1 October 1998 - No 4485



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4485: 1 October 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

1 October 1998


The following supplement was published
with this Gazette:

University
Mission Statement and Strategic Plan


University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 October 1998: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 22 September


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on
16 October.

List of the decrees:

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section



Decree (1): Procedure for reduction in
the lecturing obligations of the George Eastman Visiting
Professor

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Board of
Electors to the George Eastman Visiting Professorship, simplifies
the procedure for a reduction in the period of office and the
lecturing obligations for an Eastman Professor by removing the
requirement for an ad hominem decree on each occasion.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 317, cl. 2
(Statutes, 1997, p. 516), delete `; provided that
... less than one year'.

2 Ibid., cl. 5 (p. 517), delete `He or she
shall ... faculty board concerned.' and substitute `In
exceptional circumstances, the faculty board concerned may reduce
the professor's residence requirement and/or the number of
required lectures or classes.'

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section



Decree (2): Abolition of Oxford and
Cambridge Examinations and Assessment Council

Explanatory note

When the various Oxford and Cambridge schools examination boards
were merged in 1995, financial and management responsibility for
the new combined operation passed to the University of Cambridge
Local Examination Syndicate, while responsibility for academic
governance was vested in an Oxford and Cambridge Examinations and
Assessment Council (OCEAC) to which each university appointed
eight members. Subsequent major changes in school examinations
in the UK have made it necessary to abolish OCEAC and to
establish a new structure combining the existing Oxford and
Cambridge operations with those of the Royal Society of Arts;
this will be known as Oxford, Cambridge, and RSA Examinations
(OCR). Oxford will appoint four representatives on the new OCR
Qualifications Policy Committee (who will initially be four of
the current representatives on OCEAC: Dr J. Langton, St John's;
Dr R.H. McCleery, Wadham; Professor R.A. Pring, Green College;
and Mr R.J. Van Noorden, Hertford). The University will also
appoint 11 members to sit on various OCR subject committees. To
ensure that there is satisfactory communication between OCR and
Oxford, the University's representatives will report to Council's
General Purposes Committee.

All outstanding commitments to the staff of the Oxford office of
the Local Examination Syndicate have been properly discharged.

The following decree formally abolishes OCEAC.

Text of Decree (2)

In Ch. X, delete Sect. I (Statutes, 1997, p. 755)
and renumber existing Sectt. II--XXIV (pp. 755--60) as Sectt. I-
-XXIII.

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section



Decree (3): Establishment of M.St. in
Theology (Research)

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Theology
Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, establishes
a one-year course in Theology for the degree of M.St. (Research).
The course is intended as a structured preparation for research
for candidates who hold PRS status and intend in due course to
proceed to undertake a research degree.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997,
p. 670, l. 39, after `Theology' insert:


`Theology (Research)       Theology'.

2 Ibid., p. 1012, after l. 11 insert:

`Three in Theology (Research)'.

3 Ibid., p. 1020, l. 31, after `Studies'
insert `, of Master of Studies (Research), and'.

4 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1998.

Key to Decree (3)

Cl. 1 inserts Theology (Research) into the list of examinations
for the degree of M.St.

Cll. 2 and 3 provide for the nomination and appointment of
examiners.

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section



Decree (4): Change in format of the
Annual Report of the University

Explanatory note

Since the format of the Annual Report of the University was last
changed, in the report for 1993--4, this document has largely
retained the formal contents of the earlier format but has also
included some feature articles and illustrations. As intended
when the new format was introduced, Council has now reviewed the
matter, and has concluded that further changes are desirable.
Council has decided that, with effect from the report for 1997-
-8, two documents should be produced: an Annual Review, aimed
specifically at an external audience, which will contain key
features about how Oxford is aiding the development and
well-being of the nation through its research and teaching, as
well as articles looking ahead to innovative work under way in
the University, and will not attempt to constitute a
comprehensive survey of the University's activities in the
previous year; and a Year Report, designed primarily for an
internal audience, comprising detailed information supplied by
all faculties, departments, and other university institutions.
The Annual Review will largely continue the current design and
format of the Annual Report, though with greater and bolder use
of pictures. The Year Report will be a much longer document than
either the current or pre-1993--4 Annual Reports. It is intended
that, subject to further consideration of the practical
arrangements, the Year Report should be published on the World
Wide Web rather than in paper form; in any case, it will be made
available in paper form, and so far as possible electronically,
in university and college libraries, and a paper copy of any part
or all of it will be made available to any member of Congregation
on request. These new arrangements will be reviewed by Council
after two or three years' experience.

The statute governing the production of the Annual Report, and
its subsequent presentation to Congregation, is framed on the
basis of the present arrangements, and Council has accordingly
made the following decree suspending the relevant clauses of that
statute to enable the new arrangements to be introduced.

Text of Decree (4)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. XI, cll. 2, 3,
and 5 (Statutes, 1997, p. 19), the following
arrangements shall apply with effect from 1 October 1998.

(a) During each academic year Council shall produce
(i) an Annual Review of such of the affairs of the University
in the preceding academic year as shall seem to Council to be
of particular importance in the national and international
context, and (ii) a Year Report containing a detailed survey of
the activities of the University's faculties, departments, and
other institutions in the preceding academic year.

(b) The Annual Review shall be circulated to all
members of Congregation. The Year Report shall be made available
in university and college libraries in paper form, and so far
as possible electronically, and a paper copy of any part or all
of it shall be made available to any member of Congregation on
request.

(c) The Annual Review shall subsequently be presented
at a meeting of Congregation in accordance with the same
procedure as that prescribed in Tit. II, Sect. XI, cl. 5 for the
presentation of the Annual Report, but the Year Report shall not
be circulated beyond the arrangements set out at (b)
above.

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section



Decree (5): Consent to amendments to
Statutes of Merton College

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to
Statutes V and X of Merton College approved by the Governing Body
on 16 March 1998, in so far as such consent is required by
section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act,
1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are to provide
that all graduate scholarships should be governed by college
by-laws and to delete provisions relating to college
contributions which have now become obsolete.


Decree (6): Consent to amendments to
Statutes of Magdalen College

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to
Statutes IV and VIII of Magdalen College approved by the
Governing Body on 29 May 1998, in so far as such consent is
required by section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and
Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effect of the amendments is to allow
housing allowance to be made pensionable.


Decree (7): Remission of composition
fees (Mr J. Barratt)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 6,
cl. 15 (Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 1099, as
renumbered by Decree (3) of 11 June 1998, Gazette,
Vol. 128, p. 1352), Mr J. Barratt, Exeter, shall be required to
pay composition fees of only £600 per annum for the academic
years 1998--9 and 1999--2000.


Decree (8): Remission of composition
fees (Miss Z. Filipovic)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 6,
cl. 15 (Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 1099, as
renumbered by Decree (3) of 11 June 1998, Gazette,
Vol. 128, p. 1352), Miss Z. Filipovic, St John's College, shall
be required to pay fees at the `home' rate for her period of
undergraduate study.

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section



2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the
provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, p.
367) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for
membership of Congregation:

ANDREA CAPOVILLA, St Anne's College

CAROLYN MAREE EVANS, Exeter College

JOANNA KATHERINE MILES, Christ Church

MARK DAVID WALTERS, D.PHIL., New College

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to
the Register of Congregation:

Ball, S.A., MA, Trinity

Capovilla, A., MA status, St Anne's

Evans, C.M., MA status, Exeter

Miles, J.K., MA status, Christ Church

Walters, M.D., MA status, D.Phil., New College

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
16
October, see `Examinations and Boards' below.




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 October 1998: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

  • *
    Note on procedures in Congregation
  • *
    List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • *
    List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

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    CONGREGATION 5 October


    Degree by Special Resolution

    The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved
    at noon on 5 October, unless by that time the Registrar has
    received notice in writing from two or more members of
    Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6
    (Statutes, 1997, p. 15) that they wish the
    resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

    Text of Special Resolution

    That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
    following:

    ALAN BRINKLEY, Queen's College

    IRA MELLMAN, Lincoln College

    JEREMY JOHN RICHARDSON, Nuffield College

    DAVID ANDREWS SNEATH, St Cross College

    PAUL STROHM, St Anne's College

    KEITH STEWART THOMSON, Kellogg College

    GERARD JAN HENK VAN GELDER, St John's College

    DAVID VAVER, St Peter's College

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    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 October 1998: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
    previously published or recurrent entry.]

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    issue



    UNIVERSITY PREACHERS


    MICHAELMAS TERM 1998

    Thursday, 8 October, at 8 a.m. THE REVD DR TIMOTHY
    BRADSHAW, Fellow of Regent's Park College, Celebrant,
    Holy Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 11 October, at 10 a.m. THE REVD HUGH WHITE,
    University Lecturer (CUF) in English, Fellow of St
    Catherine's College. At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 18 October, at 10 a.m. THE REVD CANON BRIAN
    MOUNTFORD, Vicar of St Mary's. At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 25 October, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR FRANCES YOUNG,
    OBE, Cadbury Professor of Theology and
    Pro-Vice-Chancellor, University of Birmingham. At St
    Mary's.

    *Sunday, 1 November, at 10 a.m. DR JANET WILLIAMS,
    Lecturer in Religious Studies, King Alfred's University
    College, Winchester. At University College.

    Sunday, 8 November, at 10 a.m. THE REVD ANGELA
    TILBY. (Remembrance Sunday.) At St Mary's.

    Tuesday, 10 November, at 10.15 a.m. THE REVD JOHN DAVIES,
    Fellow and Chaplain of Keble College. (Court Sermon. The
    Learned and Honourable High Court Judges will attend this
    Sermon.) At the Cathedral.

    Sunday, 15 November, at 10 a.m. THE REVD DR COLIN
    THOMPSON, Lecturer in Spanish, Fellow of St Catherine's
    College. At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 22 November, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR DAVID MARQUAND,
    FBA, Principal of Mansfield College. (Sermon on the Sin
    of Pride.). At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 29 November, at 10 a.m. THE REVD JOHN CLARKE,
    Principal of Ripon College, Cuddesdon. (Advent Sermon.)
    At the Cathedral.

    *On this day, Doctors will wear their robes.

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    section



    SAVILIAN PROFESSORSHIP OF
    ASTRONOMY

    JOSEPH I. SILK (BA Cambridge, PH.D. Harvard), Professor
    of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, has
    been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1
    January 1999.

    Professor Silk will be a fellow of New College.

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    section



    MAY PROFESSORSHIP OF MEDICINE

    RAJESH V. THAKKER (MB, B.CHIR., MA, MD Cambridge),
    Professor of Medicine, Head of MRC Molecular Epidemiology
    Group and Consultant Physician and Endocrinologist,
    Imperial College School of Medicine and Hammersmith
    Hospital, London, has been appointed to the professorship
    with effect from a date to be arranged.

    Professor Thakker will be a fellow of Somerville
    College.

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    section



    PROFESSORSHIP OF PURE
    MATHEMATICS

    DAVID RODNEY HEATH-BROWN, MA, D.PHIL. (MA, PH.D.
    Cambridge), FRS, Fellow of Magdalen College and Reader in
    Mathematics, has been appointed to the professorship with
    effect from 1 January 1999.

    Dr Heath-Brown will be a fellow of Worcester College.

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    section



    GOVERNMENT GREEN PAPER, `THE
    LEARNING AGE: A RENAISSANCE FOR A NEW BRITAIN'


    The University's response

    In February 1998 the Government published a Green Paper,
    `The Learning Age: a renaissance for a new Britain' (Cm
    3790), on which comments were invited. The paper is
    available on the internet at
    http://www.lifelonglearning.co.uk and printed copies may
    be purchased from the Stationery Office. The University's
    response is set out below.

    1. General comments

    The University of Oxford welcomes and shares the
    Government's commitment to life-long learning and to
    widening participation in higher education. The
    University is a major provider of life-long learning
    opportunities and has been so since the late nineteenth
    century when it was one of the first universities to
    organise substantial programmes of higher education for
    adults. As a major research university providing
    opportunities for high-quality learning and teaching it
    is well placed to deliver `universal and life-long'
    educational opportunities which it argued as early as the
    late nineteenth century should be `regarded by
    universities as a normal and necessary part of their
    function'.

    In its Mission Statement the University has indicated a
    principal aim `to be more widely accessible, both by
    broadening recruitment to its degrees and by expansion of
    high-quality post-experience vocational courses and other
    part-time courses leading to awards while preserving the
    important provision of non-award-bearing courses'. The
    rapid and continuing expansion of its Department for
    Continuing Education has been integral in fulfilling that
    aim, in particular through increasing the accessibility
    of the University's credit- and award-bearing courses and
    of making available its facilities and expertise for
    life-long learning in the wider community. There are now
    more than 15,000 students registered for courses
    organised by the University's department, many in
    collaboration with other departments and faculties,
    including 3,000 taking credit-bearing courses and 900
    studying for university awards. Classes are taught in
    Oxford and throughout the region, particularly in more
    remote areas not well served by face-to-face providers of
    higher education.

    In most places in the Green Paper further and higher
    education are referred to together. The University
    believes strongly that the roles of both sectors are
    complementary and that there must be good links between
    the two if the Government's vision for life-long learning
    is to be achieved, but it is also concerned that there
    may be a danger that the distinctive role of higher
    education, in standards and approach, may be overlooked.
    Higher education has an important contribution to make to
    life-long learning to help men and women to develop their
    intellectual capacities to the highest levels. This
    should always be pursued by the most flexible and
    user-friendly means possible. Care should, however, be
    taken not to compromise standards and the integrity of
    the task, or the potential achievements of students, by
    concealing the demands made by life-long learning at the
    higher education level on students, teachers, and
    institutions. The University believes that it will best
    serve the Learning Age by continuing to make these
    demands.

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    2. The agenda for higher education

    The University supports the Government's agenda for
    higher education within this framework of life-long
    learning, and is responding to the direction which has
    been set in the following ways:

    —providing more places to meet demand

    Although the University is not proposing a significant
    increase in numbers of full-time students, it intends to
    maintain growth in part-time students, whose numbers have
    doubled in the last eight years. The University was
    successful in its recent bid to HEFCE for funding to
    support expansion in this area.

    —offering a wide range of courses up to
    postgraduate level

    Alongside the University's very wide range of courses
    for full-time students, it now offers 600 courses a year
    to part-time students. These range from access and
    foundation courses to increasing numbers of Master's
    degrees. There are now also opportunities to undertake
    part-time doctoral studies. The University is
    particularly well placed as a major research institution
    to respond to the needs of employers and employees for
    courses geared towards professional updating. It welcomes
    the Government's focus on provision for the highest level
    of postgraduate education and hopes that the very high
    costs of developing such courses will be recognised. In
    the area of continuing professional development it is
    understood that such courses must, when offered, meet
    their direct costs, and the full test of the market, but
    unless pump-priming funding is allocated it is unlikely
    that institutions could make the required investment out
    of their own stretched resources. An enhancement of
    schemes such as the IGDS projects and of HEFCE CVE
    development funding should be given high priority.

    —ensuring high standards so as to enhance the
    employability of graduates

    Oxford's record for the employability of its full-time
    graduates is amongst the best in the country. The same is
    increasingly true for the students on the vocationally
    orientated part-time courses.

    —improving participation by offering
    opportunities later in life to those who missed out first
    time round

    Harris Manchester College was incorporated in 1996
    with the primary purpose of meeting the needs of mature
    full-time students, and the number of such students
    reading for a first degree has doubled in recent years.
    Much of the work of the Department for Continuing
    Education is aimed at giving second chances to mature
    students who are best able to study part-time. It offers
    a range of opportunities for participation in higher
    education from courses designed to facilitate access to
    higher education to a programme of certificate, diploma,
    and Master's courses in subjects as diverse as Local
    History and Software Engineering.

    —contributing more to the economy and being
    more responsive to the needs of business

    In addition to the University's considerable success
    in technology transfer, including the establishment of
    new companies based on university research, the work of
    the CPD Centre in the Department for Continuing
    Education, and of the partners in Business at Oxford, is
    aimed squarely at responding to the needs of business,
    industry, and the professions. The University's
    contribution has been both general, for example in
    offering courses to update IT skills, and specific, for
    example running bespoke courses for local employers. The
    Business at Oxford partnership has embarked on an
    ambitious programme of expansion which began with a new
    undergraduate degree in Economics and Management in 1994
    and a Master of Business Administration in 1996. It will
    develop extensively its existing programme of executive
    courses, of which some are designed for individual
    companies and others are open to the public and recruit
    nationally and internationally.

    —collaborating effectively with other
    institutions, other learning providers, and the world of
    work

    The University works closely with a wide range of
    partners, including Oxford Brookes University, the Open
    University, the Heart of England TEC, the NHS, and local
    employers. It validates a range of degrees at Westminster
    College. In partnership with Oxford Brookes University it
    has established the Oxford Institute of Legal Practice
    which, among other things, offers a postgraduate diploma
    in legal practice which constitutes the vocational stage
    of training for solicitors. This course is validated by
    the Law Society which recently gave it an `excellent'
    grading.

    —making itself more accessible by exploiting
    new technology and flexible delivery with facilities
    available at times convenient to students

    Many of the University's 15,000 part-time students
    attend courses which are delivered in the evenings and at
    weekends. The University is also actively engaged in
    developing courses using technologies which will further
    enhance the flexible delivery of its courses. The costs
    of developing technology-based modes of delivery are not
    insignificant and the University hopes that this
    necessary development will be encouraged and supported by
    the availability of seed-corn funding from the Funding
    Councils and other bodies. The University also believes
    that there should be an element of caution in this area.
    For example, the Green Paper asks whether the University
    for Industry should focus exclusively on using new
    technology to deliver learning. The University believes
    that by focusing exclusively there is a risk
    of excluding certain groups, such as those on low
    incomes. It has noted, also, some evidence that there is
    a lower take-up of IT-delivered courses by women.

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    3. Widening participation

    The Government rightly aims to support and encourage
    students from families without a background of going to
    university to stay in education after 16 and to fulfil
    their potential by progressing to higher education.

    This University shares the Government's commitment to
    widening access, and to ensuring that Oxford is
    accessible to all academically qualified students
    irrespective of their social or educational background,
    gender, ethnicity, individual circumstances, and regional
    or national origins. Our policy to widen access to
    full-time undergraduate courses must, however, be seen in
    the context of admission to Oxford being very
    competitive. Our selection procedures are rigorous, but
    all candidates are considered carefully on their
    individual merits. In distinguishing between candidates
    we place particular emphasis on a candidate's potential
    to benefit from the educational opportunities available
    here.

    The Vice-Chancellor is chairing a working party on access
    which is considering the most effective means of ensuring
    a broad diversity of students, and which will report in
    the autumn of 1998. The working party will seek means to
    encourage more students from currently under-represented
    groups to apply to the University and, at the same time,
    to make sure that our selection procedures continue to be
    fair and properly identify potential. A variety of
    current schemes such as the student-led Target Scheme
    will be enlarged. Initiatives involving both prospective
    students (such as summer schools and master classes) and
    teachers are being developed. The in-service
    opportunities which allow practising teachers, from the
    maintained sector, time in Oxford further developing
    their professional skills are an example of this. These
    all build on the many long-standing college-based
    initiatives such as school visits, open days, and
    teachers' fora.

    The University is a major provider of educational
    services, and is already exploring ways of working with
    other higher education institutions in the region to
    promote access to higher education in general for
    previously under-represented and disadvantaged groups. We
    support the current HEFCE initiative to provide funding
    for regional schemes to widen participation in the
    University and are looking at ways of building
    partnerships with schools, the further education sector,
    and community groups in the region.

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    4. University for Industry

    The University supports any measures which encourage
    individuals to participate in life-long learning and, in
    particular, those who have little experience of post-16
    education and who need to acquire basic skills. It
    welcomes the role that the University for Industry (UfI)
    will play in this and although the level of learning on
    which the UfI appears to be focusing is that of more
    basic skills, the University will want to work with it as
    far as is practicable and, indeed, is already doing so as
    part of a regional consortium. Many of the range of short
    courses available within the University will be relevant
    to the UfI's mission, for example IT skills or
    professional updating, and more generally those aimed at
    encouraging return to learning and facilitating access to
    higher education. By working with existing providers the
    UfI will have ready access to networks and to established
    partnerships and markets which will make its task easier.
    The University hopes that once the UfI has became firmly
    established its title might be reviewed, as it is thought
    that what it aims to do, largely, is not at university
    level nor restricted to the needs of industry.

    The University supports the development of improved
    sources of guidance and advice for learners and welcomes
    the Learning Direct initiative. It believes, however,
    that comprehensive and up-to-date information about
    learning opportunities needs to be available. This may
    require a thorough trawl of existing providers. There
    will also be a need to audit information regularly and
    this could, perhaps, be organised electronically.

    5. Credit accumulation and transfer

    The University believes there is merit in developing a
    national framework for credit accumulation and transfer.
    The University has recently asked the Department for
    Continuing Education to bring forward a comprehensive and
    integrated scheme covering the relevant university
    courses which will build on the existing more limited
    arrangements which link up with regional providers.

    6. Ensuring standards, quality, and accountability

    The University supports the Government's commitment to a
    continued drive to improve standards and quality across
    teaching, research, and qualifications in higher
    education. In its recent response to the consultation
    paper issued by the Quality Assurance Agency it has set
    out its own detailed procedures which provide for
    internal quality and external accountability at a level
    appropriate to a university which aims to achieve the
    highest international standards. It is firmly of the view
    that the University's excellent record of results in
    teaching quality assessments demonstrates the adequacy of
    its current rigorous and externally scrutinised
    monitoring procedures. It also has expressed some
    concerns about the imposition of too rigid and
    bureaucratic a system and believes strongly that more
    trust should be put in the professionalism and competence
    of individual institutions.

    The University believes that the quality of provision for
    adult education should be assured as securely as that for
    any other form of education. All its courses, from
    non-award-bearing programmes to graduate courses, are
    subject to the same scrutiny and systematic reporting. It
    believes that part-time teaching staff should be included
    in the brief of the Institute for Learning and Teaching.
    The University is currently considering a recommendation
    arising from a recent review of the Department for
    Continuing Education which seeks to recognise and reward
    teaching on continuing education courses on a par with
    teaching on full-time undergraduate and graduate courses.
    The University also has in place a programme of staff
    development, assessment, and monitoring for part-time as
    well as full-time staff, and has recently established a
    pilot scheme for award-bearing courses in the training of
    university teachers. A university lecturer has been
    appointed for this purpose.

    7. Investing in learning

    The University supports the Government's funding
    priorities. In particular it believes that there should
    be equitable funding for part-time and other
    non-traditional students. It believes that the funding
    system for higher education should not discriminate
    against either learners or providers on the basis of mode
    of study, and that the funding mechanism should promote
    social inclusion. The introduction of Individual Learning
    Accounts represents a useful step in this. To be
    effective, however, the University believes that these
    should be easy to use and that employers will not only
    need incentives to support their own investment in
    employee education but will need to consider how to
    reward the employee's efforts to learn.

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    section



    HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING COUNCIL
    FOR ENGLAND (HEFCE): QUINQUENNIAL REVIEW


    The University's response

    During the Long Vacation, Mr Vice-Chancellor received an
    invitation to comment on the quinquennial review of HEFCE
    currently being conducted by the Department for Education
    and Employment (DfEE). Such reviews are a routine
    requirement for government departments in respect of
    their non- departmental public bodies (NDPBs), and the
    first part of the process (`prior options review') seeks
    to establish

    (a) whether the functions of the NDPB are
    still necessary; and

    (b) whether the constitution of the NDPB is
    still the best way to deliver these functions.

    A questionnaire drawn up by the DfEE in this connection
    is appended at A, and a note on HEFCE's purpose, mission,
    and strategic aims is appended at B. The response sent by
    Mr Vice-Chancellor on behalf of the University is
    appended at C.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    APPENDIX A

    DfEE questionnaire for interested organisations

    1. How effectively do you think the HEFCE is carrying
    out its current functions and what changes might be made
    to increase its effectiveness?

    2. Are there areas in which the HEFCE duplicates the
    work of other bodies? If so, where and how does
    duplication occur?

    3. How responsive do you think the HEFCE is to
    developments in Government policy and more generally to
    change?

    4. How effectively does the HEFCE work with other
    partners to achieve its objectives?

    5. Could any of the functions of the HEFCE be
    delivered more effectively and efficiently in other ways?

    6. How do you think the HEFCE's role should develop
    over the next few years?

    7. Is there a continuing need for a funding body
    separate from the Government to fund higher education in
    English institutions?

    8. If such a body is required, should it be the HEFCE
    or a different body? Why? And if you think a different
    body, what sort of body?

    9. If a funding body is not required, how should
    public funding for higher education in England be
    delivered?

    10. Are there any other comments about the HEFCE, its
    terms of reference, constitutional status and Board
    membership you would wish to make?

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    section


    APPENDIX B

    Note on HEFCE and its main functions

    The purpose of the HEFCE

    1. The HEFCE distributes funds made available by the
    Secretary of State for Education and Employment for the
    provision of education and the undertaking of research by
    higher education institutions in England. It is also
    responsible for funding prescribed courses of higher
    education provided in further education colleges.

    2. The HEFCE has the following statutory duties:

    —to allocate public funds for education, research
    and associated activities by higher education
    institutions in England;

    —to advise the Secretary of State on the funding
    needs of higher education institutions in England;
    and

    —to promote, through the assessment of research and
    teaching quality and other means, the quality and
    quantity of higher education learning and research
    cost-effectively and with regard to national needs.

    The HEFCE's Mission and Strategic Aims

    3. The HEFCE's mission is `Working in partnership, we
    promote and fund high-quality, cost-effective teaching
    and research, meeting the diverse needs of students, the
    economy and society.'

    4. To achieve its mission, the HEFCE aims to:

    (a) Promote high standards of education and
    research so as to advance knowledge and scholarship,
    encourage improvement and innovation and enhance
    students' learning experience and employment prospects.

    (b) Encourage institutions to increase
    access, secure equal opportunities, support lifelong
    learning and maximise achievement for all who can
    benefit from higher education.

    (c) Maintain and encourage the development of
    a wide variety of institutions with a diversity of
    missions that build upon their local, regional, national
    and international strengths and are responsive to
    change, within a financially healthy sector.

    (d) Develop and sustain effective
    partnerships with institutions, employers, other funding
    and professional bodies and others with a stake in
    higher education, by providing clear and open information
    and promoting collaboration between them.

    (e) Advise Government and other stakeholders
    on higher education's needs and aspirations, and help
    make widely known the achievements and opportunities
    offered by higher education, particularly to students.

    (f) Use consultation, research and
    benchmarking to increase knowledge and understanding of
    higher education, and inform policy development.

    (g) Contribute to the healthy development of
    higher education in this country and overseas by
    learning from international experience and helping to
    promote the reputation and competitiveness of UK higher
    education abroad.

    ( h) Promote effective financial management,
    accountability for the use of public funds and value for
    money.

    (i) Enable its staff to provide a high-quality
    service, within an open and supportive working
    environment.

    5. For 1998--9 the HEFCE is responsible for
    distributing some £3.5 billion of public funds. It
    has 165 staff and an administration costs budget of
    £8.9 million.

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    section


    APPENDIX C

    Letter to the DfEE from Mr Vice-Chancellor

    9 September 1998

    DfEE Quinquennial Review of HEFCE

    I write with reference to HEFCE circular letter 21/98,
    in which Brian Fender described to universities the
    Quinquennial Review of HEFCE currently being conducted by
    the DfEE. My purpose in writing is simply to express
    strong general support for the continued existence of
    HEFCE as a non-departmental public body responsible for
    allocating funds to the higher education sector,
    constituted in broadly its current terms.

    For all the difficulties associated with HEFCE's role, we
    believe it to be extremely valuable in acting as the
    primary `arms length' intermediary between central
    Government on the one hand, and individual universities
    on the other, at least so long as universities are not
    free simply to `get on' in the market place. Like many
    other HEIs, we have reservations about some of the
    policies recently pursued by HEFCE; these include the
    changes made to its teaching funding method and the
    attempt to impose a standard or uniform approach to
    funding what is now a very diverse sector. We are also
    concerned about the over-emphasis on regulation, audit,
    codes of practice, control, and information gathering
    which, as noted in the CVCP's submission in response to
    the review, is increasingly costly and burdensome to
    HEIs, and is really designed to protect HEFCE against the
    Public Accounts Committee in case anything goes wrong in
    the sector. However, we firmly believe that the existence
    of HEFCE or a similarly constituted body is greatly
    preferable to some of the alternatives which have been
    canvassed, such as a merger with the FEFC, or a transfer
    of research money to the research councils. We strongly
    support HEFCE's continued role in providing general funds
    for research to universities, and believe that any
    further transfer of funds from HEFCE to the research
    councils would be seriously damaging to the research base
    in higher education.

    Finally, we believe HEFCE has an important role to play
    in arguing the case for increased resources to be made
    available to higher education, but would like to see more
    openness about the advice which the funding council gives
    to ministers. HEFCE's role of a planning body, or
    non-planning body, for the UK system is unclear. HEFCE is
    neither interventionist (for example in promoting
    rationalisation of institutions or subject provision in
    the system), nor entirely hands-on. Some greater clarity
    in this area would be desirable.

    I appreciate that the review you are conducting is due to
    come to an end later this month, but hope that it is not
    too late for these views to be taken into account.

    (Signed) COLIN LUCAS

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    section



    COMMITTEE ON DISTINCTION AWARDS
    FOR NON-CLINICAL PROFESSORS

    The composition of this committee, which will consider
    making new or enhanced distinction awards with effect
    from 1 October 1998 to those
    holding the post of non-clinical professor, is as
    follows:

    Mr Vice-Chancellor

    President of Corpus Christi

    Rector of Exeter

    Principal of Hertford

    Warden of Nuffield

    Professor B.A.O. Williams

    Professor Sir Michael Atiyah

    Professor Sir David Weatherall

    Professor J.S. Rowlinson

    Professor J.E. Enderby, H.O. Wills Professor of Physics,
    University
    of Bristol

    Eligible professors have been sent details of the current
    exercise:
    any professor who has not received these should contact
    Dr J.D.
    Whiteley at the University Offices.

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    section



    COMPOSITION OF ELECTORAL BOARDS

    The composition of the electoral boards to the posts
    below, proceedings to fill which are currently in
    progress, is as follows:

    Appointed by


    Professorship of Mathematical
    Logic

    
    Mr Vice-Chancellor               ex officio
    The Warden, Merton College       ex officio
    Professor W.A. Hodges            Council
    Professor R. Solovay             Council
    Professor C. Parsons             General Board
    Professor C.J.G. Wright          General Board
    Professor C.A.B. Peacocke        Literae Humaniores Board
    Dr P.M. Neumann                  Mathematical Sciences Board
    Professor J.A.D. Welsh           Merton College
    
    


    Professorship of Genetics

    
    Professor S. Iversen (Chairman)  Mr Vice-Chancellor[1]
    The Warden, Keble College        ex officio
    Professor M. Ashburner           Council
    Dr P. Nurse, London              Council
    Professor N.E. Murray            General Board
    Professor P.C. Newell            Biological Sciences Board
    Professor C.J. Leaver            Biological Sciences Board
    Professor D.J. Sherratt          Biological Sciences Board
    Dr S.V. Hunt                     Keble College
    
    


    Professorship of Jurisprudence

    
    Mr Vice-Chancellor               ex officio
    The Master, University College   ex officio
    Professor G.A. Cohen             Council
    Professor F. Kamm                General Board
    Professor D.N. Maccormick        General Board
    Professor J. Raz                 Law Board
    Mr J. Eekelaar                   Law Board
    Professor M.R. Freedland         Law Board
    Professor J. Finnis              University College
    
    


    Nuffield Professorship of
    Pathology

    
    The Principal, Linacre College   Mr Vice-Chancellor[1]
    The Master, Pembroke College     ex officio
    Professor Sir Colin Berry        Council
    Professor H.E. Waldmann          General Board
    Professor K.E. Davies            General Board
    Professor J. O'D. McGee          ex officio
    Professor Sir David Weatherall   Clinical Medicine Board
    Dr K.A. Fleming                  Clinical Medicine Board
    Professor Sir Peter Morris       Clinical Medicine Board
    Dr C. Bunch                      Oxfordshire Health Authority
    Dr S. Whitefield                 Pembroke College
    
    


    Professorship of the Physical
    Examination of Materials

    
    The President, St John's College  Mr Vice-Chancellor[1]
    The Principal, Linacre College   ex officio
    Professor A. Sutton              Linacre College
    Professor J.W. Steeds            Council
    Dr J. King                       General Board
    Professor A. Howie               General Board
    Professor B. Cantor              Physical Sciences Board
    Professor J.D. Hunt              Physical Sciences Board
    Dr C.R.M. Grovenor               Physical Sciences Board
    

    [1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions
    of Tit. IX, Sect. III, cl. 2 (Statutes,
    1997, p. 67).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    COMPUTING SERVICES

    Charging for Janet Transatlantic Traffic

    The University is now being billed for Janet traffic (Web
    pages, e-mail, etc.), coming across the transatlantic
    network link, at the rate of £0.01 per megabyte
    (that rate is set to double in a year's time). Details of
    these charges for the whole University and
    (approximately) for departments and colleges, for each
    day and by month, can be seen on the Web at

    http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/internal/janet-billing.html

    (or
    reach it via the Oxford home page: IT Information:
    Networks). Further details of the charging arrangements
    can also be seen by following those links.

    Only inbound traffic is being charged for, and any
    traffic arriving between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m. (seven days a
    week) is free (in the first year). Traffic directed
    through the national Web cache, to which all traffic
    through the Oxford cache is directed, will be free (in
    the first year).

    The IT Committee has not yet decided on a recommendation
    about how the charges in subsequent years should be met,
    but the possibility that they will be passed on to
    departments and units will surely receive careful
    consideration.

    Use of the Oxford Web cache is still voluntary, but the
    IT Committee will doubtless also wish to consider whether
    it should be made compulsory for all traffic that could
    pass through it. Of course, use of the cache may
    sometimes be slower than going direct; however, it will
    be faster if someone else has recently retrieved the same
    page, and the saving that would be made should also be
    taken into account. Details of how to use the cache can
    be seen on the Web at
    http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/oucs/proxies/.

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    section



    CIRCULATION OF THE
    GAZETTE TO RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE
    UNIVERSITY

    It has been decided that any former member of
    Congregation over the age of seventy-five who is resident
    in Oxford may continue to receive the
    Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on
    application in writing to the Information Office,
    University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.
    Such applications must be renewed at the beginning of
    each academic year.

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    section



    ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

    2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

    Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the
    University, was established in 1988. The company has been
    formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded
    by the UK Government through the Research Councils and
    funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The
    function of the company is to ensure that the results of
    research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors,
    who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

    Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or
    royalties for the use of know-how arising out of
    research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of
    the University by setting up individual companies using
    venture capital or development capital funds.

    Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish
    to exploit the results of research supported by
    non-Research Council sources, when there are no prior
    conditions on the handling of the intellectual property
    rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a small
    pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting
    intellectual property rights and for taking work to a
    stage where its potential can be assessed.

    Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new
    ideas can be developed for market requirements. The
    company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for
    major industrial companies, so that they can have a
    window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license
    and invest where appropriate.

    A brochure explaining Isis' activities is
    available. Please contact the above address, or the
    telephone and fax numbers given below.

    Members of the University should contact the Managing
    Director if they wish to take advantage of the services
    that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

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    section



    CONCERT


    St John's College and Colin
    Carr

    MARK PESKANOV (violin) and JULIAN JACOBSON (piano) will
    perform the following works at 8.30 p.m. on Saturday, 17
    October, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's
    College: Schubert, Rondo in A major; Prokofiev, Sonata in
    F minor; Bach, Sonata in G minor for unaccompanied
    violin; Bloch, Nigun; Sarasate, op. 21 no.
    2, op. 23 no. 2, and op. 43.

    Admission is free. Programmes will be available from the
    Porters' Lodge, St John's College, but are reserved for
    members of the college until 10 October. Each programme
    will be valid as an admission ticket until 8.20 p.m. Any
    vacant seats will be filled from the door during the last
    ten minutes before the concert starts.

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    section



    BODLEIAN LIBRARY


    Introductory sessions

    Making the most of the Bodleian Library: a guide to the
    central Bodleian facilities and services

    Sessions designed to enable graduate students, academic
    staff, others of a similar status, and readers without
    any institutional affiliation, to make the most of the
    Bodleian Library, will be offered during October.
    Sessions cover the use of the Central Bodleian Library,
    including use of the catalogues and procedures for
    locating and obtaining material and a guide to reference
    material. They take the form of a tour of the Lower
    Reading Room Catalogue and General Reference Section in
    the Central Bodleian Library, so that participants can be
    shown material in context.

    Each session will begin at 9.30 a.m. promptly and will
    last for about an hour. Twelve places are available on
    each of the following dates in October: 6, 8, 9, 13, 15,
    16, 20, 22, 23, 27, 29, and 30.

    Readers who wish to attend one of these sessions are
    asked to book a place by entering their name,
    college/department address and University Card number (as
    appropriate) on the list which is available on the
    Proscholium (Bodleian Library Old LIbrary Entrance Hall)
    on the south side. Please give your name to the staff at
    the Main Enquiry Desk in the Lower Reading Room when you
    attend.

    `Making the most of the Bodleian Library' sessions
    continue throughout most of the year on Tuesdays and
    Fridays at the same time. Exact dates are given on the
    sign-up sheets.

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    section



    Disruption in central Bodleian
    Reading Rooms during Induction Week

    Readers are warned that there will be considerable
    disruption in certain reading rooms in the central
    Bodleian during induction week. Throughout the three days
    Wednesday, 7 October, to Friday, 9 October, library staff
    will be engaged in taking groups of new undergraduates
    round different parts of the library and giving them
    introductory talks in reading rooms.

    Talks will be taking place in various locations,
    including the Lower Reading Room and the Lower Camera.
    Similar talks will take place on a smaller scale in other
    reading rooms during this week and the week following.

    The library is aware that these sessions will cause
    inconvenience to readers, but believes that it is
    important to offer library introductions to new students
    during their first week here.

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    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 October 1998: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    WINCHESTER LECTURE IN INTERNATIONAL
    RELATIONS 1998

    PROFESSOR K. WALTZ, Adjunct Professor, Columbia University, will
    deliver the Winchester Lecture in International Relations at 5
    p.m. on Tuesday, 20 October, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Realism after the Cold War.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF
    EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 1998–9

    The story begins: studying the opening sections of
    masterpieces in literature

    PROFESSOR AMOS OZ, Professor of Hebrew Literature, Ben Gurion
    University of Negev, Israel, and Weidenfeld Visiting Professor
    of Comparative European Literature 1998–9, will lecture on
    the following Mondays and Thursdays in the Examination
    Schools.

    Professor Oz will also give seminars at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20
    October, and Tuesday, 27 October, in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's
    College.

    12 Oct.: `But what actually existed before the Big
    Bang?'

    15 Oct.: `On the beginning of Effie
    Briest
    by Theodore Fontane.'

    19 Oct.: `On the beginning of In the Prime of
    Her Life
    by S.Y. Agnon.'

    22 Oct.: `On the beginning of The Nose
    by Nikolai Gogol.'

    26 Oct.: `On the beginning of A Country
    Doctor
    by Franz Kafka.'

    29 Oct.: `On the beginning of Rothschild's
    Fiddle
    by Anton Chekhov.'

    2 Nov.: `On the beginning of The Autumn of
    the Patriarch
    by G. Garcia Marquez.'

    5 Nov.: `On the beginning of Nobody Said
    Anything
    by Raymond Carver.'

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    section



    CAMERON MACKINTOSH LECTURES

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's College.

    PROFESSOR THELMA HOLT and YUKIO NINAGAWA

    30 Oct.: Conversation with Michael
    Billington.

    PROFESSOR THELMA HOLT and Sir Peter Hall

    20 Nov.: `Theatre—where the imagination
    lives.'

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    section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    The following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
    Seminar Room, the Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford
    Hospital.

    Convener: G.M. Goodwin, BM, MA, D.Phil., Handley
    Professor of Psychiatry.

    DR T. TURNER, St Bartholomew's Hospital

    13 Oct.: `Whatever happened to community
    care?'

    PROFESSOR D. SKUSE, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London

    20 Oct.: `Genes, cognition, and behaviour:
    sexual dimorphism and the mysterious role of the X
    chromosome.'

    PROFESSOR S. LEWIS, Withington Hospital, Manchester

    17 Nov.: `New psychological treatments for
    schizophrenia—do they work?'

    PROFESSOR S. BRANDON, Royal Infirmary, Leicester

    1 Dec.: `Recovered memories of childhood sexual
    abuse: the nature of the controversy syndrome.'

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    section


    Nuffield Department of Surgery

    The following seminars will be held at the times indicated on
    Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of Surgery,
    Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    D. DRAGUN, Max Delbruch Centre for Molecular Medicine, Berlin

    6 Oct., 1 p.m.: `ICAM-1 antisense
    oligonucleotides block ischaemic injury in long-term
    surviving kidney allografts.'

    K. CHANNON

    13 Oct., 5 p.m.: `Gene transfer in vein graft
    atherosclerosis.'

    N. BORLEY

    20 Oct., 5 p.m.: `Are there two types of
    Crohn's disease?'

    A. HANDA

    27 Oct., 6 p.m.: `After aspirin? Anti-platelet
    agents in peripheral vascular disease.'

    T. COOK

    3 Nov., 5 p.m: `Properties and pharmacology of
    the anal sphincter.'

    S. DEMEESTER, Johns Hopkins Fellow

    10 Nov., 5 p.m.: `Mechanisms of cell death in
    organ failure.'

    P. GARSIDE, Glasgow

    17 Nov., 1 p.m.: `Revealing T and B lymphocyte
    interactions in vivo.'

    S. ANDERTON, Bristol

    24 Nov., 1 p.m.: `Peptide-inducing T cell
    tolerance in autoimmunity.'

    D. ADAMS, Birmingham

    8 Dec., 1 p.m.: `Tissue specific signals that
    regulate lymphocyte recruitment to the human liver.'

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    section


    Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    A meeting will be held on Tuesday, 13 October, in the Nuffield
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Level 3, the Women's
    Centre, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    DR C. HARPER, Alec Turnbull Family Planning Clinic, Oxford

    2 p.m.: `Mirena IUD.'

    MR R. GARRY, South Cleveland Hospital, Middlesbrough

    3 p.m.: `Radical excision of advanced
    endometriosis.'

    MR S. THORNTON, Park Hospital, Nottingham

    4 p.m.: `Frontiers in managing male
    infertility.'

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    section


    Diabetes Research Laboratories: Clinical Endocrine and
    Metabolic Meetings

    The following meetings will be held at 12.45 p.m. on Wednesdays
    in the Committee Room, Green College.

    DR L. YOUNGMAN and MS S. CLARK

    14 Oct.: `Large-scale clinical and
    epidemiological studies—novel laboratory solutions.'

    DR M. WALKER

    21 Oct.: `Type II diabetes in families—a
    complicated affair.'

    PROFESSOR P. STEWART

    28 Oct.: `Endocine hypertension.'

    PROFESSOR A. WINDER

    4 Nov.: To be announced.

    DR J. POULTON

    11 Nov.: `Microchondrial DNA diseases and
    diabetes.'

    PROFESSOR P. BAYLISS

    18 Nov.: `Diabetes insipidus.'

    PROFESSOR C. COOPER

    25 Nov.: `The epidemiology of osteoporosis.'

    DR A. NEIL

    2 Dec.: To be announced.

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    section



    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Theoretical Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in
    the Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

    Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham Professor of
    Physics.

    PROFESSOR SIR M. BERRY, Bristol

    16 Oct.: `Quantum indistinguishability.'

    PROFESSOR M.F. THORPE, Michigan State and Delft

    30 Oct.: `Rigidity and floppy modes in glasses
    and proteins.'

    PROFESSOR G. KARL, Guelph, Canada

    13 Nov.: `The classical limit of the
    Schrodinger variational principle.'

    DR N. KALOPER, Stanford

    27 Nov.: `Pre-Big Bang: the good, the bad, and
    the ugly.'

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    section


    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: Theoretical
    Chemistry Group Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    New Chemistry Laboratory Seminar Room.

    Details of the RSC Young Medallists' Symposium, to be held on 16
    November, are given below.

    Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of
    Theoretical Chemistry.

    PROFESSOR R. EVANS, Bristol

    12 Oct.: `Phase behaviour of hard-sphere
    mixtures: the role of the entropic depletion potential.'

    DR J. JONES

    19 Oct.: `Quantum computing with nmr.'

    DR H.H. FIELDING, King's College, London

    26 Oct.: `Rydberg electron dynamics.'

    DR G. RAJAGOPAL, Cambridge

    2 Nov.: `Quantum Monte Carlo simulations for
    real systems.'

    DR P.L.A. POPELIER, UMIST

    9 Nov.: `Molecular atoms.'

    DR G. JACKSON, Imperial College, London

    23 Nov.: `Understanding the effect of hydrogen
    bonding and dipolar interactions in liquid crystalline
    systems.'

    DR D.J. WALES, Cambridge

    30 Nov.: `Global analysis of potential energy
    surfaces: from high resolution spectroscopy to glasses and
    protein folding.'

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    section


    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: RSC Young
    Medallists' Symposium

    This symposium will be held at 2 p.m. on Monday, 16 November, in
    the PTCL Lecture Theatre.

    SIR HARRY KROTO

    2 p.m.: `The new round world of flat
    materials.'

    DR D.E. MANOLOPOULOS

    2.45 p.m.: `Interlayer interactions in graphite
    and carbon nanotubes.'

    DR S.D. PRICE

    4 p.m.: `Interactions of dications with atoms,
    molecules, and photons.'

    DR M. WILSON

    4.45 p.m.: ` "Covalent" effects in
    "ionic" materials.'

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    section


    Department of Materials: Hirsch Lecture

    PROFESSOR M.F. ASHBY, Cambridge, will deliver the second Hirsch
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 9 October, in the Main Lecture
    Theatre, the University Museum of Natural History.

    Subject: `The engineering science of cellular
    solids.'

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    section


    Physical Earth Science Seminars: amended notice

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Fridays in
    the coffee room, the Department of Earth Sciences.

    This list replaces that published in the Gazette of
    24 September, p. 12. The first meeting given in that listing (9
    October) has been cancelled.

    Convener: N. Mitchell, Department of Earth
    Sciences.

    E. YOUNG

    16 Oct.: `Oxygen reservoirs in the early solar
    nebula—evidence from laser microprobe analyses of
    oxygen isotopes in CAIs.'

    R. HOLME, Edinburgh

    23 Oct.: `Electromagnetic core–mantle
    coupling.'

    H. DAVIES, Liverpool

    30 Oct.: `Are some intermediate depth
    earthquakes related to subduction magmatism by hydraulic
    fractures?'

    M.M. FLIEDNER, Cambridge

    6 Nov.: `Structure of the southern Sierra
    Nevada of California—upper-crustal remnant of a
    Mesozoic magmatic arc and possible asthenospheric
    support.'

    D. CHAYES, Lamond–Doherty Earth Observatory, and R.
    ANDERSON, US Navy Artic Submarine Laboratory

    13 Nov.: `Seafloor characterisation and mapping
    pods (SCAMP)—a system for geophysical research in the
    Arctic.'

    S. SINGH, Cambridge

    20 Nov.: `Seismic evidence for magmatic
    segmentation, cooling, crystallisation and hydrothermal
    circulation in an axial magma chamber at the East Pacific
    Rise.'

    A. WATTS

    27 Nov.: `Observations of flexure and the
    viscoelastic properties of the lithosphere.'

    K. GALLAGHER, Imperial College

    4 Dec.: `The long-term evolution of passive
    margin topography.'

    P. ORR, University College, Galway

    11 Dec.: `Soft-tissue preservation in the
    fossil record: processes and implications.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    the Weiskrantz Room (C.113), the Department of Experimental
    Psychology.

    Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of Psychology,
    and P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

    DR W. TUNMER, Massey University, New Zealand

    6 Oct.: `The effects of rime-based orthographic
    analogy training on the word recognition skills of children
    with severe reading difficulties.' (McDonnell–Pew
    Seminar
    )

    PROFESSOR M. JOHNSTON, St Andrews

    13 Oct.: `Integrating medical and psychological
    models of disability.' (McDonnell–Pew
    Seminar
    )

    DR D. BISHOP, Cambridge

    20 Oct.: `The role of auditory temporal
    deficits in causing specific language impairment in
    children.'

    PROFESSOR C. MCMANUS, UCL

    27 Oct.: `Why are most people right-handed, but
    a few are left-handed?'

    DR M. GATTIS, Sheffield

    3 Nov.: `Mapping conceptual and spatial
    schemas.'

    DR J. RUSSELL, Cambridge

    10 Nov.: `Executive dysfunctions in autism:
    their nature and significance.'

    DR J. BLAIR, UCL

    17 Nov.: `Developmental and acquired
    psychopathy.'

    PROFESSOR L. MALONEY, New York

    24 Nov.: `Measurement and modelling of cue
    combination.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

    PROFESSOR T. NUNES, Institute of Education, London

    1 Dec.: `Predicting and promoting deaf
    children's development in numeracy.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Royal Society Ferrier Lecture

    PROFESSOR J.-P. CHANGEUX, Collège de France and Institut
    Pasteur, Paris, will deliver the Royal Society Ferrier Lecture
    at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 16 October, in Lecture Theatre A, the
    Department of Experimental Psychology.

    Subject: `The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and
    synaptic plasticity.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SOCIAL STUDIES

    New Issues in International Security: seminar with visiting
    speakers

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Old Library, All Souls College.

    Conveners: Sir John Coles, MA, Dr A. Hurrell, MA,
    M.Phil., D.Phil., Professor R. O'Neill, MA, D.Phil., and
    Professor A. Roberts, MA.

    DR M. KALDOR, Sussex

    16 Oct.: `New and old wars.'

    PROFESSOR N. MYERS

    23 Oct.: `Environment and security.'

    DR J. PILAT, International Institute for Strategic Studies,
    London

    30 Oct.: `Emerging terrorist threats:
    continuity and change.'

    DR F. VARESE

    6 Nov.: `Crime and mafias.'

    PROFESSOR Y. EVRON, Tel Aviv, and PROFESSOR O'NEILL

    13 Nov.: `Proliferation of weapons of mass
    destruction.'

    DR J. CHIPMAN, IISS, London

    20 Nov.: `The security implications of economic
    crises.'

    PROFESSOR L. FREEDMAN, King's College, London

    27 Nov.: `War in the information age.'

    THE CONVENERS

    4 Dec.: Conclusions.

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    section



    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

    Research Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in
    Lecture Room 1, the Department of Educational Studies.

    PROFESSOR G. KRESS, London

    12 Oct.: `Representation, learning, and
    knowledge.'

    PROFESSOR J. CALDERHEAD, Bath

    19 Oct.: `Images of teaching: their relevance
    for the professional development of student teachers.'

    DR J. MELLANBY

    26 Oct.: `Identification and remediation of
    under-achievement in secondary school.'

    PROFESSOR S. BROWN, Stirling

    9 Nov.: `Accessing how staff in special needs
    schools make sense of what they do.'

    PROFESSOR R. PRING

    16 Nov.: `Educational research: facing the
    criticism.'

    PROFESSOR J. ELLIOTT, East Anglia

    23 Nov.: `Environment education and school
    development: perspectives from the OECD's "Environment
    and Schools Initiative" project.'

    DR K. BACCHUS, Aga Khan University

    30 Nov.: `The re-professionalisation of
    practising teachers.'

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    section


    Centre for Comparative Studies in Education

    Aspects of the Education Systems of the United Kingdom

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    Lecture Room 1, the Department of Educational Studies.

    Convener: D.G. Phillips, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
    Comparative Education.

    PROFESOR D. RAFFE, Edinburgh

    13 Oct.: `Investigating the education systems
    of the United Kingdom.'

    DR S. GORARD, Cardiff

    20 Oct.: `For England see Wales: the
    distinctiveness and similarities of education in England and
    Wales.'

    DR D. MATHESON, Nene University College, Northampton

    27 Oct.: `Scottish education: myths and
    mists.'

    PROFESSOR S. DUNN, Ulster

    3 Nov.: `Northern Ireland: the influence of
    violent conflict.'

    DR C. BROCK

    10 Nov.: `Education in the Isle of Man and the
    Channel Islands: issues of scale and dependency.'

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    section



    INSTITUTE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

    The following research seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Teaching Suite, the Institute of Health Sciences
    (ground floor).

    Medical student presentations will be held in place of the usual
    seminar on 22 October (from 1 p.m.).

    Conveners: Susanna Graham-Jones, Martin Lawrence, and
    Michael Goldacre.

    PROFESSOR D. MANT, Department of Primary Health Care

    1 Oct.: `First day blues.'

    T. LAMBERT, Unit of Health-Care Epidemiology

    8 Oct.: `The disappearing doctor? Measuring the
    loss of qualified doctors from medicine.'

    PROFESSOR D. DUNT, Melbourne

    15 Oct.: `Do community based programmes aiming
    at improving physical activity have a future?' (IHS
    Guest Lecture
    )

    DR R. LEHMAN, Department of Primary Health Care

    29 Oct.: `The dilemma of heart failure: some
    Banbury observations.'

    C. SHULTZ, Department of Public Health

    5 Nov.: `Puberty: a risky time for children
    with diabetes.'

    DR S. STEWART-BROWN, Health Services Research Unit

    12 Nov.: `Emotional distress—a risk factor
    to rival social inequalities?'

    PROFESSOR D. EVANS, Otago

    19 Nov.: `Medicine as a form of social
    control.' (IHS Guest Lecture)

    DR M. MOHER and the ASSIST Collaborators, Department of Primary
    Health Care

    26 Nov.: `How to ASSIST primary care.'

    DR M. MURPHY and DR D. WHITEMAN, ICRF General Practice Research
    Group

    3 Dec.: `Folate, NTDs, heart disease, and
    cancer.'

    DR L. DAVIDSON, National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit

    10 Dec.: `Developing multidisciplinary research
    at the NPEU.'

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    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH
    STUDIES

    The following public lectures will be given at 8.15 p.m. on
    Wednesdays in Yarnton Manor. The 14 October and 21 October
    meetings will be held in the Long Gallery; subsequent meetings
    will be held in the Common Room.

    AMOS OZ, Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of Comparative European
    Literature, and DR N. DE LANGE, Cambridge

    14 Oct.: Readings in Hebrew and English from
    the novels of Amos Oz.

    SIR MARTIN GILBERT, CBE

    21 Oct.: `Is there a specific Jewish
    contribution to the twentieth century?' (Inaugural
    lecture: David Patterson Lecture Series
    )

    DR N. SOLOMON

    28 Oct.: Book launch: Historical
    Dictionary of Jewish Religion
    (Scarecrow Press).

    RABBI DR ALBERT H. FRIEDLANDER, Leo Baeck College

    4 Nov.: `Leo Baeck in retrospect.' (David
    Patterson Lecture Series
    )

    DR A. KUSHNER, Southampton

    11 Nov.: `Asylum and refugees in the twentieth
    century.' (David Patterson Lecture Series)

    DR G. ABRAMSON

    18 Nov.: Book
    launch: Drama and
    Ideology in Modern
    Israel

    (Cambridge University
    Press).

    DR A. RAPPOPORT-ALBERT, University College, London

    25 Nov.: `Why did women play no part in Jewish
    mystical tradition?' (David Patterson Lecture
    Series
    )

    PROFESSOR Z. GITELMAN, Michigan

    2 Dec.: `Conceptions of Jewishness among
    contemporary Russian and Ukrainian Jews.' (David
    Patterson Lecture Series
    )

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies.

    DR KEIKO TANAKA

    16 Oct.: `Images of men in Japanese men's
    magazines.'

    I. HALL, author of Cartels of the Mind

    23 Oct.: `Journalism and the universities in
    Japan: closed shop versus globalisation.'

    PROFESSOR R. DRIFTE, Newcastle

    30 Oct.: `Japan's quest for a permanent UN
    Security Council seat: a matter of pride, justice, or
    what?'

    PROFESSOR MARI SAKO

    6 Nov.: `The development of components
    suppliers' capabilities in the car industry in Japan.'

    DR C. HOOD, Sheffield

    13 Nov.: `Japan's next generation: Nakasone's
    legacy and the effects of the education reform process.'

    DR KONGDAN OH and DR R. HASSIG, Oh and Hassig, Pacific Rim
    Consulting

    20 Nov.: `Keeping peace in the neighbourhood:
    what can Japan do about Korea?' (In conjunction with
    Asian Studies Centre, St Antony's
    )

    PROFESSOR S. LAWSON, East Anglia

    27 Nov.: `Culture and international politics:
    Japan and the Asia–Pacific.'

    DR KWEKU AMPIAH, Stirling

    4 Dec.: `Anglo-Japanese co-operation in Africa
    in the early post-war period.'

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    section



    ST CATHERINE'S COLLEGE


    Inaugural Sir Patrick Nairne Lecture

    The first of a series of annual lectures to commemorate the
    Mastership (1981–8) of the Rt. Hon. Sir Patrick Nairne, GCB,
    MC, MA, will be held at 5 p.m. on Friday, 16 October, in the
    Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's College.

    The first lecture will be `The future of broadcasting', a
    conversation between SIR JOHN BIRT and MELVYN BRAGG. The audience
    will then be invited to participate.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WESTMINSTER COLLEGE

    Wesley and Methodist Studies Centre

    Graduate Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesdays
    (unless otherwise indicated below) in the Church and
    International House, Westminster College. The series will
    continue in Hilary Term.

    A. MOSLEY

    30 Sept.: `Oral records project—missionary
    register.'

    D. TRANTER

    28 Oct.: `John Henderson—tormented
    genius.'

    Day conference

    Sat. 7 Nov.: `Methodism and the arts.'

    K. KINGHORN

    2 Dec.: `American Methodism in the light of its
    British legacy.'

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    section



    SOCIETY FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL
    TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE

    PHILIP WALKER, President of the Tool and Trades History Society,
    will give an illustrated lecture at 2.45 p.m. on Saturday, 10
    October, in the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 10
    Banbury Road. All are welcome.

    Subject: `Nuremberg Books: illustrated registers of
    retired craftsmen who entered two charitable almshouses during
    the late fourteenth century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 October 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 1 October 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL STUDIES

    The following elections were omitted from the results of the
    annual election and by-election for membership of the Social
    Studies Board.

    Official Members

    
    A. STEPAN, Gladstone Professor of Government           MT 2000
    
    J.B. KNIGHT, Professor of Economics                    MT 1999
    
    B. SHAFER, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of 
        American Government                                MT 1999
    
    

    Ordinary Member

    
    D.A. COLEMAN, MA, Fellow of Queen's                    MT 1999
    
    

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
    regulations made by the Board of the Faculty of Theology and the
    Standing Committee for Economics and Management will come into effect
    on 16 October.


    1 Board of the Faculty of Theology

    M.St. in Theology (Research)

    With effect from 1 October 1998

    In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 726, after l. 37
    insert:

    `Theology (Research)

    1. Each candidate must hold PRS status in the University and
    follow for at least three terms a course of instruction and directed
    research and will be required to produce from their society a
    certificate that they are following such a course.

    2.Candidates will be expected to attend such lectures and seminars
    as their supervisor shall recommend.

    3. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the
    whole examination.

    4. Qualifying Examination

    Candidates may be required to pass a qualifying examination in a
    language unless dispensed by the Examiners on the sole ground that
    further proof of linguistic competence is unnecessary. Normal
    expectations for this requirement are indicated separately for each
    field of study below, but the Board of the Faculty of Theology
    may make a further requirement in the case of any candidate if it
    deems that competence in a language is indispensable for the study of
    primary sources, provided that no candidate may be required to pass
    two qualifying
    examinations. The Chairman of Examiners may not give dispensation to
    a candidate in cases where the Faculty Board has already imposed a
    specific requirement on that candidate. Examinations shall be set at
    such times as may be determined by the Board of the Faculty of
    Theology, but will normally be set on one occasion during Michaelmas
    and Trinity Terms, and on two occasions during Hilary Term.
    Candidates may apply to the Chairman of Examiners for dispensation
    from the Qualifying Examinations, or for another Qualifying
    Examination than that normally expected in the field of study not
    later than the end of Michaelmas Term. The written support of a
    candidate's supervisor is required.

    5. Proposals for titles of dissertations, major papers, and essays
    must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners by Friday of week 8 of
    Hilary Term. Candidates are advised to allow time for communication
    with the Examiners to take place before the Board's permission is
    granted, and are advised to submit their proposals as early as
    possible. All proposals should be accompanied by a brief indication
    of how the subject will be treated. Proposals for titles
    of dissertations should also be accompanied by a brief
    account of the primary and secondary sources to be used.

    6. All major papers and essays must be submitted to the Chairman
    of Examiners not later than noon on Friday of week 9 of Trinity Term.
    All communications with the examiners should be addressed to the
    Chairman of Examiners for the M.St. in Theology (Research), c/o the
    Clerk to the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

    7. Syllabus

    (a) Dissertation. Every candidate must submit a
    dissertation of 12,000–15,000 words upon a chosen subject from
    one of the five fields of study listed below. The title, which will
    have been proposed by the candidate and approved by the Board of the
    Faculty of Theology, should not be related to any of those offered
    for other essays within the same field.

    Two copies of the dissertation, which must be typewritten or
    printed, must be sent in a parcel bearing the words `Dissertation for
    the M.St. in Theology (Research)' to The Chairman of Examiners, c/o
    Clerk to the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not
    later than noon on the Friday sixteen days prior to the commencement
    of Michaelmas Full Term.

    Every candidate must attend a viva voce examination which may
    concern the matter treated in the dissertation and any related
    question of academic context, method, or background.

    (b) Every candidate will be required to satisfy the
    examiners in one field of study from those detailed in the
    schedule of papers below:

    SCHEDULE OF PAPERS

    I Old Testament

    (a) Three essays of between 2,000 and 3,000 words each on
    titles proposed by the candidate and approved by the Board of the
    Faculty of Theology.

    (b) An essay of 5,000–7,000 words on a title to be
    announced by the examiners on Friday of week 8 of
    Trinity Term.

    (c) A qualifying examination in Hebrew will normally be
    required.

    II New Testament

    (a) Three essays of between 2,000 and 3,000 words each on
    titles proposed by the candidate and approved by the Board of the
    Faculty of Theology.

    (b) An examination in New Testament Exegesis.
    Candidates will be expected to translate and comment on passages from
    the New Testament in Greek and to
    answer questions on a wide range of subjects concerned with the
    theology, ethics, and history of the New Testament.

    (c) A qualifying examination in Greek will normally be
    required.

    III Ecclesiastical History

    (a) An examination paper on The Nature and Practice
    of Ecclesiastical History, as prescribed for the M.Phil. in Theology,
    and to be sat at the same time.

    (b) Three essays of not more than 5,000 words each, on
    titles proposed by the candidate and approved by the Board of the
    Faculty of Theology.

    The titles of the essays should all fall within one of the
    following periods:

    1. The Early Church AD 303–476

    2.The Western Church AD 476–1050

    3. The Western Church AD 1050–1400

    4. English Church History AD 1066–1272

    5. European Christianity AD 1400–1800

    6. European Christianity AD 1800–1950

    One of the essays may concern a specific discipline or skill
    related to the period (for example; palaeography, archival surveys).

    (c) A qualifying examination in Greek will normally be
    required for those submitting titles in period 1., and a qualifying
    examination in Latin for those submitting
    titles in period 2, 3, or 4.

    IV Christian Doctrine

    (a) Either (1): An examination paper on set texts in
    Latin or Greek:

    EITHER as prescribed for the M.St. in Christian Doctrine, section
    A paper 4. A candidate proposing a dissertation
    on a topic in patristic theology is required to take this
    alternative.

    OR as prescribed for the M.St. in Christian Doctrine, section B
    paper 3. A candidate proposing a dissertation on a topic in medieval
    theology is required to take this alternative.

    OR as prescribed for the M.St. in Christian Doctrine, section C
    paper 3. A candidate proposing a dissertation on a topic in
    Reformation theology is required to take this alternative.

    Or (2): An examination on Doctrines and Methods from Kant to the
    Present Day, as prescribed for the M.St. in Christian Doctrine,
    section G paper 2.

    (b) One major paper of not exceeding 7,500 words;

    OR: Two essays of not exceeding 5,000 words;
    on a title or titles proposed by the candidate and approved by the
    Board of the Faculty of Theology. In submitting
    titles the candidate should explain how they form a coherent
    preparation for their doctoral studies, either in terms of historical
    period, or in terms of theme, or both.

    (c) A qualifying examination will normally be required in
    a major research language to be proposed by the candidate.

    V Christian Ethics

    (a), (b) Two major papers of not exceeding 7,500
    words each;

    OR: one major paper of not exceeding 7,500 words and three essays
    of between 2,000 and 3,000 words each;

    OR: six essays of between 2,000 and 3,000 words each.
    The titles to be proposed by the candidate and approved by the Board
    of the Faculty of Theology.

    In submitting titles for the dissertation, for major papers and
    for essays, candidates are required to explain in which pieces of
    work they intend to display competence in each of the following
    skills:

    (i) exploring an ethical question, substantive or
    conceptual, in relation to contemporary discussion.

    (ii) the interpretation of a Biblical text of moral significance.

    (iii) the discussion of a non-Biblical text of moral significance
    from some period of history prior to 1900.

    More than one of these competencies may be demonstrated in the
    dissertation or in a single major paper, but not in a single essay.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    2 Standing Committee for Economics and
    Management

    Preliminary Examination in Economics and Management

    With effect from 1 October 1999

    In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 75, l. 31, after
    `marketing' insert `, information management'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
    of oral examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Biological Sciences

    O.R.P. BININDA-EMONDS, Merton: `Towards comprehensive phylogenies:
    examples within the Carnivora (Mammalia)'.

    Department of Plant Sciences, Thursday, 8 October, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: R.W. Scotland, R. Page.

    K. GHOSH, Queen's: `Molecular characterisation and expression of the
    E1 gene of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from
    potato'.

    Department of Plant Sciences, Friday, 9 October, 9 a.m.


    Examiners: H.G. Dickinson, A. Brennicke.

    Clinical Medicine

    A. BRIGGS, Nuffield: `Uncertainty in the cost-effectiveness of health
    care interventions'.

    Institute of Health Sciences, Monday, 23 November, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: N.R. Hicks, B. O'Brien.

    D. MOULIN, Corpus Christi: `Regulation of expression of the CFTR
    gene'.

    Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wednesday, 7 October, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: D.M.W. Beeson, C. Huxley.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    English Language and Literature

    Y.M. CHAUDHRY, Wolfson: `Between extremities: Yeats's periodical
    allegiances, 1885–95'.

    Wadham, Friday, 9 October, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J.B. O'Donoghue, G. Watson.

    J. PHILIPS, Worcester: `Transformation by allegory in John Bunyan's
    writing'.

    Lincoln, Friday, 6 November, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: P.E. McCullough, N.H. Keeble.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Literae Humaniores

    J.H. HORDERN, Corpus Christi: `The fragments of
    Timotheus of Miletus. Edition and commentary'.

    Examination Schools, Saturday, 7 November, 11.30 a.m.


    Examiners: P.J. Parsons, J. Diggle.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Mathematical Sciences

    M. SELBY, New College: `Donaldson invariants and equivariant
    cohomology'.

    Mathematical Institute, Friday, 9 October, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: N.J. Hitchin, V. Pidstrigatch.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Music

    J.R. GRIMSHAW, New College: `Imitative counterpoint in
    sixteenth-century English music, c.1540–75'.

    Magdalen, Wednesday, 28 October, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: B. Bujic, R. Rastall.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Oriental Studies

    M.C.E. FINCH, Wolfson: `Min Yong-Hwan: a political biography'.

    Institute for Chinese Studies, Monday, 12 October, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: M. Deuchler, J.E. Hoare.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Physical Sciences

    P.J. CAMERON-SMITH, Lady Margaret Hall: `Spectroscopic studies of
    Jovian clouds'.

    Clarendon Laboratory, Wednesday, 14 October, 11.30 a.m.


    Examiners: E.J. Williamson, P. Gierasch.

    D. SYMONS, Magdalen: `Impact damage tolerance of
    carbon fibre reinforced plastics'.

    Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 15 October, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: J. Harding, B. Harris.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Social Studies

    MAN TO LEUNG, Nuffield: `Extending liberalism to non-
    European peoples: a comparison between John Locke and James
    Mill'.

    Examination Schools, Monday, 5 October, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M.F.E. Philp, F. Rosen.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 October 1998: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    OBITUARIES


    Corpus Christi College

    JOHN ALBERT EDWARD JEFFS, 25 July 1998; commoner
    1933–7. Aged 84.

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    section



    Exeter College

    THE REVD CANON R.M. ROBINSON, 22 August 1998; commoner
    1939. Aged 78.

    M.J.F. SAXTON, 20 July 1998; commoner 1928. Aged 88.

    MASON G. STEWART, 29 August 1998; commoner 1926. Aged
    90.

    PAUL STIRLING, 17 June 1998; Stapleton Scholar. Aged
    78.

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    section



    MEMORIAL SERVICE


    New College

    A Memorial Service for JOHN COWAN, MA, Fellow of the
    college 1959–93, Emeritus Fellow 1993–8, will
    be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 7 November, in the
    college chapel.

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    section



    ELECTIONS


    Oriel College

    To a fixed-term Lecturership in Philosophy and an
    Official Fellowship (from MT 1998):

    DAVID WILLIAM
    MACKIE, MA, D.PHIL., Corpus Christi College

    To a fixed-term Lecturership in Economics and an
    Official Fellowship (from MT 1998):

    ANDREA FUENTES
    (M.PHIL. Cambridge)

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    section



    St Catherine's College

    To a Graduate Scholarship in Philosophy
    (1998–2000):

    MARCUS WILLIAMSON

    To a Graduate Scholarship in the Arts
    (1998–2000):

    ASTRID WIND

    To a Graduate Scholarship in Science
    (1998–2000):

    LUKE CLARK

    To a Leathersellers' Graduate Scholarship
    (1998–2001):

    VASIL VASILEV

    To an Overseas Graduate Scholarship (1998):

    MELANIE FEAKINS

    To the Kobe Steel Scholarship (1998--2000):

    ANGUS GRAY-WEALE

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    To Light Senior Scholarships:

    KYEONG HO BAIK

    GEORGIA CHRISTINIDIS

    EDMUND NEILL

    MICHAEL CASTIGLIONE

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 October 1998: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to
    advertise in the Gazette

    "../../../stdg/conds.htm">

    Terms and conditions of
    acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    Tuition Offered

    d'Overbroeck's College Open Morning,
    Sat. 17 Oct. (10 a.m.–12.30 p.m.). Entry at age 13
    into year 9; at 16 into the sixth-form. Highly
    interactive teaching, excellent results, and positive
    environment. Beechlawn House, 1 Park Town, Oxford OX2
    6SN. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

    Fencing Club for boys and girls aged
    9–13. Sat. 2.–3.30 p.m. in Summertown, Oxford.
    First two sessions free; no obligation to continue.
    National Foil Coach as tutor. Contact Malcolm van
    Biervliet. Tel.: Oxford 514906 (after 6 p.m.).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Oxfam Book Fair

    New and second-hand books: fiction, non-
    fiction, and academic. With music and refreshments. Sat.
    17 Oct., 10 a.m.–4 p.m., at the Wesley Memorial
    Hall, New Inn Hall Street.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Services Offered

    Bespoke Garden and Landscape Design: `one-
    off' consultancy visits, or sketch and scaled layouts,
    planting schemes, construction details and site
    supervision, as desired. Nationwide service from
    Oxford/Gloucestershire base. Chelsea gold medal 1996 and
    1997. Contact Jacquie Gordon, tel./fax: 01531 822743.

    Personal computer consultants: we offer
    expert advice and tuition for both hardware and software.
    On-site service at home or in the office. We provide
    upgrades for most computers or alternatively we now
    supply our own range of K Tec computers; we will also
    supply or source software to match your requirements. For
    a quality service matched with competitive prices,
    contact Chris Lewis, tel./fax: Oxford 461333.

    Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New
    York to Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next week? All the
    best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect from
    college, home, factory, or elsewhere. Also 24-hour
    photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer workstation,
    high-grade colour photocopying, faxing, laminating,
    binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2
    7DL. Contact Justin Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax:
    514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

    Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
    specialises in assisting professionals and small
    businesses with tax problems including self-assessment.
    Convenient North Oxford premises. To receive further
    information please tel.: Oxford 513381, e-mail:
    100430.145@compuserve.com.

    Long established Oxford builder (25
    years). Property maintenance,
    renovation, extensions. Every aspect of the building
    trade covered.
    Free estimates. Academic references available. Richard
    Edwards. Tel:
    Oxford 343562.

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    section



    Domestic Services

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
    Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
    competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
    carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
    cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
    For free estimates and friendly advice, call
    Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Situations Vacant

    Oxford Colleges Adminssions Office: Senior
    Secretary for busy office dealing with undergraduate
    admissions. Interesting, varied work, involving contact
    with people within and outside the University. Requires
    excellent secretarial skills (inc. word-processing) and
    communication; organisational skills; ability to prioritise
    work, and willingness to work under pressure at busiest
    time of year. Flexible approach necessary, as staff work
    very much as a team, particularly when applications are
    processed. Office workload does not allow holidays between
    Sept. and Dec. (inc.), but holidays inside term time are
    possible outside this period. Applications with detailed
    c.v. and names/addresses of 2 referees to: the Secretary,
    Oxford Colleges Admissions Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, from whom details
    available. Applications close: Thurs. 15 Oct., interviews:
    late October.

    Lincoln College seeks a Development
    Officer. Experience necessary; background in publications
    desirable. Send c.v., inc. contact details for 3 referees,
    to: Elizabeth Scott, Lincoln College, Turl Street, Oxford
    OX1 3DR. Tel.: Oxford (2)79793, e-mail:
    development.office@lincoln.ox.ac.uk. Applications close: 10
    Oct.

    Urgently required: well-qualified teachers
    of Thai, Estonian, and Macedonian to prepare students for
    International Baccalaureate. Applicants should ne native
    speakers who are able to teach literature to students in
    their mother tongue; 1.5–2 hours p.w. per course. For
    full details contact Mrs C.A. Gospel, Head of Languages, as
    soon as possible. Tel.: Oxford 552031, fax: 310002.

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    section



    Houses to Let

    Light and airy 2-bedroom modern house in
    Wadham Park, Marston. Easy reach hospitals and university,
    10 minutes' pleasant cycle ride through parks to science
    area and most colleges. Ideal for couple with small child.
    Garden, parking. Available from end Sept. Six-month let:
    £685 p.c.m., 1-year or more: £650 p.c.m. Tel.:
    Oxford 552855.

    Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
    not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
    easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
    Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
    information on properties available and make use of our
    interactive database, priority reservation service
    (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
    service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
    go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
    Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
    311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
    Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Woodstock: recently refurbished small
    period cottage in quiet location close to Blenheim Park
    and town centre. Furnished and equipped to high standard.
    Would suit sabbatical couple or single person. 1 double,
    1 single bedroom, bathroom and separate w.c.,
    sitting/dining-room and kitchen. Gas c.h., phone.
    Conservatory area leading to small walled garden.
    Available Oct. £675 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 812639.

    North Oxford : unfurnished former
    Victorian lodge situated close to city centre. Newly
    renovated. Lounge/dining-room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms,
    study, bathroom, loft room, gas c.h., parking spaces,
    garden. £1,200 p.c.m. (6-month let initially). Tel.:
    01993 812123/813100.

    Witney: short term and holiday lets;
    2/3-bedroom period cottage, fully furnished and equipped.
    From £260 p.w. or £850 p.m. Ten miles from
    Oxford with good bus service into Oxford. Non-smokers; no
    pets. Tel.: 01993 703035, fax: 771014.

    An Englishman's home is his
    castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we
    have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
    quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding
    area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of
    Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in
    lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
    professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and
    most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at:
    http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
    properties that we have currently available to let.
    Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details
    of your requirements and we will do whatever we can
    without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-
    mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

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    section



    Flats to Let

    Newly-built maisonette on site
    overlooking Oxford canal. Open-plan living-room,
    kitchen/dining-room, cloakroom, 1 double bedroom
    (en suite), 1 singlr bedroom, den, TV-room,
    en suitebathroom. Fully furnished, suit
    single/couple (non-smokers preferred) but not students.
    Ten-month to 1-year let (extension negotiable). Centrally
    located, walking distence to University, train/bus
    stations, city centre. To view, tel.: Oxford 727091.

    Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk
    from city centre, all main university buildings, and
    parks, and very close to the river. Available now for
    short/long let. Exceptionally well-furnished,
    comfortable, first-floor flat in extremely quiet,
    civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive,
    leafy, residential Victorian suburb, with large, light,
    airy rooms. Double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen,
    bathroom. Off-street parking; large secluded garden.
    Regret no children or pets. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

    Bright, spacious, 2-(large)-bedroom,
    first-floor furnished flat. Good area, North Oxford.
    Sitting-room, kitchen/diner, bathroom, w.c. New carpets and
    heating system. Garage, gardens. Buses nearby. £700
    p.c.m. inc. tax and service. Mitchell, tel./fax: 01993
    830895.

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    section



    Accommodation Offered

    October 1998: North Oxford, near
    Summertown. Two large, light rooms available, each with own
    microwave and refrigerator, in quiet private house. Shared
    shower room, laundry, and garden. Must be non-smokers.
    References required. Tel.: Oxford 514677.

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
    comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
    exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within easy
    walking distance of the city centre and all main
    university buildings; a stone's throw from the river,
    parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9
    corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea-
    and coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent
    heating. Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms.
    Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

    Attractive room available
    Nov.–Mar., suit visiting academic.
    Headington—close to public transport to London and
    central Oxford. Longer let for weekdays only possible.
    Cat lover essential. Owner in London weeks. Attractive
    rates for right person. Tel.: Oxford 763650, e-mail:
    nr80@dial.pipex.com.

    Summertown: spacious 2-bedroom house,
    well furnished/equipped with parking for 1 car. £850
    p.c.m. Also: North Oxford: 2-bedroom flat, newly
    decorated/refurbished, and furnished to a high standard;
    large garage. £750 p.c.m. Contact E. Gordon Hudson,
    24 Friars Entry, Oxford OX1 2DB, tel.: Oxford 244089.
    n

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    section



    Accommodation Sought

    Mallams Residential Letting is well
    placed to help with your letting and management
    requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
    professional service tailored to your individual
    requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
    property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
    311977.

    Accommodation wanted, Oct./Nov. Minimum 1
    year, unfurnished or part-furnished. Two-bedroom ground-
    floor flat or house with two reception rooms, for lady
    wheelchair user. Maximimum rent £650 p.m. Long let.
    Tel.: Oxford 553926.

    Finders Keepers specialises in managing
    your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
    Oxford letting and managing properties—try us first!
    Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
    opened and are delighted with our service—why not
    pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers,
    73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford 311011,
    fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site:
    http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Ten garden pots and 20 herbs are looking
    for a new place to live. University administrator wants
    to buy 2/3-bedroom house (gas c.h., wooden floors,
    garden) in East Oxford, Iffley Fields, or village
    north/east of Oxford. £100,000–£115,000.
    No chain. Please write to: Ms Anja Flender, University of
    Oxford, Medical School Office, John Radcliffe Hospital,
    Oxford OX3 9DU.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of
    letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
    foremost letting agents and property managers. We
    specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
    individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
    of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
    in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
    services, or if you simply need some informal help and
    advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
    fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
    Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
    at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
    marketing your property.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Holiday Lets

    Idyllic watermill, central France.
    Secluded off-the-beaten-track location. Sleeps 8/10. Own
    stretch of river. Ideal autumn or spring break. Also
    available summer. Tel./fax: 0181-940 2395.

    Tuscany, Barga. Medieval hill town, 1
    hour Pisa airport, 40 minutes Lucca. Farmhouse and 2 s/c
    flats to let in 18th-c. Palazzo. Long and short term lets
    available from £150 p.w. Tel.: 01959 533108.

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    section



    House for Sale

    Six-bedroom family home, North Oxford,
    south-facing garden, near schools and transport.
    Available spring 1999. £300,000; furnishings
    negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 557233.

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    section



    Flats for Sale

    Flat: top floor mansion block, off
    Woodstock Road; hall, south-facing living-room, bedroom,
    kitchen, bathroom, store-room. Good decorative order. Gas
    c.h. Quiet; would suit single academic or couple.
    Spacious grounds with well-kept garden and private car
    park. £85,000 or near offer. Tel.: Oxford 511576.

    Five minutes' walk from St Giles:
    maisonette for sale. Two bedrooms, sitting-room with nice
    view, fitted kitchen, bathroom, ample storage space, c.h.
    Good decorative condition. £120,000. Tel.: Oxford
    554015 (evenings).

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    section



    Properties for sale at Oxford
    Waterside

    Central North Oxford/Jericho.
    Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned
    quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties
    available include: 2-bedroom apartments from
    £118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from
    £169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages
    from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open
    daily, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or
    726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas
    Merrifield).

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    section






    <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 2 October<br /> - 27 October

    Diary


    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff
    Development Seminars
    : places should be booked in advance
    through
    the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
    ProgrammeWeb site.

    Return to
    Contents Page of this issue



    Friday 2 October

    NATIONAL GALLERY: exhibition of works from Christ Church
    Picture Gallery opens (until 29 November). (Christ
    Church Picture Gallery to reopen 7 June 1999
    .)

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `East meets West: blue
    and white ceramics' (monthly series of cross-cultural
    talks), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
    (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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    section



    Saturday 3 October

    DEGREE CEREMONY, Sheldonian, 2.30 p.m.

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    section



    Monday 5 October

    BODLEIAN LIBRARY exhibition opens: `Beetles, beams, and
    buttresses—five hundred years of maintaining the Old
    Library' (until 30 January).

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    section



    Tuesday 6 October

    CONGREGATION meeting, 12 noon (vice-
    Chancellor's Oration).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Tombs, temples, and
    towns: the archaeological record of Egypt in the
    Ashmolean, 1898–1998', 9.45 a.m.–4 p.m. (tel.
    for further information and bookings: (2)78015).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Malchair and the
    Oxford School' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1
    p.m.)

    MATINÉE of Korean traditional music, Wolfson
    College, 3.30–5.30 p.m. (admission free).

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    section



    Wednesday 7 October

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Welcome to the
    University', 9.30 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

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    section



    Thursday 8 October

    THE REVD DR TIMOTHY BRADSHAW celebrates Holy Communion
    (Latin), St Mary's, 8 a.m.

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Tutorial teaching
    (general)', 9.30 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

    H. CRAWLEY: `Gender, change, and human rights:
    theoretical introduction' (Centre for Cross-Cultural
    Research on Women seminars: `Gender, change, and human
    rights'), Library Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2
    p.m.

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    section



    Friday 9 October

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Lecturing and
    student learning', 9.30 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Drinking in the past',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

    PROFESSOR M.F. ASHBY: `The engineering science of
    cellular solids' (Hirsch Lecture), Main Lecture Theatre,
    University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Sunday 11 October

    MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.

    THE REVD HUGH WHITE preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    section



    Monday 12 October

    CONGREGATION elections, 5 November: nominations by two
    members of Congregation to be received at the University
    Offices by 4.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR AMOS OZ (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor):
    `But what actually existed before the Big Bang?' (lecture
    series: `The story begins: studying the opening sections
    of masterpieces in literature'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Tuesday 13 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Deities in India and the
    Cyclades', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

    CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

    B. LAMPSON: `Computer systems research: past and
    future' (Strachey Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Computing
    Laboratory, 4.30 p.m.

    P. BAKER: `Travellers in Iran: oil paintings of
    seventeenth-century Europeans' (Oxford Asian Textile
    Group lecture), Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 7 p.m.
    (admission for visitors £2; further details from
    Oxford 554281 or (2)78076).

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    section



    Thursday 15 October

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Accounting and
    planning', 9.30 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    PROFESSOR N. YUVAL-DAVIS: `The multi-layered citizen,
    gender human rights, and the question of difference'
    (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars:
    `Gender, change, and human rights'), Library Seminar
    Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR AMOS OZ (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `On
    the beginning of Effie Briest by Theodore
    Fontane' (lecture series: `The story begins: studying the
    opening sections of masterpieces in literature'),
    Schools, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Friday 16 October

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Small group
    teaching', 9.30 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The world of the New
    Testament', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

    PROFESSOR J.-P. CHANGEUX: `The nicotinic acetylcholine
    receptor and synaptic plasticity' (Royal Society Ferrier
    Lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Department of Experimental
    Psychology, 4.30 p.m.

    SIR JOHN BIRT and Melvyn Bragg: `The future of
    broadcasting' (inaugural Sir Patrick Nairne Lecture),
    Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Saturday 17 October

    MATRICULATION CEREMONY, Convocation House (colleges to be
    informed of time).

    MARK PESKANOV and Julian Jacobson: violin and piano
    recital of works by Schubert, Prokofiev, Bach, Bloch, and
    Sarasate, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30
    p.m. (admission by free programme, available from college
    lodge; reserved for college members until 10 October).

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    section



    Sunday 18 October

    THE REVD CANON BRIAN MOUNTFORD preaches, St Mary's, 10
    a.m.

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    section



    Monday 19 October

    CONGREGATION elections, 5 November: nominations by six
    members of Congregation to be received at the University
    Offices by 4.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR AMOS OZ (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `On
    the beginning of In the Prime of Her Life by
    S.Y. Agnon' (lecture series: `The story begins: studying
    the opening sections of masterpieces in literature'),
    Schools, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Tuesday 20 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Ashmolean
    gentlemen—portraits and beyond', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1
    p.m.)

    ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Services to
    support academic staff', 12 noon (see
    information above
    ).

    CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR K. WALTZ: `Realism after the Cold War'
    (Winchester Lecture in International Relations), Schools,
    5 p.m.

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    section



    Wednesday 21 October

    THE RT REVD RICHARD HARRIES: `Religion in the media'
    (lecture), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Thursday 22 October

    PROFESSOR E. KOFMAN: `Women, migration, and human rights'
    (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars:
    `Gender, change, and human rights'), Library Seminar
    Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR AMOS OZ (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `On
    the beginning of The Nose by Nikolai Gogol'
    (lecture series: `The story begins: studying the opening
    sections of masterpieces in literature'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. AITCHISON: `The drinker of the devil's
    dregs' (Tyndale Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

    THE RT. HON. GILLIAN SHEPHARD, MP: `Women in
    politics—do they make a difference?' (St Hilda's
    College Lectures: `Women in Westminster'), Jacqueline du
    Pré Building, St Hilda's, 5.30 p.m.

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    section



    Friday 23 October

    ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT SEMINARS: `Effective
    meetings', 9 a.m.; `Disabled students: access, inclusion,
    and fulfilling potential', 9.30 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Renaissance (II)',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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    section



    Saturday 24 October

    DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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    section



    Sunday 25 October

    PROFESSOR FRANCES YOUNG preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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    section



    Monday 26 October

    PROFESSOR AMOS OZ (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `On
    the beginning of A Country Doctor by Franz
    Kafka' (lecture series: `The story begins: studying the
    opening sections of masterpieces in literature'),
    Schools, 5 p.m.

    DENIS MACK SMITH: `Italy in 1998: has anything
    changed?' (Dorothy Rowe Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5
    p.m.

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    section



    Tuesday 27 October

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Japanese Nanga paintings'
    (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
    for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section