. from Blackwell's Music Shop, Central Music Library, or
Philip Waite, OBC Mailing, 18 Queen's Lane, Eynsham, Oxford OX8
1HL.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Oxford Chamber Music Society

The Chagall Piano Trio will play the following at
2.45 p.m. on Sunday, 22 October, in the Holywell Music Room: Mozart,
Trio in E, K.542; Grieg, Andante con moto in C minor; Philip Grange,
work inspired by Chagall; Beethoven, Trio in D op. 70 no. 1
(The Ghost). Tickets £7.50 from Blackwell's,
£7.95 at the door, £3 students and juniors.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Exhibition

Green College, Woodstock Road: exhibition of
paintings by Derrick Holt, in aid of Sir Michael Sobell House
Hospice. Open Mon. 16–Sat. 28 Oct., 10.30 a.m.–5 p.m. Cheese and
wine reception Sun. 15 Oct., 5–7 p.m.; all welcome.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Royal Shakespeare Company

The RSC's Oxford office is organising return coach
trips to Stratford evening performances. Each £18.50 ticket
includes a free upgrade to best Stalls or Cirle seat—a £15
saving on usual RSC seat prices. Coaches depart St Giles' at 6 p.m.
for the following performances: Taming of the Shrew,
Thurs., 2 Nov.; Romeo and Juliet, Mon., 6 Nov.;
Richard III, Thurs., 9 Nov.; cJulius Caesar\, Mon., 13
Nov. Bookings (RSC Oxford): Oxford 511434.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Tuition Offered

French conversation and tuition at all levels
offered by Oxford graduate (British national, French-educated),
experienced coach and teacher. Walton Street. Tel.: Oxford 511897.

Cello tuition offered by experienced teacher.
Beginners to advanced players. Johanna Messner, Jericho. Tel.: Oxford
311981.

Piano lessons with Martin André, MA, ARCM;
intermediate to diploma level. North Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 516985.

Oxford Brookes Language Services will be holding
intensive weekend courses in French (18–19 Nov.) and Italian (2–3
Dec.). For details of these or to discuss specific language training
needs, contact Jill Thornton, Oxford Brookes Language Services,
Oxford Brookes University, Wheatley, Oxford OX33 1HX. Tel.: Oxford
485808.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Services Offered

Picture framing: we offer a high-quality service
using a wide range of materials. Wash-line mounts, case frames,
stretching of textiles, cleaning and repairs to existing frames.
Helpful and efficient service. Open 6 days a week. Richard Adams, 5c
West End, Witney, Oxon. OX8 6NG. Tel.: 01993 773431.

Garden design. If the dry summer left you
dissatisfied with your garden, let me help you re-plan for next year.
Short consultation or full-scale design. Judith Walton. Tel.: Oxford
735179.

Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery,
orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at
competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free
quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

Frederick and Sudabeh Hine, dealers in Persian,
Afghan, and Turkey carpets and rugs, runners, and kelims. Wide
selection of tribal, village, and workshop pieces. Many items heavily
reduced to make room for new importations arriving end Oct. Browse
through our warehouse without obligation 10 a.m.–6 p.m., for 7 days
a week at present. Old Squash Court at the rear of 16 Linton Road,
North Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 59396.

Personal coaching in identifying and harnessing
one's personal strengths of temperament and life-experience:
individually or as a team, for better personal and group performance.
Series of 6 sessions: £100. Individual sessions: £20.
Marlene Cohen, Training Consultant, Counsellor, Teacher. Tel.: Oxford
311080.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters,
your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic,
commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection,
pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.:
Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Situations Vacant

Serious academic summer program in Paris seeks
Director. Candidates should have 10 years' experience in secondary
school education, fluent French, and a good knowledge of Paris.
Advanced degree preferred. Send references and c.v. to: the Executive
Director, Academic Programs, 601 W110th St., Suite 7R, New York, NY
10025, USA. Fax: 212 663 8169.

St Antony's College, Oxford, European Studies
Centre: part-time secretary sought. Word-processing experience and
shorthand or audio-typing skills required. Twenty-two hours p.w.
Salary pro rata to university grade 3 scale
(£9,995–£11,581 p.a.). Closing date: 30 Oct. Applications,
with details of experience and the names of two referees, to the
College Secretary, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF.

IT Co-ordinator sought for independent,
international 16+ college with 300 students. A new full-time post
combining computing teaching with an administrative role to
co-ordinate and develop all aspects of IT throughout the college.
Salary range £13,350–£22,665 according to age,
qualifications, and teaching experience. Further details from Mrs A.
Rogers, to whom letters of application should be addressed, with the
names of two referees, by 17 October. St Clare's, Oxford, 139 Banbury
Road, Oxford OX2 7AL. A registered charity promoting education.
Charity no. 294085. Fax: Oxford 310002.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Houses to Let

To let furnished spacious recently converted 3/4
bedroom stone barn in show village 5 miles from exits 11 and 12, M40;
2 acres garden; 2 sitting-rooms, 1 with 2 grand pianos and minstrels'
gallery; featured on TV and in colour magazines. £1,250 p.c.m.
Tel.: 01295 690 674.

Two-bedroom period cottage to let in Witney, approx.
9 miles west of Oxford. Fully furnished, fitted kitchen, small
conservatory, living- room, washing-machine, TV, telephone, linen,
charming garden. Available immediately for 12 months in the first
instance. £500 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 65629, fax: Oxford 224378.

Cotswolds: Georgian farmhouse with lovely views over
open countryside, 40 minutes from Oxford; unfurnished; 5 bedrooms,
drawing-room, dining-room (open fires), 2 bathrooms, large
kitchen/breakfast room, utility-room; very easily maintained; garage;
garden. For long let, min. one year. Suit academic/professional
family. £1,500 p.c.m. (inc. gardener). Tel.: Oxford (2)76863.

Three-bedroom semi-detached house in Botley (Beech
Road); gas c.h., telephone, washing-machine, garage. Available from 1
Nov. (possibly earlier) for 6-month let or longer. £600 p.c.m.
plus utilities. Tel.: Oxford 722813.

Littlemore village (city centre 3 miles; good bus
service): modern 2/3-bedroom spacious terrace house with garage and
secluded garden, to let furnished; newly redecorated, gas c.h., small
sun-room. Regret no smokers, no pets. Vacant mid-Nov. or earlier.
£600 p.m. for year-long let, slightly more for shorter term.
Tel.: Oxford 243896 (evenings).

Staverton Road, North Oxford: well-modernised,
fully-equipped, traditional Victorian semi-detached 4/5-bedroom home.
Elegantly but comfortably furnished. £1,400 p.c.m. Finders
Keepers. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 512168, e-mail:
susannen@finders.co.uk.

House, in quiet location, 10 minutes University, 5
minutes to rail station. Available immediately, for up to 9 months.
Suit postgraduates or young professionals. Up to 4 people. Rent
£450 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 310232.

Central Headington, close to hospitals, available
Nov., recently converted 2-bed flat; spacious, tastefully furnished,
fully-fitted kitchen, large living-room, bathroom with bath and
separate pumped shower; gas.c.h.; d.g. Professionals and academics
only. Rent £590 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 68504 (evenings).

Converted barn overlooking churchyard in pretty
village 7 miles from Oxford; 4 bedrooms, study, utility, room with
washer/drier, gas c.h. plus wood-burning stove, garden, parking.
Available from Nov. Tel.: Oxford 310000, ext. 255 (day); 01993 882065
(evenings or weekends); or 01993 883801.

Finders Keepers: Finders Keepers are the current
holders of the Best Letting and Management Office in the UK. For over
25 years Finders Keepers has specialised in serving the needs of
Oxford's academic landlords and visiting tenants and has developed
tailor-made services: a choice of 5 for home owners; advance Priority
Reservation System with comprehensive booklet and maps for academic
visitors. Call, write, or e-mail for further information and fast
personal service. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2
6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk);
also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax:
204844, e-mail: stclement@finders.co.uk).

Superb, modern, architect-designed house in North
Oxford; 4 bedrooms; fully equipped; very efficient c.h.; on bus
routes; 25 minutes' walk to town. Available mid-Dec. for 4 months.
Tel.: Oxford 511825 (evenings or Sundays).

Furnished central North Oxford house to let, 7
Oct.–30 Apr. (dates flexible); walk to colleges, train station, bus
station; near Port Meadow; c.h., recently redecorated, secluded
garden, garden furniture, terrace; 3 bedrooms, 1½ bathrooms,
washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles.
Suitable for visiting academics. £830 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 775567
(J. Mackrell, evenings); or tel. (A. Gaston, Canada): 613 7451368/819
6710348, fax: 613 7450299, e-mail: gastont@nwrc.cws.doe.ca.

Very clean, peaceful rural but accessible beautiful
old stone cottage (2 bedrooms) on ancient farm; wonderful views,
walks, garden; tennis; comfortable antiques—or unfurnished;
insulation; c.h.; open log fire; garage; local pub. Six months min.
Oxford 20 minutes. Tel.: 01993 822152.

A pleasant comfortable semi-detached house close to
Iffley Village; sleeps up to 6 people; holiday or short let; parking,
TV, linen. £350 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 778458, fax: Oxford 776477.

Coming to Oxford? QB Management are one of Oxford's
foremost letting agents with a range of good quality flats and houses
in the Oxford area. We specialise in lettings to visiting academics,
medical personnel, and other professionals and our aim is to provide
the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone
or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever
we can to help without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

Mallam's Residential Letting and Management
Department offers a complete letting and management service. If you
are considering letting your property please call for a professional
consultation without cost or obligation. Tel.: Oxford 241466.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Flats to Let

A 1-bedroom flat and a 2-bedroom furnished flat to
let in North Oxford. Suitable for young academics. Use of garden. No
children or pets. Tel.: Oxford 58055 (evenings).

North Oxford: fully-furnished, well-appointed,
first-floor 1-bedroom flat inc. small study ideally suitable for
couple. Use of spacious garden plus ample parking. Available early
Nov. £600 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 514340.

Toronto, Canada, 1 Jan.–1 Aug. 1996: large
one-bedroom apartment, central location; furnished, with exceptional
views, security, underground, swimming-pool, etc. $Can.901 p.c.m.
(approx. £405). Consider exchange for London flat. Tel.: Oxford
779043, fax: Oxford (2)74445, e-mail: gail.kellough@crim.ox.ac.uk.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes from city centre,
two delightful and very comfortable flats available now in quiet,
civilised family house: (1)—large double bedroom, single bedroom,
drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom; (2)—large double bedroom,
drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, garden. Regret
no children or pets. Tel.: Oxford 52400.

Woodstock Road, within walking distance of
Summertown shops: modern purpose- built first-floor flat; d.g., fully
carpeted, individual gas c.h., fully furnished and equipped; 2 double
bedrooms, study, dining-room or third bedroom (single), large
living-room, kitchen/diner, one large bathroom, gardens on ground
floor, parking space. Most modern conveniences. £850 p.m.
Available 1 Oct. for academic year or longer. Tel.: Oxford 515301; if
no reply: 00 39 55 573056.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in a warm, comfortable
house in exclusive central North Oxford, within easy walking distance
of all main university buildings and town centre; a stone's throw
from parks, river, and several excellent restaurants. Colour TV and
tea- and coffee-making facilities in all rooms; microwaves available.
Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 57879.

Plantation Road: accommodation available for a lady
in regular employment in return for some assistance to elderly lady
morning and evening. First-class reference required. Tel.: Oxford
510147.

One person to share a cottage in Littleworth near
Faringdon. Would suit a postdoc/postgrad/professional. Furnished
double room, all mod. cons., and large garden in quiet village.
£220 p.c.m., share bills. Tel.: 01367 241961.

Available from end of Oct.: large warm room in
Kingston Road available to rent, £64 p.w. inc. bills except
phone. Own w.c. and wash-basin, share kitchen and bathroom. All mod.
cons. provided. We are looking for a non-smoking woman who likes
animals. Tel.: Oxford 511499 (after 6.30 p.m.).

North Oxford: independent male graduate wanted to
share quiet, centrally-heated house facing Port Meadow and the
Thames. Rent £58 p.w. inc. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Accommodation Sought

Royal Society Visiting Fellow from People's Republic
of China needs 2-bedroom flat in Oxford, from Dec./Jan., for 5–6
months, when his wife and 6-year-old daughter join him. Rent less
than £400 p.c.m. Dr Shisong Jiang. Tel.: Oxford 222327 (day),
e-mail: jshisong@immsvr.jr2.ox.ac.uk.

New Zealand medical academic seeks 4-bedroom home to
house-mind, exchange, or rent for 1 year, Dec. 1995–Jan. 1997.
Careful tenants, keen to experience the pleasures of an English
garden. Dr Mark Thomas, Dept. of Molecular Medicine, University of
Auckland, New Zealand. Tel.: 00 64 9 6306229, fax: 00 64 9
3737492.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents
and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and
professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford
area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply
need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us.
Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.
n

Return to List of Contents of this section



Houses for Sale

Beautifully presented and individual 3-bedroom
detached house at Garsington (10 minutes' drive Oxford, easy access
M40/London); in quiet location with views to open countryside front
and rear; good decorative order; large lounge overlooking garden;
separate dining-room and kitchen overlook front garden; downstairs
cloakroom and access to adjoining garage; upstairs 3 bedrooms,
bathroom; gas c.h. Designed and built with interesting features for
present owners. £139,000 ONO. No chain; some flexibility
possible over completion date. Tel./fax: Oxford 735540.

Modern terrace house, Jericho: 2 double bedrooms,
large sitting-room, kitchen/breakfast room, bathroom, spacious
windowed attic; balcony overlooking attractive small garden; d.g.
thoughout and energy- efficient; ample bookshelving and other
features to accommodate academic requirements. £110,000. Dr
Cowan. Tel.: Oxford 56754.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Book Sale

Mallam's Book Sale, Fri. 17 Nov. Antiquarian and
modern books, bindings, prints, engravings, and folios. Maps and
related items. Entries are invited. All enquiries: Benjamin Lloyd.
Bocardo House, St Michael's Street, Oxford OX1 2EB.

Return to List of Contents of this section





<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette, 12 October 1995: Diary, 13 October<br /> - 31 October

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Seminars: places
should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office,
University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/3_4373.htm">Staff Development Programme
supplement.

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



Friday 13 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Chinese prints by Lui Haiming'
(special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
(2)78000.)

Return to List of Contents of this section



Saturday 14 October

MATRICULATION ceremony, Sheldonian (time to be announced).

DISCUSSION to mark the seventy-fifth anniversary of the admission
of women to degrees of the University (various speakers), St Anne's.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Sunday 15 October

THE REVD DR ALLAN DOIG preaches the Ramsden Sermon, St Mary's, 10
a.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Monday 16 October

OXFORD UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S STUDIES committee meeting, Old Bar,
Mansfield, 1 p.m. New members welcome.

JONATHON PORRITT: `New directions in the Green Movement'
(Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of
Geography, 4.30 p.m.

DR G. MCCRUM: `Gender and social inequality at Oxbridge', Lecture
Room 1, Department of Educational Studies, 5 p.m.

SIR DAVID PUTTNAM: `Hearts and minds—Europe, America, and the
birth of cinema' (public lecture series to mark the centenary of
European cinema: `Hearts and minds, myths and money—the struggle
for control of the world's film industry'), Schools, 5 p.m.

THE NAXI MUSICIANS from Yunnan Province, China (lecture-recital):
`Music from South of the Clouds', Rehearsal Hall, Music Faculty, 5
p.m.

PROFESSOR N. COOK: `The Sound of Money: the power of popular
music' (lecture series: `Music and power'), Schools, 5.15 p.m.

GILLIAN AVERY: `But what did children really read? An
informal survey from diaries and memoirs' (Friends of the Bodleian
thirty-minute lecture), Convocation House, Old Schools Quadrangle,
5.30 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Tuesday 17 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Islamic design', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.A. NICOLL: `Diversity of synaptic signalling in the
CNS' (Astor Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University Department of
Pharmacology, 4 p.m.

SOCIAL STUDIES Faculty Board election, 2 November (one official
member): nominations by six electors to be received at the University
Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. WINCH: `Mandeville, Rousseau, and the paradox in favour
of luxury' (Carlyle Lectures: `Secret concatenations: riches and
poverty, Mandeville to Malthus'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR EMERITUS L. DE VORSEY: `Native American maps of the
Columbian encounter' (Oxford Seminars in Cartography), Schola
Astronomiae et Rhetoricae, Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Wednesday 18 October

DR P. GOYINS: `Health services in Eastern Kivu: collaboration or
competition' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration:
`Responding to an emergency: the Rwanda case'), Library Wing Seminar
Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: `Some recent additions to the wine-
list', 5.45 p.m. (admission £2 per person).

Return to List of Contents of this section



Thursday 19 October

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Applications for funding from the new
research councils', 10.15 a.m. (see information
above
).

WOMEN TUTORS' GROUP meeting, Old Bar, Mansfield, 1 p.m.

DR S. MOKBEL-WENSLEY: `Women and the law in Lebanon' (Centre for
Cross-cultural Research on Women seminars: `Cross-cultural
perspectives on women and the law'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR ARTHUR MILLER (Cameron Mackintosh Professor of
Contemporary Theatre): `The language of theatre', Bernard Sunley
Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

DR A. YOUNG: `Perceiving social and physical environments' (Linacre
Lectures: `Mind, brain, and the environment'), Lecture Theatre A,
Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR T.D. BARNES: `Hagiography and Roman history' (Ronald
Syme Lecture), the Hall, Wolfson, 6 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


FRIDAY 20 OCTOBER

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Seventeenth-century European
painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

PROFESSOR ARTHUR MILLER (Cameron Mackintosh Professor of
Contemporary Theatre): masterclass (scenes from Death of a
Salesman
and All My Sons performed by ETC), Old
Fire Station, George Street, 2.30 p.m. (no charge, but limited
admission: tickets from Old Fire Station box office on production of
student card).

PROFESSOR P. GOODFELLOW: `Genetics of sex determination and
differentiation' (Herbert Spencer Lectures: `Gender and society'),
Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. NELSON: `Bad rulership in the earlier Middle Ages:
diagnoses and prescriptions' (Faculty of Modern History Special
Faculty Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR M. WEITZMANN: `William Tyndale, interpreter of the Hebrew
Bible' (Tyndale Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

SIR JOHN TEMPLETON: `Accelerating progress', Templeton, 5 p.m.
(those wishing to attend should telephone Oxford 735422).

SIR DAVID PUTTNAM: `Stars, genres, and the studio system' (public
lecture series to mark the centenary of European cinema: `Hearts and
minds, myths and money—the struggle for control of the world's
film industry'), Schools, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Saturday 21 October

DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Sunday 22 October

DR J. WRIGHT preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Monday 23 October

DR G. GANDY: `Transport and the environment: a lawyer's perspective'
(Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of
Geography, 4.30 p.m.

JUDGE RICHARD A. POSNER: `Hart v. Dworkin' (Clarendon Law
Lectures: `Law and legal theory in England and America'), Gulbenkian
Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. KERN HOLOMAN: `Propaganda à
l'Américaine
: the Paris Conservatory Orchestra during
World War I' (lecture series: `Music and power'), Schools, 5.15 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Tuesday 24 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Oriental ivories', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

PROFESSOR D. WINCH: `Adam Smith and the Oeconomy of Greatness'
(Carlyle Lectures: `Secret concatenations: riches and poverty,
Mandeville to Malthus'), Schools, 5 p.m.

JUDGE RICHARD A. POSNER: `Tort and contract law' (Clarendon Law
Lectures: `Law and legal theory in England and America'), Gulbenkian
Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Wednesday 25 October

JUDGE RICHARD A. POSNER: `A theory of legal culture' (Clarendon Law
Lectures: `Law and legal theory in England and America'), Gulbenkian
Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR F. RYNTJENS: `Was Rwanda a humanitarian or political
emergency?' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration:
`Responding to an emergency: the Rwanda case'), Library Wing Seminar
Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Thursday 26 October

DR M-B. DEMBOUR: `From female circumcision to genital mutilation: a
comparison of the law in France and Britain' (Centre for Cross-
cultural Research on Women seminars: `Cross-cultural perspectives on
women and the law'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 2 p.m.

SIR DAVID PUTTNAM: `Sleeping with the enemy? Coming to terms with
television' (public lecture series to mark the centenary of European
cinema: `Hearts and minds, myths and money—the struggle for
control of the world's film industry'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PENNY SILVA: `The new Dictionary of South African English on
Historical Principles
' (OED Forum), Rewley House,
5 p.m.

MRS S. QUASH: `The colourful life of Sir Henry Cole' (Oxford
Bibliographical Society lecture), Taylor Institution, 5.30 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Friday 27 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `English painted pottery', 1.15 p.m.
(Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

SIR DAVID PUTTNAM: `Myths and money' (public lecture series to
mark the centenary of European cinema: `Hearts and minds, myths and
money—the struggle for control of the world's film industry'),
Schools, 5 p.m.


Sunday 29 October

THE REVD DR CHRISTOPHER LAMB preaches, Exeter, 10 a.m.

REFUGEE STUDIES PROGRAMME conference opens: `The role of the
military in humanitarian emergencies' (until 31 October
. For details tel.: Oxford (2)70728).

Return to List of Contents of this section



Monday 30 October

DR K. THOMPSON: `Predicting plant dispersal in response to climate
change' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre,
School of Geography, 4.30 p.m.

THE REVD PROFESSOR HENRY CHADWICK: `The power of music' (lecture
series: `Music and power'), Schools, 5.15 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Tuesday 31 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Some saints for All Saints Day', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. WINCH: `Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and factious
citizens' (Carlyle Lectures: `Secret concatenations: riches and
poverty, Mandeville to Malthus'), Schools, 5 p.m.

JANUSZ plays works by Chopin, Rachmaninov, Brahms, and Liszt,
Wolfson, 8.30 p.m. (tickets from Common Room Secretary, Wolfson, and
Blackwell's Music Shop; proceeds to African Medical and Research
Foundation).

Return to List of Contents of this section