10 October - No 4412

Oxford University Gazette

10 October 1996


 


The following supplement was published with this Gazette:
Scholarships and Prizes.

Note: Scholarships and Prizes are available separately. Each part of the supplement is over 100Kb in size. If you wish to consult it extensively, you may wish to download it to your own system.

 


University Health and Safety information

 


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University Acts

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL

1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

NICHOLAS FREDERICK BUNNIN, D.PHIL., Corpus Christi College

JAN CHRISTOPHER PALMOWSKI, D.PHIL., Christ Church

2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bunnin, N.F., MA status, D.Phil., Corpus Christi
Lea, S.M., MA, D.Phil., Linacre
Palmowski, J.C., MA status, D.Phil., Christ Church
Shin, H.S., MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., Nuffield
Sinton, V.M., MA, Wycliffe Hall
Tomlin, G.S., MA, Wycliffe Hall
Wilkinson, I.B., BM, MA, Hertford

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CONGREGATION 8 October

1 Oration by the Vice-Chancellor

Mr Vice-Chancellor addressed the House.

¶ The text of the Oration will shortly be published as a Supplement to the Gazette.

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2 Admission of Pro-Vice- Chancellors

The following persons were nominated by the Vice- Chancellor to be his deputies for the year 1996–7 and were admitted to office:

C.R. LUCAS, MA, D.PHIL., Master of Balliol College

PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD SOUTHWOOD, MA, D.SC., Fellow of Merton College

SIR ANTHONY KENNY, MA, D.PHIL., D.LITT., HON. DCL, Warden of Rhodes House

SIR KEITH THOMAS, MA, President of Corpus Christi

THE RT. HON. THE LORD DAHRENDORF, MA, Warden of St Antony's College

W. HAYES, MA, D.PHIL., President of St John's College

THE REVD E.W. NICHOLSON, DD, Provost of Oriel College

R.C. REPP, MA, D.PHIL., Master of St Cross College

PROFESSOR A.S. GOUDIE, MA, Fellow of Hertford College

E.M. LLEWELLYN-SMITH, CB, MA, Principal of St Hilda's College

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3 Admission of Clerks of the Market

M.G. BROCK, CBE, MA, Honorary Fellow of Corpus Christi, Nuffield, and Wolfson Colleges, nominated by the Chancellor, and SIR JOHN HABAKKUK, MA, Fellow of All Souls College and Honorary Fellow of Jesus College, nominated by the Vice-Chancellor, were admitted to office as Clerks of the Market for the year 1996–7.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 25 October, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 15 October

Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the preambles adopted and the special resolutions carried without a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11 (Statutes, 1995, p. 8).

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CONGREGATION 5 November 2 p.m.

1 Presentation of Vice- Chancellor's Oration

The Oration delivered by Mr Vice-Chancellor on 8 October will be presented and may be discussed.

¶ The text of the Oration will shortly be published as a Supplement to the Gazette. Unless at least two members of Congregation have severally or jointly given notice in writing to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 28 October, that they wish to discuss or to ask a question about the Oration under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect XI, cl. 4 (Statutes, 1995, p. 18; Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 1091), or unless the meeting on 5 November is required to deal with other business, Mr Vice-Chancellor will cancel the meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. III, cl. 11 (Statutes, 1995, p. 8; Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 1083).

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2 Voting on Special Resolution allocating a site

Explanatory note to Special Resolution

Following the recommendations of a committee chaired by Sir Claus Moser in 1988, Congregation passed a resolution in December 1990 (Gazette, vol. cxxi, p. 384) approving a major expansion of Management Studies in Oxford. The School of Management Studies was established in 1992 and the first Director of the School, Dr Clark Brundin, was appointed in October 1992. Since then the University has been actively implementing the plan. Three professors and twenty university lecturers have been appointed, associated with sixteen colleges. A new joint undergraduate honours course with Economics has been introduced, a postgraduate research programme in Management Studies is being developed, and the MBA commences this term. The munificent benefaction offered by Mr Wafic Said will enable the University to provide the facilities which are now urgently needed. Council and the General Board seek Congregation's approval for the provision of the necessary site.

The special resolution below releases for this purpose part of the Mansfield Road sports ground and provides for the transfer of approximately 2.1 acres, being the western part of the sports ground, to the Wafic Rida Said Business School Foundation if planning consent for the building is secured. This area will accommodate a building of some 12,500 sq.m., which is sufficient to meet the present needs and planned development of the school. In recommending this allocation the Buildings Committee noted that the remainder of the sports ground would be big enough to continue to provide some of the sports facilities now available on the site; this aspect of the proposals is considered further below in the section headed `Sports facilities'.

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Plans for the development of Management Studies

The 1990 plans for the expansion of Management Studies envisaged the introduction of an MBA course with up to 300 students, an expansion in the numbers taking the highly successful courses in Engineering or Materials, Economics, and Management, the introduction of a new Joint Honour School of Economics and Management, consolidation of existing graduate courses in Management, and, with Templeton College, a substantial development of post-experience programmes. Postgraduate activities, including the MBA, would be accommodated on the Templeton site and undergraduate activities in the centre of Oxford. It was clear that significant external funding of between £35m and £40m would be required to support this expansion.

Since Congregation agreed these plans, and as staff have been recruited to the school, the scheme has evolved. The main change is the decision that postgraduate as well as undergraduate facilities should be in the centre of Oxford (see below). While this has slightly increased the building costs, which have risen also as a consequence of inflation, the total cost of the development has changed little, £20m being required for the building and £20m for the endowment of posts. That was the target set as part of the Campaign for Oxford, shortly after Congregation's decision in 1990.

Of the fifty or so faculty members then judged to be needed to support the full plans for the school, about half are now in post. The Honour School of Economics and Management has enjoyed much success, and is currently one of the University's most oversubscribed courses. The first cohort of MBA students has been admitted: again recruitment is buoyant, and forty-nine students, associated with twenty colleges and all with first-rate academic backgrounds, have taken up places against the target of forty. Eighty places will be offered next year. Teaching for the MBA will take place in the school's temporary accommodation in the Radcliffe Infirmary, where an MBA teaching centre with its own IT and library and information facilities has been established.

In addition to teaching, a primary objective behind establishing the school has been to undertake research of international distinction. The school is introducing a new doctoral programme which will prepare students in Management Studies for academic positions in the top business schools. It is creating substantial research centres in the fields of international business and the management of technological innovation. These will be interdisciplinary and will be organised in conjunction with several other faculties in Oxford, embracing, for example, Economics, Politics, Science, and Engineering.

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The benefaction

Mr Wafic Rida Said is already a substantial benefactor of the University, as is his wife; both are members of the Chancellor's Court of Benefactors. Mr Said has now pledged £20m for the Said Business School. £18m of Mr Said's donation is to be used for a new building. The balance of £2m is to be used to form the nucleus of an endowment for use by the new foundation which it is proposed to establish (see below) for development purposes, including the augmentation of the salaries of those holding senior academic appointments in the school, an arrangement considered necessary to ensure the world-class standing of the school. The school will be renamed the Said Business School but it is not proposed to change the titles of existing courses in Management Studies or of academic posts in the school, and the academic focus of the school will be unchanged. Mr Said has made clear that his benefaction would be available only for Management Studies, reflecting his strongly held view that for the improvement of Britain's economic performance there needs to be both a genuine partnership between business and universities, and a new style of business school. He sees the proposals agreed by Congregation in 1990 as an opportunity to create such a school, and supports the University's aim of establishing Management Studies as an academic subject fully integrated into its structure, and involving the same intellectual challenges as any other applied academic discipline. The school will train those who will be the leaders of major companies and public bodies in Britain and overseas, and students, whatever their discipline or career intentions, will find Management Studies both rigorous and challenging.

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Matching funds

As stated above, the costs of realising the 1990 plans for Management Studies were from the outset estimated to be in the region of £40m. Mr Said's benefaction has been offered on the basis that the University will be successful in its aim to raise the remaining £20m, of which £2m is represented by the value of the site. The benefactor has not required the University to raise any more money than envisaged but has set a specific timetable for doing it. Some concern has been expressed about the so-called matching funding, and it is important for Congregation to be clear what this means. The University has made considerable progress in meeting the target set in 1990, in that £8m has already been raised. This includes endowments for the Peter Moores Directorship, the Peter Moores Professorship, two Rhodes Lecturerships, the American Standard Companies Professorship, The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company Professorship, and one other professorship, details of which are still being finalised. Taking account of the value of the site therefore, £10m of the £20m required has already been secured.

It is a condition of the benefaction that £2m of the outstanding £10m must be available by the completion of the building, and the remaining £8m within a further five years from that date. There is every confidence that this will be achieved. If by the completion of the building the University has not raised the whole of the £8m it will be expected to make available the income which would have been generated by the missing sum until such time as the full balance is raised, a level of provision which in any case was planned under the original proposals. No guarantee can be given that this will not have to be done, but Council is confident that, following the publication of Mr Said's benefaction, the remaining endowment will be secured. Mr Said has no objection to particular parts of the building being named after other donors, and it is expected that a significant level of outside funding can be raised in this way.

As regards the recurrent finances of the project, when the development of the subject was approved by Congregation in 1990 it was on the basis that, in the steady state, an annual surplus would be generated. Since then the General Board has continued to fund all undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, with some increase in provision in recognition of growth in undergraduate and graduate student numbers. The MBA will, as originally planned, be self-funding. Cautious projections were prepared in Trinity Term 1996 which did not take account of the effect of the proposed benefaction and were in various respects pessimistic. These show that, allowing for an overhead paid to the University which should reach some £300K per annum in a steady state (equivalent to the estimated running costs of the proposed new building), the MBA will be making an annual surplus by 1997–8 and should pay off all accumulated start-up costs both on the MBA account and on the school generally by 2004–5 at the latest. These figures do not take account of any of the benefits of income from the endowment of further posts. Neither the introduction of the MBA and the consequential expansion of the school, nor the running of the new building, will in the longer term be a call on university funds.

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The foundation

The benefaction entails the establishment of the Wafic Rida Said Business School Foundation. The trustees of the foundation are the Vice-Chancellor as chairman, three university representatives appointed by him (who are at present the Master of Balliol, Dr Brundin, and Sir Bruce MacPhail as chairman of the Council of the School of Management Studies), the benefactor, and five trustees appointed by Mr Said, subject to the Vice-Chancellor's approval. The latter are Lord Alexander of Weedon (chairman of the NatWest Group of Companies), Mr Robert Genillard (a Swiss financier and industrialist), Professor William Pounds (formerly Dean of the Sloan School of Management, MIT), Sir Charles Powell (Director of Jardine Matheson), and Ms Catherine Roe (Director of the Karim Rida Said Foundation).

Under the agreement with Mr Said the foundation's approval (such approval not to be unreasonably withheld) will be required for the appointment of Directors of the school. The foundation has wholeheartedly endorsed the recent decision of the electoral board for the Peter Moores Directorship of the School and Professorship of Management Studies to offer the appointment to Professor John Kay. Professor Kay, whose appointment was recently announced, will take up the directorship, with a fellowship of St Edmund Hall, on 1 January 1997. He is currently chairman of London Economics and Visiting Professor at the London Business School.

The building

The building is to be constructed by, and remain the property of, the foundation. It is proposed that the site be transferred to the foundation as part of the matching funding for the project, but there will be covenants attached to the transfer which will prevent the foundation from using the site for other than university purposes and which will require the foundation to sell the property back to the University, and the University to buy it, if the building is no longer required for Management Studies or some other purpose agreed between the University and the foundation. The building will be managed and maintained in the same way as any other university building. The architects have been selected following an international competition organised by the foundation and on the advice of a panel of assessors (including Lord Rothschild, Sir Philip Powell, Mr Colin Amery, and Dr Brundin), a selection process in which the Vice-Chancellor, the Master of Balliol, and the President of Magdalen (as a member, with the Vice-Chancellor, of the foundation's buildings committee) have participated; representatives of the school have also been fully involved. The firm selected is Jeremy Dixon and Edward Jones.

In commissioning a designer there has been no presumption that the allocation of the site would be a formality on the part of either the University or the City Planning Authority. It was judged, however, that a necessary condition for the allocation of the site would be a design for a building worthy of the architectural heritage of the University and the city and fully appropriate for such a sensitive site. The designs are continuing to undergo refinement and will be exhibited, for comment by members of the University, the City Council, and the general public, in the fortnight preceding the meeting of Congregation.

The site

The decision to concentrate the activities of the school in central Oxford, as strongly recommended by the first director (Dr Brundin) and supported by the academic staff and others concerned, has been reflected in the arrangements for temporary accommodation, first in offices in St Giles' and now in converted space in the Radcliffe Infirmary. The wishes of the benefactor that the building for Management Studies should be on a significant and central site thus complemented the process of planning which had gone on over the previous four or five years. As a result, on the one hand, of the reappraisal of the MBA and the implications this has had for the profile of the school and, on the other, of the wishes of the benefactor, the viability of a number of alternative sites was explored. These included:

(athe Radcliffe Infirmary site. This was initially the preferred site, but prospects of acquiring it were uncertain and have increasingly become so, and in any case acquisition would be at a date too far into the future to be appropriate. It was thought also that the scale and flexibility of that site offered opportunities for a whole range of disciplines (including scientific laboratories, which would not be permitted on the Mansfield Road site) which should not be pre-empted by a development for Management Studies;

(bthe former Wolsey Hall site, which the University had attempted unsuccessfully to purchase in 1989. This was considered on the untested assumption that the University would be able to acquire it; however, it was found to offer insufficient space for the erection of the desired new building;

(c2–4 South Parks Road, which, if St Mary's Vicarage could be acquired, would have been sufficient, at least for a first phase of development, but which had been earmarked for a considerable time for development for the sciences;

(da number of sites which might have been available in association with colleges. All of these, however, for one reason or another lacked sufficient space or a suitable environment for a purpose-built building of the scale and architectural significance required; and

(ethe Mansfield Road sports ground, which, however, had long been assumed destined to remain an open space.

As Congregation will be aware, a working party chaired by the Master of Balliol is currently reviewing all the University's sites. However, in view of the timing of the benefaction and the need to meet the development requirements of Management Studies as agreed in 1990, it has been necessary to consider a site in advance of the report of the working party. Following review of the sites in (a)–(e) above, it has been concluded that, notwithstanding evident difficulties, the Mansfield Road sports ground is the only site which could accommodate a building on the scale required for existing and planned academic developments. If additional growth were needed at a later stage, the University would be obliged to use its best endeavours to secure a nearby site, although such a need seems unlikely in the foreseeable future. The Mansfield Road site has the additional advantage of being in close proximity to the St Cross site, where further development for the Social Studies Faculty, which includes a number of disciplines closely linked with Management Studies, is in train.

The Mansfield Road sports ground is part of a site purchased by the University from Merton College in 1964 primarily for the extension of the Science Area. At the time of purchase it was planned to build on the northern section (now occupied by Zoology/Psychology, Virology, and more recently Pharmacology) and to retain the southern portion as a playing field or green space. The purchase followed a report by Sir William Holford, who had been commissioned by the University, at the suggestion of Merton, to advise on how the needs of the University's science departments over the next twenty or more years could best be met. After consultation with all interests concerned, Sir William recommended that the University should seek to acquire from Merton the houses in South Parks Road and the playing fields, and that after building and boundary lines had been settled the remainder of Merton Playing Fields should be included in the University Parks. Sir William rejected the argument that the whole of Merton Playing Fields should be held in reserve for future science buildings, saying that he believed the remainder of the playing fields should be kept in perpetuity as open space: `The preservation of open space here would have practical as well as aesthetic compensations, in relation to such matters as density, give-and-take improvements to present boundaries, and the nature of future development to the west and south of it' (Supplement (4) to Gazette No. 3157, 23 May 1963, p. 1257).

The city welcomed the Holford recommendations in May 1963, and though the whole of the playing fields had been designated for university use, it was made clear to the City Architect that the University proposed to work to the Holford recommendations and to limit development to the area north of the `Holford line'.

The matter was debated in Congregation on 18 June 1963 on the basis of a resolution that Council should be instructed to enter into negotiations with Merton College on the understanding that the southern part of Merton Playing Fields would be included in the University Parks, a resolution which was accepted. In 1965, in the context of a discussion in Congregation about a possible scheme for an underground car park under Merton Playing Fields, the undertakings into which the University had entered following on from the Holford Report were firmly reiterated (see Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 3271, 4 April 1966, p. 893) and endorsed.

Some thirty years on, however, circumstances have changed. The northern section is now full, apart from a small site currently reserved for the Brain and Behaviour Project and the future redevelopment of the Halifax House site, now used by the University Club. The University has decided to develop Management Studies, perhaps its most significant academic development since the decisions of the 1930s and 1940s to develop Clinical Medicine, but cannot do so without significant external funding. The combination of academic development and the opportunity provided by the benefaction has required a re-examination of the decisions of thirty years ago. Clearly a decision to develop the playing field (subject to planning permission) should not be taken lightly. Although there are no legally binding conditions restricting or preventing the future development, Council and the General Board recognise that when Merton agreed to sell the site to the University it did so in the knowledge that Congregation had agreed to the purchase on the clear and explicit understanding that the southern part of the field would remain open space. It is acknowledged that Merton's reluctant decision to part with the land was taken in the University's interest in order to permit rational development of the Science Area and as part of a package involving in addition the original site of St Cross College, the premises now occupied by Linacre College, and a donation by the college towards the new graduate colleges, which together represented a major act of generosity towards the University.

Inevitably the choice of the Mansfield Road site raises substantial concerns. That site is proposed because it provides adequate space, because it is central, and because its physical characteristics enable a design of the kind envisaged by the benefactor to be realised. Council and the General Board have been persuaded by these arguments. They are conscious also, however, of the sensitivity of the site and, of course, of the concerns which members of Congregation and in due course, if the site is allocated, the City Council, with which there will be full and detailed consultation, will have with regard to the loss of open space. However, Council and the General Board are encouraged by the `green' aspects of the architects' drawings. The architects themselves have in their proposal made a commitment to `give a garden back to Oxford'.

Sports facilities

The construction of the new Business School building will entail the demolition of the Mansfield Road pavilion and the loss of about half the playing area. The space remaining after allowance for the new building will be sufficient for the replacement of the existing tennis courts and changing facilities and for one football pitch. Discussions, which were initiated as soon as the constraints of confidentiality were lifted, are continuing to be held with the Committee for the University Club and other interested parties on the reprovision of the sports facilities which will be lost. Much very understandable concern has been expressed by members of the club at the prospective loss of existing facilities. The University is fully committed to the provision of sports facilities for its staff and sees this as an opportunity to address the whole issue of club facilities with which it has been concerned for many years. It aims to ensure that the club can provide better social facilities than at present. The proposals of the club's management committee for replacement of a club building and sports facilities are being actively pursued along with other options.

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Summary

Congregation supported proposals for the establishment of a business school in Oxford in 1990, and since then the School of Management Studies has been actively implementing those proposals. There is every prospect that a school of international distinction can be established which will make a substantial academic and financial contribution to the wider University. The successful completion of that process depends on the availability of appropriate infrastructure, and in particular a building. The benefaction from Mr Said provides the University with a unique opportunity for realising its plans in full. Council and the General Board have not forgotten the view which Congregation took in 1963 on the use of the site, and they accept that they are now inviting Congregation to take a different view. They would not have proposed the development of this site for a small-scale project or for an inadequately designed building. However, for the development of a major new academic activity where the generosity of a benefactor makes it possible to provide a building worthy of the site, it seems to Council and the General Board that the proposal is justified.

In the light of the above, Council and the General Board ask Congregation to approve the following special resolution.

Note. The following was published in the Gazette of 17 October: The beginning of the special resolution set out below includes words which have been added to the original version published on 10 October, Council having withdrawn the latter and substituted the following resolution in its place. The reason for this is that Council considers on further reflection that the resolution should state expressly that the relevant decision taken by Congregation on the Holford Report in 1963, and endorsed by Congregation in 1966, was based on an understanding which should no longer have effect. The phrase `part of the Mansfield Road sports ground' has accordingly been deleted and the following words have been substituted: `, notwithstanding that Congregation authorised the purchase of what is now the Mansfield Road sports ground on the understanding that it should remain undeveloped, part of that land'.

Text of Special Resolution

That, notwithstanding that Congregation authorised the purchase of what is now the Mansfield Road sports ground on the understanding that it should remain undeveloped, part of that land be released for the development of the University's Business School and for that purpose a site of 2.1 acres, comprising the western part of the Mansfield Road sports ground, be transferred to the Wafic Rida Said Business School Foundation for the construction of a building for the school if planning consent for the building is given.

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Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    DEPARTMENT OF APPLIED SOCIAL STUDIES AND SOCIAL RESEARCH

    On the recommendation of the Social Studies Board, the General Board has appointed J. PARKER, MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall and University Lecturer in Social Administration, as deputy for S. Ringen, MA, Fellow of Green College and Professor of Sociology and Social Policy, as Director of the Department of Applied Social Studies and Social Research for Michaelmas Term 1996, during which Professor Ringen has been granted sabbatical leave.

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    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

    On the recommendation of the Visitors of the Ashmolean Museum, the General Board has appointed O.R. IMPEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Green College and Reader in Eastern Art, as deputy for J.W. Allan, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of St Cross College and Professor of Eastern Art, as Acting Keeper of the Department of Eastern Art for the period from 30 September 1996 to 27 April 1997, during which Professor Allan has been granted sabbatical leave.

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    REVIEW OF THE COMPUTING SERVICES

    Under its programme of regular reviews the General Board has established a committee, chaired by Dr N.M.J. Woodhouse, to review the Computing Services. Its terms of reference are: to review all aspects of the organisation of the OUCS, the range of services that it offers, and the level of staff resources allocated to them; to consider the advantages and disadvantages of providing services through the OUCS, and assess the relative priority that should be assigned to these services; in the light of these considerations, and of likely relevant developments, to propose the optimum staffing levels for the OUCS and the most efficient funding mechanism for services that should continue to be provided by the OUCS; to consider mechanisms by which any proposals to reduce staffing levels or to transfer responsibility for services away from the OUCS can be implemented in a way which minimises the impact on the staff concerned and on the users of its services; to consider any other matter which the committee considers to be relevant to these terms of reference; and to report to the General Board by Hilary Term 1997.

    The committee would welcome comments from those who use the Computing Services and those who work in it. At the committee's request the OUCS has provided a statement of the issues it considers relevant to the review. Individuals who wish to respond in detail may find it helpful to see this paper, copies of which are obtainable from the Secretary to the Review Committee, Catherine Godman. It can also be consulted on-line at http://info.ox.ac.uk/oucs/internal/issues.html.

    Comments should be sent either to Catherine Godman, University Offices, Wellington Square, or to Dr Woodhouse, Wadham College, no later than Monday, 11 November.

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    NEW OLIS

    The University's Library System

    OLIS, the integrated library system offering on-line cataloguing, circulation, acquisitions and periodicals registration, has been transferred over the past year from DOBIS/LIBIS running on IBM hardware to Geac ADVANCE running on a Sun SPARC Centre 2000E. The new system provides readers with more versatile, precise and powerful ways in which to search the on-line catalogue. It is now possible to search the entire machine-readable database or to restrict searches to the holdings of a particular library. Searches can be readily composed using combinations of author, title, and subject terms. Previous searches can be reviewed and refined. On-line help messages are provided. Deficiencies in the display of certain diacritics and special characters on the OPAC will be addressed during the next month. It should be noted that these are not a result of errors in cataloguing.

    Selection of the new system was based not only on the need to provide improved facilities for readers but also to conform more closely to the University's IT strategy. Geac ADVANCE is an open system which will run on any Unix platform. It conforms to a wide variety of international standards and is following a development path towards a fully client–server architecture.

    The first of Geac's client products, GeoCat, has undergone intensive development and refinement during 1996 and will come into operation during Michaelmas term. It is anticipated that GeoPAC, which will provide readers with a graphical user interface to the catalogue, will be ready for distribution throughout the University's libraries early in 1997. Details of how individual members of the University can download GeoPAC for personal use will be posted on the Web at http://www.lib.ox.ac.uk/olis/ later this term. Any use of GeoPAC (which runs under Windows 95 and Windows NT) must be regarded as experimental at this stage. It will not be possible to provide support for anyone choosing to use GeoPAC until after its general release in 1997. It is also planned to provide access to the catalogue using GeoWeb. Information on how to make remote connections to the OPAC using GeoWeb or other options will be posted at http://www.lib.ox.ac.uk/olis/ as they become available.

    Seventy-two Oxford libraries now catalogue onto OLIS. See below for a complete list of member libraries with information about when they began cataloguing and whether they also use the Acquisitions Circulation or Periodical registration modules.

    OLIS is a union catalogue which contains cataloguing information (i.e. bibliographic records) from all of the member libraries. This enables a reader to search for any book held in any OLIS member library from any terminal or microcomputer connected to OLIS. Copy information (i.e. shelfmark) which is specific to a particular library has been separated so that when searching for a book, you will first be shown the copy information for the items held in the library where you are conducting your search. If there are copies in other libraries, for which there is information in the OLIS catalogue, you will be given the chance to see the information about them. It will still be necessary to check other catalogues in the libraries concerned to find information about holdings not yet catalogued on OLIS. In common with most other academic libraries in the UK, the catalogue can be searched from any terminal capable of connection to the JANET network.

    Retrospective conversion of card and other catalogues into machine readable form so that they can be interrogated on-line was recognised by the University as a major priority and is an integral part of the University's IT strategy. The OLIS catalogue now has over three million copies attached to over two million individual titles. The Bodleian Library's Pre-1920 catalogue comprising 1.2 million titles has been available on CD-ROM since January 1994. This catalogue represents the culmination of a project commenced in 1966 by John Jolliffe, Bodley's Librarian from 1982 to 1985.

    The University is funding the conversion of records in the Bodleian Guard book catalogues, and in the card catalogues of Bodleian dependent libraries. This project, using services provided by OCLC, will be completed within the next three years. Over 500,000 records are currently being added to the OLIS database each year.

    A similar project to convert the remaining printed catalogues in the Taylorian has just commenced. A project to produce machine readable records for early printed books from the Inter-Collegiate Catalogue has been founded by HEFCE and these records will shortly appear on OLIS. Details on the project are available at http://www.lib.ox.ac.uk/icc/.

    On-line circulation (issuing, reservations, and fines) has been introduced into twenty OLIS libraries. This allows readers registered in these libraries to find out what they have on loan and to place reservations from any terminal. On-line acquisitions allows a reader to find out when a book has been ordered and received by one of the thirty-three libraries now using the Acquisitions module. Six libraries are now using the periodicals registration module. This allows readers to find out when a specific issue of a journal has been received or declared missing.

    Searching the OPAC (On-line Public Access Catalogue) allows you to access the items catalogued by any of these seventy-two libraries. Information about all OLIS libraries, their holdings, opening hours and admission procedures can be found at http://www.lib.ox.ac.uk/libraries/.

    The on-line catalogue is designed so that it can be used easily, but guidance in how to use it is also provided. Explanatory leaflets about basic searching procedures and remote connection to OLIS have been distributed to all new graduates and undergraduates and are available in any OLIS library or from the Libraries Automation Service (e- mail: Stephen.Eyres@las.ox.ac.uk). Library staff are able to show readers how to use the on-line catalogue and give advice on how to search the catalogue. Assistance with problems is also provided by an On-line Catalogue Help Desk (telephone: (2)77163), staffed by members of the Bodleian Library Cataloguing Division. This is located in the Lower Reading Room of the Bodleian Library.

     


    OLIS Member Libraries

      (1) (2) (3) (4)
    All Souls College 2/90      
    Ashmolean 6/90   8/91  
    Balfour Library (Pitt Rivers) 11/93   8/95  
    Balliol College   9/89   8/91
    Biochemistry Department 7/94      
    Bodleian 9/88   8/92  
    Bodleian Japanese Library 1/88 10/94 8/93  
    Bodleian Law Library 9/88   8/92  
    Brasenose College 8/93      
    Clarendon Laboratory 1/93 10/95    
    Classics Lending 10/92 4/94    
    Computing Laboratory 6/90 10/94    
    Corpus Christi College 8/89 10/92 8/90 1/95
    Criminological Research 2/95      
    Earth Sciences 2/92   8/93 1/95
    Educational Studies 3/91 8/95 8/95  
    Engineering Science 2/91      
    English Faculty 1/89 4/90 8/91  
    Experimental Psychology 6/90 10/92    
    Geography 1/90 1/95 8/91  
    History Faculty 5/91      
    History of Art 1/92   8/93  
    History of Science 2/96      
    Hooke 1/89 10/89 10/92  
    Indian Institute 9/88   8/92  
    Institute of Economics and Statistics 1/90      
    Jesus College 8/92      
    Keble College 1/93      
    Kellogg College/
    Continuing Education
    9/92      
    Lady Margaret Hall 7/92   10/93  
    Latin American Centre 1/91   11/91  
    Lincoln College 1/92 10/94    
    Magdalen College 1/93      
    Maison Française 1/91      
    Materials Department 1/93 10/95    
    Mathematical Institute 5/90      
    Middle East Centre 1/91   11/91  
    Modern Languages Faculty 1/88 4/90 9/92  
    Music Faculty 6/90      
    New College 9/89      
    Nuffield College 9/89 10/94 8/90 1/93
    Oriental Institute 1/88   8/92  

    Chinese Studies

    1/88   8/92  

    Eastern Art

    1/88   8/92  
    Philosophy 11/90 4/95 9/92  
    Physics (Astro, Nuclear) 1/93      
    Physiology Departmental 6/90      
    Plant Sciences 1/90 10/93    
    Queen Elizabeth House 1/90 10/92 8/91 1/95
    Queen's College 2/92      
    Radcliffe Science 9/88   1/91 1/93
    Rhodes House Library 9/88   8/92  
    St Anne's College 1/91   9/92  
    St Antony's College 1/91   12/91  
    St Cross College 10/93      
    St Edmund Hall 1/92      
    St Hugh's College 7/95      
    St John's College 1/95      
    St Peter's College 10/93   9/94  
    School of Management Studies 4/96 10/96 10/96  
    Social and Cultural Anthropology 1/92      
    Social Studies 1/89 1/90 8/91 1/95
    Socio-Legal Studies 7/94      
    Staff Library 9/89   1/93  
    Taylor Institution 9/88      
    Theology 1/90 10/94    
    Trinity College 4/92      
    University Museum 1/91      
    Wadham College 4/92      
    Wellcome Institute 10/93      
    Wolfson College 7/90   8/92  
    Zoology 1/90      

    Alexander

    1/90      

    Elton

    1/90      

    Key

    (1) Cataloguing
    (2) Circulation
    (3) Acquisitions
    (4) Periodicals registration

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    CIRCULATION OF FLYSHEETS

    Ten or more members of Congregation may arrange to have a flysheet circulated with the Gazette (a) on matters before Congregation, or Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or (b) relating to matters of general interest to the University, subject to the following general conditions:

     

    (i) no flysheet will be circulated which in the opinion of the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors might be defamatory or otherwise illegal;

     

    (ii) the right is reserved on behalf of the University and its employees, without prior consultation with the signatories, to publish an apology in respect of any statement in a flysheet which is complained of as defamatory or otherwise illegal (whether or not the statement can be shown to be true);

    (iii) the signatories shall jointly and severally indemnify the University and its employees against any costs or damages payable in respect of their flysheet and, unless a Queen's Counsel (to be mutually agreed on by the signatories and the University) shall advise within four months of the making of any claim in respect of a flysheet that any proceedings could be contested with the probability of success, such damages shall include any sum paid by the University in settlement of any claim arising out of the flysheet;

     

    (iv) the flysheet shall consist of one leaf only (though text may appear on both sides of the leaf); the text shall include the name and college or department of each of the signatories;

     

    (v) a copy of the text of the flysheet shall be delivered to the Registrar before 10 a.m. on the Monday of the week in which circulation is desired; it shall be accompanied by an indemnity in accordance with condition (iii) above drawn up on a form obtainable from the Registrar and signed by each of the signatories of the flysheet; the Registrar shall be informed at the same time which of the signatories is to be notified whether the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have authorised circulation;

     

    (vi) the Registrar shall arrange for the production by the University Press of copies of a flysheet the circulation of which has been duly authorised.

    Though every effort will be made to circulate on the day desired flysheets so received, it must be understood that this cannot be guaranteed.

    (a) Matters before Congregation or Convocation

    If the flysheet deals with a matter that is a formal agendum for Congregation, or for Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the production costs will be met from university funds.

    (b) Matters of general interest to the University

    If the flysheet deals with a matter that is not a formal agendum for Congregation or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the Vice-Chancellor will decide whether it is of sufficient general interest to warrant circulation with the Gazette; the production costs for such a flysheet will be the responsibility of the signatories.

    Oxford University Student Union

    The Executive and the Graduate Committee of the Oxford University Student Union may have flysheets circulated with the Gazette under the arrangements and subject to the conditions set out above, provided that:

     

    (1) the number of names to be included on the flysheet under condition (iv) shall be not less than a majority of the total number of members of the Executive or the Graduate Committee of OUSU, as the case may be, and each of the persons named shall sign the indemnity required under condition (v);

     

    (2) the maximum number of flysheets to be circulated as of right, whether on matters before Congregation (to be paid for by the University) or on matters of general interest to the University (to be paid for by OUSU and to be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's decision as prescribed under (b) above) shall be three per term for each of these bodies, save that the Vice-Chancellor shall have discretion to permit further flysheets.

    Subject to proviso (1) above, the Executive and the Graduate Committee of OUSU may also support flysheets signed by not less than ten members of Congregation.

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    UNIVERSITY CLUB

    Wine-tastings

    The following wine-tastings will be held at the University Club, 6/8 South Parks Road, at 5.45 p.m. on Tuesdays.

    All members and their guests are welcome the fee being £2 per person.

    22 Oct.: Recent additions to the wine list.

    10 Dec.: Wines for Christmas.

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    CONCERTS

    The Allegri String Quartet

    THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET will perform the following works at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Holywell Music Room.

    Tickets for the concerts cost £8 (£6 for OAP/unwaged; £4 for students), or £20 for all three concerts (£15; £10). Tickets may be obtained from Blackwell's Music Shop. Student tickets may also be obtained from the Music Faculty.

    The Quartet will hold open rehearsals in the Holywell Music Room from 2.30 to 5.30 p.m. approximately on the concert dates.

    23 Oct.: Haydn, Quartet in D, op. 76, no. 5; Smetana, Quartet no. 1 in E minor; Beethoven, Quartet in E flat, op. 127.

    6 Nov.: Haydn, Quartet in C, op. 76, no. 3; Bartók, Quartet no. 3; Beethoven, Quartet in B flat, op. 130.

    20 Nov.: Haydn, Quartet in E flat, op. 76, no. 6; Dvorák, Quartet No. 12 in F, op. 96; Beethoven, Quartet in C sharp minor, op. 131.

     


    St Anne's College

    JULIAN GALLANT will give a piano recital at 8.15 p.m. on Friday, 18 October, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College. The programme will include Bach: Italian Concerto, Granados: Goyascos or Los majos enamorados, and music by Scriabin and David Scott. Admission is free.

     


    St Johns' College and Colin Carr: chamber music concerts

    The following concerts will be given at 8.30 p.m. on the days shown in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.

    Admission will be by tickets, which will be free and available in advance.

    THE BORROMEO QUARTET
    Wed. 27 Nov.: Mozart, K428; Kirchner, No. 2 (1958); Schubert, Death and the Maiden.

    IMOGEN COOPER
    Fri. 7 Feb. 1997: Piano works by Schubert.

    THOMAS ZEHETMAIR and SILKA AVENHAUS
    Thur. 5 June 1997: Violin and piano works by Szymanowski, Ysaye, Bartók, and Schubert.

    COLIN CARR
    Thur. 19 June 1997: a programme including cello and piano works by Schubert and Britten.

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    BODLEIAN LIBRARY

    Bodleian Library Annual Report 1994–5

    The Bodleian Library Annual Report for 1994–5 has now been published, and is available on request from the Secretary of the Library, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG.

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    ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY TEACHERS

    The Association of University Teachers is both a professional association and a trade union, committed to the advancement of university education and research. At the national level, the AUT is the recognised union for academic and academic-related staff. Besides its concern for more general questions of university education and research, the AUT negotiates salary levels and conditions of employment with the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals.

    The Oxford branch of the AUT is open for membership to university and college employees, whether academic or academic-related. It has over 900 members. It is the official body with which the University discusses priorities and problems bearing on education and research, and negotiates solutions to them. Discussions between the Oxford AUT and university officers occur formally once per term at a meeting of a Joint Consultative Committee, but there are many other informal meetings to discuss particular problems, including those affecting the conditions of employment of academic and academic-related staff, such as the `waiver clause' for those employed on contract grants. The local AUT also provides confidential advice on problems relating to terms and conditions of employment.

    Application for membership and other enquiries can be made to Mrs Anne Hendry, Administrative Secretary, Oxford AUT, New Barnett House, 28 Little Clarendon Street, Oxford OX1 2HY (telephone and fax: (2)70418, e- mail: aut@vax.ox.ac.uk) (9.30 a.m.--3 p.m., Monday--Friday).

    Enquiries may also be directed to the following: Kit Bailey (Honorary Secretary), Department of Plant Sciences (telephone: (2)75090); Denis O'Driscoll, Department of Biochemistry (telephone: (2)75260); Arthur Marsh (Personal Cases), St Edmund Hall (telephone: (2)74170).

    General meetings of the Oxford AUT take place on Tuesday of third week in each term. The Michaelmas Term meeting will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 29 October, in the Garden Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles'. All AUT members and non-members will be welcome.

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    Lectures

    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue


    CARLYLE LECTURES 1996

    Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET, formerly of the University of Paris XII, will deliver the Carlyle Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

    15 Oct.: `Introduction—temporal power and spiritual power: their relationships.'

    22 Oct.: `Aspects of the political thought of St Paul. Political Augustinism and its repercussions in the fourteenth century.'

    29 Oct.: `The theological–political problem.'

    5 Nov.: `The Monarchy of Dante.'

    12 Nov.: ` (a) Sovereignty and citizenship in the political thought of Marsilius of Padua; (b) Marsilius of Padua and the Gospel.'

    19 Nov.: `Political thought during the reign of King Charles V of France and beyond: (a) the Book of Politics of Nicole Oresme; (b) the Dream of Vergier; (c) wisdom and power according to Christine de Pisan.'

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    CLARENDON LAW LECTURES

    Business Torts

    MR TONY WEIR, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, will deliver the second series of Clarendon Law Lectures in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building, as follows: Wednesday, 30 October, 5–7 p.m., and Thursday, 31 October, 5–5.50 p.m.

    The lectures take place under the auspices of the Oxford University Press and the Faculty of Law.

    The lectures are open to the public, and those wishing to attend are advised to arrive early.

     

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    NELLIE WALLACE LECTURES 1997–8

    Corrigendum

    PROFESSOR GIAN B. CONTE, Dipartimento di Filologia Classica, Università degli studi di Pisa, will deliver the Nellie Wallace Lectures for 1997–8 during Hilary Term 1998 on dates to be announced in due course.

    This replaces the notice published in the Gazette of 26 September (p. 14) which incorrectly stated that the lectures would be given in Trinity Term 1998.

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    ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

    Special Lecture

    PROFESSOR B.L. TURNER II, Professor of Geography, Clark University, Massachusetts, Director of the George Perkins Marsh Institute, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Friday, 18 October, in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

    Convener: M. Williams, MA, Professor of Geography.

     

    Subject: `Land use/cover change: research in global environmental change and sustainable development.'

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    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

    Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: the significance of kinship

    The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Fridays in the ISCA. Details of the 6 December seminar will be announced later.

    Conveners: Shirley Ardener, Tamara Dragadze, Robert Parkin, and Jonathan Webber.

    DR T. DRAGADZE, London
    18 Oct.: `Kinship and politics in the Caucasus.'

    PROFESSOR R.H. BARNES
    25 Oct.: `Alliance and identity in an Indonesian fishing village.'

    DR C. IFEKA, University College, London
    1 Nov.: `The production of power, kinship, and ethnicity in forest "warfare" on the Nigeria–Cameroon border.'

    PROFESSOR J. CLAMMER, Japan
    8 Nov.: `The racialisation of identity in south-east Asia: biology, cultural politics, and the invention of patriarchy in contemporary Singapore.'

    RABBI DR J. ROMAIN, Maidenhead
    15 Nov.: `The effect of mixed-faith marriages on family life and identity.'

    DR C. MACDONAUGH, Oxford Brookes
    22 Nov: `The limits of kinship: an aspect of Tharu identity in south-west Nepal.'

    DR J. LLOBERA, University College, London
    29 Nov.: `Aspects of Catalan kinship, identity, and nationalism.'

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    BIOLOGIAL SCIENCES

    Department of Plant Sciences

    The following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on the days shown in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences. They will take place on Thursdays, except for the seminars to be held on Wednesday, 13 November, and Wednesday, 20 November.

     

    Convener: J.A.C. Smith, MA, University Lecturer in Plant Science.

    Third-year graduate students
    17 Oct.: Talks on work-in-progress.

    DR M.M. CAMPBELL
    24 Oct.: `How do plants make xylem?'

    PROFESSOR M. FREELING, Berkeley
    31 Oct.: `Induction of the ligule in the primordial maize leaf.'

    PROFESSOR R.J.P. WILLIAMS
    7 Nov.: `A chemical approach to evolution.'

    PROFESSOR S.P. MCGRATH, Soil Science Department, IACR- Rothamsted
    13 Nov.: `Metals in soils: sources, impacts, and their removal.'

    DR S. SMEEKENS, Utrecht
    20 Nov.: `Genetic analysis of sugar sensing in plants.'

    DR A.E. OSOURN, John Innes Centre, Norwich
    28 Nov.: `Saponins and plant defence.'

    PROFESSOR A.D. HANSON, Florida
    5 Dec.: `Biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant DMSP: a tale of two pathways.'

     

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    The following lectures will be given on Thursday, 10 October, in the Anne Anderson Lecture Theatre, Level 3, the Women's Centre, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    MR R. SMITH, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School 2 p.m.: `HIV in obstetrics and gynaecology.'

    DR I. SARGENT
    3 p.m.: `Placental immunology.'

    MR S. KENNEDY, DR G. GAFFNEY, and DR J. ZAIDI
    4 p.m.: `Obstetric/gynaecology statistics for the Women's Centre.'

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    Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine: Division of Clinical Geratology

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Seminar Room, the Department of Clinical Geratology, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Convener: J. Grimley Evans, DM, Professor of Clinical Geratology.

    DR L.K. BOWKER
    9 Oct.: `Predicting futile resuscitation (CPR).'

    MR J. SALMON
    16 Oct.: `Chronic glaucoma.'

    DR N. QIZILBASH
    23 Oct.: `Update on the Memory Trials Research Group.'

    PROFESSOR GRIMLEY EVANS
    30 Oct.: `Ageing populations—what needs to be done?'

    DR J. ARMITAGE
    6 Nov.: `Lipids and cardiovascular disease in later life.'

    DR A. WILSON
    13 Nov.: `The impact of rural development on blood pressure in Zimbabwe.'

    MR CRANSTON
    20 Nov.: `Diagnosis and management of prostatic cancer.'

    DR J. DANESH
    27 Nov.: `Helicobacter Pylori and coronary heart disease.'

    DR N. QIZILBASH
    4 Dec.: `The effectiveness of tacrine for Alzheimer's disease.'

    DR Z. CHEN
    11 Dec.: `Aspirin for acute stroke: preliminary results from mega-trials.'

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    Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery: Clinical Research Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre of the department.

    Conveners: J. Kenwright, BM, MA, Nuffield Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, and M.J.O. Francis, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PROFESSOR N. CARTWRIGHT, LSE (Chairman)
    14 Oct.: Symposium on models in the biological and physical sciences.

    DR R. BAYSTON, City Hospital, Nottingham
    21 Oct.: `Adherence and exopolymer production in staphylococcal implant-related infection; discovery, confusion, resolution, and clinical significance.'

    MR J. CHURCH, consultant orthopaedic surgeon
    28 Oct.: `Larva therapy in the management of chronic wounds and deep infection.'

    PROFESSOR D. TAYLOR, Trinity College, Dublin
    11 Nov.: `Strategies for research and development in bioengineering.'

    DR A. FLANAGAN, St Mary's Hospital
    25 Nov.: `The generation of human osteoclasts.'

    PROFESSOR A. GOODSHIP
    9 Dec.: `Principles of fracture repair.'

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    Nuffield Department of Surgery

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    Convener: P.J. Morris, MA, Nuffield Professor of Surgery.

    R. LECHLER, Hammersmith Hospital, London
    15 Oct.: `The endogenous pathway of MHC class II antigen presentation.'

    N. JONES
    29 Oct.: `Adult tolerance induction in T cell receptor transgenic mice.'

    F. POWRIE
    5 Nov.: `Cytokines in inflammatory bowel disease.'

    M. WHITELEY
    12 Nov.: `Assessing the aorto-iliac segment.'

    G. AHRENDT, Johns Hopkins Medical School
    19 Nov.: `Colon anastomotic healing is impaired by sepsis.'

    A. FOX
    26 Nov.: `Current update of endovascular techniques for aneurysmal and occlusive vascular disease.'

    J. PERKINS
    3 Dec.: `Carotid stenosis and deep breathing.'

    N. YOUNG
    10 Dec.: `Killer cell inhibitory receptors.'

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    LAW, CENTRE FOR THE ADVANCED STUDY OF EUROPEAN AND COMPARATIVE LAW

    THE RT. HON. LORD MACKAY OF CLASHFERN, Lord High Chancellor, and H.E. MONSIEUR JACQUES TOUBON, Minister of Justice, France, will speak at 5 p.m. on Friday, 25 October, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `The importance of a European legal education.'

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    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

    Probability and Statistics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Department of Statistics.

    Convener: P. Clifford, MA, Reader in Mathematical Statistics.

    DR W.N. VENABLES, Adelaide
    17 Oct.: `Profiling likelihood functions.'

    DR L. BREYER, Queensland
    24 Oct.: `On conditioning diffusions for non-explosion.'

    DR J.E. KENNEDY
    31 Oct.: `Some aspects of interest rate pricing models.'

    DR S. MAYBANK, Reading
    7 Nov.: `Bearings only tracking in the plane.'

    DR E.B. MARTIN, Newcastle
    14 Nov.: `Neural networks—another tool in the toolbox.'

    PROFESSOR P.J. BROWN, Kent
    21 Nov.: `Pattern recognition with curves.'

    DR J. CARPENTER
    28 Nov.: `Test inversion bootstrap confidence intervals.'

    PROFESSOR X.-L. MENG, Chicago
    5 Dec.: `Inferences under uncongeniality: super-efficiency and inadmissibility.'

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    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    Seminar: French Literature from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

    Conveners: J. Mallinson (Trinity College), S. Pierse (Trinity College), and A. Charlton (New College).

    A. LEVI
    17 Oct.: `What was the querelle du Cid about?'

    G. KAHN
    31 Oct.: `Figaro par lui-même.'

    E. DUBOIS
    14 Nov.: `Jeanne Françoise de Chantal, épistolière: some thoughts on the genre of the lettre de direction.'

    N. HAMMOND, Cambridge
    28 Nov.: `Epistolary performances: Mme de Sévigné and the theatricality of discourse.'

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    Graduate Seminar in Spanish Studies

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Taylor Institution.

    Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and C.P. Thompson, MA, D.Phil., Faculty Lecturer in Spanish.

    THE REVD DR COLIN THOMPSON
    15 Oct.: `Lope de Vega as a conceptista poet.'

    DR N. GRIFFITHS, Birmingham
    22 Oct.: `Popular religious scepticism and idiosyncrasy in post-Tridentine Cuenca.'

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL
    5 Nov.: `The rediscovery of early Spanish literature.'

    DR D.G. PATTISON
    12 Nov.: `The theatricality of Celestina.'

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    MODERN HISTORY

    Germany in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in 70 Woodstock Road.

    Conveners: A.J. Nicholls, B.Phil., MA, Special (non-CUF) Lecturer in Modern History, and H.J.O. Pogge von Strandmann, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Modern History.

    DR P. GHOSH
    14 Oct.: `After Weber: an interpretation of the Second Reich.'

    DR G. ROBERTS, University College, Cork
    21 Oct.: `Soviet planning for the occupation of Germany, 1941–5.'

    PROFESSOR R.J. EVANS, Birkbeck College, London
    28 Oct.: `The Bailiff's Magic Rod: corporal punishment in nineteenth-century Germany.'

    PROFESSOR POGGE VON STRANDMANN
    4 Nov.: `Europe and Russia in 1922: a missed opportunity for reconstruction?'

    DR P. GRIEDER
    11 Nov.: `Communist high politics in East Germany, 1946–73.'

    L. O'KEEFE, formerly HM Ambassador to Prague
    18 Nov.: ` "When the walls came tumbling down", 1989–91.'

    MS L. HIRSCH, Stanford
    25 Nov.: `German cultural policies in occupied Poland during the First World War.'

    DR H. AFFLERBACH, Düsseldorf
    2 Dec.: `Kaiser Wilhelm II as supreme war-lord.'

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    Problems in the history of science and technology

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History of Science and Technology Seminar Room, the Modern History Faculty Building.

    Convener: R. Fox, MA, D.Phil., Professor of the History of Science.

    DR K.D. WATSON, Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, London
    17 Oct.: `Proof of poisoning: developments in forensic toxicology in nineteenth- century Britain.'

    MONSIEUR B. LELONG, Paris
    24 Oct.: `The translation of ion physics from Cambridge to Oxford: John Townsend and the Drapers' Company Electrical Laboratory, 1900–14.'

    DR A. PACEY, Open University
    31 Oct.: `China and India in the history of technology.'

    DR B. HARTLEY
    7 Nov.: `The living academies of Nature: scientific experiment in learning and communicating the new skills of early nineteenth-century landscape.'

    DR C. SMITH, Kent
    14 Nov.: `Reinventing origins: Lord Kelvin and the age of the Earth.'

    PROFESSOR J. PARR, Simon Fraser
    21 Nov.: `Engineering for excess: technologies designed for saturated markets.'

    MS A. SECORD, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Cambridge
    28 Nov.: `Observing differences: artisans, gentlemen, and the work of nineteenth- century botany.'

    DR A. CHAPMAN
    5 Dec.: ` "Lacking an independent fortune...": G.B. Airy and the beginning of professionalisation in British astronomy, 1828–81.'

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    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Seminar in Jewish–Muslim relations

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 45 St Giles'.

    Conveners: D. Frank (Ph.D. Harvard), R.L. Nettler (MA McGill), Fellows, Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, and A. Tanenbaum.

    DR G. BOS, University College, London
    21 Oct.: `Popular science and culture in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Palestine.'

    PROFESSOR J. LASSNER, Northwestern University
    4 Nov.: `The use of quotations from the Hebrew Bible in an anti-Islamic text from Ottoman Egypt.'

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    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Oxford Physics Colloquia

    The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Physics, and G.G. Ross, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Theoretical Physics.

    PROFESSOR H. WALTHER, Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching
    25 Oct.: `Quantum optics of a single atom.'

    PROFESSOR SIR M. BERRY, Bristol
    1 Nov.: `Chaos and classical limits.'

    PROFESSOR G. EFSTATHIOU
    15 Nov.: `Cobras samba.'

    DR C. EBERLEIN, Camridge
    22 Nov.: `Sonoluminescence as quantum vacuum radiation.'

    PROFESSOR L. EAVES, Nottingham
    29 Nov.: `Quantum chaology in semiconductor heterostructures.'

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    Geophysical and Nonlinear Fluid Dynamics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. With the exception of the seminar to be held at 11.15 a.m. on Tuesday, 22 October, they will take place at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays.

    Convener: P.L. Read, MA, University Lecturer in Physics.

    DR W. NORTON
    14 Oct.: `Mixing of air masses in the stratosphere.'

    PROFESSOR T. RATIU, California, Santa Cruz
    22 Oct.: `Stability analysis and self- organisation via relative equilibria.'

    DR D. MARSHALL, Reading
    28 Oct.: `Topographic steering of large- scale ocean currents.'

    DR W. ARTER, AEA Technology PLC
    4 Nov.: `Numerical simulation of magnetic fusion plasmas.'

    DR C. JONES, Reading
    11 Nov.: `Simulations of the stratocumulus–trade cumulus transition with the Colorado State University General Circulation Model.'

    DR D. PARKER, Reading
    18 Nov.: `Barotropic instability in uniform strain and the consequences for explosive cyclogenesis in the atmosphere.'

    DR N. BALMFORTH, Nottingham
    25 Nov.: `Stability of vorticity defects in shear flow.'

    DR T. PALMER, ECMWF, Reading
    2 Dec.: `Some applications of singular vectors and related adjoint methods to atmospheric predictability.'

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    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    University Laboratory of Physiology

    The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology.

    Convener: J.C. Ellory, MA, Professor of Physiology.

    PROFESSOR J.T. DEITMER, Kaiserslautern, Germany
    16 Oct.: `pH and calcium signallign in glial cells.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    PROFESSOR P.B.C. MATTHEWS
    23 Oct.: `Using the EMG to explore the properties of motoneurons, reflexes, and higher motor coding.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    DR K. FOX, Cardiff
    30 Oct.: `Mechanisms underlying plasticity in the barrel cortex.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

    DR P.R. GORDON-WEEKS, King's College, London
    6 Nov.: `MAP1B phosphorylation and growth cone pathfinding.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    DR V.L. LEW, Cambridge
    13 Nov.: `Sickle cell anaemia: the long way from molecular origin to pathophysiology.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    PROFESSOR R.J. NAFTALIN, King's College, London
    20 Nov.: `The role of colonic crypts in water and ion transport.' (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    DR D. MAURER, MRC Cognitive Development Unit, London
    27 Nov.: `Does seeing come naturally? Vision at birth and after congenital cataract.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

    DR D.J. TOLHURST, Cambridge
    4 Dec.: `Threshold and contrast- normalisation models of the responses of cat simple cells.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

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    Department of Human Anatomy: Research Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy.

    Convener: H.M. Charlton, MA, D.Phil., Acting Head of Department.

    DR Z. ERZINLIOGLU, Cambridge
    18 Oct.: `Forensic entomology—how insects solve crime.'

    DR J. RUSSELL, Edinburgh
    25 Oct.: `Modulation of the oxytocin system in pregnancy and parturition.' (Sponsored by Glaxo Wellcome Research and Development)

    DR R. LESLIE
    1 Nov.: `The piriform cortex and mood: a therapeutic site of action of lithium?'

    DR R. RIDLEY, Cambridge
    8 Nov.: `Prion diseases of humans and animals.'

    PROFESSOR D. DE BONO, Leicester
    15 Nov.: `The plasminogen activator and inhibitor system in the blood vessel wall: the usefulness of redundancy?' (Sponsored by Yamanouchi Research Institute)

    PROFESSOR S. BROWN, MRC Laboratory, Harwell
    22 Nov.: `Mouse models for genetic deafness.'

    PROFESSOR S. GREENFIELD
    29 Nov.: `Non-cholinergic acetylcholinesterase: fact or fantasy?'

    PROFESSOR S. LIGHTMAN, Bristol
    6 Dec.: `Stress and the neuroendocrine hypothalamus.'

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    SOCIAL STUDIES

    Senior Research Seminar in American Politics

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Chester Room, Nuffield College.

    Conveners: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellor Professor of American Government, and colleagues.

    PROFESSOR SHAFER
    22 Oct.: `1996 in perspective: the two majorities in postwar American politics.'

    GARY HART, Pembroke College, and attorney, Denver, Colorado
    5 Nov.: `The modern Machiavelli: problems of leadership in contemporary American politics.'

    PROFESSOR A.E. HOWARD, Virginia
    19 Nov.: `A generational look at the Supreme Court in American politics.'

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    THEOLOGY, ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Eastern Christian Studies Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the House of St Gregory and St Macrina, 1 Canterbury Road.

    Conveners: K.T. Ware, MA, D.Phil., Spalding Lecturer in Eastern Orthodox Studies, and S.P. Brock, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Syriac Studies.

    DR BROCK
    16 Oct.: `A remarkable monastic anthology from Sinai.'

    DR WARE
    30 Oct.: `The human person as an image of the Trinity: from Augustine to Gregory Palamas.'

    DR O. NICHOLSON
    13 Nov.: `Preparation for martyrdom in the early Church.'

    DEAN N. SAKHAROV
    27 Nov.: `The concept of image and likeness in Fr. Sophrony (Sakharov) (1896–1993).'

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    BODLEIAN LIBRARY

    Oxford Seminars in Cartography

    SARAH TYACKE, Keeper of Public Records, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 24 October, in the Schola Astronomiae et Rhetoricae, Schools Quadrangle, the Bodleian Library.

    Further details are available from Nick Millea, Map Curator, Bodleian Library (telephone: (2)77182, e-mail: nam@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

    Subject: `The earliest English chart-makers 1550–1650.'

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    BYZANTINE STUDIES

    The following seminars in Byzantine Studies will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the New Seminar Room, St John's College.

    Conveners: Professor Elizabeth Jeffreys, Dr Marlia Mango, and Dr James Howard-Johnston.

    PROFESSOR R. THOMSON
    18 Oct.: `The defence of Armenian Orthodoxy in Sebeos.'

    DR HOWARD-JOHNSTON
    25 Oct.: `Sebeos and the Emperor Heraclius.'

    DR M. WHITBY
    1 Nov.: `George of Pisidia and the Emperor Heraclius.'

    DR M. MANGO
    8 Nov.: `Late antique silver in a private context: the Sevso Treasure.'

    PROFESSOR M. JEFFREYS, Sydney
    15 Nov.: `An electronic Digenis.'

    DR I. ARZHENTSEVA, Moscow
    22 Nov.: `Byzantine antiquities in the Caucasus.'

    PROFESSOR C. CONSTANTINIDIS, Ioannina
    29 Nov.: `Gardens in legal and other secular texts of the later Byzantine period.'

    PROFESSOR R.R.R. SMITH
    6 Dec.: `Late antique portraits in a public context: honorific statuary at Aphrodisias in Caria, AD 300–600.'

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    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Programming Research Group

    The Strachey Lecture

    JAY MISRA, Texas, will deliver the Strachey Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 22 October, in the Computing Laboratory Lecture Theatre, the Wolfson Building.

    Subject: `Powerlist: a structure for parallel recursion.'

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    CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

    Conveners: D.E.R. Faulkner, MA, Senior Research Associate of the centre, and R.G. Hood, MA, D.Phil., Head of Department and Reader in Criminology.

    S. SHAW, Director, Prison Reform Trust
    23 Oct.: `The case for a new Prison Act.'

    E. FITZGERALD, QC
    6 Nov.: `Recent cases in the domestic courts and the European Court of Human Rights.'

    SIR DAVID RAMSBOTHAM, HM Chief Inspector of Prisons
    20 Nov.: `Prisons and the public interest: inspection, oversight, and accountability.'

    DR A. LIEBLING, Cambridge
    4 Dec.: `Evaluating incentives and earned privileges—power, status, and influence.'

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    ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Main Lecture Theatre, the School of Geography.

    Further information can be obtained from Martin Price, ECU, 1a Mansfield Road, Oxford (telephone: Oxford (2)81182).

    PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE
    21 Oct.: `Dust bowls—past, present, and future!'

    DR B. VIRA
    28 Oct.: `Trade liberalisation and environmental regulation—identifying the conflicts.'

    DR C. TOULMIN, International Institute for Environment and Development
    4 Nov.: `Dust bowls, drought, and desertification: what can a global convention do to help?'

    DR J. LEGGETT
    11 Nov.: `Something is moving in the greenhouse.'

    DR J. WILLIAMS, Natural Resources Unit
    18 Nov.: `Managing environmental change in developing countries: information, decisions, and intervention.'

    DR D.DREWRY, Natural Environment Research Council
    25 Nov.: `Rime on the Ancient Mariner: ice-sheets, climate change, and sea level.'

    DR J. CORBETT, University College, London
    2 Dec.: `Losers and gainers in the transition to sustainability: equity issues in Local Agenda 21 initiatives in Europe.'

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    EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

    1996 International Colloquium: Philosophical Dialogues in Performance

    This colloquium will be held on 18 October (in the Taylor Institution), and on 19 and 20 October (in the Maison Française).

    Further information is available from the European Humanities Research Centre, 37A St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LD (telephone: Oxford (2)80742, fax: (2)80740).

     


    Friday, 18 October

    BERNARD WILLIAMS, interlocutor, with JOHN SEARLE, JERRY FODOR, and MARTIN DAVIES
    8.15 p.m.: `Mind and machine'.

     


    Saturday, 19 October

    MALCOLM BOWIE and JOHN FORRESTER
    9.30 a.m.: `Psychoanalysis as a theory of dialogue.'

    DOMINIQUE LECOURT, interlocutor, with JEAN-JACQUES LECERCLE and SANDRA LAUGIER; GRAHAM LOCKE, interlocutor, with SABINA LOVIBOND, ALAN MONTEFIORE, and NICK BUNNIN
    2 p.m.: `French v. English epistemological traditions.'

    THE GREAT ESCAPE THEATRE COMPANY
    8 p.m.: performance of Beyond all Certainty: Wittgenstein and Turing, a play by Bo Göranzon and Anders Karlqvist.

     


    Sunday, 20 October

    GABRIEL JOSIPOVICI and ELINOR SHAFFER, interlocutors, with BO GÖRANZON, MAGNUS FLORIN, and KRISTER HENRIKSSON
    9.15 a.m.: `Philosophy in performance.'

    IAN CHRISTIE
    11.15 a.m.: `Philosophy and film: Freud, Wittgenstein, and others'— extracts from films by Derek Jarman, Hugh Brody, Raul Ruiz, and Hollis Frampton.

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    FILM STUDIES

    European Cinema and Literary Movements

    The meetings listed below will take place as follows: Wednesday lectures and seminars at 5 p.m. in 47 Wellington Square; Monday lectures at 10 a.m. in the Taylor Institution.

     

    Related film-screenings are listed below.

    Convener: I. Christie, MA, University Visiting Lecturer in Film.

    PROFESSOR P. EVANS, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London
    Wed. 23 Oct.: `Buñuel's dream narratives.'

    K. THOMPSON, Wisconsin–Madison
    Wed. 30 Oct.: `The silent Lubitsch: German v. American styles.'

    O. TAPLIN
    Wed. 6 Nov.: `Angelopoulos and the Greek tradition.'

    MR CHRISTIE
    Mon. 11 Nov. and Wed. 13 Nov.: `Film and the Russian avant-garde.'

    C. EDWARDS
    Mon. 18 Nov.: `German expressionist cinema.'

    D. ROBINSON
    Wed. 20 Nov.: `New light on the Caligari myth.'

    G. NOWELL-SMITH
    Mon. 25 Nov. and Wed. 27 Nov.: `Italian neo-realist cinema.'

    MR CHRISTIE
    Mon. 2 Dec.: ` "Auteurism"—for and against.'

    PROFESSOR I.W.F. MACLEAN
    Wed. 4 Dec.: `Parody, reflexivity, reference: Blow Up.'

     


    Related film-screenings

    The following films will be shown at the Phoenix Picture House, Walton Street, at 12 noon on Sundays, and at 2 p.m. on Wednesdays.

    Sun. 13 Oct./Wed. 16 Oct.The Red Shoes (UK, 1948; Powell–Pressburger).

    Sun. 20 Oct./Wed. 23 Oct.The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (France, 1972; Buñuel).

    Wed. 30 Oct.The Oyster Princess (Germany, 1919; Lubitsch) (with live accompaniment).

    Sun. 3 Nov./Wed. 6 Nov.Ulysses' Gaze (Greece, 1995; Angelopoulos).

    Wed. 13 Nov.The Battleship Potemkin (USSR, 1925; Eisenstein) (with live accompaniment).

    Wed. 20 Nov.The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (Germany, 1919; Wiene) (with live accompaniment).

    Sun. 24 Nov./Wed. 27 Nov.Rome Open City (Italy, 1945; Rossellini).

    Wed. 4 Dec.: Special screening for course attenders.

     


    Graduate Film Studies Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room C, Magdalen College. All those interested in film studies and film in relation to other fields are welcome.

    Convener: I. Christie, MA, University Visiting Lecturer in Film.

    MR CHRISTIE
    22 Oct.: `Il miglior fabbro—Scorsese's debt to Powell.'

    K. THOMPSON, Wisconsin–Madison
    29 Oct.: `Storytelling in the New Hollywood: the case of Groundhog Day.'

    B. COKELISS
    5 Nov.: `Cutting patterns: editing the male body in Scorsese.'

    J. BUCHANAN
    12 Nov.: `Adaptation or appropriation? Forbidden Planet and Shakespeare.'

    M. EATON, writer
    19 Nov.: `Television drama—a screenwriter's perspective.'

    P. COOK, East Anglia
    26 Nov.: `Neither here nor there: national identity in Gainsborough costume drama.'

    C. FINN
    3 Dec.: `Capturing the wanderer: archaeology and nomads in filming The English Patient.'

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    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

    The contemporary Islamic world

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

    DR O. ROY, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France
    16 Oct.: `The failure of political Islam.'

    PROFESSOR J. PISCATORI
    23 Oct.: `Transnationalism of Islam.'

    DR ABDEL WAHAB AL-EFFENDI, London
    30 Oct.: `From margin to pariah: Sudan's trip around the edge.'

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    LIBRARIES BOARD TRAINING CO- ORDINATING COMMITTEE

    MR R.P. CARR, who will be taking up appointment as the Director of the University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian from 1 January 1997, will give a seminar at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. The seminar is part of the TCC series for library staff.

    Places may be booked by e-mailing stephen.eyres@las.ox.ac.uk.

     

    Subject: `Riding the tiger: the academic library in a climate of change.'

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    MAISON FRANÇAISE

    Franco-British seminars in the history of science: science, technology, and society since the First World War

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Maison Française.

    Further details are available from Professor Robert Fox, Modern History Faculty, or the Director's Secretary, Maison Française.

    Convener: M. Dominique Pestre, Directeur de recherche, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, and Visiting Scholar, the Maison Française.

    G. PAOLONI, Rome, D. EDGERTON, London, and M. PESTRE
    15 Oct.: `Physical science and the military in Britain, France, and Italy since the Second World War.'

    V. QUIRKE, Oxford, F. JACQ, Paris, and M. PESTRE
    29 Oct.: `The physical and biomedical sciences and industry since the Second World War: the cases of France and Britain.'

    J. HEILBRON, Oxford, J. MORRELL, Bradford, and M. PESTRE
    12 Nov.: `Civility in physical science, 1918–39: Oxford, Paris, and California.'

    J.-P. GAUDILLIÈRE, Paris, and C. WEBSTER, Oxford
    26 Nov.: `Policies and practices in public health in post-war Britain and France.'

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    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Seminar in Contemporary South Asia

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in Queen Elizabeth House. With the exception of the 14 November meeting, which will be held in the Library Wing Seminar Room, the seminars will be held in the Blackhall Seminar Room.

    P. VERA-SANSO, Kent
    17 Oct.: `Dominant daughters-in-law and submissive mothers-in-law? Urban inversions in south India.'

    M. O'SULLIVAN
    24 Oct.: `The Muslim community and ethnic conflict in Sri Lanka.'

    K. SARAP, Sambalpur
    31 Oct.: `Land market transactions in rural India: theory and evidence.'

    R. RUKMANI, Madras Institute of Development Studies
    7 Nov.: `Agrarian relations, the role of the state and the process of urbanisation: a case study of Thanjavur district, India, 1901–91.'

    P. JEFFERY, Edinburgh
    14 Nov.: `Engendering institutional communalism: gender, community, and the local state in rural Bijnor.' (Joint seminar with the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women)

    J. BEALL, LSE
    21 Nov.: `Urban poverty in Pakistan.'

    S. KAVIRAJ, SOAS
    28 Nov.: `Filth and the "Public Sphere": concepts and practices of space in Calcutta.'

    M. LAU, SOAS
    5 Dec.: `Access to environmental justice: a case study of Karachi.'

     


    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

    Gender, identity, and religion

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. For further information, telephone Oxford (2)73644.

    Conveners: Janette Davies and Dr Lidia Sciama.

    THE REVD GEORGE HARGREAVES
    17 Oct.: `Gender negotiations within the black majority churches in Britain.'

    DR J. WALDREN
    24 Oct.: `Women and Christianity in contemporary Spain.'

    DR HIROKO KAWANAMI, Lancaster
    31 Oct.: `Can women be celibate? Asceticism and sexuality in Theravada Buddhism.'

    DR M. BANKS
    7 Nov.: `Jainism and gender.'

    DR P. JEFFERY, Edinburgh
    14 Nov.: `Engendering institutional communalism: gender, community, and the local state in rural Bijnor.' (Joint seminar with the Contemporary South Asia Programme)

    L. LAUER
    21 Nov.: `Creating the Western Lady: missionary efforts in India and China (1860–1920).'

    DR N. ABU-ZAHRA
    28 Nov.: `The pure and the powerful: a study of Egyptian women.'

    Y.N. YASHIN, Princeton
    5 Dec.: `Gender, religion, and public culture in Turkey.'

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    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE AND THE INDIAN STUDIES CENTRE, ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    Evening Seminar on South Asia

    MS CRIANA CONNAL will give a seminar at 8 p.m. on Monday, 2 December, in the New Room, Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College.

    Subject: `The Bandit Queen, Kali and Phoolan Devi.'

    The following films will be shown at 8 p.m. on Mondays in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College: Bhaji on the Beach on 21 October (introduced by the director, Gurinder Chaddha); Father, son and holy war on 11 November (a film by Anand Patwardhan, introduced by Nandini Gooptu).

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    GREEN COLLEGE

    Radcliffe Lecture

    DR C. STRINGER, Natural History Museum, will deliver the Radcliffe Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 7 November, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Subject: `African exodus: the origins of modern humanity.'

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    LINACRE COLLEGE

    Linacre Lectures 1996–7

    Culture and Environment

    The Linacre Lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building.

    Linacre College acknowledges the generosity of Riche Monde (Bangkok) Ltd. in making the current lecture series possible.

    PROFESSOR B. CUNLIFFE
    24 Oct.: `Landscapes with people.'

    PROFESSOR D. LOWENTHAL, University College, London
    7 Nov.: `Environment as heritage: legacies of locale.'

    PROFESSOR R. PORTER, Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, London
    21 Nov.: `And was Jerusalem...? The English Enlightenment and the environment.'

    PROFESSOR I. ARMSTRONG, Birkbeck College, London
    5 Dec.: `The transformations of glass: technology and text in nineteenth-century culture.'

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    MANSFIELD COLLEGE

    Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Council Room, Mansfield College (ground floor, main building).

    Further information is available from the Project Administrator, OCEES, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone: Oxford (2)70886, e-mail: ocees@mansfield.ox.ac.uk).

    E. GOLDSMITH, founder and editor The Ecologist
    15 Oct.: `Towards a new environmental ethic.'

    N. EINARSSON, Fisheries Research Institute, University of Iceland
    22 Oct.: `Anthropomorphism and the use of metaphor in environmental discourse: why pigs must fly and whales sing.'

    A. IRWIN, Brunel
    29 Oct.: `Public responses to risk and environmental issues.'

    M. COHEN, Ove Arup Research Fellow, OCEES
    5 Nov.: `Limits of rational environmentalism.'

    M. BELL, Iowa State and Newcastle
    12 : `The natural conscience: towards a sociology of environmental morality.'

    J. MEADOWCROFT, Sheffield
    19 Nov.: `Implementing sustainable development in high consumption societies: a research design.'

    C. BIEGERT, convener, World Uranium Hearing
    26 Nov.: `Sacred ground—so what? White man's energy v. red man's philosophy in North America.'

    T. DALYELL, Member of Parliament for Linlithgow
    3 Dec.: `The environmental implications of the abuse of the UN and abuse of sanctions.'

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    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    Special lecture

    MIKHAIL GORBACHEV will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 28 October, in the Sheldonian Theatre (the Chancellor presiding).

    Entry is free, but by ticket only, available from the Campaign Office, St Antony's College (telephone: (2)74496).

    Subject: `Russia between the past and the future: a difficult path from totalitarianism to democracy.'

     


    Asian Studies Centre

    A view of Asian women through film

    The following seminars, which will include the showing of a film, will take place in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. They will be given at 8 p.m. on Mondays, except for the meeting to be held on Thursday, 31 October, at 8.30 p.m.

    Convener: J.M. Corbett, MA, Nissan Lecturer in the Economic and Social Development of Contemporary Japan.

    14 Oct.Half the Sky (China, 1995; 60 minutes). Speaker: Sun Shuyun (director).

    21 Oct.Bhaji on the Beach (UK, 1995; 97 minutes). Speaker: Gurinder Chadha (director). (Joint meeting with South Asian Evening Seminar)

    31 Oct.The Tenth Dancer (Cambodia, 1993), and Serene Smile (Cambodia; total film time about 75 minutes). Speaker: Dr Peter Carey, Trinity College.

    4 Nov.Rising above—Women of Vietnam (1994; 60 minutes). Speaker: Dr Sonja Ruehl, SOAS.

    11 Nov.Father, Son and Holy War (India, 1994; 120 minutes). Speaker: Dr Nandini Gooptu, St Antony's College. (Joint meeting with the South Asian Evening Seminar)

    18 Nov.Eat, Drink, Man, Woman (Taiwan, 1995; 120 minutes). Speaker: Dr Stuart Thompson, SOAS.

    25 Nov.Twenty-four Eyes (Japan, 1954; 158 minutes). Speaker: Dr Brian Powell, Keble College.

     


    Special Seminar

    MR C.Y. LEUNG, Baker & McKenzie, Hong Kong, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in the New Room, the Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College.

    Subject: `China's corporatisation experiment: a lawyer's observations.'

     


    Huan Hsing Foundation Distinguished Lecture in Asian Studies

    PROFESSOR PER FISCHER, Mainz, formerly German Ambassador to Beijing, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 2 December, in the Fellows' Dining Room, the Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College.

    Subject: `Is democracy a panacea? Problems of transition in the PRC.'

     


    Centre for Indian Studies

    South Asian History Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Small Dining Room, first floor, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Those attending are asked to note the changed venue and time.

    Convener: D.A. Washbrook, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Modern South Asian History.

    M. BANERJEE, University College, London
    15 Oct.: `Feeding grass to lions: the Khudai Khidmatgar and Akali movements compared.'

    S. BLACKBURN, SOAS
    22 Oct.: `Orality, print, and the novel in nineteenth-century Tamil.'

    A. GROUT, SOAS
    29 Oct.: `Treasures of the Earth: attitudes to European mining in India, c.1770–1850.'

    M. WASEEM
    5 Nov.: `Between three worlds: perspectives on the Pakistani world-view.'

    D. ALI, SOAS
    12 Nov.: `Courtly fashioning in medieval India.'

    R. YOUNG
    19 Nov.: `Nationalism and its doubles.'

    P. KIDAMBI
    26 Nov.: `Popular politics in Bombay City, 1890–1920.'

    M. ARIS
    3 Dec.: `In search of Vanaratna (1384–1468): the life of "The Last Pandit" according to newly discovered Tibetan sources.'

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    ST PETER'S COLLEGE AND THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY BRITISH HISTORY

    Sir Alec Cairncross Lecture

    PROFESSOR A. MILWARD will deliver the Sir Alec Cairncross Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 18 October, in the chapel, St Peter's College. All are welcome to attend.

    Subject: `Europe, empire, and dominion: Britain and the EEC 1961–3.'

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    WADHAM COLLEGE AND THE MATHEMATICAL INSTITUTE

    Milne Lecture

    PROFESSOR SIR ROGER PENROSE will deliver the twentieth annual Milne Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 14 November, in the Mathematical Institute. All are welcome to attend.

    Subject: `The complexity of our singular universe.'

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    WOLFSON COLLEGE

    Public Lecture

    PROFESSOR GEORGE H. PETERS, Research Professor in Agricultural Economics, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 24 October, in the Hall, Wolfson College.

    Subject: `Starvation or plenty in 2020?'

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    FRIENDS OF REWLEY HOUSE

    DR JESSICA RAWSON will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 25 October, in the lecture theatre, Rewley House. Entry is free to members, £2 to others. Tickets are available from Rewley House or at the door.

    Subject: `The British Museum's "Chinese Treasures" exhibition.'

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    FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

    LAUREN KASSELL will give a thirty-minute lecture at 1 p.m. on Friday, 25 October, in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre. All are invited.

    Subject: `Better than sex and Shakespeare: Simon Forman's manuscripts.'

    Sandwiches and wine will be served after the lecture at a cost of £2.50 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234).

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    OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY FORUM

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Rewley House. All are welcome to attend.

    PROFESSOR JOHN HONEY, sometime Professor of English, Osaka International University, Japan
    24 Oct.: `Anagogic attitudes: authority, prescription, and chaos in language use.'

    DR ROWENA FOWLER, Bristol
    21 Nov.: `Robert Browning and the OED.'

     

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    Grants and Research Funding

    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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    RESEARCH AND COMMERCIAL SERVICES OFFICE

    The University's Research and Commercial Services Office (RCSO) has launched a new electronic service to provide up- to-date and easily accessible information about research funding opportunities to members of the University. The new service, which replaces the former system of bi-monthly issues of Research and Industry News (RIN) combined with irregular but targeted circulars on funding opportunities sent to heads of departments and chairmen of faculty boards, is available via the World Wide Web to any member of the University with access to the Web and a computer registered in the `ox.ac.uk' domain.

    The RCSO's pages can be found at the following location: http://www.admin/ox.ac.uk/rcso.

    It is intended that, in future, all information on funding opportunities will be distributed electronically by the RCSO, in the form of a weekly bulletin, eletronic Research and Industry News (eRIN), which is available through the RCSO's pages.

    Members of the University who do not have access to the Internet can register to receive hard copies of eRIN; enquiries regarding such registration should be sent in the first instance to Ms Lorraine Hedges, RCSO, University Offices (telephone: (2)70145). Advice on connecting to the World Wide Web and on registration of computers can be obtained from the Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS). General enquiries relating to the content and operation of the RCSO's Web pages should be directed to Dr Chris Norris (telephone: (2)70011; e-mail: chris.norris@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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    SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

    The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications from members of the University for grants towards the costs of research in economic history. Applications will be considered from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of academic staff, and may relate to research into the economic history of any period or country.

    Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information about the general nature of their research to establish that it falls within the field of economic history; and (b) specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one referee who might be consulted by the committee.

    It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional circumstances.

    The committee will consider applications twice in each year. The closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A. Macallister, Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

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    Examinations and Boards

    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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    CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

    HILARY TERM AND APRIL 1997

    Honour Moderations

    Greek and Latin Literature: D.P. FOWLER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

    Latin Literature with Greek: D.P. FOWLER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

     

    Honour School

    Natural Science
    Physics—three- and four-year courses: C.D. RODGERS, MA, Fellow of Jesus (address: Department of Physics)

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    Qualifying Examination

    Qualifying examination in Statistics, for candidates offering Psychology in the Final Honour School of PPP or Experimental Psychology: D.A POPPLEWELL, Brasenose (address: Department of Experimental Psychology)

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    Master of Science

    Applied Social Studies Qualifying Examination: A. BUCHANAN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's (address: Department of Applied Social Studies)

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    TRINITY TERM 1997

    Honour Moderations

    Archaeology and Anthropology: P.G. RIVIÈRE, B.LITT., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre (address: Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology)

    Music: M.J. BURDEN, MA, Fellow of New College

    Honour Schools

    Archaeology and Anthropology: B.W. CUNLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL., Kellow of Keble (address: Institute of Archaeology)

    Music: H.D. JOHNSTONE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's (address: Music Faculty)

    Natural Science
    Chemistry Part I: P.A. COX, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College (address: Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory)

    Geology: J.H. WOODHOUSE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester (address: Department of Earth Sciences)

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    Qualifying Examination

    Qualifying examination in Statistics, for candidates offering Psychology in the Final Honour School of PPP or Experimental Psychology: D.A POPPLEWELL, Brasenose (address: Department of Experimental Psychology)

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    Master of Philosophy

    Comparative Social Research: A.F. HEATH, MA, Fellow of Nuffield

    Master of Science

    Applied Social Studies: A. BUCHANAN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's (address: Department of Applied Social Studies)

    Biology: D.H. SHOTTON, MA, Fellow of Wolfson (address: Department of Zoology)

    Comparative Social Research: A.F. HEATH, MA, Fellow of Nuffield

    Forestry and its relation to land use: P.J. STEWART, MA, Fellow of St Cross (address: Department of Plant Sciences)

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    Diploma

    Applied Archaeology: G.R. LOCK, MA, Fellow of Kellogg (addrsess: Department for Continuing Education)

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    Certificates

    Foundation Certificate in English Language and Literature (first year): P.J. THOMPSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Regent's Park

    Foundation Certificate in English Language and Literature (second year): P.J. THOMPSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Regent's Park

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    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 25 October.

    1 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

    (a) M.St. in Islamic Art and Archaeology

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 672, l. 47, delete `Languages' and substitute `Studies before admission to the course'.

    2 Ibid., p. 673, delete ll. 3–4 and renumber 4–5 as 3–4.

    3 Ibid., p. 673, delete ll. 7–20 and substitute:

    `(a) Attendance. Every candidate must attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as his or her supervisor shall determine, and must, upon entering the examination, provide evidence of his or her attendance to the examiners.

    (b) Written Examination. Every candidate must take four written papers, as follows:

    I. From Late Antiquity to Islam
    An aspect of the art and archaeology of the Near East during the transition from Late Antiquity to the formation of Islam, 550–900.

    II. The Breakdown of the Caliphate
    An aspect of the art and archaeology of the Islamic world, 900–1250.

    III. The Great Empires
    An aspect of the art and archaeology of the Islamic world, 1250–1600.

    IV. Approaches and Problems
    A general paper on Islamic Art and Archaeology.

    (c) Museum- or Artifact-based Project. Every candidate must complete a project of museum- or artifact-based research in Islamic Art and Archaeology, to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies not later than its second meeting in Michaelmas Term, and present it in the form of a seminar paper during the Hilary Term. A written version of the paper must be submitted for examination (see below).

    (d) Dissertation. Every candidate must submit a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words on a subject in Islamic Art and Archaeology to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies not later than its second meeting in Michaelmas Term (see below).

    (e) Oral Examination. Every candidate will be examined viva voce unless exempted by the examiners. The choice of aspects under Papers I–III above must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies not later than its second meeting in Michaelmas Term. A list of the options available will be available in the Faculty Office in the Trinity Term of the year preceding examination, and will be sent to applicants. Two typewritten or printed copies of the written version of the seminar paper in (c) above and of the dissertation in (d) above must be sent in a parcel bearing the words `Written work for the M.St. in Islamic Art and Archaeology' to The Chairman of Examiners, c/o Clerk to the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of first week of Trinity Term.'

    (b) M.Phil. in Islamic Art and Archaeology

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 615, l. 9, delete `an examination identical with that' and substitute `(i) an examination consisting of Papers I–III'.

    2 Ibid., p. 615, l. 10, after `Archaeology' insert:

    `;

    (ii) an essay of approximately 5,000 words on a subject of bibliographical and/or historiographical interest relevant to the subject proposed for the thesis, to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies not later than its second meeting in Michaelmas Term and to be sent in a parcel bearing the words `Essay for the M.Phil. in Islamic Art and Archaeology' to The Chairman of Examiners, c/o Clerk to the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday fifth week of Trinity Term;

    (iii)'.

    2 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

    Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 498, l. 21, delete `since 1880' and insert `in the Twentieth Century'.

    2 Ibid., l. 28, insert `Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of developments both before and since 1945.'

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    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Anthropology and Geography

    R.M. MURPHY, Wadham: `Space, class, and rhetoric in Lahore'.
    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Thursday, 31 October, 2.15 p.m.
    Examiners: W.R. James, V. Das.

    Biological Sciences

    A. WILES, Green College: `Structure of the c-terminal fragment of the secreted complement control protein from vaccinia virus'.
    Department of Biochemistry, Monday, 28 October, 1.45 p.m.
    Examiners: M.P. Williamson, K.B.M. Reid.

    Clinical Medicine

    YUN ZHANG, Green College: `Molecular genetics of type 2 diabetes'.
    Nuffield Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Friday, 11 October, 2 p.m.
    Examiners: D.J. Galton, S.J.H. Ashcroft.

     

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    English Language and Literature

    E.S. RORABACK, Linacre: `Money and power in Henry James'.
    St Catherine's, Tuesday, 22 October, 2 p.m.
    Examiners: M. Ellmann, T.F. Eagleton.

     

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    Literae Humaniores

    G. BECHTLE, University: `An anonymous commentary on Plato's Parmenides'.
    Christ Church, Friday, 1 November, 12 noon.
    Examiners: M.J. Edwards, J.M. Dillon.

     

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    Medieval and Modern Languages

    P.L. JOHNSON, St John's: `The novels of Llorenì Villalonga: literary aesthetics and ambivalence'.
    Taylor Institution, Friday, 11 October, 2.30 p.m.
    Examiners: A. Terry, D.J. George.

     

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    Modern History

    D.P. JOHNSON, Exeter: `The bishops of London and their Acta, 1189–1228'.
    Somerville, Friday, 25 October, 2.15 p.m.
    Examiners: B.F. Harvey, D.M. Smith.

     

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    Social Studies

    T. BENBOW, St Antony's: `The impact of air power on navies and naval strategy'.
    Examination Schools, Thursday, 28 November, 11 a.m.
    Examiners: M. Howard, G. Till.

     

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies

    Contents of this section:

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    OBITUARY

    St Edmund Hall

    RANULPH WAYE, MBE, TD, MA, 3 September 1996; commoner 1928–31. Aged 88.

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    ELECTIONS

    Mansfield College

    To a Junior Research Fellowship in the Humanities:

    ASHLEY JAMES WALTER JACKSON

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    St Anne's College

    To a Professorial Fellowship:

    PROFESSOR PETER JAMES DONELLY (B.SC. Queensland), Professor of Statistical Science

    To an Honorary Fellowship:

    PROFESSOR ELIZABETH MARY JEFFREYS, B.LITT. (MA Cambridge)

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    NOTICES

    Nuffield College

    Official Fellowship in Politics (Comparative Politics and Public Policy-Making)

    The college proposes to appoint, with effect from 1 October 1997, an Official Fellow in Politics. This post is a new one, and requires a multinational perspective on the processes of politics and the making of public policy in the developed nations. The duties of an Official Fellow are to engage in research and supervise graduate students; an established scholarly record is essential. Nuffield is a graduate college specialising in the social sciences at Oxford, especially politics, economics, and sociology. Salary ranges from £23,486 to £40,107 according to age (under review). Nuffield College is committed to the principle of equality of opportunity.

    Further details can be obtained from our Web site, http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/Jobs/, or from Mrs Marion Rogers, Nuffield College, Oxford OX1 1NF (e-mail: marion. rogers@nuf.ox.ac.uk), to whom application materials, naming three referees, should be sent by 15 December.

    The college exists to promote excellence in education and research.

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    St Anne's College

    Junior Research Fellowships

    The Drapers' Company Junior Research Fellowship, this year offered in Chemistry, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biophysics. The Kathleen Bourne Junior Research Fellowship in French Language and Literature or French Architecture, Art, History, Music, or Philosophy.

    The college invites applications for the above fellowships tenable for one or two years from 1 October 1997. The posts are open to graduates, women or men, in their second or subsequent year of research. The Kathleen Bourne Junior Research Fellowship is limited to citizens of one of the countries or territories of the British Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland. Requests for further particulars, which should be obtained before application is made, should be addressed to the Senior Tutor's Secretary, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS. Please enclose a self- addressed envelope. The closing date for applications is 1 November.

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    Somerville College

    Mary Somerville Research Fellowship

    Somerville College invites applications for a Mary Somerville Research Fellowship tenable for three years from October 1997, in any of the following subjects: History, Classics, Archaeology, Psychology, Biological Sciences. The annual stipend is £10,688 (currently under review) with free residence in college. Applicants must be graduates in at least their second year of research. Further particulars are obtainable from the Principal's Secretary, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD (telephone: Oxford (2)70630, fax: (2)70606). Closing date for applications: 15 November.

    Advertisements

    Contents of this section:


    How to advertise in the Gazette

    Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

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    Oxford Humanists

    Oxford Humanists meet regularly to discuss a wide range of topical social and moral questions from a non-religious viewpoint. For details and current programme, contact Jean Woodman, 57 Delbush Avenue, Oxford OX3 8EA. Tel.: Oxford 60520.

     

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    Tuition Offered

    Piano lessons: children and adults. All grades. Beginners welcome. Experienced teacher. Miss P. Read, BA (Hons.), LRAM. Jericho. Tel: Oxford 510904.

    Piano tuition. Cheryl Younie, M.Mus. Piano Performance and Pedagogy, University of Michigan, and formerly teacher and examiner for the Sydney Conservatorium, now welcomes advanced and/or seriously committed pupils in Oxford or Wantage. Emphasis on technique and musicianship through a wide variety of repertoire. Tel.: 01235 861081.

    Piano lessons. Very experienced and highly qualified teacher of piano and electronic keyboard has vacancies for pupils. Any level---beginners to diploma standard. Also French tuition---any level. Can travel to your home. Tel. Oxford 776999.

    English language. Academic writing, grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables including evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour, Cambridge exams., general English are best value in Oxford. Writing up? Private tuition available with experienced tutors. Free test/advice from the Director of Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5 p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9 Blue Boar Street (off St Aldate's by Christ Church), Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077, e-mail: OLT@dial.pipex.com.

    Experienced French teacher offers lessons at all levels, including GCSE, A level, Business French, musical pronunciation, and general conversation. Tel.: Oxford 511105.

    The Alexander Technique can help relieve stress and tension. Jan Steele, BA, and Janet Sherbourne, MA, both STAT qualified teachers of the Technique, offer lessons in Oxford. Please telephone for brochure and further information. Tel.: Oxford 770272.

     

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    Services Offered

    Word-processing---Word 6 or WordPerfect 6. Manuscripts, articles, theses. Efficient and reliable service. Will collect and deliver locally. Tel. Oxford 777026.

    Carpentry, joinery, fitted cupboards, doors, etc., undertaken. Prompt, efficient, and sympathetic service at competitice prices. R.H. Sprot. Tel.: 01869 345060.

    A La Carte? Finders Keepers' latest idea to enhance service to their tenants. If you seek a property to rent, call us first. Our 24 Oxford staff are dedicated to offering exceptional service. Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

    Counselling/Psychotherapy. British Association for Counselling Approved Member, Accredited Counsellor (Oxford graduate, 1959, woman working in North Oxford) offers counselling/psychotherapy. Fee normally £25 per session. Some concessionary places. Tel.: Oxford 554438.

    Frederick and Sudabeh Hine, Persian carpet importers. Dealers in hand-made eastern rugs and runners generally. We sell only the genuine article and at prices which are at probably the lowest anywhere for comparable quality. Visit our warehouse and browse undisturbed. Home trial and exchange. Free buyer's guide for all new customers. Usual opening hours: 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 559396.

    Tax advice and accounts preparation. Ex- KPMG Chartered Accountant specialises in assisting academics and other professionals with their tax affairs, inc. self- assessment. Tax returns from £125, accounts from £150. Convenient North Oxford premises with parking. Tel.: Oxford 513381, fax: Oxford 558064.

    Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the University Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and finishing; Output Bureau provides high-quality output from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

    Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture designed and made by Richard Kay and Piers Roberts from local workshops. From tables, chairs, cabinets, desks, to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 238112.

    Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

    Domestic Services

    Beech Tree Nursery School at Rye St Antony School: set in idyllic surroundings on Headington Hill; places for boys and girls from 2½ to 5 years old. Tel. for further information: Oxford 62802/229215, fax: 63611.

     

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    Situations Vacant

    Office manager required for educational foundation in the centre of Oxford (an overseas student programme working with several Oxford colleges). Graduate preferred, ideally about 24--8 with some experience in administration. The manager will report to the president (a senior academic) and supervise a staff of 5. Good prospects for advancement. Salary will probably in the region of £16,000--£20,000 with 5 weeks' vacation a year. Send c.v. to: OSAP, 33--5 George Street, Oxford OX1 2AY.

     

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    Houses to Let

    Three-bedroom house in excellent condition with laminated wooden flooring, newly and fully furnished, in New Marston, close to both city centre and Headington. Ideal for professional/academic, for any period of time required. Sharers max. of three persons. Rent £800 p.m. To view, contact Dr Shaei, 48 Blandford Avenue, Oxford. Tel. Oxford 558848.

    Old Kidlington. Period house, 3 bedrooms, small garden, furnished. Children welcome. Available immediately. On frequent bus route to Oxford. £700 p.c.m. Tel. Oxford 66830.

    Furnished 3-bedroom semi-detached house available for long-term (min. 1 year) let. Newly decorated with hardwood floors, c.h., washer/drier and garden. Situated in cul-de-sac off Iffley village and less than 2 miles from Oxford city centre. £540 p.m. exc. bills. Tel. Oxford (2)72147 (day), or 718909 (evenings).

    Beckley: 4-bedroom, 2-bathroom detached house with large garden. Oxford 5 miles, JR 3 miles. Available 21 Dec.--5 Apr. £800 p.c.m. Tel. Oxford (2)72507, or 351641 (evenings); e-mail: dmoore@physiol.ox.ac.uk.

    Headington: furnished house, 3 bedrooms, dining-room, sitting-room, bathroom, utility room with w.c., large garden, off-street parking, c.h., washing-machine, telephone. Close to bus stop (no. 15 and 10) and the hospitals. Long let preferred. £640 p.m. Tel. Oxford 62006 (after 6 p.m.), e-mail: beatao@immsvr.jr2.ox.ac.uk.

    North Oxford , ideally located, newly-furnished Victorian house in Jericho; 2 bedrooms, first-floor bath, conservatory, courtyard garden. Available from Oct./Nov. One year rental at £800 p.m. Tel. Oxford 554507.

    Burford: very central 17th-c. cottage; 3 bedrooms, pretty garden. Available now for 6-month let. Suitable for visiting academics. £650 p.c.m. Contact Mr Follett. Tel. Oxford 311006.

    Finders Keepers, winners of the UK Best Letting and Management award for the second consecutive year, are dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to select accommodation. Up-dated, detailed information on the Internet, priority reservation system, welcome food pack, personal service, and much more---call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Cottage to let on Old Boar's Hill, 4 miles from Oxford; 3 bedrooms; c.h. plus Aga; fully equipped; large, natural garden in peaceful surroundings. Tel.: Oxford 735318 or 00 39 444 324729.

    North Oxford house-sit from 1 Nov. Quiet street about a mile from Carfax. Fully-furnished house with dedicated staff; 1 bedroom, study, bath, kitchen-cum-solarium, garden; includes utilities except phone/taxes; daily newspaper, dairy delivery; parking permit can be arranged. Prefer single, visiting fellow, or mature, married couple. Non-smokers only. With regrets, no children or pets. £850 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 559029.

    Witney: period cottages, 2/3-bedroom, fully furnished and well equipped. Short, i.e. weekly lets and longer lets up to 6 months. No smokers or pets. Good bus service to Oxford. Tel.: 01993 703035, fax: 01993 771014.

    Attractive converted barn with pretty garden in quiet village 10 miles west of Oxford. Fully furnished. Large galleried living-room. Study. Kitchen/breakfast room. 4 bedrooms (2 en-suite). Cleaning and some gardening included. Viewable and available for 1 year from 23 Sept. £1,250 p.c.m. Tel.: 0171-402 4330 (answer-phone).

    An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

     

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    Flats to Let

    Elegant, light, airy, fully furnished, don's 2-bedroom flat in leafy, quiet street in North Oxford (Summertown). Pretty gardens. Private parking. 5--10 minutes from city centre. Close to shops, library, bus-stop etc. Would suit academic person/couple. Available now for one month or more. Reasonable rent: £580 o.n.o. Tel.: 0171- 389 2403 (day), or 0171-235 8251 (evenings).

    Central North Oxford: one-bedroom apartment; 2 bathrooms, lounge, kitchen; well placed for the University and business centre. Best suited to professionals and mature visiting academics. Available for the academic year, £575 p.c.m. Tel. Oxford 516144.

    Woodstock Road, 2 miles from city centre: modern, open-plan, ground-floor flat; living-room, double bedroom, kitchen, bathroom; telephone; access to rear garden; car parking; near bus-stop. Available immediately. £475 p.c.m. inc. water rates. Tel. Oxford 557684 (after 6 p.m.).

    Available end of Oct.: self-contained flat in Old Headington. Large living-room with kitchenette, double bedroom, bathroom, washing- machine, private entrance. £500/£550 p.c.m. for single/double occupancy, inc. gas c.h. and council tax. Non-smokers preferred. Tel. Oxford 63390.

    Brand-new flats from £600 p.c.m. Two beds. Car-parking. Easy access to city centre and ring-road. Premier. Tel. Oxford 792299.

    Headington—available mid-Oct.: newly- converted 1-bedroom flat, quiet location, private road; fully furnished; large double bedroom, en-suite shower room, sitting-room, kitchen, c.h., parking facility. Professionals and academics only. £495 p.c.m. inc. of water rates. Tel.: Oxford 68504.

    Accommodation Offered

    Wolvercote, North Oxford (5 minutes to city centre): superb homes from £850 p.c.m. Premier. Tel. Oxford 792299.

    Oxford and Abingdon, fine selection of flats and houses. Premier. Tel. Oxford 792299.

    Large room to let in quiet house in Cricket Road. Gas c.h., d.g., off- street parking. Share kitchen and bathroom with one other person. £220 p.c.m. exc. bills. Tel. for appointment to view: Oxford 430595.

    Premier are pleased to offer new apartments, ideal for the ring- road and city centre. Also North Oxford homes for careful couples/families. Shared houses often available. Premier. Tel. Oxford 792299.

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the comfortable home of a semi- retired academic couple in leafy, exclusive central North Oxford. Within easy walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, excellent pubs and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea- and coffee-making facilities, microwaves. Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 557879.

    Alternative medicine centre. Space available. Therapy and treatment rooms. Consulting and counselling rooms. Every facility. Very moderate rates. Central North Oxford. Tel. for further details: Oxford 54326 (9 a.m.–12 noon).

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    Accommodation Sought

    Concert pianist seeks large studio/bedsit/room in central or North Oxford in which to practise and teach. Tel. Oxford 245343.

    North Oxford : self-contained 2-bedroom flat required for distinguished senior visiting US professor and wife. Non-smokers. Six months from mid-Jan. 1997. Contact Professor Armitage. Tel. Oxford (2)75299, e-mail: armitage@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

    Writer migrating from London seeks studio/workshop to rent or buy anywhere in or near Oxford. I may also need a small unfurnished flat, not necessarily near the studio. Andrew Duncan. Tel./fax: 0181-969 8332.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

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    Accommodation Exchange

    New York/London exchange: Manhattan apartment (57th Street and 2nd Avenue, 3 blocks from East River, walking distance of Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Centre, Bloomingdale's, etc.); fully equipped and furnished bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, living-room (with sofa-bed and small sofa for child). Excellent security: elevator manned round the clock. Available 15 Apr.--15 May or 23 June--23 July, in exchange for similar flat in central London, close to theatres, galleries, etc. No pets either way (hair allergy) and non-smokers preferred. Tel. Oxford (2)78916.

     

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    Holiday Let

    Andalucia: magical medieval village with stunning landscape; house at front of village with unobstructed views past Gibraltar and the Mediterranean to the Rif mountains of Morocco; terraces overhang the campo so that there is a feeling of being in the countryside; top terrace like a beach. Visit Granada, Cordoba, Ronda, Seville, Cadiz, Morocco. House divided into 2 parts. Reduction for long let. Dr Campbell. Tel.: Oxford 513935. n

     

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    Flats for Sale

    Retirement flat, Eynsham. Modern, purpose- built 1-bedroom apartment, in quiet location but close to all amenities; Economy 7 heating; 24-hr. emergency call system; communal gardens and many other benefits. £35,000. Tel.: Oxford 791910.

    Modern immaculate 2-bedroom first-floor apartment in east Oxford; one of 15 two-storey flats in attractive courtyard with communal gardens; fitted kitchen, curtains, carpets; low-cost energy and maintenance; off-street parking for 2 cars. £68,500. Fax/telephone: Oxford 723281, e-mail (Compuserve): 101716.721.

     

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    Diary

    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.

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    Friday 11 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Reflections on lustreware', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Sunday 13 October

    MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.

    THE REVD CANON JOHN WHITE preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    Monday 14 October

    CONGREGATION elections, 24 October: nominations by six members of Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

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    Tuesday 15 October

    The meeting of Congregation, due to take place today, is cancelled.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Rococo silver', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `Introduction—temporal power and spiritual power: their relationships' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    E. GOLDSMITH: `Towards a new environmental ethic' (Oxford for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

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    Wednesday 16 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Classical origins of European art: coins, sculpture, and pots', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

    DR GEORGE KANYEIHAMBA: `Rights for refugees: Uganda' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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    Thursday 17 October

    THE REVD G. HARGREAVES: `Gender negotiations within the black majority churches in Britain' (Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender, identity, and religion'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR G. JOSIPOVICI (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The age of suspicion' (lecture series: `On trust'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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    Friday 18 October

    COLLOQUIUM: `Philosophical dialogues in performance' (until Sunday) (for information and registration, contact the European Humanities Research Centre: (2)80742).

    DR T. DRAGADZE: `Kinship and politics in the Caucasus' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The significance of kinship'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Pre-Raphaelites and the nineteenth century', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    PROFESSOR A. MILWARD: `Europe, empire, and dominion: Britain and the EEC 1961–3' (Sir Alec Cairncross Lecture), the chapel, St Peter's, 5 p.m.

    JULIAN GALLANT: piano recital including works by Bach, Granados, Scriabin, and David Scott, Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 8.15 p.m. (admission free).

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    Saturday 19 October

    MATRICULATION ceremony, Sheldonian (time to be announced).

    REFUGEE STUDIES PROGRAMME Round Table meeting: `The challenge of the new asylum legislation for religious leaders', St Philip and St James' Church, Woodstock Road, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

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    Sunday 20 October

    MR BRUCE KENT preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    Monday 21 October

    PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE: `Dust bowls—past, present, and future!' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

    PROFESSOR R. GREGORY: `Pictures as paradoxical objects' (Joseph Beuys Lecture), Schools, 4.30 p.m.

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    Tuesday 22 October

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Induction programme for academic staff—Session II', 12 noon (see information above).

     

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The arts of Byzantium', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `Aspects of the political thought of St Paul. Political Augustinism and its repercussions in the fourteenth century' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    N. EINARSSON: `Anthropomorphism and the use of metaphor in environmental discourse: why pigs must fly and whales sing' (Oxford for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

    UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting (`Recent additions to the wine list'), 5.45 p.m. (admission £2).

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    Wednesday 23 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Medieval arts and the development of collecting', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Introduction to financial managment I', 2 p.m. (see information above).

     

    P. BAKER: `Who will be a refugee in Hong Kong?' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR P. EVANS: `Buñuel's dream narratives' (Film Studies lecture series: `European cinema and literary movements'), 47 Wellington Square, 5 p.m.

    THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET perform works by Haydn, Smetana, and Beethoven, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets £8/£6 from Blackwell's Music Shop; student tickets £4, from Blackwell's or the Music Faculty).

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    Thursday 24 October

    DR J. WALDREN: `Women and Christianity in contemporary Spain' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender, identity, and religion'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

     

    PROFESSOR G. JOSIPOVICI (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `Lightness and gravity' (lecture series: `On trust'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. HONEY: `Anagogic attitudes: authority, prescription, and chaos in language use' (OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR B. CUNLIFFE: `Landscapes with people' (Linacre Lectures: `Culture and environment'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR G.H. PETERS: `Starvation or plenty in 2020?' (public lecture), the Hall, Wolfson, 5.30 p.m.

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    Friday 25 October

    PROFESSOR R.H. BARNES: `Alliance and identity in an Indonesian fishing village' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The significance of kinship'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

     

    L. KASSELL: `Better than sex and Shakespeare: Simon Forman's manuscripts' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty- minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A walk through eastern art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    DR J. RAWSON lectures on the British Museum's `Chinese Treasures' exhibition (Friends of Rewley House lecture), the Lecture Theatre, Rewley House, 4.30 p.m. (admission £2; free to members).

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    Saturday 26 October

    DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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    Sunday 27 October

    THE REVD CHRISTOPHER JONES preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    Monday 28 October

    DR B. VIRA: `Trade liberalisation and environmental regulation—identifying the conflicts' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

    MIKHAIL GORBACHEV: `Russia between the past and the future: a difficult path from totalitarianism to democracy' (special lecture, the Chancellor presiding), Sheldonian, 5 p.m. (entry free, but by ticket only, from the Campaign Office at St Antony's: (2)74496).

    PROFESSOR ALBIE SACHS delivers the Refugee Studies Programme's Annual Human Rights Lecture, Schools, 5 p.m.

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    Tuesday 29 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `English furniture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

     

     

     

     

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Tutorial teaching—general', 2 p.m. (see information above).

     

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `The theological–political problem' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    A. IRWIN: `Public responses to risk and environmental issues' (Oxford for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

    KRISTIN THOMPSON: `Storytelling in the new Hollywood: the case of Groundhog Day' (Graduate Film Studies Seminar), Lecture Room C, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

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    Wednesday 30 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Renaissaince painting, sculpture, and decorative arts', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Introduction to financial managment II', 2 p.m. (see information above).

     

    R. CARVER: `Refugee protection in Africa' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

    KRISTIN THOMPSON: `The silent Lubitsch: German American styles' (Film Studies lecture series: `European cinema and literary movements'), 47 Wellington Square, 5 p.m.

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    Thursday 31 October

    DR HIROKO KAWANAMI: `Can women be celibate? Asceticism and sexuality in Theravada Buddhism' (Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender, identity, and religion'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

     

    PROFESSOR G. JOSIPOVICI (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `Dante: trusting the mother tongue' (lecture series: `On trust'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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