1 May 1997 - No 4435



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 127, No. 4435: 1 May 1997<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

1 May 1997





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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 May 1997: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 28 April


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6
(Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the following
resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 28
April.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

ADRIENNE HALL, St Hilda's College

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section



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 28 April


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into
effect on 16 May.

List of the decrees:

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section



Decree (1): Curators of the
Taylorian Institution

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Curators of the Taylor Institution and with the
concurrence of the Libraries Committee in respect of cl.
5, provides for the appointment of the Librarian of the
Taylor Institution to be made by a widely based selection
committee. At the same time the opportunity is taken to
delete a number of obsolete requirements and other
detailed provisions which, where appropriate, the
curators will regulate by standing order.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. III, Sect. LXXXI, § 1,
cl. 1 (6)–(10) (Statutes, 1995, p.
324), delete `members of Convocation' and substitute
`persons'.

2 Ibid., items (11) and (12), in
each case delete `member of Convocation' and substitute
`person'.

3 Ibid. (p. 325), delete `The
curators may appoint a Secretary.'

4 Ibid., delete cl. 2 and renumber
existing cl. 3 as cl. 2.

5 Ibid., delete cll. 4 and 5,
insert new cl. 3 as follows, and renumber existing cll.
6–8 as cll. 4–6:

`3. The Librarian shall be appointed by the curators on
the recommendation of a committee consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor or the person appointed by
the Vice-Chancellor to chair the Curators of the Taylor
Institution, as the case may be;

(2) the head of the college with which the
librarianship shall be for the time being associated by
Council, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a
person appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the
college specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) the Director of University Library Services and
Bodley's Librarian;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the Libraries
Committee, of whom one shall be a person who is not a
resident holder of a teaching, research, or
administrative post in the University or in any college
or other society;

(7)–(9) three persons appointed by the Curators
of the Taylor Institution.'

6 Ibid., cl. 4 as renumbered,
delete `persons, being' and `, whether men or women,'.

7 Ibid., cl. 6 as renumbered,
delete `Librarian shall reside ... closed; but the'.

8 Ibid., delete `to him or her'
and substitute `the Librarian'.

9 Ibid., delete cll. 9 and 10 and
renumber existing cll. 11–12 as cll. 7–8.

10 Ibid., cl. 7 as renumbered (p.
326), delete `and shall sign its register'.

11 Ibid., delete cl. 13 and
renumber existing cll. 14–15 as cll. 9–10.

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section


Key to Decree (1)

Cll. 1 and 2 remove obsolete references to Convocation.

Cl. 3 removes an obsolete reference to the appointment
of a secretary (which is now a function of the central
administration).

Cl. 4 deletes the requirement upon curators to attend a
minimum number of meetings in each year.

Cl. 5 deletes the requirement to hold a set number of
meetings in each term, reference to the number of
curators that constitutes a quorum, and the provision for
a casting vote. It also provides for the Librarian to be
appointed by the curators on the recommendation of a more
widely drawn selection committee modelled on a
professorial electoral board and including provision for
college representation.

Cl. 6 deletes an otiose reference to the eligibility of
both men and women for scholarships or exhibitions.

Cll. 7 and 8 remove the requirement for the Librarian to
reside within the University.

Cl. 9 deletes an obsolete provision for the appointment
of assistants in the library, and also deletes the
provision for a committee for the selection of books and
periodicals to be purchased. Book selection is now
routinely carried out by the library staff in
consultation with members of the Modern Languages
Faculty. The curators propose to replace this committee
with one more specifically concerned with the management
of the Taylor Institution Library, to be regulated by
standing order.

Cl. 10 removes an obsolete reference to readers signing
the library register, which is no longer kept.

Cl. 11 removes obsolete references to the keeping of
porters and other servants, and to authority to require
staff to reside within the Taylor Institution.

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section



Decree (2) : Reorganisation of
the legislation governing the B.Th. and Certificates in
Theology

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Theology Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board, reorganises the legislation governing the B.Th.
and Certificates in Theology. The legislation for B.Th.
course open only to members of the University is moved,
from that part of the Examination Decrees governing
courses open to non-members, to immediately after the
section governing the BA and BFA, and consequential
changes are made to the legislation governing the course
for the B.Th. at Westminster College and the
certificates. The opportunity is taken also to revise the
admission procedures for the B.Th. now that
candidates—other than those at Westminster
College—must be matriculated. No other material
changes are made.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1996, after p. 523, insert Ch. VI, Sect.
XXXIV:

`TIMES AND EXERCISES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY

Ch. VI, Sect. XXXIV]

(i) DECREE

General

1. The examination for the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology shall be under the supervision of the Board of
the Faculty of Theology which shall have power to make
regulations governing the examination.

2. Any person who has been admitted under the
provisions of this section as a Student for the Degree of
Bachelor of Theology, who has satisfied the conditions
prescribed in this section, and who has satisfied the
examiners for the degree may supplicate for the Degree of
Bachelor of Theology.


Examination for the course of instruction at
Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Greyfriars; Harris Manchester
College; Mansfield College; Regent's Park College;
Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall; St Stephen's
House; and Wycliffe Hall

3. The supervision of arrangements for the Degree of
Bachelor of Theology shall be the responsibility of the
Supervisory Committee for the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology and the Theology Certificates.

4. Candidates for this degree may be admitted by
Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Greyfriars; Harris Manchester
College; Mansfield College; Regent's Park College; Ripon
College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall; St Stephen's House;
and Wycliffe Hall.

5. The Registrar shall keep a register of all
candidates so admitted.

Examination for the course of instruction at
Westminster College

6. The examination for the course of instruction at
Westminster College shall be subject to the provisions of
Ch. X, Sect. IX, cll. 1–8.'

2 Ibid., delete from p. 957, l. 38
to p. 959, l. 13 and substitute:

`COURSE FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY
AND DIPLOMA OF HIGHER EDUCATION (THEOLOGY)
AT WESTMINSTER COLLEGE


Ch. X, Sect. IX]

(i) DECREE

1. This course shall be subject to the provisions of
Ch. VI, Sect. XXXIV, cll. 1–2.

2. The Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have
power to admit as students for the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology candidates nominated by Westminster College.

3. Westminster College shall make a return to the
Registrar by the end of the first week of Michaelmas Full
Term, showing the names of all persons nominated in that
term as Students for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology,
and the Registrar shall keep a register of such students.
The names of all persons nominated for registration as
distance-learning students shall be returned to the
Registrar by the end of the first week of the Full Term
in which they are nominated.

4. The Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have
power, on the advice of Westminster College, to remove
temporarily or permanently the name of a student from the
register.

5. The examination shall be divided into two stages
and no candidate shall be permitted to proceed to the
second stage who has not satisfied the examiners in the
first stage.

6. The Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have
power to grant Diplomas of Higher Education (Theology) to
candidates who, after having satisfied the examiners for
the first stage of the examination, withdraw, or fail to
satisfy the examiners for the second stage.

7. A full-time Student of the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology may hold that status for twelve terms but the
Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have power, on the
advice of the Examination Board, to grant an extension of
time for a period or periods not exceeding three terms in
all.

8. Part-time students at Westminster College may hold
the status of Student for the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology for up to twice the number of terms for which
equivalent full-time students may hold that status.'

Key to Decree (2)

Cl. 1 provides for the general legislation governing the
B.Th., and the specific legislation governing the course
of instruction at Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Greyfriars;
Harris Manchester College; Mansfield College; Regent's
Park College; Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall;
St Stephen's House; and Wycliffe Hall.

Cl. 2 provides for the specific legislation governing
the course of instruction at Westminster College.

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section



Decree (3): Abolition of the
M.St. in Law and Economics

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Law Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
abolishes the M.St. in Law and Economics with immediate
effect. It is regretted that this is necessary because,
following certain staff departures, the Law Faculty will
no longer be able to provide teaching for the course.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (3)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 644, delete
l. 21.

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section



Decree (4): Reorganisation of
the legislation governing the M.Th. and Postgraduate
Diploma in Applied Theology

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Theology Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board, reorganises the legislation governing the M.Th.
and Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Theology. The
legislation for the M.Th. course open only to members of
the University is moved, from that part of the
Examination Decrees governing courses open to
non-members, to immediately after the section governing
the M.Sc. and MBA, and consequential changes are made to
the legislation governing the course for the M.Th. at
Westminster College and the diploma.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1996, after p. 757 insert Ch. VI, Sect.
XXXV:

`TIMES AND EXERCISES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE
OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY (IN APPLIED THEOLOGY)


Ch. VI, Sect. XXXV]

(i) DECREE

General

1. Any person who has been admitted under the
provisions of this section as a Student for the Degree of
Master of Theology, who has satisfied the conditions
prescribed in this section, and who has satisfied the
examiners for the degree may supplicate for the Degree of
Master of Theology.

2. The examination for the Degree of Master of
Theology shall be under the supervision of the Board of
the Faculty of Theology which shall have power to make
regulations governing the examination.


Examination for the course of instruction at
Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Greyfriars; Harris Manchester
College; Mansfield College; Regent's Park College; Ripon
College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall; St Stephen's House;
and Wycliffe Hall
.

3. There shall be a committee for the supervision of
arrangements for the Degree of Master of Theology called
the Master of Theology Studies Committee. This committee
shall consist of two representatives of the Board of the
Faculty of Theology (at least one of whom shall be a
member of the board's Graduate Studies Committee) and one
representative of each of the participating institutions,
namely, Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Greyfriars; Harris
Manchester College; Mansfield College; Regent's Park
College; Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall; St
Stephen's House; and Wycliffe Hall. The committee may
co-opt up to three additional members. The committee
shall have such powers and duties in respect of the
Degree of Master of Theology as may from time to time be
prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology.

4. The Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have
power to admit as students for the Degree of Master of
Theology candidates nominated by Blackfriars; Campion
Hall; Greyfriars; Harris Manchester College; Mansfield
College; Regent's Park College; Ripon College, Cuddesdon;
St Benet's Hall; St Stephen's House; and Wycliffe Hall.

5. Each of the institutions specified in clause 4
above shall make a return to the Registrar by the end of
the first week of Michaelmas Full Term, showing the names
of all persons nominated in that term as students for the
Degree of Master of Theology, and the Registrar shall
keep a register of such students.

6. The Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have
power, on the advice of a student's society or other
institution, to remove temporarily or permanently the
name of a student from the register.


Examination for the course of instruction at
Westminster College

7. The examination for the course of instruction at
Westminster College shall be subject to the provisions of
Ch. X, Sect. XI, cll. 1–8.'

2 Ibid., delete from p. 960, l. 14
to p. 961, l. 6 and substitute

`COURSES FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY AND
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN APPLIED THEOLOGY
AT WESTMINSTER COLLEGE


Ch. X, Sect. XI]

(i) DECREE

1. This course shall be subject to the provisions of
Ch. VI, Sect. XXXV, cll. 1–2.

2. The Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have
power to admit as students for the Degree of Master of
Theology candidates nominated by Westminster College.

3. Westminster College shall make a return to the
Registrar by the end of the first week of Michaelmas Full
Term, showing the names of all persons nominated in that
term as students for the Degree of Master of Theology,
and the Registrar shall keep a register of such students.

4. The Board of the Faculty of Theology shall have
power, on the advice of Westminster College, to remove
temporarily or permanently the name of a student from the
register.'

3 Ibid., p. 961, ll. 7, 10, 15,
and 17, renumber existing cll. 1–4 as cll. 5–8.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 22–9, as
amended by Decree (4) of 28 November 1996
(Gazette, p. 400).

Key to Decree (4)

Cl. 1 provides for the general legislation governing the
M.Th., and the specific legislation governing the course
of instruction at Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Greyfriars;
Harris Manchester College; Mansfield College; Regent's
Park College; Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall;
St Stephen's House; and Wycliffe Hall.

Cll. 2–4 provide for the specific legislation
governing the course of instruction at Westminster
College.

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section



Decree (5): Change to procedures
for confirmation of status for D.Phil. students

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
General Board after consultation with faculty boards and
other relevant bodies, amends the existing provisions for
confirmation of status for D.Phil. students. At present
these provide for confirmation of status to take place by
the end of the sixth term from a student's admission to
D.Phil. status. The timing of confirmation of status
therefore depends on the timing of transfer or
readmission to D.Phil. status and so may take place any
time between the ninth and the twelfth term. In view of
the pressure on the University to improve the numbers of
publicly supported students who submit within four years,
it has been agreed, with the support of junior member
representatives, that it is more appropriate for
confirmation of status to have taken place by the end of
the ninth term from admission, so that it
forms a useful point at which the progress of the thesis
and the timetable for submission can be monitored by a
faculty or department.

Text of Decree (5)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1996, p. 788, delete ll. 5–11 and
substitute:

`1. A candidate who has been admitted to the status of
Student for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy must, not
later than the ninth term or normally earlier than the
sixth term after that in which he or she was initially
admitted to the status of a Probationer Research Student
or to the status of a student for another higher degree
of the University, or the eighteenth and twelfth terms
respectively in the case of a part-time student, apply to
the faculty board or committee concerned for confirmation
of his or her status as a D.Phil. Student. A faculty
board or committee may, for good reason, permit a
candidate to defer for a maximum of three terms his or
her application for confirmation of status. A student who
has been admitted to the status of Student for the Degree
of Doctor of Philosophy after successfully completing the
requirements for the Degree of Master (or Bachelor) of
Philosophy, or having held the status of Student for the
M.Litt. or M.Sc. by Research, may be exempted by the
faculty board or committee concerned from the requirement
for confirmation of status. With the exception of
students who have been exempted under this provision, all
Students for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy must have
their status confirmed before making an application for
the appointment of examiners.'

2 This decree shall be effective
from 1 October 1997.

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section



Decree (6): Reduced residence
requirement for D.Phil. students if holders of the M.Th.
who have studied for the latter at Oxford

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Theology Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board, reduces the residence requirement for a student
for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy from six terms to
three terms in the case of holders of the M.Th. who have
studied for that degree at Oxford, in line with holders
of other higher degrees, and in line with the fee
concession already enjoyed by such holders of the M.Th.
This change does not however apply to those who hold the
M.Th. having studied for it at Westminster College, since
the Westminster students have not previously either been
in residence or attended in the University for stipulated
periods during their study.

Text of Decree (6)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 789, l. 33,
after `Magister Juris' insert `or Master of Theology
(except for those who hold the degree having studied for
it at Westminster College)'.

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section



Decree (7): Changes to the
Certificate in Management Studies

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Committee for the School of Management Studies, with the
agreement of the Social Studies Board, and with the
concurrence of the General Board, transfers formal
responsibility for the Certificate in Management Studies
from the faculty board to the committee, introduces a
requirement that the committee appoint a supervisor for
each candidate for the certificate, and provides for the
nomination of examiners.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (7)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1996, p. 938, ll. 5, 10–11, and
13–14, in each case delete `Board of the Faculty of
Social Studies' and substitute `Committee for the School
of Management Studies'.

2 Ibid., ll. 8, 15, 18, 20, 22,
23, 28, 30 (twice), 33, 34, and 37, in each case delete
`board' and substitute `committee'.

3 Ibid., after l. 15 insert new
clause 4 as follows and renumber existing cll. 4–7
(ll. 16–36) as cll. 5–8:

`4. Every person who has been accepted as a candidate for
the certificate shall be placed by the committee under
the supervision of a member of the University or other
competent person selected by the committee. It shall be
the duty of the supervisor to direct and superintend the
work of the candidate and to submit a report to the
examiners on the candidate's work.'

4 Ibid., l. 22, after `He' insert
`or she', and after `time' insert `indicate whether he or
she wishes to be examined by dissertation or written
examination and, if the former, shall'.

5 Ibid., l. 23, after `he' insert
`or she'.

6 Ibid., l. 24, delete `His
application' and substitute `Applications'.

7 Ibid., l. 26, delete `he' and
substitute `the candidate'.

8 Ibid., p. 992, l. 40, delete
`and'.

9 Ibid., l. 41, after `Diploma in
Management Studies,' insert `and for the Certificate in
Management Studies,'.

10 Ibid., p. 1036, ll. 26–7,
delete `Board of the Faculty of Social Studies' and
substitute `Committee for the School of Management
Studies'.

Key to Decree (7)

Cll. 1, 2, and 10 transfer responsibility for the
certificate from the Social Studies Board to the
Committee for the School of Management Studies.

Cl. 3 introduces the requirement that the committee
appoint a supervisor for each candidate.

Cll. 4–7 remove existing gender-discriminatory
language.

Cll. 8 and 9 provide for the appointment of examiners.

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section



Decree (8): Establishment of
M.Sc. courses in International Relations Research and in
Politics Research

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Social Studies Board and with the concurrence of the
General Board, establishes one-year courses in
International Relations Research and in Politics Research
for the degree of M.Sc. The courses will be open only to
those graduate students accepted as Probationer Research
Students in the two subject areas, and will form the core
of the first-year research training for such students.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (8)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1996, p. 977, after l. 19, as amended by
Decree (3) of 14 November 1996 (Gazette, p.
321), insert in right-hand column:

`Three in International Relations Research.

Three in Politics Research.'

2 Ibid., p. 988, l. 3, after
`Philosophy,' insert `of Examiners in Politics Research
for the Degree of Master of Science,'.

3 Ibid., p. 990, l. 38, after
`Philosophy' insert `and in the examination in
International Relations Research for the Degree of Master
of Science'.

4 Ibid., p. 996, l. 8, delete `.'
and substitute `;' and after l. 8 insert:

`in International Relations Research for three
examinations;

in Politics Research for three examinations.'

Key to Decree (8)

Cl. 1 provides for the numbers of examiners.

Cll. 2 and 3 provide for the nomination of examiners.

Cl. 4 provides for examiners to serve for three
examinations.

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section



Decree (9): Reduction of length
of service of Moderators for the Preliminary Examination
in Engineering Science

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Sub-faculty of Engineering Science and with the
concurrence of the General Board, reduces the length of
service of Moderators for the Preliminary Examination in
Engineering Science from three years to two. The
sub-faculty believes that the format of the papers in the
Preliminary Examination, which characteristically
comprise an unusually large number of questions, makes it
academically desirable for there to be a more frequent
rotation of examiners to maintain the quality of the
questions set.

Text of Decree (9)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 996, l. 34,
delete `three' and substitute `two'.

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section



Decree (10): Appointment of
assessors for the M.Sc. in Computation and the M.Sc. in
Software Engineering

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Mathematical Sciences Board and with the concurrence of
the General Board, allows the appointment for an
unlimited period of assessors to act in the case of
assignments examined in the M.Sc. in Computation and the
M.Sc. in Software Engineering.

Text of Decree (10)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 1012, l.
30, after `Engineering Science' insert `or to act solely
in relation to assignments in the M.Sc. in Computation
and the M.Sc. in Software Engineering'.

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section



Decree (11): Format of class
list for Course 2 of the Honour School of Jurisprudence

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Law Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
deletes the provision under which, in the class list for
students who have successfully completed Course 2 of the
Honour School of Jurisprudence, there must be added, in
brackets, after the student's name, the words `English
Law with French Law' (or, in place of the word `French',
the relevant adjective). The examiners in the Honour
School of Jurisprudence in 1996 found that this provision
presented considerable typographical difficulties and
greatly lengthened the class list, and they requested
that the provision be repealed.

Text of Decree (11)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 1020,
delete ll. 23–31.

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section



2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of
Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded
to the following person who is qualified for membership
of Congregation:

MICHAEL JOHN KOOY, Corpus Christi College

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section



3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have
been added to the Register of Congregation:

Hall, A., MA, St Hilda's

Kooy, M.J., MA status, Corpus Christi

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section



CONGREGATION 29 April


1 Declaration of approval of
unopposed Statutes promulgated on 25 March

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr
Vice-Chancellor declared the Statutes (1) establishing
the Reuters Professorship of Intellectual Property and
Information Technology Law and (2) concerning the
entitlement of members of Faculties to membership of
Congregation approved.


2 Promulgation of Statutes

Forms of Statutes were promulgated. No notice of
opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared
the preambles carried of the proposed Statutes (1)
establishing the degree of Master of Earth Sciences, (2)
replacing the Committee for the Scientific Collections
with Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of Natural
History, and (3) concerning the Bampton and Sarum
Lecturships.

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section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into
effect on
16 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 May 1997: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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issue






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 May 1997: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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issue



JOHN PEARCE MEMORIAL PRIZES IN
SURGERY 1997

Prizes have been awarded to the following:

JAMES ALEXANDER HAENEY, Brasenose College

SADIA NASEEM KHAN, St Edmund Hall

MARISA DANIÈLE LE MASURIER, Green College

MOHAMMAD BAGHER MALAKI VARNAMKHASTI, Queen's College

MATTHEW BENJAMIN KEEBLE SHAW, Green College

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section



KEYS TO THE UNIVERSITY PARKS

The Curators of the University Parks give notice that the
locks to the Parks will be changed in the week beginning
5 May 1997.

In Hilary Term 1996 the Explanatory Note to a decree
amending that governing the Curators of the University
Parks stated that the gates to the University Parks had
locks which were of an obsolete pattern and which would
shortly need to be replaced (Gazette, Vol.
126, 14 March 1996, p. 866). It also noted that, owing to
the presence of the Marston--Oxford cycle track and
footpath on the south side of the Parks, there was now a
route between South Parks Road and Ferry Road, Marston,
open twenty-four hours a day, except on 1 January and 25
December of each year. In these circumstances, the
Curators of the Parks would no longer be issuing keys to
the gates of the University Parks to members of the
University. In reaching this decision, the curators had
been influenced by a number of factors: (1) It was
impossible to make the Parks' boundaries totally secure
from illegal entry, and the curators did not have the
resources to enable them to protect legitimate
key-holders when the Parks closed. (2) It had been the
habit of some key-holders to admit non-key-holders after
the gates had been locked. This had led to those admitted
being unable to get out without either climbing out (and,
on occasion, causing damage while doing so) or calling
out the Superintendent to open a gate. (3) Regrettably,
some key-holders had removed padlocks from those gates to
which fixed locks could not be fitted. This had been a
continuing, costly problem. (4) Closure of the Parks to
all persons after sunset would make the effective
protection of buildings and equipment by the University
Security Service more practicable.

The locks still need to be changed but the curators have
now revised their proposal with regard to the issue of
keys: a limited number of keys to the new locks will be
available, on application, and on payment of a deposit of
£100 and an annual fee of £10. The deposit will
be refundable on return of the key, less any sums
outstanding from the annual charge, which will be payable
in advance. Application forms for keys are available from
Mr C.E. Willis, University Offices, Wellington Square,
Oxford OX1 2JD. Initial applications will be considered
by the curators; if the number of applications received
by 30 April exceeds the number of keys available,
allocations will be made on the basis of need as
reasonably determined by the curators. When all keys the
curators have agreed to allow into circulation have been
issued, no more keys will be issued until key-holders
return their keys. Persons to whom the curators have
issued keys (for the old locks) may return them for a
refund of their deposit. The keys should be returned,
with an indication of the approximate date of issue, to
Mr Willis at the above address.

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REVIEW OF GEOGRAPHY

As part of its system of rolling reviews of departments
and faculties every ten years, the General Board has
established a committee to review the School of
Geography. The membership of the review committee is as
follows:

Mr P.M. Oppenheimer (Chairman), Christ Church


Professor G.C.K. Peach, St Catherine's

Professor Ron Johnston, University of Bristol

Professor David Harvey, Johns Hopkins University

Professor David Sugden, University of Edinburgh

Professor Albert Pissart, University of Liège,
Belgium

The General Board has recommended that the terms of
reference of the review be as follows:

(a) to consider both the provision and
quality of teaching, and the future development of
teaching and the quality of research in the School of
Geography, and the balance between teaching at
undergraduate and graduate levels on the one hand and
research on the other, having regard to international
standards of excellence;

(b) to consider the extent, balance, and
method of examination of the syllabus;

(c) to review the organisational and
management structures and facilities in the School of
Geography, including such matters as academic and non-
academic staff planning and recruitment; accommodation
and future space needs; the relationship between the
School and associated units and cognate disciplines,
bearing in mind the recommendations of the Review
Committee for Earth Sciences;

(d) to make recommendations, bearing in mind
if funding is required to implement them, the likely
measure of available resources.

The Review Committee will start its work early in Trinity
Term and intends to submit its report before the end of
Michaelmas Term 1997. It will be inviting written
comments from senior and junior members of the School,
the Environmental Change Unit, and the Transport Studies
Unit. Any other members of the University who wish to
submit written comments on the issues covered by the
committee's terms of reference are invited to send them
to the Secretary to the Review Committee, Dr A.M.
Knowland, Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE,
as soon as possible, and in any case no later than 9
June.

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WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE
UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is
drawn to individual cases of financial hardship among
widows of former members of the Federated Superannuation
System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of
Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources
are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and
any enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation
Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford
OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest
confidence.

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section



DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE
POLICIES AVAILABLE TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Sun Alliance Connections, the personal insurances
division of the main insurer of the University, provides
discounts for members, staff, their families, and
pensioners of the University of Oxford. The following
savings can be achieved:

Household (buildings and/or contents: 20 per cent;

Travel (including winter sports): 12.5 per cent;

Private medical expenses: 10 per cent;

Private car: 5 per cent.

The University acts solely as an introducer of business
to Sun Alliance Connections, receiving no commission or
other remuneration, with all savings passed on to the
subscribing member. For further information, a brochure
may be obtained from Graham Waite (telephone: (2)80307),
or Gill Tombs (telephone: (2)70110) at the University
Offices. To obtain a quotation or receive specific
information on the covers available, telephone Sun
Alliance Connections' regional office on 0800 592 829 and
quote reference number 34V0067.

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section



UNIVERSITY CLUB

Wine-tastings will be held at 5.45 p.m. on the following
Wednesdays in the University Club, 6/8 South Parks Road.
All members and their guests are welcome, the fee being
£2 per person.

7 May: Wines from the southern
hemisphere.

18 June: Wines for summer drinking.

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section


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM


Vivien Leigh Prize

A prize of £275 is offered by the Ashmolean Museum
from the Vivien Leigh Fund for a two-dimensional work of
art on paper, not exceeding 55 by 40 centimetres, by an
undergraduate member of the University. The work will be
chosen, if a work of sufficient merit is submitted, by
the Keeper of Western Art in the Ashmolean Museum, from
work submitted to the Print Room by Wednesday, 11 June,
or work submitted at the annual degree show at the Ruskin
School of Drawing and Fine Art. It is a condition of the
award that the winning work be given to the Ashmolean.

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section



CONCERTS


Faculty of Music

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET will give the following
concerts at the times shown in the Holywell Music Room.
Tickets for the midday concert cost £5/£2.50;
tickets for the evening concerts cost
£8/£6/£4. Tickets may be obtained from
Blackwell's Music Shop or at the door.

Tue. 6 May, 12 noon (with Ben Wright, double
bass; Alexandra Davidson, bassoon; Dave Skinner,
clarinet; and Julian Faultless, horn): Beethoven's
Septet, op. 20.

Wed. 21 May, 8 p.m.: quartets by Schubert
(D.94), Mendelssohn (op. 12), and Beethoven (op. 59, no.
2).

Wed. 4 June, 8 p.m. (with Rachel Norman,
viola, and Augusta Harris, cello): the
Capriccio by Mendelssohn, Shostakovitch's
Third Quartet, and the Sextet (op. 36) by Brahms.

PHANTASM will perform Music for Viols; J.S. Bach: Twelve
Contrapuncti from The Art of Fugue, at 7.30
p.m. on Wednesday, 14 May, in the Holywell Music Room.
Tickets, costing £8/£6/£4, may be obtained
from Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the door. The
programme will include a lecture-demonstration by
Professor Laurence Dreyfus.

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section



MAISON FRANÇAISE

Les films de François Truffaut

The following films by François Truffaut, with
English sub-titles, will be shown at 8.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Maison Française.

For details of this term's lectures and conferences at
the Maison, see `Lectures' below.

6 May: Jules et Jim (1961; 100
minutes)

13 May: La peau douce
(1964; 116 minutes)

20 May: Baisers
volés
(1968; 90 minutes)

27 May: Domicile conjugal (1970; 100
minutes)

3 June: Les deux Anglaises et
le continent
(1971; 132 minutes)

10 June: Le dernier
métro
(1980; 130 minutes)

17 June: Vivement
dimanche
(1983; 111 minutes)

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section


Les poèmes d'Apollinaire: poèsie et
musique

This reading/recital will be held at 8.15 p.m. on
Thursday, 15 May, in the Maison Française. Nicole
Gore will read Apollinaire; at the piano, Inger Dahlin
will play Debussy, Poulenc, and Satie.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 May 1997: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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issue



INAUGURAL LECTURES


King John II Professor of
Portuguese Studies

PROFESSOR T.F. EARLE will deliver his inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `The Comedy of the
Foreigners
: Renaissance Sicily through
Portuguese eyes.'

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section



Wykeham Professor of Ancient
History

PROFESSOR R.C.T. PARKER will deliver his inaugural
lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 12 May in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Cleomenes on the Acropolis.'

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section



Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
Professor of American History

PROFESSOR R.L. MIDDLEKAUFF will deliver his inaugural
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Democracy in America before
Tocqueville.'

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section



Professor of the Romance
Languages

PROFESSOR M.D. MAIDEN will deliver his inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Where's the Romance?'

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section



Professor of Biological
Anthropology

PROFESSOR R.H. WARD will deliver his inaugural lecture at
5 p.m. on Friday, 23 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Golden Apples and a Golden Bough:
future prospects for
biological anthropology?'

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section



MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR J.N. COLDSTREAM, FBA, FSA, Professor of
Classical Archaeology, University College, London, will
deliver the Myres Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 5
May, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean
Museum.

Subject: `Light from Cyprus on the "Dark
Age" of Greece?'

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section



JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN
BRITISH HISTORY

PROFESSOR J. CANNON, CBE, will deliver a James Ford
Special Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: ` "We have the power": the
English Ascendancy 1707–
1801.'

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section



CHERWELL–SIMON MEMORIAL
LECTURE 1997

PROFESSOR BERTRAND HALPERIN, Professor of Physics,
Harvard
University, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Memorial
Lecture at 4.30
p.m. on Friday, 9 May, in Lecture Theatre A, the
Zoology/Psychology
Building.


Subject: `Electrons, quantum mechanics,
and strong magnetic
fields.'

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section



RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL LECTURES
1996–7

The hero and his clay feet: a gendered view of the
Ramayana

PROFESSOR NABANEETA DEV SEN will deliver the
Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 12 May: `Two sixteenth-century women's
Ramayana: reading Chandra in the light
of Molla.'

Fri. 16 May: `Lady sings the blues:
twentieth-century women singing the Rama tale in
Bengali, Marathi, and Telugu.'

Thur. 22 May: `The hero and his clay feet:
differing perceptions.'

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section



TANNER LECTURES ON HUMAN VALUES
1997

Social capital in post-industrial societies

FRANCIS FUKUYAMA will deliver the Tanner Lectures at 5
p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 12 May: `The great disruption.'

Wed. 14 May: `Technology, hierarchy, and
social capital.'

Thur. 15 May: `The origins of order.'

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section



THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1997

PROFESSOR J.D. NORTH, FBA, University of Gröningen,
will deliver the 1997 Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 22 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel College.

Subject: `Stars and atoms.'

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section



INTERDISCIPLINARY LECTURE
SERIES


History and Philosophy of
Biology

Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Department of Physiology. The 20 May
meeting will be chaired by Dr Paul Slack; the 3 June
meeting by Dr Rom Harré.

Further details may be obtained from Dr T.J. Horder,
Department of Human Anatomy (telephone: (2)72189).

PROFESSOR R. PORTER, Wellcome Institute, London

20 May: `Philosophies of science in pre-
war Cambridge: evolving attitudes to science as
defined through C.P. Snow's influence.'

DR A. HOPE, Lecturer in Medical Ethics, Oxford Medical
School

3 June: `Dementia, identity, and advance
directives: key philosophical issues exemplified in
medical practice.'

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section


Debate: `The public must understand science'—but
how?

This round-table discussion on the aims, and the
difficulties, involved in selling science to the public,
with opportunities for questions from the audience, will
be held at 5 p.m. on Monday, 26 May, in the University
Museum. The panel will be Professor R. Dawkins, Professor
S. Greenfield, and Professor C. Blakemore. The meeting
will be chaired by Professor Sir Walter Bodmer.

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section



ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

School of Geography: research seminars

The following research seminars will be given at 4.45
p.m. on Tuesdays in the Senior Common Room, the School of
Geography. With the exception of the final seminar, two
presentations will be given at each meeting.

Conveners: G.C.K. Peach, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor of Social Geography, G.L. Clark, MA, Halford
Mackinder Professor of Geography, and A.S. Goudie, MA,
Professor of Geography.

J. GARI

6 May: `Biodiversity, communities, and
globalisation.'

CHIH HOONG SIN

6 May: `Ethnic residential segregation
in Singapore's public housing.'

J. HUNTER

13 May: `The construction of Germany's
environmental policy shift: a case study of
"Waldsterben".'

S. NAYLOR

13 May: `Researching the aetiology of
asthma morbidity: considerations in the choice of an
approach to study design.'

A. WILLICH

20 May: `Thomas the Tank Engine and the
Fat Controller or Do I Still Have to Change at Didcot
Parkway?'

M. KEYKHAH

20 May: `Global environmental change and
the risk of insurance.'

E. CHYE

27 May: `Women and politics in
Singapore: development of women's opportunities and
future prospects.'

P. BENNETT

27 May: `Mutual risk: moral economy in
environmental insurance.'

D. MORAN

3 June: `Survival strategies in marginal
settlements during the post-Soviet transition.'

N. THOMAS

3 June: `Lady Mary Curzon, Vicereign of
India: negotiating the boundaries of gender and
empire.'

CHAO-JUNG CHIU

10 June: `Proposed methods of coastal
management in Taiwan.'

D. POWER

10 June: `The alienation of the public
in the City of London.'

L. BEINHART

17 June: `Writing and writers.'

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section



CLINICAL MEDICINE

Nuffield Department of Surgery

Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of
Surgery, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

P. MOSS

6 May: `Soluble MHC tetramers for
detection of antigen-specific T cells.'

P. REAY

13 May: `Filamentous phage and antibody
libraries.'

C. PULLAR

20 May: `Cell signalling: techniques and
applications in immunology.'

P. ROTHWELL

17 June: `Who benefits from carotid
endarterectomy?'

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section


`Evidence based' surgery on trial

The following meetings will be held at 5.30 p.m. on
Tuesdays in Lecture Theatre 2, the Academic Block, the
John Radcliffe Hospital.

Prosecuting: MARK THOMPSON-FAWCETT;
defending: TIM COOK

27 May: Pouch formation after
proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis without
covering ileostomy.

Prosecuting: BRUCE GEORGE;
defending: NEIL BORLEY

3 June: Primary anastomosis after on-
table washout after resection of obstructing sigmoid
tumour.

Prosecuting: MARK WHITELEY;
defending: JANE PHILLIPS-HUGHES

10 June: Thrombolysis for acute critical
ischaemia.


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section


Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays
in the Library, the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology.
Details of the 2 June seminar will be announced later.

Convener: J.J. Harding, MA status,
University Research Lecturer.

C. DONNELLY, Edinburgh

19 May: `The Edinburgh case-control
study of cataract.'

P. MAINI and E. GAFFNEY

9 June: `Mathematical modelling of
epithelial corneal wound healing.'

P. URSELL

16 June: `The relationships between
post-operative blood-aqueous barrier drainage and
LOCS III cataract gradings following routine
phakoemulsification surgery.'


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section



LAW, SOCIAL STUDIES

The function of law in the international community

Seminars will be held on Tuesdays, as follows: the
29 April seminar will be held at 8.30 p.m. in the
Habakkuk Room, Jesus College; subsequent seminars will be
held at 5 p.m. in Room A, the Social Studies Faculty
Centre.

For details of Professor Harold Koh's Waynflete Lectures,
see under `Magdalen College' below.

Conveners: M.W. Janis, MA, Reader in Law,
A.J. Hurrell, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., University Lecturer
in International Relations, and E.A. Roberts, MA,
Montague Burton Professor of International Relations.

DR P. ALLOTT, Cambridge

29 Apr.: `The true function of law in
the international community.' (Jointly with the
International Law Association, British
Branch
)

H.C. KRUEGER, Secretary to the European Commission of
Human Rights, Strasboug

6 May
: `Why nations obey the European Human
Rights Convention.'

PROFESSOR V. GOWLLAND-DEBBAS, Graduate Institute of
International Studies, Geneva

27 May: `The role of the UN Security
Council in the enforcement of international
obligations.'

PROFESSOR R. LAPIDOTH, Hebrew University of Jerusalemn

3 June: `Autonomy as a means of self-
determination.'

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section



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Mathematical Logic Seminar

The following seminars will take place at 4.30 p.m. on
Fridays in the Mathematical Institute. Details of the 10
May and 20 June seminars will be published later.

Convener: A.J. Wilkie, MA, Professor of
Mathematical Logic.

DR F. WAGNER

2 May: `Quasi-o-minimal structures.'

DR J. KRAJICEK, Prague

9 May: `Algebraic proof systems.'

PROFESSOR I. STEWART, Leicester

23 May: `Logics with zero-one laws and
descriptive complexity theory.'

DR M. PREST, Manchester

30 May: `Ziegler spectra of algebras and
rings.'

DR MAKOTO KIKUCHI, Kobe

6 June
: `Model theoretic proofs of the
incompleteness theorems.'

PROFESSOR N. CUTLAND, Hull

13 June: `Loeb measures in practice:
recent advances.'

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section


Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Nonlinear and geophysical fluid dynamics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Mondays in the Seminar Room, Dartington House. The series
is organised by Dr Mat Collins (telephone: (2)72086), and
Ms Isla Gilmour (telephone: (2)70520).

Conveners: I.M. Moroz, MA, University
Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics, and P.L. Read, MA,
University Lecturer in Physics.

DR W. FREUH, Edinburgh

12 May: `Vortices in a rotating shear
layer.'

DR M. HARRISON, Meteorological Office

19 May: `Diagnosis and verification of
medium-range ensembles.'

A. STEPHEN, AOPP

2 June: `Low dimensional models of
baroclinic waves.'

DR M. ALLEN, AOPP and RAL

16 June: `A statistical approach to
fault diagnosis in climate models.'

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section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

French literature from the Renaissance to the
Enlightenment

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Old Bursary, Trinity College.

Conveners: J. Mallinson, S. Pierse, A.
Charlton.

W. PERKINS, Birmingham

1 May: `Women in politics in early
modern France: Madame de Longueville.'

R. PENSOM

15 May: `Le mystère du
Misanthrope.'

U. LANGER, Wisconsin

29 May: `Narrative and justice: the
Renaissance novella.'

J. MALLINSON

12 June: `Many happy returns:
Tartuffe from Molière to
Beaumarchais, and back?'

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section



MODERN HISTORY

Lectures on the Nazi dictatorship

PROFESSOR HANS MOMMSEN, Professor of Modern European
History, Ruhr-University, Bochum, will deliver the
following lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the
Examination Schools.

Tue. 13 May: `The failure of the Weimar
Republic and Hitler's seizure of power.'

Tue. 20 May: `Hitler as a ruler: the
National Socialist system of government.'

Thur. 22 May: `The German resistance: was
there an alternative to Hitler?'

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section



MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

Economic History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College.

Conveners: J.S. Foreman-Peck, MA, University
Lecturer in Economic History, C.H. Feinstein, MA,
Chichele Professor of Economic History, T. Leunig, MA,
D.Phil., Nuffield College Prize Research Fellow, and A.
Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic
History.

JOSE MORILLA CRITZ, Alcala

6 May: `The broadening of Mediterranean
agriculture as a factor in its crisis,
1850–1950.'

G. CAMERON

13 May: `Economic convergence between US
and Japanese manufacturing since the mid-1950s.'

L. NEAL, Illinois–Urbana

20 May: `John Law's speculative attack
on the South Sea Bubble: international capital
movements in the first emerging markets.'

K. HARLEY, Western Ontario

27 May: `Cotton textile exports: prices,
profits, and welfare.'

M. THOMAS, Virginia

3 June: `How the US labour market worked
one hundred years ago.'

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES

Topics in Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Egyptology

The following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays
in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Conveners: J.R. Baines, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor of Egyptology, J.A. Black, B.Phil., MA,
D.Phil., University Lecturer in Akkadian, and S. Dalley,
MA, Senior Research Fellow, Somerville College.

N. VELDHUIS, Groningen and the Warburg Institute

20 May: `Reading the signs: Old
Babylonian scholarship.'

C. KIRBY

27 May: `Strategy and priorities in the
survey of Kom el-Hisn in Egypt's western Delta.'

J.A. HACKETT, Harvard

3 June: `Characterising Phoenician and
Punic goddesses.'

J. LOVELL

10 June: `The last prehistoric villages
in Jordan.'

C. GALLORINI, University College, London

17 June: `A reconstruction of Petrie's
excavations at Kahun.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Materials Modelling Laboratory Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1.15 p.m. on
Fridays in Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology
Building.

Conveners: D.G. Pettifor, MA, Isaac Wolfson
Professor of Metallurgy, and A.P. Sutton, MA, M.Sc.,
University Lecturer in Materials Science.

DR A.P. ROBERTS

2 May
: `Modelling the mechanical and transport
properties of random microstructures.'

PROFESSOR H.M. FLOWER, Imperial College

9 May: `Modelling liquid metal
infiltration of fibre preforms.'

PROFESSOR L.L. HENCH, Imperial College

16 May: `A quantum mechanical theory of
brittle fracture.'

PROFESSOR D.J. SROLOVITZ, Michigan

30 May: `CVD diamond growth: bridging
the atomic and microstructural scales.'

PROFESSOR J.E. INGLESFIELD, Cardiff

6 June: `Modelling electron energy loss
experiments in NiO.'

DR C. VINEY

13 June: `Modelling of chimeric liquid
crystalline polymers.' (Interdepartmental
polymer seminar
)

Discussion meeting (in association with OCIAM)

20 June: `Dislocations and metal
plasticity.'

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section


Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on
Fridays in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon
Laboratory.

For details of the Cherwell–Simon Memorial Lecture
(9 May), see above.

Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor of Physics, and G.G. Ross, MA, D.Phil., FRS,
Professor of Theoretical Physics.

PROFESSOR N. GISIN

16 May: `Quantum cryptography below Lake
Geneva.'

PROFESSOR W. SIBBETT, St Andrews

30 May: `Femtosecond lasers: from X-rays
to T-rays.'

DR C.D. RODGERS

6 June: `Volcanos and ozone.'

DR J. SANDERS

13 June: `The Clarendon Laboratory
archive and other amusements.'

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section


Interdepartmental polymer seminars

The following seminars will be given as shown.

Convener: C.P. Buckley, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer in Engineering Science.

DR C. IMRIE, Aberdeen, will give a seminar at 2.15 p.m.
on Thursday, 8 May, in the Hume Rothery Lecture Theatre,
the Department of Materials.

Subject: `Supramolecular liquid crystals.'

DR R. WHITELEY, Raychem (UK), will give a seminar at 4.15
p.m. on Tuesday, 27 May, in Lecture Room 3, Thom Building
(sixth floor), Department of Engineering Science.

Subject: `Flame retardants in polymers and
the measurement of fire hazard parameters.'

DR C. VINEY will lecture at 1.15 p.m. on Friday, 13 June,
in Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology
Building (Department of Materials).

Subject: `Modelling of chimeric liquid
crystalline polymers.'

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section


Astrophysics colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture.

Conveners: M.D. Lacy, and A.E. Lynas-
Gray.

DR J. BELL, Jodrell Bank

13 May: `Tests of relativistic gravity
using millisecond pulsars.'

DR K. FREEMAN, Mount Stromlo Observatory

20 May: `Kinematics of planetary nebulae
in elliptical galaxies and the Virgo Cluster.'

DR E. SZUSZKIEWICZ, Leicester, and PROFESSOR J.C. MILLER,
Trieste

27 May: `Non-stationary behaviour of
accretion flows on to black holes.'

DR P.A. JAMES, Liverpool John Moores University

3 June: `Searches for red haloes around
disk galaxies.'

DR P. PODSIADLOWSKI

10 June: `Supernova 1987a: ten years
later—a mystery solved.'

PROFESSOR R.C. HENRY, Johns Hopkins

17 June: `The cosmological deuterium-to-
hydrogen ratio.'

DR A.P. MARSTON, Drake University

8 July: `Circumstellar matter and the
evolution of massive stars.'

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section


Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: solid state seminars

The following talks on the chemistry, structure, and
properties of solids will be given at 11.45 a.m. on
Tuesdays in the Abbot's Kitchen, the Inorganic Chemistry
Laboratory.

Convener: Dr A.M. Chippindale, New
College.

DR T.P. BRAUN, Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart

6 May: `The cluster theory of
thorium.'

Y. DOU, ICL

13 May: `The electronic and surface
properties of CdO and Cd2SnO4
and how they are affected by n-type doping: EELS and
photoemission studies.'

DR J.A. HRILJAC, Birmingham

20 May: `XRD studies of zeolite
inclusion complexes.'

DR M.C. GROSSEL, Southampton

27 May: `Supramolecular control of
molecular electronic behaviour.'

DR V. CHRISTOU, ICL

3 June: `Organometallic phosphors in
thin film displays.'

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section



PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

DR LEON. E. ROSENBERG, Senior Vice-President, Scientific
Affairs, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, will lecture at 4
p.m. on Monday, 19 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the
Department of Pharmacology.

Subject: `Evolving nature of pharmaceutical
industry research: impact on collaborations with
academia.'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES

The Chinese Economy

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in Room 207, the Institute for Chinese Studies.

Conveners: J.B. Knight, MA, Professor of
Economics, C.Z. Lin, MA, D.Phil., Shaw Lecturer in the
Economy of China, and Zhao Renwei (BA Beijing), Visiting
Fellow, All Souls College.

DR R. ASH, SOAS

6 May: `The grain problem in China.'

DR A. HUSSAIN, LSE

13 May: `Patterns of provincial growth
in China.'

PROFESSOR ZHAO RENWEI, Chinese Academy of Social
Sciences, Beijing

20 May: `The evolution of economic
thought among Chinese economists during the reform
period.'

PROFESSOR A. MADDISON

27 May: `Chinese economic performance:
first century to early
nineteenth century.'

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section



ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT

The following seminars will be given at 2.15 p.m. on
Mondays in the Main Lecture Theatre, the School of
Geography.

PROFESSOR D. ANDERSON, Imperial College

5 May: `Innovation and environmental
policy.'

PROFESSOR T. HARRIS, West Virginia

12 May: to be announced.

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND
JEWISH STUDIES

Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 8.15 p.m. on the
days shown in the Common Room, Yarnton Manor. With the
exception of the lecture to be held on Monday, 9 June,
they will take place on Wednesdays.

PROFESSOR Y. KAPLAN, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

7 May: `The self-definition of the
Sephardi Jews of Western Europe in the early modern
period.'

PROFESSOR H. MOMMSEN, Rhein-Universität, Bochum

14 May: `Modernisation, armaments, and
compulsory labour in Nazi Germany: the case of the
Volkswagen factory.'

PROFESSOR H. TIROSH-SAMUELSON, Indiana

21 May: `Eudaimonia as hermeneutics:
Maimonides' conception of happiness.'

28 May: `Human felicity and the pursuit of
holiness: between philosophy and Kabbalah.'

J. COHEN, Liverpool

4 June: `Restitution and reconciliation
in Jewish law and international law.'

PROFESSOR R. LAPIDOTH, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

9 June: `Jerusalem: some legal
aspects.'

DR S. KRAJEWSKI, Warsaw

18 June: `Catholic–Jewish dialogue
in postwar Poland.' (Jointly sponsored by the
Centre and the Institute for Polish–Jewish
Studies
)

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section


Jacobs Lectures in Rabbinic Thought 1997

The pursuit of happiness in pre-modern Judaism:
between philosophy and Kabbalah

PROFESSOR HAVA TIROSH-SAMUELSON, Indiana University, will
deliver the Jacobs Lectures in Rabbinic Thought as
follows: lectures will be given at 8.30 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Hebrew Centre, Yarnton Manor; seminars
will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Committee
Room, Wolfson College.

Lectures

21 May: `Eudaimonia as hermeneutics:
Maimonides' conception of happiness.'

28 May: `Human felicity and the pursuit of
holiness: between philosophy and Kabbalah.'

Seminars

22 May: `The Maimonidean enigma:
ambiguity and interpretation.'

29 May: `Human perfection: the interplay of
the intellect and the will in post-Maimonidean Jewish
philosophy.'

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section



MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF
SCIENCE

Collection and Comparison in the Sciences

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Museum of the History of Science.

A study visit to the exhibition `In Visible Light:
Photography and Classification in Art, Science, and the
Everyday' (Museum of
Modern Art, Oxford), will be arranged for a date to be
announced.

DR M.T. BRAVO, Manchester

30 Apr.: `The problem of precision in
scientific travel: Rennell's enlightened Oriental
geography.'

DR S.D. RENZI, Cambrige

7 May: `Collectors and conjectures:
identifying nature in the seventeenth century.'

DR N. SCHLANGER

14 May: `The natural history of
implements: tools and the idea of time in Victorian
anthropology.'

DR B.P. DOLAN, Wellcome Institute, London

21 May: `Analysing antiquity in the
laboratory: collections, classifications, and
chemistry.'

DR K. ARNOLD, Wellcome Institute, London

28 May: `From wonderful collections to
cabinets of taxonomy: English museums, 1650--1750.'

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC
STUDIES

Orientalism revisited

ABDUL-NABI ISSTAIF, Professor of Comparative Literature
and Criticism, University of Damascus, and Visiting
Fellow of the Centre, will deliver the following
lectures, concerning the work of Edward Said, at 11 a.m.
on Thursdays in the Centre.

15 May: `Said's phenomenon.'

22 May: `Said's reception in the Arab
world.'

29 May: `Said's legacy.'

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section



MAISON FRANÇAISE

Lectures

Except where otherwise indicated, the following lectures
will be given at 5.15 p.m. on the days shown in the
Maison Française.

For details of this term's film-showings and other events
at the Maison, see `Notices' above.

R. REMOND, Président de la Fondation Nationale des
Sciences Politiques, Paris

Thur. 8 May: `La situation politique en
France aujourd'hui.'

D. LARGUECHE, Tunis

Fri. 9 May, 5 p.m., Middle East Centre, St
Antony's
: `Femmes, marginalité, et
exclusion dans la Tunisie ottomane
(18e--19e siècles).'

A. PROCHIANTZ, CNRS

Wed. 21 May: `Des gènes de
développement pour toute la vie.'

P. SCHNEIDER, art historian and critic

Tue. 27 May, 4.30 p.m., Ashmolean: `La
réception des oeuvres: Manet.'

Wed. 28 May, 5.15 p.m., Maison
Française
: `Peinture et déluge.'

F. GEORGEON, Institut National des Langues et
Civilisations Orientales et EHESS

Fri. 30 May, 5 p.m., Middle East Centre, St
Antony's
: `Les buveurs d'Istanbul: la
consommation de boissons alcoolisées de
l'Empire ottoman à la République de
Turquie.'

PROFESSOR G. LABICA, Paris X–Nanterre

Thur. 5 June: `Robespierre et
l'invention de la démocratie.'


Research meetings

The following meetings will be held on the days shown in
the Maison Française.

Sat. 10/Sun. 11 May: Franco-British
colloquium on ancient philosophy: `Aristotle's
Eudemian Ethics, on voluntariness'
(various speakers).

Fri. 23 May: `Corps-esprit-machine' (Franco-
British colloquium, various speakers).

Thur. 26 June/Fri. 27 June: Franco-British
seminar on electoral behaviour (various speakers).


Study-day: The historic town at the end of the twentieth
century: a European perspective

This meeting, organised in association with the School of
Architecture, Oxford Brookes University, and the EU
Erasmus Programme, with various speakers, will be held on
Saturday, 14 June, 10 a.m.–4.30 p.m., in the Maison
Française.

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section



SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on
Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Convener: A.P. Ljungqvist, MA, University
Lecturer in Finance (telephone: (2)76343, e-mail:
econapl@ermine).

P.S. SUDARSANAM, City University

5 May: `What do top investment bankers
bring to the takeover party? Do they earn their
fees?''

O. YOSHA, Tel Aviv

12 May: `International risk sharing and
European monetary unification.'

C. LENNOX

19 May: `Do companies use auditor
switching to obtain more favourable audit
reports?'

F. CORNELLI, London Business School

26 May: `Revenue efficiency of
bankruptcy procedures.'

J. CORBETT

2 June: `Japan's banking crisis in
international comparison.'

W. PERRAUDIN, Birkbeck College, London

9 June: `Real options and pre-emption in
a continuous time pricing model.'

A. HUGHES, Cambridge

16 June: `Corporate governance and
management board dismissals.'


Marketing research seminar

PROFESSOR S. BEATTY, University of Alabama, will give a
seminar at 11.30 a.m. on Friday, 6 June, in the Seminar
Room, the Radcliffe Infirmary (second floor). Those
wishing to reserve a place should fax or e-mail Dr
Richard Elliott (fax: Oxford (2)74899, e-mail:
richard_h_elliott@msn.com).

Subject: `Customer motivations to engage in
relationships with retailers and service providers.'

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section



ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Chichele Lectures 1997

The Chichele Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the
following Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls
College.

DR D. PERLER

9 May: `John Norris.'

S. MANDELBROTE

23 May: `All Souls from the Civil War to
the Restoration.'

DR J. BENNETT

30 May: `Wren.'

DR J. CLARKE

6 June: `Warden Niblett.'

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section



HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE

Idreos Lectures in Science and Religion 1997

DR ARTHUR PEACOCKE, Director, the Ian Ramsey Centre, will
deliver the Idreos Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following
days in Harris Manchester College.

Wed. 7 May: `Welcoming the "disguised
friend"---Darwinism and divinity.'

Thur. 8 May: `The quest for Christian
credibility.'

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section



LADY MARGARET HALL

SUZELLE SMITH and DON HOWARTH, Senior Partners in Los
Angeles law firm Howarth & Smith, will give a seminar
at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 14 May, in the Talbot Hall,
Lady Margaret Hall. Simon Jenkins will introduce the
subsequent discussion. Those wishing to attend should
contact Ruth Martin, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone:
(2)74302, e-mail: ruth.martin@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Media and the law.'

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section



MAGDALEN COLLEGE


Waynflete Lectures 1997

Reflections on European History

PROFESSOR N. DAVIES, Professor Emeritus, University of
London, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on
the following Wednesdays in the Examination Schools.
Admission is free.

7 May: `Europe: a history—the author's
critique of "a total history of Europe in all
periods" .'

14 May: `Western civilisation versus
European history.'

21 May: `The Great Schism: British versus
Continental history.'


Why nations obey international law

PROFESSOR H.H. KOH, Gerard C. and Bernice Latrobe Smith
Professor of International Law and Director, Orville
Schell Center for International Human Rights, Yale Law
School, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on
the following dates in the Examination Schools.
Admisssion is free.

8 May: `Why nations obey? Foundations.'

13 May: `Why nations obey? Theories.'

15 May: `Why nations obey? Transnational
legal process.'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Richard Storry Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR CHUSHICHI TSUZUKI, International University of
Tokyo, will deliver the Richard Storry Memorial Lecture
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the New Lecture
Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `A benign future for Japan?
Historical reflections.'



Middle East Centre

Hamid Enayat Lecture

DR I. AFSHAR will deliver the fourteenth Hamid Enayat
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 8 May, in the New Lecture
Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `Culture and translation in
nineteenth-century Iran.'



SOMERVILLE COLLEGE


James Bryce Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR ANTHONY CLARE will deliver the James Bryce
Memorial Lecture at 5 pm on Tuesday, 6 May, in the Witts
Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `Psychotherapy: a secular religion?'

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section



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture
1997

PROFESSOR A. DUFF will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Law, language, and community:
preconditions of criminal responsibility.'

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section



OXFORD SIGNALLING GROUP

The following lectures will be given at the meeting to be
held at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 May, in the Department of
Pharmacology.

J. MATTHEWS, Cardiff: `SHP-1 deficient T
cells are hyperproliferative: why?'

J. FRAMPTON, Institute of Molecular
Medicine: `The role of myb in haemotopoietic
commitment and development.'

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 May 1997: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



RESEARCH AND COMMERCIAL SERVICES
OFFICE

The Oxford University Research and Commercial Services
Office (RCSO) is based in the University Offices,
Wellington Square (with a satellite room at Room 9, Manor
House, John Radcliffe Hospital). The RCSO is part of the
University's central administration.

The office processes and approves all applications to
outside bodies for research grants and approves research
related agreements on behalf of the University. It also
acts in an advisory capacity for those seeking outside
funding or requiring information about specific
initiatives (e.g. LINK, ROPA, Teaching Company Schemes,
EU research programmes, etc.).

The RCSO produces a weekly bulletin on funding
opportunities, electronic Research and Industry
News
(eRIN), which is available to
members of the University via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rcso/erin/current.

Research contracts with industry are negotiated
through the RCSO, which also deals, inter
alia
, with various intellectual property
matters, research-related work covered by purchase
orders, consultancy agreements, agreements covering
clinical trials and services, and services to industry.

The Director of the RCSO is Ms June Clark (telephone:
(2)70142, e-mail: june.clark@admin.ox.ac.uk).

The Assistant Director of the RCSO is Dr Roger Pritchett
(telephone: (2)80499, e-mail:
roger.pritchett@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Other members of the RCSO from whom advice may be
sought are as follows:

Enquiries relating to day-to-day processing of
research grant applications should be addressed to the
RCSO's Research Grants Office, Room 330, the University
Offices (telephone: (2)70146), or, in the case of certain
clinical departments, to the RCSO satellite office, Room
9, Manor House, John Radcliffe Hospital (telephone: 553
22544).

General enquiries may be addressed, in the first
instance, to the Director's Personal Assistant, Ms Jane
Vicary (telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to
direct calls to the appropriate member of staff.

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section


Administrative procedures in respect of externally
sponsored research

Members of the University are reminded that it is a
requirement of the General Board that all applications
for externally funded support must be endorsed on behalf
of the University through the Research and Commercial
Services Office before they are dispatched to the
sponsor, whether or not this is required by the funding
body. (This includes, for example, bodies such as the
Leverhulme Trust, and other charities and EU programmes
which do not specifically ask for administrative
authorisation.)

The reason for the requirement is twofold: namely
(i) to ensure that the funds being requested are adequate
for the purpose and the costing rules of the funding body
have been applied correctly, and (ii) to ensure that the
University would be in a position to undertake the
obligations arising from an award and that these do not
contravene University policy.

The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants
for research grants should submit their applications,
together with a completed copy of the University's
outside grant form (OG12), to Room 330, Research and
Commercial Services Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square, telephone (2)70146—leaving three
clear working days for them to be processed.

In connection with the acceptance of awards and
signature of contracts it should be noted that Statutes,
Tit. X, cl. 2, provides that `no official of the
University or any other person employed by the University
or working in or in connection with any department of or
under the control of the University shall in connection
with any invention, discovery, or patent, or ... process,
or manufacture have authority to make any representations
on behalf of the University or to enter into any contract
on behalf of the University or to be concerned in any
transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on behalf
of the University except with the express consent of
Council'.

The relevant officials in the Research and
Commercial Services Office have been given authority to
approve applications for external funds in support of
research and the terms of contracts in straightforward
cases under this provision: in more complicated cases,
specific authority is necessary.

Enquiries related to any aspect of externally
sponsored research should be directed to the Research and
Commercial Services Office, whose staff would be pleased
to help.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 1 May 1997: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINER

The following has been appointed:

BACHELOR OF MEDICINE

Second Examination

Additional Examiner

Year 3

Medicine

P. BECK (MD London), FRCP (vice Holgate, granted
leave of absence)

For Trinity Term 1997

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section



APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINER AND MODERATOR
PRO HAC VICE

The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have appointed E.A. SOUTHWORTH,
MA,
Fellow of St Peter's College, as a Moderator in Spanish in the
Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages to be held in
Trinity
Term 1997 pro hac vice (vice Dr C.H.
Griffin, granted leave of
absence); they have also appointed T.M. COX (M.SC., MD London),
FRCP, Professor of Medicine at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge,
as an
Additional Examiner in Medicine for Year 3 of the Second
Examination of the degree of Bachelor of Medicine to be held in
Trinity Term 1997 pro hac vice (vice
Professor A.M. McGregor, granted leave of absence).

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee for the
School of Management Studies will come into effect on 16 May.


1 Board of the Faculty of Law

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M.St. in Law and Economics

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1996, delete from p. 675, l. 32,
to
p. 677, l. 8.

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2 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical
Sciences

M.Sc. in Computation

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 716,
l. 34 and l. 39, and
p. 717, ll. 6–7 and l. 18, in each case delete `chairman of the
organising committtee' and substitute `director of the course'.

2 Ibid., p. 716, l. 28, after `seven' insert `and
no more than eight'.

3 Ibid., l. 37, delete `in the first week of' and
substitute `on the first Friday in'.

4 Ibid., p. 717, ll. 7–8, delete `under
Schedule A which will be offered for examination and similarly for
the topics of Schedule B' and substitute `which will be taken in that
term, and similarly a list of the remaining topics being taken must
be submitted for approval'.

5 Ibid., l. 10, delete `Section B.' and
substitute `Section B; candidates shall be allowed to choose a
maximum of eight topics.'

6 Ibid., delete ll. 22–3 and substitute:

`9. Not later than noon on a date to be determined by the
examiners, who are responsible for making sure candidates are aware
of that date and that the date is announced at the head of the
assignment sheet, the completed assignment for that project and all
associated practicals'.

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3 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

M.Sc. in Politics Research and M.Sc. in International Relations
Research

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 753,
after l. 37 insert:

`Politics Research

1. No candidate shall be admitted to the M.Sc. in Politics
Research who has not already been accepted as a Probationary Research
Student in Politics.

2.A candidate for the M.Sc. in Politics Research shall follow for
three terms a course of instruction in Politics
Research and will, when entering for the examination, be required to
produce a certificate from his or her society to this effect. Notice
of the subjects in which the candidate is to be examined and the form
of the examination must be submitted to the Faculty Administrator,
the Social Studies Faculty Centre by 5 p.m. on Monday of Sixth Week
of Michaelmas Term for confirmation by the second Michaelmas Term
meeting of the Politics Graduate Studies Committee to reach the
Chairman of the Examiners for the M.Sc. in Politics Research by
Monday of First Week in
Hilary Term.

3. Every candidate must attend such lectures, seminars, and
classes as the Politics Graduate Studies Committee shall determine,
and provide evidence of his or her attendance to the examiners.

4. Candidates, unless dispensed by the Politics Graduate Studies
Committee, shall be required to sit a written examination paper.

5. The examination paper shall consist of the Qualifying Test as
for the M.Phil. in Politics (p. 618) or the M.Phil. in European
Politics and Society (p. 585), as set out in the regulations for the
respective M.Phil.s with resits as governed by these regulations.
Candidates may be directed by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee
in consultation with the Examiners to answer questions from any one
section of the paper.

6. Where dispensation from the written examination paper is
granted, candidates will be required by the Politics Graduate Studies
Committee, in consultation with their supervisor, to submit written
papers in at least one of the required seminars, to be presented
according to the conventions of the seminar, as set out in the
relevant Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students. The seminar
papers will be assessed by one or two assessors (who will not
normally include the candidate's supervisor) and the marks submitted
to the M.Sc. examiners no later than Monday of Second Week in Trinity
Term of the candidate's first year.

7. Satisfactory completion of three modules of the Research
Training programme is required, normally by the end of Hilary Term.

8. Where satisfaction of a language requirement is necessitated,
by a candidate's choice of subject, this shall be as set out in the
M.Phil.s in European Politics and Society, Oriental Studies, Russian
and East European Studies, Latin American Studies. (In the case of an
especially difficult language, some dispensation from other
requirements may be granted by the Politics Graduate Studies
Committee.)

9. Two typed or printed copies of a Research Essay of
4,000–6,000 words, germane to the student's proposed thesis,
must be submitted. The essay shall include a provisional list of
chapter headings, an indication of how the thesis relates to existing
literature, a statement of the questions being addressed in the
thesis, and a discussion of research methods, including an account of
the resources and methods of analysis to be used. The essay, which
must be typed or printed on one side of the paper and include
bibliographical references, must be handed into the Clerk of the
Schools by noon on the Friday of the Eighth Week of Hilary Term. Both
copies must state clearly on the packaging and the front page the
candidate's name and college, and the words `M.Sc. in Politics
Research' on one copy, and `Politics PRS' on the other. The Clerk to
the Schools will forward one copy to the Chairman of the M.Sc.
Examiners, the other to the Secretary of the Politics Graduate
Studies Committee. Research Essays judged by the M.Sc. Examiners to
be below the appropriate standard will be
returned to the relevant candidates by Monday of First Week of the
following term and may be resubmitted in amended form by Friday of
Fifth Week of that Term with the approval of the Politics Graduate
Studies Committee.

10. Either: A piece of work relevant to the proposed
thesis must be submitted. This should be of between 5,000 and 7,000
words and may take the form of a draft section of the candidate's
proposed thesis. The essay, which should be typed or printed on one
side of the paper and include bibliographical references, must be
handed into the Clerk of the Schools by noon on the Friday of the
Fifth Week of Trinity Term. Both the essay and the packaging should
be clearly marked with the candidate's name and college and the words
`M.Sc. in Politics Research'. M.Sc. candidates who wish to proceed to
M.Litt. or D.Phil. status must submit at the same time a second copy
of this work and (if they wish) a revised version of the research
essay in

9 above, with the appropriate application form,
to the Graduate Studies Office (see the Regulations governing the
transfer to M.Litt. or D.Phil. Status in Social Studies).

11 or: With the approval of the
candidate's supervisor and of the Politics Graduate Studies
Committee, a candidate may opt to be examined on a paper related to
his or her
research programme from a relevant M.Phil. course and to be examined
at the end of Trinity Term in that M.Phil. paper.

12. Candidates must present themselves for a viva voce
examination when required to do so by the examiners. The examiners
shall not fail any candidate without inviting him or her to attend
such an examination.

13. No candidate will be allowed to resit any element of the
examination on more than one occasion.'

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2 Ibid., p. 749, before `Mathematical Modelling
and
Numerical Analysis' insert:

`International Relations Research

General

Students for this course are normally admitted as Probationer
Research Students but are also registered in the first instance for
the Degree of Master of Science in International Relations Research
and, in their first year, follow the requirements laid down for that
degree. The International Relations Graduate Studies Committee, on
behalf of the Social Studies Board, may exempt from the M.Sc. those
students who have already obtained an equivalent qualification. Such
students are subject to the regulations for Probationer Research
Students as laid out in the regulations governing research students
in Social Studies.

1. No candidate shall be admitted to the M.Sc. in International
Relations Research who has not already been
accepted as a Probationer Research Student in International
Relations.

2.A candidate for the M.Sc. in International Relations
Research shall follow for three terms a course of instruction in
International Relations Research and will, when entering for the
examination, be required to produce a certificate from his or her
society to this effect.

3. Every candidate must attend such lectures, seminars, and
classes as the International Relations Graduate Studies Committee
shall determine.

4. The M.Sc. shall consist of the following elements:

(a) A research essay of 4,000–6,000
words. This should contain a substantive discussion of the proposed
thesis topic, including: a title and provisional list of chapter
headings, an indication of how the thesis relates to existing
literature, a statement of the questions being addressed in the
thesis, and a discussion of research methods, including an account of
the sources and methods of analysis to be used. It may be used as
part of the eventual thesis. It must be handed in to the Clerk of the
Schools by noon on the Friday of the Eighth Week of Hilary Term. It
must be typed or printed on one side of paper only, and include
appropriate bibliographical references. It must state clearly, on
both the envelope and the front sheet of the essay, the candidate's
name, college, and degree course.
Research Essays judged by the M.Sc. examiners to be below the
appropriate standard will be returned to the relevant candidates by
Monday of the First Week of the following term and may be resubmitted
in amended form by Friday of the Fifth Week of that term.

(b) A single, three-hour examination
paper
divided into two sections, on International History
1900–45 and on Theories and Concepts in International Relations,
as set for the M.Phil. Qualifying Test in International Relations.
Candidates will be required to answer questions from both these
sections. This examination shall take place during the First Week of
Trinity Term, the exact date to be
decided by the examiners in consultation with the Clerk of the
Schools.

Candidates who fail this examination may, at the discretion of the
International Relations Graduate Studies Committee, be allowed to
retake it in the Seventh Week of the same Trinity Term.

(c) Modular assessment of research
training
, involving three pieces of written work (or
equivalent) on subjects
approved by the Course Director and chosen from the courses provided
as part of the Research Training Programme established by the Social
Studies Faculty Board and to be completed normally by the end of
Hilary Term.

(d) Either: A Piece of Work Relevant to the
Proposed
Thesis
, of between 5,000 and 7,000 words that may take the
form of a draft section of the candidate's proposed
thesis. It must be handed in to the Clerk of the Schools by noon on
the Friday of the Fifth Week of Trinity Term. It must be typed or
printed on one side of paper only, and include appropriate
bibliographical references. It must state clearly, on both the
envelope and the front sheet
of the essay, the candidate's name, college, and degree course.

or: with the approval of the candidate's supervisor
and of the International Relations Graduate Studies Committee, a
candiate may opt to be examined on a paper related to his or her
research programme from a relevant M.Phil. course and to be examined
at the end of Trinity Term in that M.Phil. paper.

6. No candidate will be allowed to resit any element of the
examination on more than one occasion.

7. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the
whole examination.'

3 Ibid., p. 841, l. 38, delete `(including
International Relations)'.

4 Ibid., p. 841, delete ll. 39–48, and
substitute:

`Probationer Research Students, unless or until they have entered
upon another course, or have been otherwise dispensed from some or
all of the following requirements by the relevant Graduate Studies
Committee, are required to undertake the work set out below during
their first year.

1. A first-year student shall:

(i) attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as his or
her supervisor and/or the relevant Graduate Studies Committee shall
determine;

(ii) present his or her work at least once at an appropriate
research seminar as specified in (i) above;

(iii) attend regularly and satisfy the relevant instructors in the
appropriate Research Training courses offered for new graduate
students in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms of their first year;

(iv) submit to her or his supervisor, with a second copy to the
relevant Graduate Studies Committee, a typed or printed
3,000–5,000 word essay by the last Friday of his or her first
Hilary Term setting out the title and subject of the thesis and the
manner in which the candidate proposes to treat it. Where relevant
this will include an account of the conceptual framework, the
hypotheses to be examined, the structure of the argument, the
evidence that would count for or against the hypotheses (the research
design), and the major published works, the available archival
sources and the interviews or surveys that will need to be conducted.
This essay should serve as the basis for the
application for transfer of status.

2.Complete applications for transfer from PRS status to D.Phil. or
M.Litt. status must be delivered to the Graduate Studies Office,
University Offices, Wellington Square, not later than 5 p.m. on the
Friday of Fifth Week of Trinity Term of a PRS's first year. In
addition to satisfying the above requirements (i–iv), the
transfer of status application must include:

(i) an outline of the proposed research topic in the form
of a typed or printed essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words, which
should include a provisional thesis title; a provisional list of
chapter headings; an indication of how the thesis relates to existing
literature; a statement of the questions being addressed in the
thesis; and a discussion of research methods, including the sources
and methods of analysis to be used; and

(ii) a piece of typed or printed written work relevant to the
thesis (e.g. a draft chapter) of between 5,000 and 7,000 words.

3. Candidates whose applications for transfer of status have not
been successful may be permitted by the relevant Graduate Studies
Committee to resubmit revised versions of the proposals at the end of
the same Trinity Term or at the beginning of the following Michaelmas
Term.

4. Probationer Research Students registered for the M.Sc. in
Politics should normally apply for transfer of status to M.Litt. or
D.Phil. by the Friday of Fifth Week of Trinity Term of the student's
first year and should submit the
material specified in 2 (i) and (ii) above.

Though not in itself sufficient qualification for students wishing
to advance to M.Litt. or D.Phil. status, the successful completion of
the M.Sc. may serve in place of 1.(i)–(iv) above, and
material submitted as part of the requirements for the M.Sc. may also
be used in the transfer application.'

5 Ibid., p. 841, l. 48 insert:

`Additional regulations for International Relations

Probationer Research Students, unless or until they have entered upon
another course, or have been otherwise dispensed from some or all of
the following requirements by the IR Graduate Studies Committee, are
required to undertake the work set out below during their first year.

A first-year student shall:

(i) attend such lectures, seminars, and classes as his or
her supervisor and/or the Politics Graduate Studies Committee shall
determine;

(ii) present his or her work at least once at an appropriate
research seminar as specified in (i) above;

(iii) attend regularly and satisfy the relevant instructors in the
appropriate Research Training course offered for new graduate
students in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms of their first year;

(iv) submit to her or his supervisor, with a second copy
to the Graduate Studies Committee, a typed or printed
3,000–5,000 word essay by the last Friday of his or her first
Hilary Term setting out the title and subject of the thesis and the
manner in which the candidate proposes to treat it. Where relevant
this shall include an account of the conceptual framework, the
hypotheses to be examined, the structure of the argument, the
evidence that would count for or against the hypotheses (the research
design), and the major published works, the available archival
sources and the interviews or surveys that will need to be conducted.
This essay should serve as the basis for application for transfer of
status; material from it may form part of the submission in (v)
below.

Applications for transfer from PRS status must be made by the
Friday of the fifth week in their third term after
admission. In addition to satisfying the above requirements
(i–iv), and submitting the form referred to in (a)
above, the transfer of status application must include:

(v) an outline of the proposed research topic in the form of a
typed or printed essay of between 4,000 and 6,000 words, which should
include a provisional thesis title; a provisional list of chapter
headings; an indication of how the thesis relates to existing
literature; a statement of the questions being addressed in the
thesis; and a discussion of research methods, including the sources
and methods of analysis to be used; and

(vi) a piece of typed or printed written work relevant to the
thesis (e.g. a draft chapter) of between 5,000 and 7,000 words.
Complete applications for transfer of status shall be delivered to
the Graduate Studies Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
no later than 5 p.m. on the Friday of Fifth Week of Trinity Term of a
PRS's first year. Candidates whose applications for transfer of
status have not been successful may be permitted by the International
Relations Graduate Studies Committee to submit revised
versions of their proposals at the end of the same Trinity Term or at
the beginning of the following Michaelmas Term.

Though not in itself sufficient qualification for students wishing
to advance to M.Litt. or D.Phil. status, the successful completion of
the M.Sc. may serve in place of (i)–(iv) above, and
material submitted as part of the
requirements for the M.Sc. may also be used in the transfer
application.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



4 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) B.Th. and Certificates in Theology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, after
p. 523 after the decree governing the Bachelor of Theology, insert:

`(ii) Regulations

A. Regulations for the course of instruction at Blackfriars;
Campion Hall; Greyfriars; Harris Manchester College; Mansfield
College; Regent's Park College; Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's
Hall; St Stephen's House; and Wycliffe Hall.

A.1. Course requirements

The length of the course is three years. Candidates must, if admitted
after 1 September 1995, be members of the University. A minimum of
thirteen subjects must be taken from the syllabus in Section B and
must include the following: all four papers in section I; paper II.2;
one paper from section III; paper IV.1; one paper from section V;
paper VI.1.

The supervisory committee shall have power to dispense candidates
who already have an honours degree in Theology from individual
compulsory papers. The minimum number of subjects to be offered will
still apply.

Details of which subjects may be taken by 7,000 or 10,000 word essays
in place of written examination papers are given in the syllabus in
section B below.'

2 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
941, delete ll. 2–8.

3 Ibid., ll. 9, 10, and 15, and delete `B.' and
substitute `A.'

4 Ibid., l. 17, delete `in section E' and
substitute `in section B of the regulations for the Bachelor of
Theology'.

5 Ibid., ll. 24, 25, and 35, delete `C.' and
substitute `B.'

6 Ibid., ll. 36 and 37, delete in each case `in
section E' and substitute `in section B of the regulations for the
Bachelor of Theology'.

7 Ibid., p. 942, ll. 6 and 7, delete `D.' and
substitute `C.'

8 Ibid., after l. 14, insert:

`C.2. Examinations, and Essays and Field Studies

The provisions governing the examination, and the details of which
subjects may be taken by 7,000 or 10,000 or 15,000 word essays in
place of written examination papers are given in Section A of the
regulations for the Bachelor of Theology.'

9 Ibid., l. 15, delete `D. 2' and substitute `A.
2'.

10 Ibid., p. 942, l. 38, delete `D. 3' and
substitute `A. 3'.

11 Ibid., p. 943, l. 30, delete `E' and substitute `B'.

12 Ibid., l. 42, delete `D.3' and substitute
`A.3'.

13 Ibid., move p. 942, l. 15–p. 948 l. 30
(as amended) to after p. 523 after section A.1 (as introduced by cl.
1 above) of the Regulations for the course of instruction for the
B.Th. at Blackfriars; Campion Hall; Greyfriars; Harris Manchester
College; Mansfield College; Regent's Park
College; Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Benet's Hall; St Stephen's
House; and Wycliffe Hall.

14 Ibid., p. 959, ll. 15, 16, 30, 41, 42, 44,
delete `A.' and substitute `C.'

15 Ibid., p. 960, delete ll. 3–13.

Return to List of Contents of this section


(b) Master of Theology

With immediate effect

1 Ibid., p. 962, l. 4, delete `A.' and substitute
`B.'.

2 Ibid., p. 963, after l. 8 insert:

`(ii) Regulations'

3 Ibid., l. 9, delete `B.' and substitute `A.'.

4 Ibid., move text from between p. 963, l. 9 (as
amended) (starting `(ii) REGULATIONS')–p. 965, l. 39 (ending
`individually dispensed by the examiners.') to after the decree for
the M.Th. after p. 757.

Return to List of Contents of this section



5 Committee for the School of Management
Studies

Certificate in Management Studies

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 939, delete ll.
3–50 and substitute:

`All candidates for admission as students for the Certificate in
Management Studies must apply to the Secretary of Faculties.
Applications may be made throughout the academic year. A registration
fee as prescribed in Ch. VIII, Sect. i, § 2 (see Appendix I) is
payable by non-members of the University under Ch. X, Sect. viii, cl.
4 and must accompany the application for admission. The Secretary of
Faculties shall submit all such applications to the Committee for the
School of Management Studies.

2.Entry for the Examination

Every candidate for admission to the examination must apply to the
Committee for the School of Management Studies through the Secretary
of Faculties for entry to the examination. Entry may be made at any
time during the academic year but should be between two months before
the start and two months after the end of the complete course of
study undertaken at Templeton College which has been approved by the
Committee for the School of Management Studies. Candidates must
indicate whether they wish to submit a dissertation or complete the
written examination. If a candidate elects to submit a dissertation
he or she must indicate, at the time of application, the subject
chosen.

Every candidate for the certificate shall pursue a course of study at
Templeton College approved by the Committee for the School of
Management Studies.

3. The Examination

(i) The examination will consist of:

(a) Either a dissertation of no more than
20,000 words on a subject falling within any field of Management
Studies to be agreed by the committee.

Two printed copies of the dissertation must be submitted to the
Chairman of Examiners c/o the Postgraduate Secretary at the School of
Management Studies within six months of an application being approved
by the Graduate Studies Committee, or the candidate's application
will lapse. The dissertation must be accompanied by a statement that
it is the candidate's own work.

Or, (i) a written examination paper of three
hours duration. Questions will be set on the fundamental concepts and
techniques of management, including any one or more of the following:
accounting and financial management, organisational behaviour and
human resource management, marketing and strategic management, or any
other area which the Committee for the School of Management Studies
may from time to time agree related to the course of study.

The written examination must be conducted within six months of an
application being approved by the Graduate Studies Committee, or the
candidate's application will lapse. All written examinations will be
conducted on University premises, and due notice shall be given to
each candidate of the time and place for the examination.

(ii) a written assignment of no more than 5,000 words on a
subject to be agreed with the candidate's supervisor.

(b) A report by the supervisor on the candidate's work.

(c) A viva voce examination which may be required at the
discretion of the examiners.

(ii) Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in any part or
parts of the examination may resubmit their dissertation or resit the
written examination on not more than one occasion which normally
shall be within six months of the initial failure.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committee
give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

L. BROMHAM, Merton: `Rate variation in DNA sequence evolution'.

St Catherine's, Tuesday, 6 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: E.C. Holmes, J. Maynard Smith.

A. METCALFE, Linacre: `Rule of HGF/SF in liver regeneration and
possible involvement of P53'.

Genetics Unit, Tuesday, 3 June, 1 p.m.


Examiners: K.E. Davies, F. Stewart.

English Language and Literature

I. MCLELLAN, Lincoln: `Fictional scepticism: the career of prose
romance in the seventeenth century'.

Somerville, Friday, 16 May, 10 a.m.


Examiners: K.D. Duncan-Jones, P. Hammond.

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Literae Humaniores

H.M. JOHNSTONE, St Hugh's: `Prolegomena to a critical edition of the
Aristotelian Magna Moralia'.

St John's, Monday, 12 May, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: A.J.P. Kenny, D.B. Robinson.

M. REVERMANN, Corpus Christi: `Comic business. Aspects of
theatricality and dramatic technique in four Aristophanic comedies
(V., Nub., Th., and Pl.), with special
reference to exits and entrances'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 30 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: E.M. Hall, S.J. Halliwell.

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Physical Sciences

J. BLETCHER, Exeter: `The shamsan lava sequence of the Aden volcano,
Yemen: eruption from a vertically zoned magma chamber'.

Department of Earth Sciences, Monday, 23 June, 10 a.m.


Examiners: J.D. Bell, S. Blake.

S. LIN, Magdalen: `Crack analysis by distributed strain
nuclei with application to identation testing'.

Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 15 May,
11 a.m.


Examiners: A. Sackfield, F.P.E. Dunne.

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Theology

S. FINAMORE, Regent's Park: `God, order, and chaos: a history of the
interpretation of Revelation's plague sequence (6.1–17;
8.1–9.2; 11.15–19; 15.1; 15.7–16.21) and an assessment
of the value of Rene Girard's thought for the understanding of these
visions'.

Examination Schools, Thursday, 22 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J.P.M. Sweet, J.B. Muddiman.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Committee for Comparative Philology and General Linguis

WEN-CHAO LI, Lady Margaret Hall: `A diachronically-
motivated segmental phonology of Mandarin Chinese'.

Linacre, Monday, 19 May, 10 a.m.


Examiners: S.R. Parkinson, R. Wiese.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 May 1997: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



OBITUARIES


Christ Church

ANTHONY CUTHBERT BAINES, MA, 3 February 1997; Westminster
Scholar 1930–3. Aged 84.

WILLIAM FRANCIS BULLOCK, MA, 19 February 1997;
commoner 1964–7.

MATTHEW ANTHONY LEONARD CRIPPS, MA, CBE, DSO, TD, QC,
February 1997; commoner 1933–6. Aged 83.

IAN JOICEY DICKINSON, BA, 13 December 1996; commoner
1940–1.

CHRISTOPHER P. DRIVER, MA, 18 February 1997; scholar
1951–5.

PETER P.B. GLENVILLE, 1996; commoner 1932–5.

HIS HON. RICHARD A.L. HILLARD, MA (HON.), 2 November
1996; commoner 1929–31.

MARTIN J.R. HOLMES, MA (HON.), January 1997;
Westminster Scholar 1924–6.

ARTHUR WILLIAM RUPERT JELF, BA, 1987; commoner
1951–5.

ANTHONY B. KEITH, MA, 1990; commoner 1963–6.

DOUGLAS WILLIAM LATTIMER, BA, 6 March 1997; scholar
1929–32.

THE REVD T.G. LUDDINGTON, MA, date unknown; commoner
1952–4.

LORD CHRISTOPHER PAGET MAYHEW, MA, 7 January 1997;
exhibitioner 1934–8. Aged 81.

HIS HON. JUDGE JOHN DAVID FITZGERALD MOYLAN, MA, 23
December 1996; Holford Scholar 1934–8. Aged 81.

HALL PARKE, MA, recorded as 1997; commoner
1923–6.

ROGER A.E. NORTHWAY, MA, 1996; commoner 1957–60.

MARK PATTEN, 1996; commoner 1919–23.

JOHN DOUGLAS PHIBBS, BM, MA, 1993; exhibitioner
1935–8.

THE REVD BERNARD J. ROBSON, MA, 3 October 1996;
commoner 1953–7.

EDGAR HENRY SEWARD, BM, MA, DM, June 1995; commoner
1936–9. Aged 77.

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section



St Anne's College

MISS WINIFRED GOODWIN; member of the Society of Oxford
Home-Students 1929–32. Aged 87.

MRS BEATRICE CAMERON (née Whitaker);
member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1929–32. Aged 87.

MRS YOLISWA SIYOLWE (née Nkuhlu);
Graduate Student and Rhodes Scholar 1990–3. Aged 31.

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section



St Hilda's College

HANNA JEDWELL (née Mendelsohn), BA, 31
March 1997; commoner 1942–5. Aged 72.

ANNE TUCKER, MA, D.PHIL., February 1997; commoner
1939–42 and 1957–9. Aged 75.

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section



St Peter's College

THE REVD WILBERT VERE AWDRY, OBE, MA, 21 March 1997;
commoner 1929–32, Honorary Fellow 1996–7. Aged
85.

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section



ELECTIONS


Brasenose College

To Supernumerary Fellowships:

MICHAEL EWENS (BA Open)

DAVID POPPLEWELL (PH.D. Sussex)

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section


To a fixed-term Teaching Fellowship in Classics (for
five years from 1 October 1997):

LLEWELYN MORGAN, BA
(PH.D. Cambridge)

To a Visiting Fellowship (HT 1998):

PETER
SCHLECTRIEM, Professor of Law, Freiburg University

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section


To Visiting Fellowships in Hellenic Studies
(1997–8):

GEORGE ZIS (B.SC. London, MA Manchester), Professor of
Economics and Economic History, Manchester Metropolitan
Univesity

CHRISTOS ROZAKIS (Graduate in Law, Athens; LL.M.
London, LL.M., SJD Illinois), Professor of International
Law and Institutions, University of Athens

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section



St Antony's College

To the Bursarship and a Governing Body Fellowship
(from 1 July 1997):

MRS AMANDA KAYE, MA

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section



St Hugh's College

To a Jubilee Scholarship:

JAMES RICHARD
BURBRIDGE, formerly of Reigate Grammar School

To an Organ Scholarship:

JAMES ANDREW MCCULLAGH,
formerly of Ballyclare High School

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 1 May 1997: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise
in the Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of
acceptance of advertisements

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issue



Lecture

Professor Dr Theodor Abt will lecture on
`The roots of alchemy', 11 a.m.--5 p.m. on Sat., 31 May, in
the Lecture Room, the Ashmolean Museum. Dr Abt is professor
of agronomy and economic planning at the Federal Institute
of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He trained as an analytical
psychologist at the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich where he
became a training analyst and a member of the Curatorium. He
also trained with Dr Marie-Louise von Franz. In this
day-long lecture he will explore, from a Jungian
perspective, a series of alchemical pictures from Egyptian
manuscripts. Attendance costs £35 inc. tea and coffee;
£25 students. Bookings: Carmen Reynal, Keyneton Hayes,
Upper Slaughter, Glos. GL54 2JG. Tel.: 01451 821 947.

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section



Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Oxford University Newcomers' Club
welcomes partners of visiting academics, of newly-appointed
academics, of graduate students, and of undergraduate
students. Open 10.30 a.m.--12 noon at 13 Norham Gardens, to
meet for coffee and to find out about the term's programmes
of events. We meet every Wednesday for the 8 weeks of Full
Term (plus the week before and the week after) and through
the summer vacation.

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section



United Oxford and Cambridge
University Club

The London club for all University members.
Special rates for those with college or University
appointments or University residence. Modernised and
reasonable bedroom accommodation. Excellent library
facilities. Restaurant and squash courts. Full service at
weekends. Reciprocal arrangements with over 125 clubs
world-wide. Further details from Derek Conran, Hertford
College, or Membership Secretary, 71 Pall Mall, London SW1Y
5HD. Tel.: 0171-930 5151, fax: 0171-930 9490.

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section



Tuition Offered

Painting in traditional English water-
colours with Rebecca Hind. One-week intensive courses for
spring and summer; weekly part-time courses thoughout the
year. Tel. for brochure: Oxford 340633.

English language. Academic writing,
grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables including
evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour, Cambridge exams.,
general English are best value in Oxford. Writing up?
Private tuition available with experienced tutors. Free
test/advice from the Director of Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5
p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9 Blue Boar Street (off St
Aldate's by Christ Church), Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077,
e-mail: OLT@dial.pipex.com.

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section



Services Offered

Mallams Book Auctions. Regular specialist
sales of books and prints including antiquarian literature,
science and natural history, atlases and maps, fine
bindings, first editions, engravings, and related items.
Mallams, Bocardo House, St Michael's Street, Oxford. Tel.:
Oxford 241358.

Town and Country Trees: professional tree
surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges.
Quality work at competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally
based. For a free quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson.
Tel.: 01993 811115.

Gardens creatively
designed–constructed—planted and maintained.
Knowledgeable service with 25 years' experience. Portfolio
available. Colin Broad. Tel./fax: Oxford 882711.

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section



Houses to Let

Islip: lovely spacious period cottage in
beautiful village (conservation area), 5 miles from central
Oxford, available 25 July--31 Aug.; in very quiet lane with
easy access to city by bus, train, or car; sitting-room,
dining hall, large conservatory/playroom, very large
kitchen/dining-room (Aga, electric hob and oven, microwave,
dish-washer, fridge, freezers, and cooler), laundry room
(washing machine and drying area), 4 bedrooms (sleeps 7), 2
bathrooms, dressing room and shower room. Large and pretty
garden with terrace. Garage. £350 p.w. to inc. some
housekeeping. Tel.: Oxford 841759, fax: 371939.

West Oxford: terrace house in excellent
condition; 3 bedrooms (inc. 1 study-bedroom); 10-minute walk
to central Oxford, 5-minute walk to station, in a quiet
cul-de-sac overlooking playing-field; fully furnished and
equipped (gas c.h., fireplace, phone, TV and video, fitted
kitchen, washer-drier, fridge, freezer, microwave); small
garden with sunny patio. Available Aug. to end of Dec.
(dates flexible). £750 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 794232,
e-mail: h.j.glock@reading.ac.uk.

Observatory Street: a well-presented
2-bedroom house with conservatory, pretty garden, and
garage. Furnished and equipped to a high standard. inc.
dish-washer and microwave. May consider short let. Available
immediately, £950 p.c.m. Finders Keepers. Tel.: Oxford
311011, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk.

Lonsdale Road. Edwardian semi-detached
4-bedroom family home close to Summertown in quiet and
popular residential side street. The house is on 3 floors
with sitting-room, music room, and large kitchen/breakfast
room. Enclosed garden. Rent of £1,500 p.c.m. inc.
council tax and utilities. Available now, fully furnished
and equipped. Finders Keepers. Tel.: Oxford 311011, e-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk.

Sutton Courtenay village, 8 miles from
Oxford, ideal for European School, Culham; convenient for
Harwell, JET, Culham, and Rutherford Appleton Laboratories
and Didcot Station. Warm, comfortable, modern
architect-designed family home; 3/4 bedrooms, gas c.h.,
fully furnished, labour-saving modern kitchen, bathroom and
utility/shower-room with second w.c. Very spacious. sunny
open-plan ground floor. Integral garage. Sheltered
south-west facing garden with sun-terrace. Fruit trees,
lawn, grape vines. Available end of May, £700 p.c.m.
Tel.: Abingdon (01235) 847329.

Summer let in Oxford, 5 minutes from city
centre: live in comfort near the Thames. Centrally heated,
4-bedroom Victorian house. Large split-level living-room;
bathroom, bidet, and w.c.; shower-room, power-shower, and
w.c.; fully-equipped kitchen; south-facing garden. Available
for 6 weeks, 18 July--31 Aug. Price negotiable. Tel./fax:
Oxford 725193, e-mail: JXT18@dial.pipex.com.

Charming central North Oxford house, one
street from St Giles', Radcliffe Infirmary, and St Antony's
College. Just modernised, extended and refurbished to the
highest standards. Two bedrooms, plus study or guest room;
basement study/bedroom; living room leading to large, light
conservatory dining-room and kitchen. Bathroom with shower
and w.c., plus separate w.c. Luxuriously furnished and fully
carpeted. Fully equipped kitchen with washing-machine,
drier, dish-washer. Burglar alarm system linked to station.
Gas c.h. Three telephones. Beautiful garden, with parking
space at rear. Rent includes various services. Viewing
highly recommended. £1,500 p.m. Available from June.
Tel.: Oxford 559614.

Luxurious, well-lit, newly refurbished
accommodation on two floors in central North Oxford. Near
Port Meadow; convenient for University, schools, shops.
Three bedrooms (2 double, 1 single); sitting-room;
dining-room; modern kitchen; 2 bathrooms (inc. separate
shower); own small paved, well-stocked garden. Beautifully
furnished and decorated, with new carpets throughout. Gas
c.h., washing machine, drier, dish-washer, 2 telephones, TV
points. £1,400 p.m. Families only. Available Sept.
onwards. Tel.: Oxford 559614.

Osney: 3-bedroom terrace house in excellent
condition, 10 minutes' walk from central Oxford, in secluded
district by the river. Fully furnished and equipped, gas
c.h., fitted kitchen, washing-machine, freezer, fridge,
phone, TV, garden with patio and seats. Available July for 1
year or longer. Only visiting academics considered.
£750 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 862347.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the
saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles
on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation
in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB
management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents,
specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel,
and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest
and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax
us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever
we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax:
764777.

City centre house with view of Thames
available for 3 months, mid- June–mid-Sept. Fully
equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas
c.h., garden, garage. £950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
250462.

Mallams is a long-established independent
company offering a letting service tailored to the needs of
the discerning landlord. If you would like further details
or professional advice on any aspect of the letting market
please call our Summertown office. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
311977.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not
a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it easy for
visitors to Oxford to find the right property. Browse
through our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on
properties available and make use of our interactive
database, priority reservation service (credit cards
accepted), welcome food pack, personal service, and much
more. Call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. For
further information contact Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury
Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993,
e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

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section



Flats to Let

North Oxford : 1 Oct. 1997 to 30 June 1998,
£530 p.m.; fully equipped ground-floor flat suitable
for 2 adults; dining-room/study, living-room/study, double
bedroom, shower-room, kitchen with dish-washer,
washing/drying machine, electric stove; c.h., carport, small
garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street, Princeton, NJ 08540,
USA.

North Oxford , within the ring-road:
self-contained luxury accommodation available from 1 May;
very quiet with lovely views and patio; near convenient bus
route; suit visiting academic, single or couple. Regret no
children, smokers, or pets. £600 p.c.m. inc. Tel.:
Oxford 515085.

Headington Hill: spacious, well-equipped
2-bedroom flat in quiet location, convenient for hospitals
and both universities; splendid southerly outlook across
parkland; bathroom, shower-room, 2 w.c.s; c.h., entry-phone,
garage, communal gardens. Available 1 Aug. £700 p.c.m.
Tel.: Oxford 515089.

Recently refurbished, luxurious
ground-floor flat in central North Oxford. Near Port Meadow,
convenient for shops, schools, University; separate dining
and sitting rooms with oak flooring; one large carpeted
bedroom; basement; fully fitted kitchen with dish-washer,
washing-machine, and drier. Bathroom with separate shower.
Gas c.h. Telephone. TV point. Own entrance and charming
paved gardens front and back. £850 p.m. Available from
Oct. Tel.: Oxford 559614.

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section



Accommodation Offered

Premier: apartments and houses. Long or
short lets. From £600 p.c.m. North Oxford, Headington,
and rural locations. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: 798087.

Tenant wanted to share charming central
North Oxford house, opposite St Antony's, near Radcliffe
Infirmary, 5 minutes' walk from St Giles'; house architect
designed in Regency style, furbished to highest standards
with conservatory, courtyard garden, bathroom, shower-room,
and off-street parking. All mod. cons.: dish-washer,
washing-machine, microwave, gas c.h. References required.
Tel.: Oxford 872575.

Small single room to let in east Oxford.
Low rent in exchange for house and cat sitting. Use of
large, well-equipped kitchen. Suit graduate student/postdoc.
Tel.: 0181-533 0142 (answer-phone).

Rooms to let in Grandpont. A quiet house,
within walking distance from the city centre. Shared kitchen
and sitting-room. Available from Sept. onwards for long-term
occupancy. Would suit professionals or postdoctoral
academics. Non-smokers only. Tel.: Oxford 727826 (evenings),
e-mail: spanu@trans.plants.ox.ac.uk.

Large `double' room (£75 p.w.) and
single room (£60) to rent in spacious house in
Littlemore with conservatory and lovely large garden, 3
miles from city centre. Close to bus route 16 and a short
walk from the Iffley Road bus routes. Rosemary. Tel.: Oxford
714351.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the home of
a semi-retired academic couple. Warm, comfortable house in
exclusive central North Oxford within easy walking distance
of city centre, all main university buildings, parks, river,
shops, pubs, and restaurants. Every room has tea-and
coffee-making facilities, microwave, and colour television.
Very moderate terms. Tel. and fax: Oxford 557879.

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section



Accommodation Sought

Visiting American professor and wife
seeking furnished house or flat to rent in central Oxford
for a.y. 1997--8 (1 Oct.--30 June). Local references
furnished on request. Contact Charles Shaw, Assistant
Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square. Tel.:
Oxford (2)70036, e-mail: Charles.Shaw@admin.ox.ac.uk.

Three-bedroom (minimum) accommodation
required in Oxford 26 May--31 Aug., for three professional
adults working in the city. Tel.: 01235 530620.

Two visiting professional women require
comfortable accommodation preferably in central or North
Oxford for the month of July. Best references. Tel.: Oxford
557422, fax: 310202.

Academic couple seeks house in Oxford to
house-sit July/Aug. and possibly Sept. We will gladly mind
pets and gardens if needed. Tel. mobile: 402 927 037 (after
7 p.m.).

Retired British academics visiting Oxford
require a house-sit/rental for 2/3 months in Oxford or
surrounding area from the beginning of May. Willing to do
gardening. Dr Taylor. Tel.: Oxford 61483.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting
your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost
letting agents and property managers. We specialise in
lettings to both academic and professional individuals and
their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from
good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If
you would like details of our services, or if you simply
need some informal help and advice without obligation,
telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 764533, or fax: 764777.

American academic family of 4 seeks 2+
bedroom house or flat for any 4-week period 1 June–9
Aug. Can provide Oxford references. Dr Trent Foley, Davidson
College, Box 1719, Davidson NC 28036, USA. Tel.: 704
8922263, fax: 704 8922005, e-mail: trfoley@davidson.edu.

House (2--3 bedrooms) required 1 Sept.
1997–30 June 1998 in Oxford/area/local towns for
Canadian sabatical family of 4. We are renting our house in
Vancouver and know the problems of finding good tenants . .
. don't worry, we are! Chris Overall. Fax: 1-604-822-8279,
e-mail: overall@unixg.ubc.ca.
n

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

American cardiology/psychology professors
who previously lived in Oxford seek 4+ bedroom house to rent
late Aug. 1997--late Aug. 1998. Would consider exchange for
4-bedroom Seattle home or 4-bedroom beachfront island home.
Home tel.: 206 285 4005; fax: 206 764 2257, e-mail:
jrs@u.washington.edu (Dr John Stratton); e-mail:
cws@u.washington.edu (Dr Carolyn Webster-Stratton).

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section



Accommodation Offered to Rent or
Exchange

University widow seeks to exchange
fully-furnished modern completely equipped house, good
garden, in central North Oxford on bus route, near shops,
schools, etc., for a flat/house in London or Israel. Would
consider suggestions of exchange in any other university
centre with easily accessible adult Jewish education. Would
consider rental. Available autumn 1997 or later. Min. 6
months. Contact Lewis. Tel.: Oxford 515440, fax: 511568.

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section



Holiday Lets

Villa and garden with wonderful views, 40
minutes from Florence; all mod. cons.; swimming and sports
facilities nearby; sleeps 8; available mid-July–mid-
Sept. £350 p.w. Lukes. Tel. (Italy): 00 39 55
8428317.

Greek islands: charming villas, many with
enclosed courtyards, on the islands of Skiathos, Skopelos,
and Alanissos, from £59 p.p. p.w. Also available:
walking and cooking holidays in unspoilt surroundings. Tel.
for brochure: 00 30 424 22947 (24 hours); fax: 00 30 424
23057.

Verona outskirts: in exceptionally beautiful 15th-c. villa,
self-contained ground-floor flat; large double bed-sitting
room, kitchen/dining room, bathroom; garden area, parking,
frequent buses from door to city centre; £300 p.w. inc.
services and weekly cleaning. Available 7--21 June and 28
June--18 July. Tel. Contessa da Sacco: 00 39 452 6499; or
Moore: 01844 238247.

Share a flat with 3 delightfully
self-sufficient cats in the heart of Florence (Santa Croce);
large, cool rooms: living-room, dining-room, 3 bedrooms
sleeping five, breakfast-room/kitchen, 2 bathrooms.
£300 p.w. inc. gas, electricity, washing-machine, and
cat supplies. Available 26 July--30 Aug. for periods of not
less than two weeks. Payable in sterling. Walsh. Tel.: 00 39
55 23 44 864, fax: 00 39 55 21 06 21.

Tuscan hills: our own beautiful restored
farmhouse in idyllic setting. Easy reach Siena and Florence.
Ideal for walkers, foodies, art buffs, and nature lovers.
Some summer dates available. Sleeps up to 8. Tel.: 01252
870737, fax: 01252 860236, e-mail: sleip8nir@aol.com.

Umbrian house, sleeps 8; garden and
swimming pool; beautiful views. Near to Perugia and Assisi.
Availble Sept. and Oct. Tel.: Oxford 556404 (evenings).

Attractive, secluded North Pembrokeshire
farmhouse, 5 miles from coast; set in 20 acres of land with
private lake for swimming and boating. Sleeps 10/12. Well
equipped and comfortable. Some weeks remaining in school
holidays, at £400 p.w. Off-season vacancies and rates
on request. Tel.: Oxford 556244.

Duras, south-west France, 1 hour Bordeaux
airport: 300-year-old farmhouse, set amidst vineyards, with
beautiful views; sleeps 6; 2 bedrooms en-suite. Lovely
garden and terrace. Brand new 15m swimming-pool with
jacuzzi. Available from 1 June. £500 p.w. Tel.: Oxford
553685.

SW France (Tarn-et-Garonne), traditionally
restored farmhouse and outbuildings in hilltop hamlet with
fine views over unspoilt countryside, close to medieval
market town on River Aveyron. Sleeps 8+, small pool,
semi-circular garden facing south with trees and some shade.
Tel.: 0118 987 3095.

Northumberland, between the Cheviots and
the sea: a stone-built cottage in a small unspoilt village,
with 3 bedrooms; sleeps a min. of 6; sitting-room, kitchen,
bathroom; 5 miles to Alnwick Castle, in easy reach of many
more and miles of beautiful sea-shore. Tel.: 01665 579
292.

Charming terrace house for short or long
lets in conservation area of unspoiled Southwold (Suffolk),
seconds from sea. Sleeps 4+. Marvellous area for walking,
cycling (2 bikes available), church visiting, bird-watching,
or pub-hopping. Tel.: Oxford 513464 (evenings).

Holiday in Umbria. Ideal for lovers of
tranquillity, superb scenery, good food. Perfect for
visiting Renaissance art treasures. Newly converted flat for
two, large shaded terrace, magnificent view. Perugia 9 kms,
Assisi 20 kms. For information telephone Willliam Urquhart.
Tel.: 01252 877155.

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section






<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 2 May<br /> - 19 May

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Seminars
: places should be booked in advance through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/1_4410.htm">Staff Development
Programme supplement.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 2 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Lace, fur, and fashion',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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section



Saturday 3 May

DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

PITT RIVERS MUSEUM `Pitt Stop' event for children and
families (not for unaccompanied children): `Dangerous
dragons'—trails and stories about objects featuring
dragons in the Museum, 2–4 p.m. (admission free).

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section



Sunday 4 May

JOANNA TROLLOPE preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 5 May

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed for normal business (today
only).

PROFESSOR D. ANDERSON: `Innovation and environmental
policy' (Environmental Change Unit seminars), Main
Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

CONGREGATION elections, 29 May: nominations by two
members of Congregation to be received at University
Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.N. COLDSTREAM: `Light from Cyprus on the
"Dark Age" of Greece?' (Myres Memorial Lecture), Headley
Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 5 p.m.

PITT RIVERS MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Collecting in
Melanesia—a rainy season among the Arawe' (open
throughout 1997).

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section



Tuesday 6 May

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Management skills for research
team leaders—management of change', 9.15 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Pastels workshop', 10
a.m.–4 p.m. (Cost: £25. Tel. for details:
(2)78015.)

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Pastels: special
exhibition', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET, with other musicians,
perform Beethoven's Septet (op. 20), Holywell Music Room,
12 noon (tickets £5/£2.50 from Blackwell's
Music Shop or at the door).

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR T.F. EARLE (King John II Professor of
Portuguese Studies): `The Comedy of the
Foreigners
: Renaissance Sicily through Portuguese
eyes' (inaugural lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Literary inspection' (Lyell
Lectures in Bibliography: `Policing literature in
eighteenth-century Paris'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR ANTHONY CLARE: `Psychotherapy: a secular
religion?'
(James Bryce Memorial Lecture), Witts Lecture Theatre,
Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.A.M. MCDONNELL: `In the beginning was the
COMET...' (Halley Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University
Museum, 5 p.m.

C. PERRINGS: `The nature of economics and the
economics of nature' (Oxford Centre for the Environment,
Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5
p.m.

A. PNUELI: `When deduction meets exploration'
(Strachey Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Computing
Laboratory, 5 p.m.

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section



Wednesday 7 May

DR G. DICKSON: `Peace and violence; orthodoxy and heresy'
(Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion:
`Medieval Pentecostalism—the tradition of
charismatic Christian enthusiasm in Western Europe,
c.1000–1500'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. DAVIES: `Europe: a history—the
author's critique of "a total history of Europe in all
periods" ' (Waynflete Lectures: `Reflections on European
History'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. NOZICK: `Invariance and objectivity'
(John Locke Lectures: `Invariance and objectivity'),
Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR S. MELZAK: `When children are not accompanied by
parents or substitute carers' (Refugee Studies Programme
Seminars on Forced Migration: `Children and adolescents
in forced migration'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

DR A. PEACOCKE: `Welcoming the "disguised
friend"---Darwinism and divinity' (Idreos Lectures in
Science and Religion), Harris Manchester, 5 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: wines from the southern
hemisphere, 5.45 p.m. (admission £2).

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section



Thursday 8 May

PROFESSOR D. Ó CORRÁIN: `Vikings in Ireland
and Britain: a reconsideration' (O'Donnell Lecture in
Celtic Studies), Taylorian Hall, Taylor Institution, 5
p.m.

THE REVD PROFESSOR JAMES BARR: `History, criticism,
and ideology' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `History,
theology, biblical criticism: the end-of-century
interactions'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Censorship' (Lyell Lectures in
Bibliography: `Policing literature in eighteenth-century
Paris'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H.H. KOH: `Why nations obey? Foundations'
(Waynflete Lectures: `Why nations obey international
law'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR I. AFSHAR: `Culture and translation in nineteenth-
century Iran' (Hamid Enayat Lecture), New Lecture
Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR A. PEACOCKE: `The quest for Christian credibility'
(Idreos Lectures in Science and Religion), Harris
Manchester, 5 p.m.

R. REMOND: `La situation politique en France
aujourd'hui' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15
p.m.

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section



Friday 9 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The first Ashmolean
Museum', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
(2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR B. HALPERIN: `Electrons, quantum mechanics,
and strong magnetic fields' (Cherwell-Simon Memorial
Lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building,
4.30 p.m.

DR D. PERLER: `John Norris' (Chichele Lectures), Old
Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

D. LARGUECHE: `Femmes, marginalité, et
exclusion dans la Tunisie ottomane
(18e--19e siècles)' (Maison
Française lecture series), Middle East Centre, St
Antony's, 5 p.m.

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section



Saturday 10 May

COLLOQUIUM: `Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics, on
voluntariness' (Franco-British meeting, various
speakers), Maison Française (continues tomorrow).

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section



Sunday 11 May

DR SHEILA CASSIDY preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery exhibition opens: `Clova
Stuart-Hamilton—recent works' (until 8 June).

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section



Monday 12 May

JOURNAL CLUB meeting (Human Population Genetics), Room
209, Department of Statistics, 1 p.m.

CONGREGATION elections, 29 May: nominations by six
members of Congregation to be received at University
Offices by 4 p.m.

FACULTY BOARD elections, 5 June: nominations by two
electors to be received at the University Offices by 4
p.m.

PROFESSOR R.C.T. PARKER (Wykeham Professor of Ancient
History): `Cleomenes on the Acropolis' (inaugural
lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N.D. SEN: `Two sixteenth-century women's
Ramayana: reading Chandra in the light of
Molla' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `The hero and
his clay feet: a gendered view of the
Ramayana'), Schools, 5 p.m.

F. FUKUYAMA: `The great disruption' (Tanner Lectures
on Human Values: `Social capital in post-industrial
societies'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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section



Tuesday 13 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The painting of
miniatures', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

LITERAE HUMANIORES Faculty Board election, 22 May (one
ordinary member): nominations by six electors to be
received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.L. MIDDLEKAUFF (Harmsworth Professor of
American History): `Democracy in America before
Tocqueville' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Smuggling' (Lyell Lectures in
Bibliography: `Policing literature in eighteenth-century
Paris'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR J. LIPNER: `The shaping of religious identity: an
overview with an Indian theme' (Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry
Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H.H. KOH: `Why nations obey? Theories'
(Waynflete Lectures: `Why nations obey international
law'), Schools, 5 p.m.

J. ADAMS: `Virtual risk and the management of
uncertainty' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics,
and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. MOMMSEN: `The failure of the Weimar Republic and
Hitler's seizure of power' (lecture series: `Lectures on the Nazi
dictatorship'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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Wednesday 14 May

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Dealing with the media (television and
crisis management): advanced', 9.30 a.m. (see
information above
).

DR G. DICKSON: `Memory, mythistory, and the creation of
institutions' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative
Religion: `Medieval Pentecostalism—the tradition of
charismatic Christian enthusiasm in Western Europe,
c.1000–1500'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. DAVIES: `Western civilisation versus European
history' (Waynflete Lectures: `Reflections on European History'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

F. FUKUYAMA: `Technology, hierarchy, and social capital'
(Tanner Lectures on Human Values: `Social capital in post-
industrial societies'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. NOZICK: `The objectivity of science' (John Locke
Lectures: `Invariance and objectivity'), Gulbenkian Lecture
Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR C. PETTY: `Separated children: policy and practice'
(Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration:
`Children and adolescents in forced migration'), Library Wing
Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

J. MACK: `Art, divination, and knowledge' (Friends of the Pitt
Rivers Museum: Beatrice Blackwood Lecture), Inorganic Chemistry
Laboratory, 7 p.m.

PHANTASM perform Music for Viols; J.S. Bach: Twelve
Contrapuncti from The Art of Fugue, Holywell Music
Room, 7.30 p.m. Includes lecture/demonstration led by Professor
Laurence Dreyfus. Tickets £8/£6/£4 from
Blackwell's Music Shop or at the door.

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Thursday 15 May

THE REVD PROFESSOR MICHAEL SCREECH: `An attempt to pass off a
forged Rabelais' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture),
Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

THE REVD PROFESSOR JAMES BARR: `Ideology and theology'
(Hensley Henson Lectures: `History, theology, biblical criticism:
the end-of-century interactions'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Authors' (Lyell Lectures in
Bibliography: `Policing literature in eighteenth-century Paris'),
St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H.H. KOH: `Why nations obey? Transnational legal
process' (Waynflete Lectures: `Why nations obey international
law'), Schools, 5 p.m.

F. FUKUYAMA: `The origins of order' (Tanner Lectures on Human
Values: `Social capital in post-industrial societies'), Schools,
5 p.m.

PROFESSOR CHUSHICHI TSUZUKI: `A benign future for Japan?
Historical reflections' (Richard Storry Memorial Lecture), New
Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

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Friday 16 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Athenian Acropolis', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR J. CANNON: ` "We have the power": the English
Ascendancy 1707–1801' (James Ford Special Lecture in British
History), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N.D. SEN: `Lady sings the blues: twentieth-century
women singing the Rama tale in Bengali, Marathi, and Telugu'
(Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `The hero and his clay feet: a
gendered view of the Ramayana'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. EYRE (Cameron Mackintosh Visiting Professor of
Contemporary Theatre): `National theatre' (lecture), Bernard
Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

LORD HABGOOD: `Waiting for God' (Eric Symes Abbott Memorial
Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

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Sunday 18 May

THE REVD DR HENRY CHADWICK preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

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Monday 19 May

PROFESSOR C.N.J. MANN: `Petrarch: the Life of Letters' (Rowe
Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

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